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Can Losing Weight Lower Blood Sugar Levels?

Blood Sugar: What You Need To Know

Blood Sugar: What You Need To Know

Stroll through the diet book section at Barnes & Noble and you'd think that blood sugar was the secret to effortless weight loss: There's The Sugar Solution, Sugar Busters!, Get the Sugar Out (to name a few). Which made us wonder: What is blood sugar anyway? And how important is it, really, when you're trying to shed pounds? To find out, we consulted the experts, pored over the latest research, and cut through the, um, BS. We also partnered with legendary chef Mollie Katzen, author of The Moosewood Cookbook, to give you a 7-day low-sugar diet--a week's worth of delicious meals that will help you keep your blood sugar (and the number on your scale) under control. No bull. Blood-Sugar Basics Let's say you're having a tuna sandwich for lunch. As soon as you finish eating, your digestive system starts breaking down the carbs — the lettuce, tomato, and whole-wheat bread — into glucose. (In case you were dozing during Bio 101, glucose is a simple sugar found in plant and animal tissue.) Those glucose molecules race through your bloodstream, prompting insulin, a hormone made by your pancreas, to get in on the action. Think of insulin as your body's own personal UPS man (minus the foxy brown shorts): It scoops up the glucose in your blood and delivers it to sugar-hungry cells in your brain, muscles, and internal organs to use for energy. Insulin helps convert protein and fat into fuel too, but glucose is "your body's most useful form of energy," says David L. Katz, M.D., an associate professor at the Yale School of Public Health. "It's really the only fuel that brain cells and red blood cells use." To get enough glucose, your body depends on carbs like the U.S. depends on foreign oil. That's why low-carb diets aren't a great idea for the long haul. "Although your body can p Continue reading >>

How To Lower Fasting Glucose

How To Lower Fasting Glucose

1 Lose weight if you are overweight or obese. Excess weight plays a role in hormone blood sugar management imbalance. Losing 7 to 10 percent of your body weight can reduce your risk of developing diabetes, according to Harvard School of Public Health. That means if you are a female weighing 180 pounds, losing just 12 to 18 pounds helps get your hormones in balance and bring your fasting glucose back to a normal range. 2 Ditch the couch potato lifestyle and get your body moving. Physical activity influences blood glucose regulation. Exercise improves insulin sensitivity and helps your body absorb glucose, according to Harvard School of Public Health. Soak in some sunshine and go for a 30-minute walk or hike. Go bicycling, rollerblading or play tennis with a friend. It doesn't matter what you do as long as you are moving. Aim to get between 30 to 45 minutes of physical activity most days of the week. 3 Give your diet a makeover, because a diet filled with junk food sets the stage for hormonal issues. Eliminate sugary drinks, junk foods and foods high in refined sugar. Instead, rely on complex carbohydrates such as beans, legumes, whole grains and vegetables along with lean proteins like fish, lamb, chicken and turkey. Start your day with steel-cut oats and a few slices of your favorite fruit. Snack on high-protein foods such as low-fat yogurt, seeds and nuts. 4 Drop your nightly munchie habit if high fasting glucose in the morning is the problem. If your fasting glucose is normal during the day, yet high in the morning, your late-evening food choices may deserve blame, according to Diabetic Living. Consuming sugary foods in the evening before bed can throw your hormones off, causing you to wake up to high blood sugar. Diabetic Living suggests having a high-protein snack i Continue reading >>

