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Can Protein Lower Your Blood Sugar?

Increase In Dietary Protein Improves The Blood Glucose Response In Persons With Type 2 Diabetes | The American Journal Of Clinical Nutrition | Oxford Academic

Increase In Dietary Protein Improves The Blood Glucose Response In Persons With Type 2 Diabetes | The American Journal Of Clinical Nutrition | Oxford Academic

Background: In single-meal studies, dietary protein does not result in an increase in glucose concentrations in persons with or without type 2 diabetes, even though the resulting amino acids can be used for gluconeogenesis. Objective: The metabolic effects of a high-protein diet were compared with those of the prototypical healthy (control) diet, which is currently recommended by several scientific organizations. Design: The metabolic effects of both diets, consumed for 5 wk each (separated by a 25-wk washout period), were studied in 12 subjects with untreated type 2 diabetes. The ratio of protein to carbohydrate to fat was 30:40:30 in the high-protein diet and 15:55:30 in the control diet. The subjects remained weight-stable during the study. Results: With the fasting glucose concentration used as a baseline from which to determine the area under the curve, the high-protein diet resulted in a 40% decrease in the mean 24-h integrated glucose area response. Glycated hemoglobin decreased 0.8% and 0.3% after 5 wk of the high-protein and control diets, respectively; the difference was significant (P < 0.05). The rate of change over time was also significantly greater after the high-protein diet than after the control diet (P < 0.001). Fasting triacylglycerol was significantly lower after the high-protein diet than after the control diet. Insulin, C-peptide, and free fatty acid concentrations were not significantly different after the 2 diets. Conclusion: A high-protein diet lowers blood glucose postprandially in persons with type 2 diabetes and improves overall glucose control. However, longer-term studies are necessary to determine the total magnitude of response, possible adverse effects, and the long-term acceptability of the diet. Dietary protein , diabetes , diet , in Continue reading >>

Diabetics May Lower Blood Glucose Levels By Eating Protein And Vegetables 15 Mins Before Their Carbs, Says Extremely Small Study

Diabetics May Lower Blood Glucose Levels By Eating Protein And Vegetables 15 Mins Before Their Carbs, Says Extremely Small Study

Diabetics May Lower Blood Glucose Levels By Eating Protein And Vegetables 15 Mins Before Their Carbs, Says Extremely Small Study A new, small study from the Weill Cornell Medical College in New York found diabetics who ate their protein and vegetables before they ate their carbohydrates were better able to lower their blood glucose levels. "We're always looking for ways to help people with diabetes lower their blood sugar," Dr. Louis Aronne , senior study author of the Sanford I. Weill Professor of Metabolic Research and professor of clinical medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College, said in a press release . "We rely on medicine, but diet is an important part of this process, too. Unfortunately, we've found that it's difficult to get people to change their eating habits." This is especially difficult when people, diabetic or not, are advised to stop consuming carbs. Carbs, however, raise blood sugar, and too many can be especially problematic for diabetics. So to get a better idea of how much of an impact food order makes, researchers worked with patients who had both type 2 diabetes and obesity and were taking an oral drug to help control their blood sugar. Patients were twice given a meal to eat consisting of ciabatta bread and orange juice (carbs), as well as a chicken breast, lettuce, and tomato salad with low-fat dressing and steamed, buttered broccoli (protein, vegetables, and fat) twice on separate days a week apart. And when they ate their carbs 15 minutes before the rest of their meal, patients glucose levels were much higher than when they ate the meal in the reverse order. When patients ate their vegetables, protein, and fat first, blood sugar lowered up to 37 percent. "Based on this finding, instead of saying 'don't eat that' to their patients, clinicians Continue reading >>

Proven Tips & Strategies To Bring High Blood Sugar Down (quickly)

Proven Tips & Strategies To Bring High Blood Sugar Down (quickly)

