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Can Vinegar Lower Blood Sugar?

How To Use Apple Cider Vinegar For Diabetes

How To Use Apple Cider Vinegar For Diabetes

With an estimated 86 million Americans diagnosed with pre-diabetes, and a further 29.1 million having being diagnosed with diabetes,1 it is time to take a serious look at the nutrients that can help regulate or reduce the factors that are responsible for diabetes. Lets have a look at how you can use apple cider vinegar (ACV) for diabetes (type I and type II). ACV for Type II Diabetes Diabetes is classified into type I and type II diabetes. In type II diabetes, two of the biggest factors responsible for the condition are blood sugar and insulin levels. Type II diabetes occurs when you lose the ability to regulate blood sugar levels, either as a result of insulin resistance or because of a lack of insulin. Nutrients that facilitate the ability to regulate blood sugar levels are therefore highly beneficial for helping individuals reduce or treat type II diabetes. ACV has gained a reputation as one of these nutrients. I have already mentioned the amazing health benefits of ACV and about the 11 ways you can use it to revolutionize your health. Here are a number of studies that show you how to use ACV for regulating blood sugar and how much you need to consume. ACV can have Similar Effect to Diabetes Medication Certain diabetes medications are designed to block the digestion of sugars and starches. By blocking the digestion of these compounds, these medications can effectively prevent blood sugar spikes, and they can therefore help to regulate healthy blood sugar levels. According to Carol Johnston, Professor and Associate Director of the Nutrition Program of Arizona State University, ACV can also help to block your body’s ability to digest sugar and starch, which means that ACV is similar in its actions as some diabetes medications.2 Research – ACV for Type I diabetes Me Continue reading >>

Awesome Reasons Why Acv Is Good For Diabetes

Awesome Reasons Why Acv Is Good For Diabetes

Apple cider vinegar has long been a favorite natural remedy for an extraordinary number of ailments. It has been used to treat bacterial and fungal infections, hyperacidity, warts, fatigue, cancer, to clear acne, cure hiccups, lower blood pressure, get rid of dandruff, on sunburns and to treat leg cramps, to name just a few. Apple cider vinegar has been used for centuries and is made from fermented apple mash. It contains acetic acid, vitamins, minerals, amino acids, polyphenols and other types of acids. The “mother” fluid is a product of a long fermentation process and will often look cloudy because of the non-infectious and non-toxic bacteria (the probiotics) that it contains. Other, “non-mother” products are filtered to remove the cloudiness and may be less beneficial. Evidence is beginning to pile up for at least some uses of apple cider vinegar—commonly known as ACV. Many professionals will recommend, however, that you only use the “mother” ACV and not any filtered ACV products. Some of the Evidence-based Medical Uses of Apple Cider Vinegar Many of the uses for ACV is to fight infections, particularly skin infections—since ACV is high in acetic acid, it is very likely that ACV can kill off bacterial, fungal and viral infections because the acid in ACV is absorbed and directly kills off any infectious agent. This is likely to explain the traditional use of ACV on skin infections. [1] Using ACV on wounds may also be useful in preventing infections because of its acidity. ACV is also used to treat hyperacidity (heartburn). To use ACV for heartburn, the recommendation is to add about 1 tablespoon of ACV to 6 ounces of water and drink it about 20 minutes before a meal—this actually stimulates a normal amount of acid in the stomach.[2] ACV has been test Continue reading >>

Vinegar Consumption Increases Insulin-stimulated Glucose Uptake By The Forearm Muscle In Humans With Type 2 Diabetes

Vinegar Consumption Increases Insulin-stimulated Glucose Uptake By The Forearm Muscle In Humans With Type 2 Diabetes