Lose Weight With Type 1 Diabetes

Lose Weight With Type 1 Diabetes

WRITTEN BY: Cliff Scherb Editor’s Note: Cliff Scherb, Founder of Glucose Advisors and TriStar Athletes LLC, is a nutrition and fitness expert. He consults through virtually teaching his decision support system – Engine1 the app and its methodologies to aspiring T1 individuals and athletes. Cliff also creates custom training programs and insulin plans for endurance athletes, using Training Stress Modeling and real-time coaching. To inquire about coaching openings, FB LIVE sessions, and general questions please email [email protected] Losing weight can be difficult — add Type 1 diabetes to the mix with its daily management demands — and it’s even more of a challenge. I know, because I’ve been a Type 1 diabetic for 29 years and I’m also an endurance athlete. The internet is saturated in advice on how to lose weight with or without Type 1, so it’s hard to know what is worth while and what will just waste your time — or worse, can negatively impact your health. I’m not going to declare all out war on carbohydrates, or tell you can or can’t drink your calories in the form of olive oil, or feast and fast with cayenne peppers and maple syrup. No, the real distilled learning from my years of consulting and data analysis shows that a balanced, low-insulin diet with nutrient timing and activity is the best way to lose weight with Type 1 diabetes. It also helps you maintain brain and body function as well as energy levels. If you are reading this you’ve probably already given this some thought and know why it’s important to lose weight and/or lean out, but I maintain it’s all about performance! Performing means living a longer or healthier life or if you’re an athlete, it can also translate to beating out your competition. Things that Impact w Continue reading >>

Weight Loss And Blood Sugar

Weight Loss And Blood Sugar

Click “Play” to Listen Prefer to Download & Save? Right Click Here & “save as” to your computer. Mac users cmd. + click + “save target as”. Listen to Jon Gabriel Teach About: Why regulating your blood sugar is crucial to weight-loss How to get control of your blood sugar level Top tips for keeping up your energy levels and boosting your health OR Read The Lecture Transcripts Here I just wanted to talk a little bit, for starters before we take any callers, about blood sugar. I don’t know if you read the latest newsletter that we sent out, but learning how to regulate your blood sugar is really crucial in losing weight. And when the FAT programs are on, which I talk about in my book, The Gabriel Method, your body loses the ability to regulate its blood sugar properly. And that’s because your body becomes less sensitive to the hormone insulin. So I want to give just a quick talk about how your body normally regulates blood sugar, and what happens when the FAT programs are on, to get your body to no longer be able to regulate blood sugar properly, and why it’s so crucial to be able to regulate your blood sugar and to understand blood sugar if you want to lose weight. So the way your body normally regulates blood sugar, is your body always has to have a certain amount of sugar in your bloodstream at all times to provide energy for your brain and for your muscles and for your liver, and just for basic functioning. If you have too much sugar in your bloodstream, it’s going to cause problems. It can cause nerve damage and it can be extremely detrimental. And if you have too little sugar in your blood, it’s going to make you tired and you’re not going to have enough energy for your brain. So your body always has to keep a certain amount of sugar in your b Continue reading >>

6 Ways Weight Loss Can Help Control Diabetes

6 Ways Weight Loss Can Help Control Diabetes

Losing 5 to 10 percent of your body weight might help you better manage your type 2 diabetes and keep blood sugar levels under control. Here’s how. Thinkstock Maintaining a healthy weight has its obvious health benefits — but it can also help you better manage your type 2 diabetes. In fact, losing weight can bolster your blood sugar control and lower your risk for diabetes complications like high blood pressure and plaque buildup in the arteries. Nudging down the number on the scale by just 5 to 10 percent has also been shown to help some people reduce the amount of diabetes medication they need, according to an article published in Diabetes Care in June 2015. “Weight loss is very high on the priority list,” says Joanne Rinker, RD, CDE, LDN, senior director for community health improvement at Population Health Improvement Partners in Morrisville, North Carolina, and a spokeswoman for the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Rinker admits that dropping pounds isn’t easy, but when you succeed, you’ll reap a host of health benefits, such as: Improved insulin resistance. With type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t properly respond to the insulin produced by the pancreas, and your blood glucose levels go up. That’s called insulin resistance, and it’s linked to excess weight. When you drop the extra pounds, your body becomes more efficient and can use the insulin more easily, Rinker explains. As a result, insulin resistance goes down, which is a good thing for diabetes management. Better A1C results. Since insulin sensitivity improves with weight loss, you’ll see better results when your doctor does an A1C test, which provides a picture of your blood glucose levels over the previous three months. “This is why lifestyle change through diet and exercise Continue reading >>

