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Can Too Much Lantus Cause High Blood Sugar

Insulin Glargine, Recombinant (subcutaneous Route)

Insulin Glargine, Recombinant (subcutaneous Route)

Description and Brand Names Drug information provided by: Micromedex US Brand Name Descriptions Insulin glargine is a long-acting type of insulin that works slowly, over about 24 hours. Insulin is one of many hormones that help the body turn the food we eat into energy. This is done by using the glucose (sugar) in the blood as quick energy. Also, insulin helps us store energy that we can use later. When you have diabetes mellitus, your body cannot make enough insulin or does not use insulin properly. This causes you to have too much sugar in your blood. Like other types of insulin, insulin glargine is used to keep your blood sugar level close to normal. You may have to use insulin glargine in combination with another type of insulin or with a type of oral diabetes medicine to keep your blood sugar under control. This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription. This product is available in the following dosage forms: Solution Before Using In deciding to use a medicine, the risks of taking the medicine must be weighed against the good it will do. This is a decision you and your doctor will make. For this medicine, the following should be considered: Allergies Tell your doctor if you have ever had any unusual or allergic reaction to this medicine or any other medicines. Also tell your health care professional if you have any other types of allergies, such as to foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals. For non-prescription products, read the label or package ingredients carefully. Pediatric Appropriate studies performed to date have not demonstrated pediatric-specific problems that would limit the usefulness of Basaglar® or Lantus® to treat type 1 diabetes in children 6 years of age and older. However, safety and efficacy of Lantus® have not been establish Continue reading >>

Lantus Dosing

Lantus Dosing

Well, I never thought I’d say this, but it’s a great week to be a person with Type 1 diabetes. With all of the bad news surrounding the Type 2 drug Avandia (rosiglitazone), it’s a relief to know I don’t have to worry about it. I recommended you read my colleague Tara’s blog entry (“Type 2 Drug Avandia Linked to Increased Risk of Heart Attacks”) for the full story. That’s one of the first times in my life I’ve referred to someone as a colleague. What can I say? It’s just not a word in my describe-a-friend/coworker vocabulary. While all of the controversy surrounds Avandia, I’m way over in Type 1 land contemplating whether or not to lower my daily dose of Lantus (insulin glargine). I’ve just started a brand new bottle of Lantus and I’ve been taking my normal 15 units in the morning and then eating a rather normal breakfast and lunch, but I’m still going low in the midmorning and early afternoon. This happened Monday after eating Brussels sprouts and whole-wheat pasta for lunch and only taking one unit of rapid-acting NovoLog (insulin aspart) to help out the Lantus. I’ve known for a while that my body is sensitive to insulin, but lately it’s been a little more sensitive than usual. I took 13 units of Lantus yesterday and my blood glucose was 86 mg/dl before lunch. I often wonder how much of an adjustment two units of Lantus is. While I’m very much locked in on an insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio with my NovoLog, it’s a bit tricky to judge how much the longer-lasting insulins affect your blood glucose. Is there a chart for your Lantus dose? I seem to remember something from when I was diagnosed. I wonder what Google will tell me to do. I realize that Lantus doesn’t have a true peak the way some of the other insulins do, but sometimes it su Continue reading >>

High-alert Medications - Lantus (insulin Glargine)

High-alert Medications - Lantus (insulin Glargine)

The leaflets are FREELY available for download and can be reproduced for free distribution to consumers. Or, if you are a facility or organization, you can order professional pre-printed leaflets shipped directly to you. Extra care is needed because Lantus is a high-alert medicine. High-alert medicines have been proven to be safe and effective. But these medicines can cause serious injury if a mistake happens while taking them. This means that it is very important for you to know about this medicine and take it exactly as directed. Top 10 List of Safety Tips for Lantus When taking your medicine 1. Know your insulin. Lantus is a long-acting insulin that should be injected below the skin once daily as directed by your doctor. On rare occasions, your physician may direct you to take Lantus two times daily. Take Lantus the same time every day. 2. Prepare your insulin. A rapid- or short-acting insulin is often prescribed with Lantus. However, Lantus should never be mixed in the same syringe with other insulins before injection. Do not vigorously shake insulin before use. 3. Don't reuse or recycle. Dispose of used syringes/needles, pens, and lancets in a sealable hard plastic or metal container (e.g., empty detergent bottle, sharps container from your pharmacy). When the container is full, seal the lid before placing it in the trash. Do not reuse or recycle syringes/needles or lancets. 4. Don't share. Even if you change the needle, sharing an insulin pen or syringe may spread diseases carried in the blood, including hepatitis and HIV. To avoid serious side effects 5. Avoid mix-ups. List If you use more than one type of insulin, make sure each vial or pen looks different to avoid mix-ups. Lantus is a long-acting insulin that may look like a rapid- or short-acting insulin. For Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine (lantus)