Go to: Background and Aims. Vinegar has been shown to have a glucose-lowering effect in patients with glucose abnormalities. However, the mechanisms of this effect are still obscure. The aim of this randomised, crossover study was to investigate the effect of vinegar on glucose metabolism in muscle which is the most important tissue for insulin-stimulated glucose disposal. Materials and Methods. Eleven subjects with DM2 consumed vinegar or placebo (at random order on two separate days, a week apart), before a mixed meal. Plasma glucose, insulin, triglycerides, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA), and glycerol were measured preprandially and at 30–60 min for 300 min postprandially from the radial artery and from a forearm vein. Muscle blood flow was measured with strain-gauge plethysmography. Glucose uptake was calculated as the arteriovenous difference of glucose multiplied by blood flow. Results. Vinegar compared to placebo (1) increased forearm glucose uptake (p = 0.0357), (2) decreased plasma glucose (p = 0.0279), insulin (p = 0.0457), and triglycerides (p = 0.0439), and (3) did not change NEFA and glycerol. Conclusions. In DM2 vinegar reduces postprandial hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinaemia, and hypertriglyceridaemia without affecting lipolysis. Vinegar's effect on carbohydrate metabolism may be partly accounted for by an increase in glucose uptake, demonstrating an improvement in insulin action in skeletal muscle. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02309424. Go to: 1. Introduction A mixture of vinegar and olive oil is a common salad dressing used in the Mediterranean diet. The main constituent of vinegar is acetic acid, which gives vinegar its characteristic taste and smell. The consumption of vinegar with meals was used as a folk medicine for the tre Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes - Could A Spoonful Of This Every Day Condiment Cure You?

Type 2 Diabetes - Could A Spoonful Of This Every Day Condiment Cure You?

Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas which allows your body to use sugar from carbohydrates for immediate energy or to store for later - a process type 2 diabetes sufferers struggle to do. In this condition, the pancreas doesn’t produce enough insulin, or the body’s cells don’t react to insulin. Which means blood sugar levels can get too high for too long a period. This can cause hyperglycaemia, which in turn can trigger heart disease, stroke and kidney disease. The weight loss benefits of drinking it are known, but it could also help you manage your diabetes too. But there might be a simple solution in the form of apple cider vinegar. The weight loss benefits of drinking it are known, but it could also help you manage your diabetes too. Research has found it improved type 2 diabetes patients’ insulin sensitivity - that’s insulin’s ability to bring sugar out of the bloodstream and into the body’s cells. The 2004 study also discovered it lessened the rise of blood sugar and insulin when patients were given insulin- and glucose-spiking foods, such as a bagel and orange juice. Fri, August 19, 2016 Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition. Further research supports these findings. A Swedish study saw healthy males given bread with and without white vinegar - the former group showed a lowering of blood sugar and insulin - while in a 2008 study on rats it reduced blood sugar levels. Researchers have found that less than one ounce of apple cider vinegar is needed to significantly reduce blood sugar levels after a meal, while a study published in the journal Diabetes Care discovered two tablespoons with a cheese snack w Continue reading >>

How To Lower Morning Blood Sugar

How To Lower Morning Blood Sugar

It seems strange to be able to keep blood sugar levels in control throughout the day and have morning blood sugar high, right? I mean, it doesn't seem logical. After all, you haven't eaten anything so it should be lower shouldn't it? It's a common assumption and it would seem logical, but it is common for people with type 2 diabetes to have high blood sugar in the morning. Why? Because your body continues to produce glucose even when you don't eat. It's called gluconeogenesis. This is a natural process for all of us. But in diabetes many people have increased gluconeogensis. Another reason is that cortisol (our stress hormone) is the hormone that slowly increases in levels from around 3 am onwards to reach it’s peak early in the morning. Cortisol has a direct influence on blood sugar levels too – elevating them. Still, there are practical things you can do to lower morning blood sugar levels, here's how… How to Lower Morning Blood Sugar Lowering morning highs has a lot to do with your overall health, diet, and lifestyle and usually incorporates a number of different factors. Put some of the following things into practice, give it some time, and no doubt you will start seeing an improvement. Just remember, the number you're aiming for with fasting blood sugar is between 90-110 (5-6.1). Try Apple Cider Vinegar & Cheese Before Bed One small study found that having 2 tablespoons of apple cider vinegar with 1 oz (28 g) cheese (which is just 1 slice cheese) before bed reduced morning glucose by 4% compared to 2% when the participants only had cheese and water. People that had a typical fasting glucose above 130 mg/dl or 7.2 mmol/l had an even better result of 6% decrease in morning blood sugar levels. It’s not fully understood why vinegar has such a beneficial effect Continue reading >>