Untreated, high blood sugar can cause many problems and future complications. Recognizing signs of high blood sugar levels and knowing how to lower them can help you prevent these complications and increase the quality and length of your life. Topics covered (click to jump to specific section) High blood sugar level symptoms and signs Symptoms of high blood sugar include: Increased thirst Tired all the time Irritability Increased hunger Urinating a lot Dry mouth Blurred vision Severe high blood sugar can lead to nausea and fruity smelling breath The signs and symptoms for high blood sugar are the same for both type 1 and type 2. Signs usually show up quicker in those who have type 1 because of the nature of their diabetes. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease that causes the body to stop making insulin altogether. Type 2 is caused by lifestyle factors when the body eventually stops responding to insulin, which causes the sugar to increase slowly. People with type 2 can live longer without any symptoms creeping because their body is still making enough insulin to help control it a little bit. What causes the blood sugar levels go to high? Our bodies need sugar to make energy for the cells. Without it, we cannot do basic functions. When we eat foods with glucose, insulin pairs with it to allow it to enter into the cell wall. If the insulin is not there, then the glucose molecule can’t get through the wall and cannot be used. The extra glucose hangs out in the bloodstream which is literally high blood sugar. The lack of insulin can be caused by two different things. First, you can have decreased insulin resistance which means that your insulin doesn’t react the way that it is supposed to. It doesn’t partner with glucose to be used as fuel. Secondly, you can have no insuli Continue reading >>

How Does Protein Affect Blood Sugar?

How Does Protein Affect Blood Sugar?

I’m considering whether I should advise my patients with diabetes to pay careful attention to the protein (particularly complete animal proteins) content of their diet. It’s an important issue to Dr. Richard K. Bernstein, who definitely says it has to be taken into account. Here are some of Dr. Bernstein’s ideas pulled from the current edition of Diabetes Solution: The liver (and the kidneys and intestines to a lesser extent) can convert protein to glucose, although it’s a slow and inefficient process. Since the conversion process—called gluconeogenesis—is slow and inefficient, diabetics don’t see the high blood sugar spikes they would see from many ingested carbohydrates. For example, 3 ounces (85 g) of hamburger patty could be converted to 6.5 g of glucose under the right circumstances. Protein foods from animals (e.g., meat, fish, chicken, eggs) are about 20% protein by weight. Dr. B recommends keeping protein portions in a particular meal consistent day-to-day (for example 6 ounces with each lunch). He recommends at least 1–1.2 g of protein per kilogram of ideal body weight for non-athletic adults. The minimum protein he recommends for a 155-lb non-athletic adult is 11.7–14 ounces daily. Growing children and athletes need more protein. Each uncooked ounce of the foods on his “protein foods” list (page 181) provides about 6 g of protein. On his eating plan, you choose the amount of protein in a meal that would satisfy you, which might be 3 ounces or 6–9 ounces. If you have gastroparesis, however, you should limit your evening meal protein to 2 ounces of eggs, cheese, fish, or ground meat, while eating more protein at the two earlier meals in the day. Dr. Bernstein wrote: “In many respects—and going against the grain of a number of the medi Continue reading >>

How To Control Blood Sugar After A High-protein Meal

How To Control Blood Sugar After A High-protein Meal

What is the influence of dietary protein on post meal blood glucose? Does protein effect blood sugar after a meal? Is there additional math we need to do for improved control after meals? At present, those of us who use intensive insulin therapy understand how proper mealtime insulin dosing requires appropriate carbohydrate counting. This is based on the thought that carbohydrate is the main nutrient that influences our post meal blood sugar values. However, studies have demonstrated that protein and fat may also play a role in what happens to our post meal blood sugar. The impact of dietary protein on blood sugar has long been a topic of debate. Early research hypothesized that 100 g of ingested protein produced 50–80 g glucose. Later research showed, it was only ~ 10 g of glucose that showed up in the circulation following consumption of 50 g of protein (this is a serving of cooked meat about the size of a full outstretched woman’s hand). This equates to ~ 1 g of glucose produced from every 5 g of protein consumed. The results of the study below are consistent with this and, indicate consumption of ~ 75g and 100 g of protein ALONE may produce late rises in blood glucose which is similar to that from 15 and 20 g of glucose. This is relevant, given that 20 g of consumed glucose causes significant post meal excursions when insulin is NOT given. However, because the impact from protein (usually not covered by insulin) is delayed and sustained it shows a good reason we need consider dosing for protein dependent on portion consumed. Protein-rich meals may result in delaying the rise in blood glucose and produce a sustained high blood glucose. This indicates a need for more insulin for such meals or snacks as well as a new way to think about dosing insulin to offset the Continue reading >>