Insulin Glargine (lantus)

What is INSULIN GLARGINE-INJECTABLE, and how does it work (mechanism of action)? Insulin glargine is a bioengineered (man-made) injectable form of long-acting insulin that is used to regulate sugar (glucose) levels in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Individuals with type 1 diabetes do not produce insulin on their own; and individuals with type 2 diabetes do not produce enough insulin, or insulin is not as effective due to insulin resistance. Insulin glargine works the same way as natural human insulin, but it's action lasts longer. It helps diabetic patients regulate glucose or sugar in the body. Insulin glargine works by promoting movement of sugar from blood into body tissues and also stops sugar production in liver. Insulin glargine is man-made insulin that mimics the actions of human insulin. The FDA approved insulin glargine in April 2000. What are the side effects of INSULIN GLARGINE-INJECTABLE? Common side effects of insulin glargine are: Local allergic reactions that may occur at the injection sites are: Long term use of insulin glargine can lead to thickening of fat tissues at the injection site. Severe allergic reactions are: Swelling under the skin Bronchospasm (tightening of chest that leads to difficulty breathing) Individuals should contact a healthcare professional if they experience any of the above reactions. What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Type 2 diabetes can affect all people, regardless of age. Early symptoms of type 2 diabetes may be missed, so those affected may not even know they have the condition. An estimated one out of every three people within the early stages of type 2 diabetes are not aware they have it. Diabetes interferes with the body's ability to metabolize carbohydrates for energy, leading to high levels of blood sugar. These chronically high blo Continue reading >>

Lantus Lows

Lantus Lows

Can Lantus insulin cause serious lows? It can. Lantus (insulin glargine) is a long-acting basal insulin that is supposed to be released slowly and evenly throughout approximately 24 hours. The actual time it last varies in different patients. Bolus, or prandial, insulins are fast-acting insulins, and if you inject too much of them, or don’t eat as much as you thought you were going to eat when you calculated the bolus dose, the result can be serious low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), because the insulin works quickly. People don’t expect Lantus to cause hypoglycemia because it’s supposed to be released slowly, a little bit at a time. However, although this is rare, Lantus can cause serious hypoglycemia if it’s injected into a blood vessel. This happened to me once and several times to a good e-mail friend whose observational skills I trust. Neither of us uses bolus insulin. At least several people I don’t know have reported similar episodes on various Internet lists. There are probably even more instances in which people who use bolus insulin in addition to the Lantus assumed they’d injected the wrong insulin – or calculated the bolus insulin dose incorrectly – because Lantus isn’t supposed to cause lows. These Lantus lows occur between 30 and 45 minutes after injecting the Lantus. In my case, I’d injected and went out to my office in the barn to work at the computer and started to feel peculiar about 30 minutes later. Just to be safe, I went back in the house and tested. I was 25 I couldn’t believe it, so I retested and the meter said 35. At this point I could tell my brain wasn’t working right, but my first thought was to have lunch (fish and cauliflower). Then it occurred to me that cooking fish and cauliflower might not be the best way to treat Continue reading >>

Reasons Your Blood Sugar Levels Can Change

Reasons Your Blood Sugar Levels Can Change

There are many reasons why blood sugar levels can vary. And each person faces challenges that are unique to them. If you have questions, speak to your healthcare professional. Download and print this Doctor Discussion/Q&A Guide to check off concerns you have about effects on your blood sugar levels and talk with your doctor about your concerns. Not getting the right dose of insulin Your body has unique needs. Even if you've been taking insulin for an extended period, many variables, including the reasons listed below, may lead to a need for a change. Additional diabetes medication, as well as medicine that you may take for other conditions you have, can have an effect on your glucose levels. Sickness as common as a cold can change the amount of sugar in your blood. The more severe the illness is, the greater the potential for change. It's important to get plenty of liquids. When not properly hydrated, your body's level of glucose can rise. A woman's menstrual cycle has various effects on her system, including a possible drop in her blood sugar levels. Short or long-term pain or injury can cause your body to release hormones. This release can lead to an increase in your glucose levels. Day to day drama that you might not consider substantial can have a real physical effect, resulting in a change in the amount of glucose in your blood. Alcohol can have a definite effect on sugar, especially when it's consumed on an empty stomach. This can lower your blood glucose levels. Whether you're taking more trips to the gym, or simply running more errands, any increase in physical activity can make your body more sensitive to insulin, and affect your glucose. Make notes on your printed out Doctor Discussion Guide about the issues you would like to discuss with your doctor. Continue reading >>