This Is What Happens When You Take Apple Cider Vinegar Right Before Bed

This Is What Happens When You Take Apple Cider Vinegar Right Before Bed

No health issue happens in isolation. Often the underlying cause of one disease will also raise your risk of other complications. So it is with diabetes and blood sugar issues. Unfortunately, if you’ve been diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, you have a higher risk of other problems including cardiovascular issues(source), issues with your weight (source), and maybe even cancer (source). The good news is that making sustainable changes to your diet and lifestyle can help to fight a variety of health risks all at once. Even certain natural ingredients can have multiple benefits to your body. The case in point? Apple cider vinegar. About Apple Cider Vinegar Apple cider vinegar is made in a two-step process, similar to how alcohol is made. The first step is to expose crushed apples, or apple cider, to yeast, which ferment the sugars and turn them into alcohol. Then bacteria is added to the alcohol solution which ferments the alcohol and turns it into acetic acid, the main compound in vinegar. Apple cider vinegar is a miracle worker. It can do so many things for the body, including, curing hiccups, soothing a sore throat, lowering cholesterol, preventing indigestion, aiding in weight loss, clearing acne, boosting energy, controlling bad breath, and whitening teeth (2). But if you are diabetic or insulin resistant, apple cider vinegar at bedtime could help you control your blood sugar. Apple cider vinegar before bedtime In a study of four men and seven women diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, who were not taking insulin, findings indicated that two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar taken with 1 ounce of cheese before bedtime may favorably impact waking glucose concentrations (1). This is mostly due to the acetic acid in the vinegar. Acetic acid Acetic acid, the main active ingre Continue reading >>

Apple Cider Vinegar And Your Health

Apple Cider Vinegar And Your Health

Apple cider vinegar has a long history as a home remedy, used to treat everything from a sore throat to varicose veins. But there’s not much science to support the claims. Still, in recent years, some researchers have been taking a closer look at apple cider vinegar and its possible benefits. It’s mostly apple juice, but adding yeast turns the fruit sugar into alcohol -- this is fermentation. Bacteria turn the alcohol into acetic acid. That’s what gives vinegar its sour taste and strong smell. Vinegar’s used in cooking, baking, salad dressings, and as a preservative. There’s a lot of acid in it, so drinking vinegar straight isn’t recommended. And it can cause serious problems if you have a lot of it. If you’re looking to take some for health reasons, most people recommend adding one to two tablespoons to water or tea. Vinegar has been used as a remedy since the days of Hippocrates. The ancient Greek doctor treated wounds with it. In recent years, people have explored apple cider vinegar as a way to lose weight, improve heart health, and even treat dandruff. Many of these claims aren’t supported by modern research. But some studies have found that acetic acid -- which gives vinegar its distinctive taste and smell -- may help with a variety of conditions: Japanese scientists found that drinking vinegar might help reduce obesity. One small study found that vinegar improved blood sugar and insulin levels in a group of people with type 2 diabetes. Vinegar also has chemicals known as polyphenols. They’re antioxidants that can curb cell damage that can lead to other diseases, such as cancer. But studies on whether vinegar actually lowers your chances of having cancer are mixed. Did we mention it’s highly acidic? Drinking a lot of apple cider vinegar can dam Continue reading >>