Food Order Has Significant Impact On Glucose And Insulin Levels

Food Order Has Significant Impact On Glucose And Insulin Levels

Eating protein and vegetables before carbohydrates leads to lower post-meal glucose and insulin levels in obese patients with type 2 diabetes, Weill Cornell Medical College researchers found in a new study. This finding, published June 23 in the journal Diabetes Care, might impact the way clinicians advise diabetic patients and other high-risk individuals to eat, focusing not only on how much, but also on when carbohydrates are consumed. Dr. Louis Aronne's study in Diabetes Care found that insulin and glucose levels were significantly lower when protein and vegetables were eaten before carbohydrates. "We're always looking for ways to help people with diabetes lower their blood sugar," said senior author Dr. Louis Aronne, the Sanford I. Weill Professor of Metabolic Research and a professor of clinical medicine at Weill Cornell Medical College, who is the study's principal investigator. "We rely on medicine, but diet is an important part of this process, too. Unfortunately, we've found that it's difficult to get people to change their eating habits. "Carbohydrates raise blood sugar, but if you tell someone not to eat them — or to drastically cut back — it's hard for them to comply," added Dr. Aronne, who is also director of the Comprehensive Weight Control Center at Weill Cornell. "This study points to an easier way that patients might lower their blood sugar and insulin levels." Patients with type 2 diabetes typically use a finger prick test to check their glucose levels throughout the day. Maintaining normal levels, specifically after meals, is of the utmost importance, because if a diabetics' blood sugar level is consistently high or frequently spikes, they risk complications of their disease, including hardening of the arteries and eventually death from heart dise Continue reading >>

How Does Protein Affect Blood Sugar?

How Does Protein Affect Blood Sugar?

One of the common pitfalls for people living a ketogenic lifestyle centers around protein and how it can sabotage your ketosis without you even knowing. You might think you are doing well, eating right, avoiding carbs, but you’re not seeing progress. One of the points I talked about here has to do with moderating your protein as a step to get back on track or break a plateau. So I thought I’d go into a little more depth. Your body has two main sources of energy: glucose and ketones. Ketones are only generated through fat metabolism. Glucose can be created by metabolizing carbs or proteins. A brief interruption to discuss carbs and protein Carbs are, basically, just sugars that are arranged in different structures that can be rearranged into glucose. Proteins, on the other hand, are a complicated matter. Proteins are strings of amino acids. There are 22 dietary amino acids, nine of which are essential, which means they cannot be generated by the cells in the body. So we must get those nine amino acids via our diet. And, of course, meat is the best dietary source for our amino acids. All of our body tissues are constructed of protein, so when we eat protein, we are supplying our tissues with material for rebuilding and healing. That’s why bodybuilders shovel huge amounts of protein into their gullet, because they are constantly breaking down their muscle fibers, so they need a constant stream of protein to heal and build their muscle. Interruption complete Our bodies can use ketones to power roughly 75% of its energy needs. The remaining 25%, almost all of which is used by the brain, comes from glucose. But, if we’re ketogenic, how do we get that glucose? If we are powered by fat, dietary and stored, and fat metabolism results in ketones, then where can we get the Continue reading >>

How Much Protein Should A Person With Diabetes Eat?

How Much Protein Should A Person With Diabetes Eat?

