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Can Thyroid Problems Cause High Blood Sugar Levels?

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Iodine and Starch Experiment | Iodine Experiment | Starch Experiment | Science experiments for kids Simple and easy experiment to demonstrate the iodine with starch reaction! For this test you will need: Two test tubes Soluble starch powder Iodine solution Water Dropper Procedure: Put some starch powder into a test tube and fill the test tube with water. Mix the starch in the test tube well until the starch dissolves in the water. Fill the other test tube with normal water. Place both the test tubes in a test tube stand. Using a dropper take iodine solution. Put some drops in each test tube. Observe that the test tube with starch solution turns to purple black color. The other test tube with normal water retains the color of iodine i.e orange or yellow. Explanation: Starch is a mixture of amylose and amylopectin, which are different forms of glucose/starch. Amylose in starch is responsible for the formation of a deep blue black color. Amylase is long polymer chains of glucose units connected by an alpha acetal linkage and looks much like a coiled spring. However iodine is a potassium iodide reagent and it is not very soluble in water. So, iodine is prepared by dissolvi

Is Iodine Causing Obesity, Diabetes, And Cancer? You Might Be Surprised.

We all need iodine. In fact, we might need it more than we realize. Research shows that there is a 90% chance that iodine deficiency is a major contributing factor to weight gain and/or decreasing weight loss. This is especially true in women. Along with its effect on weight, iodine also increases our body's sensitivity to insulin, aiding in the normalization of blood glucose levels. With its dual impact in both the obesity and Type II Diabetes epidemics, iodine is moving back to the forefront of medical care where it was until the 1960's. What is Iodine? Iodine is found in every organ and tissue in the body. It is found in high levels in the thyroid gland, liver, lungs, heart, and adrenal glands. It is found in the highest concentrations in fat and muscle tissue. Iodine, a trace element, is required by humans for the synthesis of thyroid hormones and is essential for normal thyroid function. It attaches itself to our hormone receptors within the body and increases the sensitivity of the receptors to their associated hormones. The thyroid is not the only organ in the body that needs iodine. In fact, every cell in the body needs iodine. It is particularly important for organs like t Continue reading >>

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  1. Em_NZ

    Hyperthyroidism - BG rises in a non diabetic?

    Hi all, long time no see!
    My mother was recently diagnosed with hyperthyroidism, her numbers coming out over twice the max 'normal' amount. She's only just started taking pills for it, so far things aren't really improving but we're hoping for a good change real soon!
    My question is, can an overactive thyroid raise blood sugar levels in a non-diabetic? She's always had perfectly healthy BG results until now. Even now it's nothing tragic - her A1c was 6.3, which many of us would be proud of but I know it's a little high for a non-D.
    I'm pretty sure it's just the thyroid acting up seeing as it's affecting her whole metabolism - but just hoping someone can confirm that for me. And will it all settle down once the pills are doing what they should? Anything else I should know?

  2. drsoosie

    It is possible it could raise it a little, however according to my endo not likely. She should also have herself checked for diabetes or pre-diabetes. I have Grave's disease and when I had high BG last year, before I was diagnosed, I was convinced it was because my Synthroid was too high and I was consuming more sugar to compensate for the high metabolism. It turns out, being an auto-immune person, I actually had Type 1 diabetes. The symptoms are similar in the beginning to an over active thyroid.

  3. Em_NZ

    She's being sent for a GTT (ugh) so we'll see how that goes. I'm going to offer to go with her, I want to be there to support her - and also just see how it's done as I never had one myself!
    Also I'm going to her place for dinner tonight so I'll take my spare meter and do my own little GTT, testing before & a couple of times after we eat.
    6.3 isn't that high for a non-diabetic is it?
    I would not wish diabetes on anyone, and I'd freak if Mum got it! She's just had the test to see if her hyperthyroidism is auto-immune, so that's a result we're waiting for. If it is there's more of a chance of her prospective diabetes being T1... I think we'd all prefer T2, with an A1c like that she'd be able to control it well with diet & exercise as she's already pretty smart when it comes to nutrition.
    My diabetes has come through my Dad's side of the family - no trace of it at all in my Mum's (huge!) family. So I'm thinking that so far the odds are good for this to just be an oddity because of her body going a little nuts.
    Then again, maybe I'm in denial, because I really can't handle the thought of my Mum having to go through everything that I go through!

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Take Dr. Berg's Body Type Quiz: http://bit.ly/BodyTypeQuiz Dr. Berg talks about the thyroid gland and what could be the potential thyroid problems (it is mostly secondary). The thyroid symptoms include hair loss, dry hair, loss of eyebrows, abnormal thyroid glands and hormones, all these are caused due to low thyroid levels in the body. Dr. Berg discusses about the major thyroid problems and their associated thyroid treatment. The main cause for thyroid issues is liver and gall bladder. The next possible cause of thyroid symptoms could be the adrenals. In this case you can have either high quantity of thyroid (hyper thyroid) or low quantity of thyroid (hypo thyroid), both if which are triggered by high amount of stress levels. The third most probable cause could be ovaries. In this case the estrogen depletes the activity of thyroid over time which causes a thyroid disorder. It is very rare that you have primary thyroid problem. Dr. Berg explains the root cause and how to make your thyroid come back. Dr. Eric Berg DC Bio: Dr. Berg, 50 years of age is a chiropractor who specializes in weight loss through nutritional and natural methods. His private practice is located in Alexandria,

300 "typical" Thyroid Symptoms (yep, That Many!)