All It Takes Is One Boiled Egg To Control Sugar Levels In The Blood

All It Takes Is One Boiled Egg To Control Sugar Levels In The Blood

Every time you eat, your blood sugar levels go up. This is especially true for individuals who have type 2 diabetes or insulin resistance. Having to learn how to control your blood sugar levels within a healthy range is by no means an easy task. It can take months for a newly diagnosed patient to learn what to eat and what to avoid. And during this period of time, someone with type 2 diabetes is likely to experience high blood sugar levels, which is detrimental to their overall health. Too much sugar in the blood for long periods of time can increase your risk of heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, vision problems, and nerve problems. (1) How To Control Blood Sugar Levels For the majority of healthy individuals, normal blood sugar levels are as follows: Between 4.0 to 6.0 mmol/L (72 to 108 mg/dL) when fasting. Up to 7.8 mmol/L (140 mg/dL) 2 hours after eating. (2) For people with insulin resistance, their blood sugar levels remain high long after having finished their meal. Fortunately, there are many foods you can eat that can help you control blood sugar levels naturally. As you’ll learn eventually, relying on expensive diabetes drugs in the long-run can have negative side effects on your body. Below is a powerful remedy that combines three simple ingredients to prevent your blood sugar levels from going rampant. For this recipe all you will need is apple cider vinegar, water, and a boiled egg. See also: Reversing diabetes Type-2 Instructions: Boil an egg in the afternoon, and peel it. Pierce the egg a 2-3 times using a toothpick. Put the egg in a mason jar and pour just enough vinegar over it so that it is completely covered. Close the jar and let it soak overnight in your refrigerator. The next morning, drink a glass of warm water and eat your egg. Repeat th Continue reading >>

Apple Cider Vinegar Helps Blood Sugar, Body Fat, Studies Say

Apple Cider Vinegar Helps Blood Sugar, Body Fat, Studies Say

Apple cider vinegar has been touted as a cure-all for decades. I've seen claims that it can do everything from halt hiccups to whiten teeth, and even banish dandruff. Whether or not it's capable of all those things, there is some solid research to back up apple cider vinegar as a healthy elixir, as long as you use it correctly. One promising benefit: It seems to help regulate blood sugar. A study published in Diabetes Care looked at men and women with type 2 diabetes. The researchers found that when the participants downed two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar before bed with a snack (one ounce of cheese), they had lower blood sugar levels the next morning, compared to when they ate the same bedtime snack paired with two tablespoons of water. Another study published in the same journal compared the effects of apple cider vinegar on healthy adults, people with pre-diabetes, and people with type 2 diabetes. Study participants in all three groups had better blood glucose readings when they consumed less than an ounce of apple cider vinegar with a high-carb meal (a white bagel with butter and orange juice), compared to when they the had the same meal and drank a placebo. People with pre-diabetes improved their blood glucose levels with vinegar by nearly half, while people with diabetes cut their blood glucose concentrations by 25%. Some research also suggests that apple cider vinegar may ward off scale creep. In a study published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry, mice fed a high-fat diet along with acetic acid -- vinegar's key component -- developed up to 10% less body fat than control rodents. The researchers believe the findings support the notion that acetic acid turns on genes that trigger enzymes to break down fat and prevent weight gain. To investigat Continue reading >>

Can Vinegar Help Lower Blood Sugar?

Can Vinegar Help Lower Blood Sugar?

Q: I have read that regular daily doses of vinegar help lower blood glucose levels. Is that true? If so, what dosage is recommended? A: Some studies on small numbers of people have shown that taking 2 tablespoons of vinegar before a starchy meal can reduce the rise in blood glucose after the meal. But this may not be true for everyone with diabetes. If you want to try it, check your blood glucose two hours after the meal and see if your blood glucose is lower. Make sure you check after several meals before reaching a conclusion about whether the vinegar helps. Vinegar has no calories or carbohydrates and makes a great low-sodium, low-calorie salad dressing, which may help you add more nutritious nonstarchy vegetables to your diet. It's not, however, a magic solution. If you mix the vinegar with oil, be aware that each tablespoon of oil has about 100 calories, so use more vinegar than oil. If you want a sweeter dressing, add a packet of artificial sweetener. Madhu Gadia, M.S., R.D., is a certified diabetes educator. Continue reading >>