The Limitations Of Lantus

The Limitations Of Lantus

There's a common error revealed by many emails I get as well as what I see posted on discussion boards. It has to do with the failure of medical staff to explain to patients for whom Lantus is prescribed what it is that Lantus does and what it is that Lantus cannot do. Lantus is a basal insulin. Basal insulin are slow long-acting insulins that attempt to mimic a specific function of the healthy beta cell. Normal people's beta cells secrete tiny pulses of insulin every couple minutes throughout the day and night. These pulses allow healthy cells to take in blood sugar and use it any time they need to. This slow steady release of tiny bits of insulin is called Basal Insulin Release. It is a failed basal insulin Release that Lantus attempts to replace. But basal insulin production is a completely separate function from the much more powerful insulin release that happens when you eat foods that contain carbohydrates. That is because the influx of a large amount of carbohydrate into the digestive system stimulates two more insulin releases--first phase and second phase insulin release. These fast, large insulin releases are much more powerful than the tiny pulses of insulin produced during basal insulin release. The problem patients run into when they are prescribed Lantus is that they do not understand that there are these different kinds of insulin release and assume that if they are injecting insulin to replace the insulin their bodies no longer make, these injections should be enough to give them normal blood sugars. But if Lantus is what they are injecting, it will be impossible for most people with Type 2 to get normal blood sugars when they eat any significant amount of carbohydrate. Though they inject a large dose of Lantus, that Lantus will be absorbed very slowly o Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

There are two reasons why your blood sugar levels may be high in the morning – the dawn phenomenon and the Somogyi effect. The dawn phenomenon is the end result of a combination of natural body changes that occur during the sleep cycle and can be explained as follows: Your body has little need for insulin between about midnight and about 3:00 a.m. (a time when your body is sleeping most soundly). Any insulin taken in the evening causes blood sugar levels to drop sharply during this time. Then, between 3:00 a.m. and 8:00 a.m., your body starts churning out stored glucose (sugar) to prepare for the upcoming day as well as releases hormones that reduce the body's sensitivity to insulin. All of these events happen as your bedtime insulin dose is also wearing off. These events, taken together, cause your body's blood sugar levels to rise in the morning (at "dawn"). A second cause of high blood sugar levels in the morning might be due to the Somogyi effect (named after the doctor who first wrote about it). This condition is also called "rebound hyperglycemia." Although the cascade of events and end result – high blood sugar levels in the morning – is the same as in the dawn phenomenon, the cause is more "man-made" (a result of poor diabetes management) in the Somogyi effect. There are two potential causes. In one scenario, your blood sugar may drop too low in the middle of the night and then your body releases hormones to raise the sugar levels. This could happen if you took too much insulin earlier or if you did not have enough of a bedtime snack. The other scenario is when your dose of long-acting insulin at bedtime is not enough and you wake up with a high morning blood sugar. How is it determined if the dawn phenomenon or Somogyi effect is causing the high blood sug Continue reading >>

Can Too Much Lantus Cause High Am Bg's?

Can Too Much Lantus Cause High Am Bg's?

I am a type 1A diabetic with normal insulin sensitivity and predictable bg responses to insulin doses. Until now. I went on a reducing diet (high protein, next to 0 carbs, increased exercise) but never decreased my once daily PM dose of Lantus (10 units.) Immediately my AM bg's jumped to over 200 and stayed there. No hypoglycemia during sleep (I never woke up, anyway.)I could bring my daily bg's down with my shortacting insulin. I increased the PM dose of Lantus by 1 unit and found the next day my am bg was even higher. And still, no hypo's waking me up from sleep. I suspect that Lantus' action is so flat that it may cause hypoglycemia that the liver responds to but does not cause the usual hypoglycemic symptoms. I know this pattern is seen when Lantus is used with cat diabetics. My cat was getting bg's from 300-450for 2 years until I started dropping his dose; he is now stabilized on 1/2 the dose he used to get! He never had any hypos; the only symptom of too much Lantus was superhyperglycemia. I suspect this happens with humans too, and me in specific, but I've not seen anything mentioned in any literature or posting mentioning this phenomena. Continue reading >>

Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

The Dumbest & Smartest Things A Doctor Ever Told Me I eat a low fat diet, so why is my cholesterol level still high? Why are my blood sugars higher in the morning than when I go to bed the night before? This typically occurs due to the dawn phenomenon. The dawn phenomenon is the rise in blood glucose levels in the dawn (that is, the morning) due to excessive release of glucose from the liver into the blood. Here is a graph of a person’s blood glucose readings measured with a device (a “continuous glucose monitor”) that automatically measures the body’s glucose level about 300 times per day (each colour represents a different day): As you can see in the preceding graph, every day starting at about 3am this person’s glucose levels started to go up. This individual, like so very many others living with diabetes who have high blood glucose levels first thing in the morning, blamed themselves and attributed their elevated morning blood glucose to having overeaten or snacked the night before. Not so! What they (and you) eat at bedtime (or suppertime) seldom is a significant factor in leading to high blood glucose levels the next morning; heck, the food you ate the night before is long since digested, absorbed into the body, and metabolized well before the following morning’s breakfast. This graph nicely illustrates that point. One colourful term for the liver’s tendency to release glucose into the blood overnight is a liver leak. How much sugar (glucose) gets released from the liver if you have the dawn phenomenon? How about this: Almost as much as is contained in TWO CANS OF COLA! If you have the dawn phenomenon this is something that is not simply to be accepted. Rather, your therapy should be adjusted to fight it so that your blood glucose levels are kept w Continue reading >>

Lantus

Lantus

NOTICE: This Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) is intended for persons living in Australia. (lant-us) What is in this leaflet It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor, pharmacist or diabetes educator. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you using Lantus against the benefits they expect it will have for you. If you have any concerns about using this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist. What Lantus is used for Lantus is used to reduce high blood sugar (glucose) levels in people with diabetes mellitus. Lantus is a modified insulin that is very similar to human insulin. It is a substitute for the insulin produced by the pancreas. Lantus is a long-acting insulin. Your doctor may tell you to use a rapid-acting human insulin or oral diabetes medication in combination with Lantus. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why Lantus has been prescribed for you. Before you use Lantus When you must not use Lantus Some of the symptoms of an allergic reaction may include: If you have a lot of hypos discuss appropriate treatment with your doctor. After the expiry date printed on the pack or if the packaging is torn or shows signs of tampering. If you use Lantus after the expiry date has passed, it may not work as well. If it has expired or is damaged, return it to your pharmacist for disposal. If the product appears cloudy, discoloured or contains particles, or if the injection pen/cartridge/vial appears damaged. If you are not sure whether you should start using this medicine, talk to your doctor. There is no experience with the use of Lantus in children less than 6 years. Before you start to use Lantus Tell your doctor if you have allergies to any other medicines, foo Continue reading >>

Lantus Triggering A Rise In Blood Sugar??

Lantus Triggering A Rise In Blood Sugar??

Lantus triggering a rise in blood sugar?? Friend T1 since 1998, Novorapid x3 daily Lantus x1 Lantus triggering a rise in blood sugar?? I have noticed in the past fortnight that in the first hour (sometimes 2) after injecting Lantus, there is a rise in my blood sugars. I'm currently injecting 14 units at 10pm and 14 units at 10am For example tonight, I ate supper at 5pm and injected my novo accordingly. This all worked out fine and by 9pm I was back down to 5.6 mmol/l (100). At 10pm I was 5.2 mmol/l (94). I injected my Lantus and 45 mins later I had risen to 7.8 mmol/l (140)........... by morning I'm back in range again. This KEEPS happening, morning and night. I'm fairly certain this isn't anything to do with my food or novorapid. Is it possible that when the body recognises Lantus entering the blood stream, it responds by putting out some glugogen?? If so how can I combat this?? Any suggestions or comments on this theory welcome. Lantus takes about an hour and a half to reach it's full potential or maximum effectiveness. It could be that it doesn't last exactly 24 hours in you, so it's running out when you inject and then it takes it over an hour to reach full effectiveness....perhaps that gap in coverage is causing your sugar to rise a bit? If it were me, I wouldn't be too concerned about 7.8, but if it were much higher than that I would consider either splitting the dose or taking a very small amount of novorapid to combat it. What do you think? Id highly recommend trying or asking your doctor about splitting your Lantus into two injections if you can handle another shot on schedule. I wanted my pump with that being one of the strong resasons why, lantus just didnt last 24 hrs in me I went high before it (re)kicked in. I couldnt handle another timed injection so I n Continue reading >>