As many of you know, I have thyroid disease. I’ve been meaning to compile a list of various symptoms linked to thyroid issues for a while, in part to highlight just how multifaceted, unpredictable and nebulous the disease is. It’s worth remembering that every cell in our body has thyroid receptors (the only other substance with receptors on every cell is Vitamin D). This really does explain why a dodgy thyroid can manifest in so many different ways. It’s an illness of the entire body. It also explains why autoimmune thyroid disease, or Hashimotos, is so often misdiagnosed as 93847 other conditions and why so many Hashi sufferers finally arrive at the correct diagnosis exhausted from trying all kinds of different supplements and treatments for 93847 unrelated conditions. Oh, and it explains why we can be left feeling like a crazy hypochondriac. Right? When I reflect on the sheer number of symptoms linked to Hashimotos it reminds me just how fruitless it is to try fix symptoms (which would take several lifetimes even if such fixes existed) and that focusing on a broad healing is far more productive. This is what I do now. I steer my efforts to modulating my stress. This is the Continue reading >>

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  1. holdthegluten

    last night when i got home from work I had something really scary happen............I just gave my son a bath and all of a sudden my legs got really weak and they started shaking uncontrollably, then my stomach and legas were shaking............i thought it was low blood sugar, so i ate a banana and drank some juice.......i tested my blood sugar and it was 80 after the banana, but I was still shaking and weak, my heart was also racing and i got a really warm sensation in my chest, neck an face when this all started........i did go quite a while without eating, but it was weird that i still had the symptoms even after my blood sugar was normal..............it went away after about 30 minutes.......I read about hyper thyroidism and the symptoms are pretty much dead on, even the gritty eyes feeling. Today I had a mild case of the legs weakness, but not shaking. My blood sugar was 68 and i ate plenty of food to keep it above that. Do you think I have a thyroid problem and its making it difficult to control my blood sugar? I am lost? Do these two go hand in hand?

  2. 2kids4me

    symptoms of hyperthyroidism do include a racing heart as the heart rate is increased, also weight loss and elevated temperature are not uncommon,
    What you described is a severe hypoglycemic event.
    The shakiness and sensations you describe are related to an adrenalin release. It is not unusual that your blood sugar was still low after the juice and banana and that it took 30 mins for the feelings to pass..
    Easiest way to explain it is in point form:
    blood sugar drops to critical level and body reacts
    adrenalin is released in order to mobilize glycogen from storage in the liver
    adrenalin causes increased heart rate and sweating - often followed by chills
    low blood sugar creates muscle weakness / cloudy thinking, unable to think straight
    food is eaten - but because of the hypoglycemia blood has been shunted from the intestine to the brain and vital organs. Absorbtion of food is slower
    this shunting of blood may cause nausea
    stomach has to digest food and send it small intestine before the carbs can be utilized by body
    because of adrenalin release and whole body response to hypoglycemia - it can take 30 - 45 minutes before the body stops "yelling for food"...
    Often in diabetics a severe low leads ot a somoygi effect - where the blood sugar skyrockets after a low - this leads to lethargy and a crappy feeling
    Quote

    http://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/arti.../Somogyi_Effect
    Somogyi effect,

    When blood glucose levels drop too low, the body sometimes reacts by releasing counterregulatory hormones such as glucagon and epinephrine. These hormones spur the liver to convert its stores of glycogen into glucose, raising blood glucose levels. This can cause a period of high blood sugar following an episode of hypoglycemia
    Thyroid problems are commonly associated with diabetes and celiac. If your heart rate is normal at other times and you are not suffering from insomnia and weight loss - then chances are your thyroid is fine and what you experienced was a severe hypoglycemic event. What you described is exactly what I experience during a severe hypoglycemia, including the time it takes to feel fully recovered.
    Keeping dextrose tablets on hand would be wise as they are absorbed as soon as you put them in your mouth - the body does not need to digest it or break it down before "using it".
    If you are concerned about your thyroid - you can ask to be checked.. and make sure they check more than just the TSH and T4...they should run a comprehensive thryoid panel that also checks for antibodies to the thyroid, as well as T3 levels. Also a hyperthyroid individual usually but not always has an enlarged thyroid / or nodules on it.
    Are you diabetic as well - or hypoglycemic ?- is that why you havea glucose meter?

  3. holdthegluten

    I am not diabetic or hypoglycemic............I have a meter because my wife thought she was having blood sugar issues and so we got one..........I didnt eat for 7 hrs and then had a dr pepper because i was feeling a little faint.........i was with clients one after another and didnt have time to eat. I hope it was just a one time thing. Today I checked my blood sugar and it was 68 and i ate really good........what would cause a sudden difficulty in maintaining blood sugar.