Drink Apple Cider Vinegar To Lower Blood Sugar And Insulin

Drink Apple Cider Vinegar To Lower Blood Sugar And Insulin

Insulin is a protein peptide and a hormone produced by the pancreas. We’ve primarily understood insulin as the blood sugar reducer. It sends out a signal to cells in the liver, muscles and adipose tissue that glucose is available to be converted into glycogen and stored. Glycogen stores fill up pretty quickly and, unless you burn it, gets quickly converted to fat. In fact, when insulin is present the body doesn’t burn fat. Insulin Resistance When we eat a diet high in sugar and carbs our body is frequently subjected to glucose spikes, which it doesn’t tolerate well. Every time the glucose rises our pancreas releases insulin. Then it potentially becomes sort of like a naggy friend. The more they speak, the less you hear. Eventually you might hear their message but it will take 100 times more effort because you’ve learned how to tune them out. So it is with our cells. If we’re experiencing insulin spikes frequently throughout the day our cells will stop “listening.” This is what we call insulin resistance. Meanwhile, sugar remains in the blood. In a taxing effort to get the cells to pay attention the pancreas produces more insulin. Pretty soon the insulin level is abnormally high, a once underestimated but serious problem also called hyperinsulinemia. Dr. Ron Rosedale is author of The Rosedale Diet and co-founder of the Colorado Center for Metabolic Medicine. He is renowned for his success “helping diabetics to eliminate or reduce their need for insulin and to reduce heart disease-both without drugs or surgery,” as well as successfully treating the whole gamut of age-related diseases such as cancer, heart disease and type 2 diabetes.[1] His first course of action usually involves diet with the purpose of reversing insulin resistance. According to Rosedal Continue reading >>

Can Vinegar Help Control Blood Sugar?

Can Vinegar Help Control Blood Sugar?

A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized study found that body weight and belly fat were significantly reduced by adding just a single tablespoon of vinegar to one’s daily diet. Is there any benefit to vinegar consumption if you’re not overweight? Well, the subjects’ triglycerides normalized, and, for those taking the larger dose of two tablespoons per day, there was a dip in blood pressure. Those effects may have just been because of the weight loss, though. Other than taste, is there any benefit to normal-weight individuals sprinkling vinegar on their salads? If you feed people a half cup of table sugar, as their blood sugars spike, their artery function can become impaired. The higher the blood sugars go, the more the arteries take a hit. There’s a drug, though, that can block sugar absorption. By blunting the blood sugar spike with this drug, you can prevent the arterial dysfunction. This demonstrates that it’s probably good for your heart if you don’t have big blood sugar spikes after meals. In fact, how high your blood sugars spike after a meal is a predictor for cardiovascular mortality. So do people who eat lots of high glycemic foods, like sugary foods and refined grains, tend to have more heart attacks and strokes? Yes. They also appear more likely to get diabetes—but maybe people who eat lots of Frosted Flakes and Wonder Bread have other bad dietary habits as well. The diets that have been put to the test in randomized controlled trials and proven to prevent diabetes are the ones focusing on cutting down on saturated fat and ramping up the consumption of fiber-rich whole plant foods, such as fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, without specific regard to lower or higher glycemic loads. The drug has been put to the test, though, and blunti Continue reading >>