How To Use Berberine To Boost Weight Loss, Lower Blood Sugar & More

How To Use Berberine To Boost Weight Loss, Lower Blood Sugar & More

Berberine might just be one of the best supplements you’ve never heard of. Elevated blood sugar levels damage the body’s tissues and organs leading to a variety of health problems, poor quality of life, and shortened lifespan. We strongly believe a low carb diet like the Keto diet, along with increased exercise is the most effective means of combatting high blood sugar, metabolic syndrome, diabetes and related disease. However, many people are not able to control their blood sugar levels with diet and exercise alone and turn to prescriptions medications from their doctor. The most commonly used prescription drug for high blood sugar is metformin (Glucophage) Works as well as Metformin A review of the 14 most relevant studies that found berberine works as well as the most commonly prescribed diabetes drugs metformin, rosiglitazonem and glipizide (10, 11,15). Berberine seems to work via multiple different mechanisms (12): Decreases insulin resistance, so it is more effective at lowering blood sugar levels Increases glycolysis inside the cells Signals the liver to decrease glucose production. Increases the number of beneficial bacteria in the gut. Remarkable as it seems that it acts in all these pathways, also seems to affect various other enzymes, molecules and genes related to blood sugar control. Normalized Blood Sugar Levels 116 diabetic patients given 1 gram of berberine per day for 3 months. These patients experienced fasting blood sugar levels lowered to normal levels, from 126 to 101 mg/dL (13). Lowers Bad Cholesterol Levels These same 116 patients experienced A1c levels lowered by 12% on average, and greatly lowered levels of cholesterol and triglycerides. Triglyceride decreased from 2.51 to 1.61, total cholesterol from 5.31 to 4.35, and LDL cholesterol. from Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: 8 Steps To Weight-loss Success

Type 2 Diabetes: 8 Steps To Weight-loss Success

Losing weight is at the top of many people's to-do lists. But for those with type 2 diabetes, weight control is especially important. “Carrying excess body fat increases the body's resistence to insulin, making blood glucose management more challenging,” says Sue McLaughlin, RD, CDE, past 2009 national president of health care and education for the American Diabetes Association. "According to the World Health Organization, 90 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese." In fact, research indicates that the longer someone has a high body mass index or BMI (a common measure of being overweight or obese), the greater their risk of developing type 2 diabetes. It’s no secret that losing weight — and keeping it off — isn’t easy. But it is possible, and the benefits for those with diabetes are great. So how do you get started? Experts say the right way to lose weight is to incorporate a healthful diet into your overall diabetes management plan. Diabetes Diet Control: Steps to Success Here's how to get started on the path to weight-loss success: Get physical. Exercise can help keep off the weight. “Research shows that people who increase physical activity along with reducing calorie intake will lose more body fat than people who only diet,” says McLaughlin, now a certified diabetes educator at Nebraska Medicine, Children's Hospital and Endocrine Clinics, in Omaha and Lincoln, Nebraska. For confirmation, look at the National Weight Control Registry (NWCR), a database of 10,000 men and women who have lost a significant amount of weight and kept it off. Only 10 percent reached and maintained their weight-loss goal without exercise. Most people in the register chose walking as their form of exercise. Eat breakfast. The most effective diabetes die Continue reading >>