How Much Protein Should a Person With Diabetes Eat? Protein itself does not have much of an effect on blood sugar levels, though the food the protein is in may. Typically, people with diabetes don't need any more protein than people who don't have diabetes. There are, however, times when less protein isbetter. Protein is one of three essential macronutrients; the other twoare fat and carbohydrate. These are needed in large amounts to maintain health and vital functions. The body uses protein to build, repair, and maintain most of your body's tissues and organs. Proteins are also necessary for immune system function and they help some additional physiological processes. As long as your kidneys are healthy, about 15 to 20 percent of your daily calories should come from protein. This is the same amount suggested for a balanced non-diabetic diet. About 45 to 50 percent of your caloric intake should come from carbohydrates and the rest should come from fat. A person who needs 2,000 calories per day needs about 75 to 100 grams protein per day. It would be more accurate, however, to use the standard formula of 0.8 grams protein per kilogram of body weight. To do the kilogram conversion, divide your weight in pounds by 2.2. For instance, if you weigh 150 pounds, that is equal to 68 kilograms. Divide that by 0.8 and you get a protein goal of 85 grams. According to the USDA Dietary Guidelines , it is recommended to eat 5 1/2 ounces of protein-rich food each day. Foods that are high in protein include meat, fish, seafood, chicken, eggs, dairy products, legumes, nuts, and seeds. One-half chicken breast has 29 grams protein A 3-ounce portion of steak has 26 grams protein When choosing proteins for a diabetic diet, the concern is more with the fats and carbohydrates that these foods Continue reading >>

Low Carbohydrate Dieters: Beware Of High Protein Intake

Low Carbohydrate Dieters: Beware Of High Protein Intake

Most of us have heard something about low carb dieting. Whether it is the Atkins Diet or the Paleo Diet, carbohydrate restriction is becoming more popular as more people experience dramatic weight loss. While restricting carbohydrate intake does offer several health benefits, there are also dangers involved with eating too much protein. Not only does excessive dietary protein burden the digestive system, it can also contribute to the production of sugar in the body and even inhibit the body’s ability to naturally detoxify! Eating a low carb diet doesn't mean that you have to overload your plate with protein at every meal! Moderating protein in your diet can help you to live longer, limit sugar, and even improve daily digestion. Weight loss is not the only benefit of carbohydrate restriction. When done correctly, a low carb diet can help to control blood sugar, and it can even reverse insulin resistance, helping to heal disorders that are related to a sugar-heavy diet, such as polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Low carb diets can also help to cool down chronic inflammatory disorders, such as rheumatoid arthritis and several autoimmune conditions. Part of the overall success of a low carb diet is that: Many of our processed foods are carbohydrate-rich: Processed foods, which are full of refined oils and sugar, are hazardous for anyone’s health. Carb-heavy foods are often full of common immune system triggers: Several food allergies and immune system disorders are actually rooted in the proteins found in grain-based carbohydrates. One example is wheat gluten. A diet that is full of carbohydrates also feeds infection in the body. This infection could be in the form of bacteria, yeasts, or parasites. 3 Reasons to Limit Your Protein Intake Reason #1 to Moderate Your Protei Continue reading >>

High-protein Diet Can Help Type 2 Diabetes Patients Control Blood Sugar

High-protein Diet Can Help Type 2 Diabetes Patients Control Blood Sugar

A new clinical study suggests that diets high in protein, independent of caloric intake, improve metabolic health. High-protein diets in type 2 diabetes patients are controversial. Such diets have been linked to increased risk of heart disease and certain cancers. However, these diets have also been praised because they result in less carbohydrate intake and weight loss. A clinical study conducted by researchers in Germany studied the effects of two high-protein diets on patients. The diets were isocaloric, with the only difference being the source of protein: animal or plant (pulses). The study included 30 type 2 diabetes patients. The average age of participants was 65 years, the average BMI was 30.5, and average HbA1c was 7.0%. Both diets were 30% protein, 40% carbohydrates, and 30% fat. Length of the trial was 6 weeks. The study authors analyzed different metabolic and molecular parameters before and after the diet. Both subject groups saw an improvement in liver health with reductions AST, ALT, and GGT. The fat content of the liver and Hba1c levels also improved in all subjects. The animal protein diet reduced liver fat content by 43.6% whereas the plant diet reduced liver fat content by 37.1% (p < 0.001). Hba1c levels were reduced by 0.58% in the animal protein diet group and 0.41% in the plant diet group (p < 0.001). Insulin sensitivity, derived from hyperinsulinemic euglycemic clamps, improved significantly only in the animal protein diet group with a change of 0.88 mg/kg BW/min (p < 0.05). The plant protein diet group saw an improvement in kidney function, which was not found in the animal protein diet group. The serum creatinine reduction was 7.79 micromols per liter (p < 0.01). Glomerular filtration rate also improved in the plant protein diet group. This fin Continue reading >>