A Spoonful Of Vinegar Helps The Sugar Go Down

A Spoonful Of Vinegar Helps The Sugar Go Down

Strange as it might seem, including some vinegar in your diet might improve your blood sugar. Though vinegar has a bit of a checkered past—it has too often been hyped in weight-loss diets and miracle cures—solid research has clearly shown that it can improve glycemic control. Vinegar has been widely consumed throughout Asia, and is considered a “functional food.” There is now modern research backing the ancient use of vinegar, particularly for keeping blood sugar levels under control, for both normal individuals and those with diabetes. The biologically active constituent of vinegar is acetic acid, which is also the source of the liquid’s lip-puckering pungency. Acetic acid inhibits the activity of several carbohydrate-digesting enzymes, including amylase, sucrase, maltase, and lactase. As a result, when vinegar is present in the intestines, some sugars and starches temporarily pass through without being digested, so they exert less of an impact upon blood sugar levels. Research tracking hemoglobin A1C in people with type 2 diabetes found that a daily dose of vinegar improved glycemic control, and was superior to dill pickles or vinegar in pill form. Because taking a teaspoon or two of vinegar alone seems to cause burping and acid reflux in a lot of people, it’s a good idea to combine vinegar with food. The easiest way of doing this is to use oil-and-vinegar salad dressings: balsamic, red wine, apple cider, or any flavored vinegars (avoid the fruity, sweet ones, of course, or you may cancel out the benefit.) When making the dressing, use about 50 to 75 percent vinegar, and add some minced garlic, dried oregano, and basil—or stir in a little Dijon mustard. You can also try vinaigrette dressings drizzled over steamed veggies such as cauliflower. Vinegar is a Continue reading >>

Can Apple Cider Vinegar Lower Blood Sugar?

Can Apple Cider Vinegar Lower Blood Sugar?

Drinking apple cider vinegar before meals may lower sugar levels in the bloodstream, and could therefore help people with diabetes, according to a 2013 study from Arizona State University cited by Prevention magazine. But experts caution against viewing apple cider vinegar as a cure-all: "[M]uch of what you read about this product on the Internet is overstated, or simply unfounded," writes physician and bestselling author Joseph Mercola. "While apple cider vinegar probably won't make you skinny, it does appear to help with diabetes and blood sugar control," WebMD reports, also referring to the 2013 study, which was authored by Arizona State nutritionist Carol Johnston. Special: See How Vinegar May Lower Your Cholesterol and Improve Your Health The acid in apple cider vinegar appears to block some of the starch we eat from being digested, which in turn keeps blood sugar levels from rising — an "anti-glycemic" effect similar to that of some medications, Johnston tells WebMD. Participants in her study who drank a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar (sometimes called ACV) mixed with 8 ounces of water before a meal had "lower blood glucose levels compared to participants who didn't consume the tart solution," Prevention reports. In another study, people with type 2 diabetes for whom insulin was ineffective had lower levels of blood glucose after downing two tablespoons of apple cider vinegar before bed, Reader's Digest reports. Based on these findings, Reader's Digest and other lifestyle and health publications are touting the virtues of apple cider vinegar — and not just for diabetics. "A few swigs of apple cider vinegar could help keep your blood sugar levels balanced, according to several studies that have shown a link between the two," Reader's Digest reports. Lifehack Continue reading >>

Vinegar May Lower Blood Sugar

Vinegar May Lower Blood Sugar

Doesn’t it seem like everyone is talking about the beneficial effects of vinegar? Well as it turns out, there is at least one scientifically proven benefit that I think you should know about. In a recent study that was published in the Annals of Nutrition and Metabolism, researchers conducted four randomized trials to determine the effectiveness of vinegar in reducing blood sugar after a meal. They experimented on three groups of adults without diabetes, with one group that did have Type II diabetes. The study gave small amounts of vinegar (10 g) either with a meal, or five hours before a meal. The meals were standardized by serving either a complex carbohydrate, or a simple carbohydrate sugar – dextrose. The researchers found that 10g of vinegar (2 teaspoons) ingested at mealtime, but not 5 hours before a meal, has a dramatic effect on blood sugar after the meal, reducing it by as much as 20% in comparison to placebo. This effect was seen when complex carbohydrates were ingested, but interestingly, not when simple carbs (sugar) were consumed. Now, there may be some detrimental issues associated with vinegar consumption, but keep in mind that vinegar is one of the components of the so-called Mediterranean diet, a diet that has a track record of association with reduced risk for a number of diseases. Read Next Continue reading >>

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