> Weight And Diabetes

> Weight And Diabetes

A balanced diet and an active lifestyle can help all kids maintain a healthy weight. For kids with diabetes, diet and exercise are even more important because weight can affect diabetes and diabetes can affect weight. This is true for kids and teens with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, the body doesn't use glucose properly. Glucose, a sugar, is the main source of energy for the body. Glucose levels are controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is made in the pancreas. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make enough insulin. Undiagnosed or untreated type 1 diabetes can cause weight loss. Glucose builds up in the bloodstream if insulin isn't available to move it to the muscles. When glucose levels become high, the kidneys work to get rid of it through urine. This causes weight loss due to dehydration and loss of calories from the sugar that wasn't used as energy. Kids who develop type 1 diabetes often lose weight even though they have a normal or increased appetite. Once kids are diagnosed and treated for type 1 diabetes, weight usually returns to normal. Developing type 1 diabetes isn't related to being overweight, but keeping a healthy weight is important. Too much fat tissue can make it hard for insulin to work properly, leading to both higher insulin needs and trouble controlling blood sugar. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas still makes insulin, but the insulin doesn't work in the body like it should and blood sugar levels get too high. Most kids and teens are overweight when they're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese increases the risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Also, weight gain in people with type 2 diabetes makes blood sugar levels even harder to control. People with type 2 diabetes have a condition called ins Continue reading >>

Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar And Reduce Your Risk Of Diabetes

Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar And Reduce Your Risk Of Diabetes

A second study in a 2013 edition of the journal Obesity analyzed the impact of weight loss among obese subjects with metabolic abnormalities. Results showed that those who lost 5 percent of their body weight experienced significant improvements in fasting blood sugar levels compared to those who did not lose weight. Lower your own blood sugar levels by committing to a weight loss plan. By reducing your calorie intake and adding regular exercise to your routine, you can drop enough weight to protect yourself from diabetes. Cut out Sugary Drinks Sugar-sweetened beverages, such as soda, iced tea, and sports drinks, can increase your risk of diabetes. Those who drink one to two sugar sweetened beverages per day are 26 percent more likely to develop diabetes than those who consume less than one such beverage per month, according to a 2010 study in Diabetes Care. In addition, a 2013 study in the British Journal of Nutrition found that those who increased their consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages during a six-year period were 1.6 times more likely to develop elevated fasting blood sugar levels. Reducing your intake of these sugary beverages can lower your risk of diabetes. According to a 2013 study in the journal PLoS ONE, a 10-20 percent reduction in the intake of sugar-sweetened beverages would reduce new cases of diabetes. Specifically, replacing sugary beverages with water can have a beneficial impact on your health. A 2007 study in Obesity found that those who replaced sugary beverages with water cut their daily energy intake by 200 calories. This reduction could help with weight loss and therefore reduce your diabetes risk. Increase Your Fiber Intake Adding fiber to your diet can reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes. A 2014 study in the European Journal of Epidemiolo Continue reading >>

How To Lower Blood Glucose Levels

How To Lower Blood Glucose Levels

Blood sugar (glucose) is at the heart of diabetes management. Diabetes develops when your pancreas can no longer produce insulin in sufficient quantity, or your body becomes less sensitive to the insulin you produce. Without enough effective insulin, your blood sugar levels can get out of control. High blood glucose (hyperglycemia) is most common in type 2 diabetes. But any person with diabetes can have bouts of high blood sugar. Lowering your blood sugar is crucial to both short-term and long-term diabetes management. When left untreated, hyperglycemia can cause: eye damage cardiovascular disease kidney failure nerve damage (neuropathy) skin and gum infections joint problems diabetic coma Many people with diabetes can detect hyperglycemia. According to the Mayo Clinic, signs of high blood sugar start to develop when levels reach more than 200 mg/dL. Some common symptoms include: sudden, excessive fatigue severe headaches blurry vision increased urination abdominal pain nausea dry mouth confusion The goal is to prevent hyperglycemia before it starts. It can develop suddenly, but in many cases high blood sugar develops over the course of several days. Symptoms worsen the longer you experience elevated blood sugar. The key is knowing where your blood sugar levels stand. Regular blood glucose monitoring is essential, especially in type 2 diabetes. The American Heart Association (AHA) recommends a range of 70 to 130 mg/dL before meals, and blood glucose less than 180 mg/dL after eating. Dietary changes are among the first actions taken by diabetics. Not only does a healthy diet make you feel good, but you can also lower your blood sugar during the process. Carbohydrates are often a source of criticism because they affect glucose more than any other food group. But it’s im Continue reading >>