High-protein Breakfasts Could Help Maintain Blood Sugar Control

High-protein Breakfasts Could Help Maintain Blood Sugar Control

The new research found that when women consumed high-protein breakfasts, they maintained better glucose and insulin control than they did with lower-protein or no-protein meals. "For women, eating more protein in the morning can beneficially affect their glucose and insulin levels,"​ commented Dr Heather Leidy from the University of Missouri. "If you eat healthy now and consume foods that help you control your glucose levels, you may be protecting yourself from developing diabetes in the future."​ Blood sugar management​ The team noted that in most healthy individuals, the amount of glucose, or sugar, in the blood increases after eating. When glucose increases, levels of insulin increase to carry the glucose to the rest of the body. Previous research has shown that extreme increases in glucose and insulin in the blood can lead to poor glucose control and increase an individual's risk of developing diabetes over time. Study details​ The team, including researchers from the University of Missouri and Biofortis Clinical Research, studied women aged 18-55 years old who consumed one of three different meals or only water on four consecutive days. Each tested meals was less than 300 calories per serving and had similar fat and fibre contents. However, the meals varied in amount of protein: a pancake meal with three grams of protein; a sausage and egg breakfast skillet with 30 grams of protein; or a sausage and egg breakfast skillet with 39 grams protein. Glucose and insulin levels were monitored for four hours after they ate breakfast. "Both protein-rich breakfasts led to lower spikes in glucose and insulin after meals compared to the low-protein, high-carb breakfast,"​ explained study co-author Kevin Maki of Biofortis Clinical Research. "Additionally, the higher-pr Continue reading >>

8 Sneaky Things That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

8 Sneaky Things That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

Skipping breakfast iStock/Thinkstock Overweight women who didn’t eat breakfast had higher insulin and blood sugar levels after they ate lunch a few hours later than they did on another day when they ate breakfast, a 2013 study found. Another study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that men who regularly skipped breakfast had a 21 percent higher chance of developing diabetes than those who didn’t. A morning meal—especially one that is rich in protein and healthy fat—seems to stabilize blood sugar levels throughout the day. Your breakfast is not one of the many foods that raise blood sugar. Here are some other things that happen to your body when you skip breakfast. Artificial sweeteners iStock/Thinkstock They have to be better for your blood sugar than, well, sugar, right? An interesting new Israeli study suggests that artificial sweeteners can still take a negative toll and are one of the foods that raise blood sugar. When researchers gave mice artificial sweeteners, they had higher blood sugar levels than mice who drank plain water—or even water with sugar! The researchers were able to bring the animals’ blood sugar levels down by treating them with antibiotics, which indicates that these fake sweeteners may alter gut bacteria, which in turn seems to affect how the body processes glucose. In a follow-up study of 400 people, the research team found that long-term users of artificial sweeteners were more likely to have higher fasting blood sugar levels, reported HealthDay. While study authors are by no means saying that sugary beverages are healthier, these findings do suggest that people who drink artificially sweetened beverages should do so in moderation as part of a healthy diet. Here's what else happens when you cut artificial sweetener Continue reading >>

How Does Protein Affect Blood Sugar In Diabetics?

How Does Protein Affect Blood Sugar In Diabetics?