Insulin-glargine, Injectable Solution

Insulin-glargine, Injectable Solution

Low blood sugar warning: You may have mild or severe low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) while you’re taking insulin glargine. Severe low blood sugar can be dangerous. It can harm your heart or brain, and cause unconsciousness, seizures, or even be fatal. Low blood sugar can happen very quickly and come on without symptoms. It’s important to check your blood sugar as often as your doctor says to. Symptoms can include: anxiety, irritability, restlessness, trouble concentrating, feeling confused or not like yourself tingling in your hands, feet, lips, or tongue dizziness, lightheadedness, or drowsiness nightmares or trouble sleeping headache blurred vision slurred speech fast heart rate sweating shaking unsteady walking Thiazolidinediones warning: Taking diabetes pills called thiazolidinediones (TZDs) with insulin glargine may cause heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including shortness of breath, swelling of your ankles or feet, and sudden weight gain. Your doctor may adjust your TZD dosage if you have these symptoms. Infection warning: You should never share insulin vials, syringes, or prefilled pens with other people. Sharing or reusing needles or syringes with another person puts you and others at risk of various infections. Low potassium levels warning: All insulin products can decrease the amount of potassium in the blood. Low potassium blood levels may increase your risk of irregular heartbeat while taking this drug. To prevent this, your doctor will check your potassium blood levels before you start taking this drug. Insulin glargine is a prescription drug. It comes as an injectable solution. This drug is self-injectable. Insulin glargine is available as the brand-name drugs Lantus, Basaglar, Toujeo, and Soli Continue reading >>

Lantus Side Effects Center

Lantus Side Effects Center

Lantus (insulin glargine [rdna origin]) Injection is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body used to treat type 1 (insulin-dependent) or type 2 (non insulin-dependent) diabetes. The most common side effects of Lantus is hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. Symptoms include: hunger, sweating, irritability, trouble concentrating, rapid breathing, fast heartbeat, seizure (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal). Other common side effects of Lantus include pain, redness, swelling, itching, or thickening of the skin at the injection site. These side effects usually go away after a few days or weeks. Lantus should be administered subcutaneously (under the skin) once a day at the same time every day. Dose is determined by the individual and the desired blood glucose levels. Lantus may interact with albuterol, clonidine, reserpine, or beta-blockers. Many other medicines can increase or decrease the effects of insulin glargine on lowering your blood sugar. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant before using Lantus. Discuss a plan to manage blood sugar with your doctor before becoming pregnant. Your doctor may switch the type of insulin you use during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Insulin needs may change while breastfeeding. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding. Our Lantus (insulin glargine [rdna origin]) Injection Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. Continue reading >>

Unlocking The Basal Mystery

Unlocking The Basal Mystery

We all know about bolus, but do you know how basal insulin works? Here’s the inside story. Any person with diabetes on insulin therapy knows that you need insulin when you eat a meal. Using a see-saw as an analogy, food and insulin balance each other out. Too much food and not enough insulin, you have hyperglycemia. Too much insulin and not enough food, and you have hypoglycemia. But most people who use insulin also realize that it’s not just for when you eat. Folks with a pump use insulin nearly 24 hours a day, taking only short breaks for showering, swimming, or sex. Also, people who manage with multiple daily injections (MDIs) have to take two types of insulin, a short-acting bolus insulin (Humalog, Novolog or Apidra) for their meals as well as a long-acting basal insulin (Levemir or Lantus). There’s a big difference between the two, but many people with diabetes don’t understand what basal insulin is and what it means to them. They either follow doctor’s orders and take long-acting insulin without understanding exactly what’s going on in their bodies or, worse, they don’t follow doctor’s orders. Let’s look at basal insulin, what it does, and how to test your basal rate, since a little knowledge can bring an outsized peace of mind: Managing Spontaneous Sugar Basal literally means “background”, and basal insulin is the background insulin that has to be constantly infused or active in our bodies or our blood sugar spikes. Unlike previous long-acting insulins that would peak, basal insulin is programmed to keep our blood sugars stable in the absence of food. But how many of us actually understand the biology behind the basal? I’ve had Type 1 diabetes for almost 20 years, but it wasn’t until I took an Anatomy & Physiology class and spoke with se Continue reading >>

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