The Starvation Diet That Can Reverse Type Two Diabetes: How Dramatic Weight-loss Could Lower Blood-sugar Levels

The Starvation Diet That Can Reverse Type Two Diabetes: How Dramatic Weight-loss Could Lower Blood-sugar Levels

One of the most effective ways to tackle type 2 diabetes is to lose weight, and it seems that dramatic weight loss may be particularly beneficial for blood-sugar levels. This surprising effect was first seen in patients who had undergone weight-loss (bariatric) surgery. As well as losing weight, many also reversed their diabetes. We will look at surgery on the next page, but there may be ways to replicate these benefits without major surgery — the answer may be as simple as a drastic, short-term diet. This is very much cutting-edge thinking and is the brainchild of Professor Roy Taylor, director of Newcastle Magnetic Resonance Centre at Newcastle University. Inspired by the diabetes-reversing effects of bariatric surgery, he decided to investigate the impact of a short-term, low-calorie diet on type 2 diabetes, using regular MRI scans to record exactly what was going on in the body. What he found could help to transform the health of many people with type 2 diabetes, even those who have had it for years. In a study published in 2011, he took 11 people with newly diagnosed type 2 (defined as being diagnosed in the previous four years) and gave them liquid diet formula. This provided 600 calories and was formulated so they received the right amount of nutrients. They also had around 200 calories of non-starchy vegetables such as broccoli and spinach — these provided fibre usually obtained from carbs, which were excluded from the diet. After a week, MRI scans showed the fat around their livers had dropped by 30 per cent; furthermore, their blood-sugar levels were normal. At the end of the eight-week trial, fat levels in the pancreas had also plummeted and they were producing insulin again. Participants also lost an average of 2st 5lb (15kg). At a follow-up scan three m Continue reading >>

6 Ways To Lower Your A1c Level

6 Ways To Lower Your A1c Level

Diabetes is a serious, chronic disease that can lead to many complications. When managed properly, diabetes does not have to control your life or ruin your health. Getting tested, especially if you are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes, is a proactive measure you can take for yourself and your future. In the early stages of diabetes, there are no symptoms. An early diagnosis helps you get treatment before complications occur. The A1C test is a blood test that checks for type 2 diabetes. It is also used to see how well you are managing your diabetes if you have already been diagnosed. The test provides information about a person’s average levels of blood sugar over a two- to three-month period. The number is reported in the form of a percentage. The higher the percentage, the higher your average blood glucose levels are, and the higher your risk for either diabetes or related complications. A1C is one of the primary tests used for diabetes diagnosis and management. It can test for type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but it can’t test for gestational diabetes. It can also be used to predict the likelihood that someone will get diabetes. The A1C test measures how much glucose, or sugar, is attached to hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells. The more glucose attached, the higher the A1C. This test is groundbreaking, as it 1) doesn’t require fasting, 2) gives a picture of blood sugar levels over a period of days and weeks instead of at just one point in time like fasting sugars, and 3) can be done at any time of day. This makes it easier to administer and easier to make accurate diagnoses. According to the National Institutes of Health, a normal A1C is below 5.7 percent. If your score is between 5.7 and 6.4 percent, the diagnosis is prediabetes. Having prediabetes put Continue reading >>

Will Weight Loss Help Your Diabetes?

Will Weight Loss Help Your Diabetes?