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Why do we have an epidemic of thyroid disorder? What is thyroid disorder? Why is our thyroid so very important? What does losing your thyroid do to your metabolism? Fertility, PCOS, weight gain/loss and other thyroid related disorders. The hormone concerto. How to heal your thyroid health by rolling back your insulin resistance.

What You Need To Know About Your Thyroid Health

The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped gland found inside your neck, right under your larynx or voice box. Your thyroid is responsible for producing the master metabolism hormones that control every function in your body. Hypothyroidism occurs when your thyroid produces too little thyroid hormone, a condition that is often linked to iodine deficiency. Your thyroid, one of the largest endocrine glands, greatly influences almost every cell in your body. Aside from regulating your metabolism and weight by controlling the fat-burning process, thyroid hormones are also required for the growth and development in children and in nearly every physiological process in your body. When your thyroid levels are out of balance, so are you. Too much or too little hormone secretion in this gland can spell trouble for your overall health and well-being. Mounting research shows that 10 to 40 percent of people living in the United States have suboptimal thyroid function.1 Poor thyroid function has been linked to serious health conditions like fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, acne, eczema, gum disease, infertility, and autoimmune diseases, which is why it's imperative that you to learn how you Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. holdthegluten

    last night when i got home from work I had something really scary happen............I just gave my son a bath and all of a sudden my legs got really weak and they started shaking uncontrollably, then my stomach and legas were shaking............i thought it was low blood sugar, so i ate a banana and drank some juice.......i tested my blood sugar and it was 80 after the banana, but I was still shaking and weak, my heart was also racing and i got a really warm sensation in my chest, neck an face when this all started........i did go quite a while without eating, but it was weird that i still had the symptoms even after my blood sugar was normal..............it went away after about 30 minutes.......I read about hyper thyroidism and the symptoms are pretty much dead on, even the gritty eyes feeling. Today I had a mild case of the legs weakness, but not shaking. My blood sugar was 68 and i ate plenty of food to keep it above that. Do you think I have a thyroid problem and its making it difficult to control my blood sugar? I am lost? Do these two go hand in hand?

  2. 2kids4me

    symptoms of hyperthyroidism do include a racing heart as the heart rate is increased, also weight loss and elevated temperature are not uncommon,
    What you described is a severe hypoglycemic event.
    The shakiness and sensations you describe are related to an adrenalin release. It is not unusual that your blood sugar was still low after the juice and banana and that it took 30 mins for the feelings to pass..
    Easiest way to explain it is in point form:
    blood sugar drops to critical level and body reacts
    adrenalin is released in order to mobilize glycogen from storage in the liver
    adrenalin causes increased heart rate and sweating - often followed by chills
    low blood sugar creates muscle weakness / cloudy thinking, unable to think straight
    food is eaten - but because of the hypoglycemia blood has been shunted from the intestine to the brain and vital organs. Absorbtion of food is slower
    this shunting of blood may cause nausea
    stomach has to digest food and send it small intestine before the carbs can be utilized by body
    because of adrenalin release and whole body response to hypoglycemia - it can take 30 - 45 minutes before the body stops "yelling for food"...
    Often in diabetics a severe low leads ot a somoygi effect - where the blood sugar skyrockets after a low - this leads to lethargy and a crappy feeling
    Quote

    http://www.diabetesselfmanagement.com/arti.../Somogyi_Effect
    Somogyi effect,

    When blood glucose levels drop too low, the body sometimes reacts by releasing counterregulatory hormones such as glucagon and epinephrine. These hormones spur the liver to convert its stores of glycogen into glucose, raising blood glucose levels. This can cause a period of high blood sugar following an episode of hypoglycemia
    Thyroid problems are commonly associated with diabetes and celiac. If your heart rate is normal at other times and you are not suffering from insomnia and weight loss - then chances are your thyroid is fine and what you experienced was a severe hypoglycemic event. What you described is exactly what I experience during a severe hypoglycemia, including the time it takes to feel fully recovered.
    Keeping dextrose tablets on hand would be wise as they are absorbed as soon as you put them in your mouth - the body does not need to digest it or break it down before "using it".
    If you are concerned about your thyroid - you can ask to be checked.. and make sure they check more than just the TSH and T4...they should run a comprehensive thryoid panel that also checks for antibodies to the thyroid, as well as T3 levels. Also a hyperthyroid individual usually but not always has an enlarged thyroid / or nodules on it.
    Are you diabetic as well - or hypoglycemic ?- is that why you havea glucose meter?

  3. holdthegluten

    I am not diabetic or hypoglycemic............I have a meter because my wife thought she was having blood sugar issues and so we got one..........I didnt eat for 7 hrs and then had a dr pepper because i was feeling a little faint.........i was with clients one after another and didnt have time to eat. I hope it was just a one time thing. Today I checked my blood sugar and it was 68 and i ate really good........what would cause a sudden difficulty in maintaining blood sugar.

  4. -> Continue reading
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