Approximately one out of every 10 people in the U.S. has diabetes, a disease that affects how the body uses sugar, also known as glucose. Careful blood glucose control is essential to manage this condition and reduce the risk of complications such as nerve damage, blindness and heart disease. Adding more protein-rich foods to your diet -- and few carbohydrates and fats -- may help balance blood glucose levels. Video of the Day Improved Blood Glucose Balance A 2003 study published in the "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition" concluded that a high-protein diet helped lower blood glucose levels after eating and improved overall blood glucose control in people with Type 2 diabetes. Test individuals on the high-protein diet had a ratio of protein to carbohydrates to fat of 30:40:30, compared to 15:55:30 for the control group. Both groups consumed the diet for five weeks. Despite the positive results from this research, longer studies are needed to gauge the long-term effects and any possible adverse effects of a high-protein diet on diabetics. Direct Effects of Protein Many protein-rich foods contain minimal or no carbohydrates and only have a small effect on blood sugar levels. These include lean meats, chicken, turkey, fish and eggs. However, you add extra carbohydrates if the protein food is battered, crusted or marinated or you are eating it with sauce. University of Michigan Medicine recommends that a meal should contain a half portion of raw or cooked vegetables such as green beans and squash, a quarter portion of carbohydrate such as whole-grain pasta or brown rice, and a quarter portion -- 3 ounces -- of protein such as lean meat or fish. Protein-rich foods such as legumes and milk and dairy products also contain carbohydrates, which will raise your blood glucose Continue reading >>

How Do Fats & Proteins Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

How Do Fats & Proteins Affect Blood Sugar Levels?

After you eat, your blood sugar levels increase and trigger the release of insulin, an important hormone in managing how your body uses glucose. Different types of nutrients affect blood sugar differently, and maintaining an appropriate intake of carbohydrates, proteins and fats will help control blood sugar levels and prevent or manage metabolic diseases like Type 2 diabetes. Carbohydrates, proteins and fats are the three macronutrients your body needs. Carbohydrates are primarily used for energy, while proteins are important for rebuilding tissue, and fats are important for maintaining cell membranes and facilitating vitamin absorption, among other functions. Carbohydrates have the most significant impact on blood sugar, so carbohydrate intake should be monitored closely by individuals with or at risk for Type 2 diabetes. Protein's Effects on Blood Sugar Compared to carbohydrates, protein keeps blood sugar levels steady. When consumed alone, protein does not generate a rise in blood sugar. According to a study published in 2003 in “American Society for Clinical Nutrition,” individuals with Type 2 diabetes who maintained a 30:40:30 intake ratio of protein to carbohydrates to fat showed a 40 percent lower blood sugar response than those who maintained a 15:55:30 intake ratio. This suggests that protein is neutral food for blood sugar levels and can replace at least some carbohydrates to yield a better overall blood sugar response. Fat's Effects on Blood Sugar Like protein, fat has significantly less impact on blood sugar than carbohydrates. When consumed alone, ingested fats have no bearing on the concentration of circulating blood sugar. Replacing some carbohydrate content with healthy dietary fats could therefore result in steadier overall levels of blood sugar. M Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Diet Myths

10 Diabetes Diet Myths

Have you heard that eating too much sugar causes diabetes? Or maybe someone told you that you have to give up all your favorite foods when you’re on a diabetes diet? Well, those things aren’t true. In fact, there are plenty of myths about dieting and food. Use this guide to separate fact from fiction. MYTH. The truth is that diabetes begins when something disrupts your body's ability to turn the food you eat into energy. MYTH. If you have diabetes, you need to plan your meals, but the general idea is simple. You’ll want to keep your blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible. Choose foods that work along with your activities and any medications you take. Will you need to make adjustments to what you eat? Probably. But your new way of eating may not require as many changes as you think. MYTH. Carbs are the foundation of a healthy diet whether you have diabetes or not. They do affect your blood sugar levels, which is why you’ll need to keep up with how many you eat each day. Some carbs have vitamins, minerals, and fiber. So choose those ones, such as whole grains, fruits, and vegetables. Starchy, sugary carbs are not a great choice because they have less to offer. They’re more like a flash in the pan than fuel your body can rely on. MYTH. Because carbs affect blood sugar levels so quickly, you may be tempted to eat less of them and substitute more protein. But take care to choose your protein carefully. If it comes with too much saturated fat, that’s risky for your heart’s health. Keep an eye on your portion size too. Talk to your dietitian or doctor about how much protein is right for you. MYTH. If you use insulin for your diabetes, you may learn how to adjust the amount and type you take to match the amount of food you eat. But this doesn't mean you Continue reading >>

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