There's no question about it. If you're overweight and have type 2 diabetes, you will lower your blood sugar, improve your health, and feel better if you lose some of your extra pounds. You'll want to work closely with your doctor or diabetes educator, because your blood sugar, insulin, and medications will need special attention while you're losing weight. If you drop even 10 or 15 pounds, that has health perks, such as: Lower blood sugar Lower blood pressure Better cholesterol levels Less stress on your hips, knees, ankles, and feet More energy Brighter mood The Right Balance for Diabetes and Weight Loss Keep tight control over your blood sugar levels while you lose weight. You don't want to get high or low levels while you change your eating habits. It’s generally safe for someone with diabetes to cut 500 calories a day. Trim from protein, carbohydrates, and fat. The USDA says that calories for adults should come from: 45% to 55% carbs 25% to 35% fat 10% to 35% protein Carbs have the biggest effect on blood sugar. Those that have fiber (whole-grain bread and vegetables, for example) are much better than eating sugary or starchy carbs, because they’re less likely to spike your blood sugar and quickly make it crash. How Exercise Helps One of the many benefits of working out is that it helps keep your blood sugar in balance. You're also more likely to keep the pounds off if you're active. If you're not active now, check in with your doctor first. She can let you know if there are any limits on what you can do. Aim to get at least 2.5 hours a week of moderate aerobic exercise, like brisk walking, to improve your health. You can split up the time any way you choose. To help yourself lose weight you’ll need to do more physical activity. You should also do strength tr Continue reading >>

6 Tips For Losing Weight When You Have Diabetes

6 Tips For Losing Weight When You Have Diabetes

The benefits of a healthy weight Thinking of dropping a few pounds? If you’re overweight and have diabetes, it’s one of the best things you can do for your overall health. A study at the Kaiser Permanente’s Center for Health Research in Oregon found that people who shed weight within about 18 months of being diagnosed with type-2 diabetes were more likely to keep long-term control over their blood pressure and glucose levels. When you have diabetes, a healthy weight reduces your risk of cardiovascular disease and actually helps your body’s own insulin to work better. “In addition, people who lose weight generally feel better. It’s value added!” says Dr. Ian Blumer, a diabetes specialist in Ajax, Ontario, and author of Diabetes for Canadians for Dummies. Want work towards a healthy number on the scale? These six tips will help you reach your goal. 1. Talk to your healthcare team Let your dietitian, nurse educator and/or doctor know that you’re taking on the task of losing weight. “Find out if there should be some change in your therapy,” says Blumer. Your healthcare professional can also help you set reasonable goals. Fad diets are definitely not recommended. But if you do plan to make drastic changes to your daily menu, it’s critically important you have medical guidance, Blumer says. “Before adopting a low-carb diet, a doctor should be consulted as certain medications-such as insulin-may need to be adjusted in order to avoid low blood glucose.” 2. Count your calories Losing weight means cutting calories, but it doesn’t have to mean eliminating everything you love to eat. Just eat smaller portions, and focus on low-fat foods. Try keeping a record of what you’re eating and how many calories you’re consuming. That way you’ll be able to id Continue reading >>

Will My Blood Glucose Go Down If I Lose Weight?

Will My Blood Glucose Go Down If I Lose Weight?

Losing excess weight can help lower your blood sugar levels. The sugar in your blood is a necessary component to your body's physiological processes; however, too much is detrimental. It can lead to a variety of health complications, including type 2 diabetes and obesity. Talk to your doctor about your sugar levels as well as how to lose weight safely. He can recommend a diet and exercise regimen to lower your glucose levels by shedding unwanted pounds. A majority of the food you eat -- even if it is not a carbohydrate -- is broken down into usable molecules of glucose, or sugar. Glucose is absorbed into the blood stream and then taken to hungry cells for energy use by the hormone insulin. Your biological processes need energy; however, the sugar your body does not need is stored as fat. Chronic high blood sugar levels -- particularly if you have diabetes -- may eventually lead to complications like heart disease, kidney failure and obesity. Weight Loss and Blood Sugar According to the American Diabetes Association, losing weight will reduce your blood sugar levels. Even shedding a few pounds can help manage your blood glucose and reduce your risk of more serious disease complications. In a June 2011 study published in the "Journals of Gerentology," postmenopausal women that underwent a six month weight loss and low-intensity exercise training program saw positive results. Along with overall weight loss, blood glucose, triglycerides and blood pressure levels decreased. How Much To Lose Though how much your blood sugar decreases with a certain amount of weight loss is not known, even a small decrease in weight can help. In the above-mentioned study, the participants lost between 11 and 15 percent of their body's total fat mass over the six month period. According to the Continue reading >>

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