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Can I Have Glucose During Pregnancy?

Glucose Screening And Glucose Tolerance Testing

Glucose Screening And Glucose Tolerance Testing

Learn what these painless tests are, and why it's important to have them done during your second trimester. When is the test taken? Glucose screening is usually done between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy. If the test, which screens for gestational diabetes, reveals elevated levels of blood glucose (sugar), a glucose tolerance test is then given to confirm the gestational diabetes diagnosis. Who needs to take the test, and why? You should have a glucose screening during pregnancy if you are over 30, have a family history of diabetes, had a troubled earlier pregnancy or are obese. But even if you don't fit any of these criteria, your practitioner may still advise taking this safe and simple test, because about half of the women who develop gestational diabetes have no known risk factors. About 15 to 20 percent of women who take this screening will show abnormal levels of glucose and will be given the more involved (and more precise) glucose tolerance test. About 15 percent of the women given the second test will be diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can be controlled by diet, exercise or insulin. But if the elevated glucose levels remain undetected, the excess sugar in the mother's blood raises the odds of the baby being macrosomic, or overly large—generally 9 pounds, 14 ounces or more. Macrosomic babies may have difficulty fitting through the birth canal and are at risk for health problems such as jaundice, low blood calcium levels, or hypoglycemia. Luckily, glucose screening and glucose tolerance testing can help you detect gestational diabetes early, and give you a chance to minimize the risks of this condition. What's involved? For glucose screening, you will be given a syrupy (and a little unpleasant) glucose solution to drink. An hour after y Continue reading >>

Alternatives To The Glucose Drink For Pregnant Women

Alternatives To The Glucose Drink For Pregnant Women

Alternatives to the Glucose Drink for Pregnant Women Alternatives to the Glucose Drink for Pregnant Women Alternatives to the Glucose Drink for Pregnant Women An oral glucose tolerance beverage is being prescribed by doctors to pregnant women everywhere when they get tested for gestational diabetes. You may have seen photos of this drink passed around social media being labeled as the most disgusting drink ever, and it is. It isnt just the taste of the drink that is the problem, it is also what is in the drink that has us gasping. Here is a look inside the glucose drink that they are giving almost all pregnant women: These drinks (also known as Glucola) are sugar water with hazardous artificial colors and preservatives with a very long shelf life. This is not exactly something you want to drink when you are pregnant but doctors continue to use it as a way to test for gestational diabetes. While its certainly important to monitor your blood glucose during pregnancy, there are alternatives to drinking this toxic sugar water. There are other options out there! While some doctors might not openly give you the choice of using another substance to get the same results, it is always important to ask. The purpose of the drink is to ingest 50 to 100 grams of glucose, after which your doctor can test how your body handles influx of sugar. Here are a few other options that you could suggest instead of taking the Glucola jelly beans- Eating 28 jelly beans had the same effect on blood sugar in a 50 gram glucose test. Of course, youd want to choose a non-gmo variety, free of artificial colors. alternative foods- This woman was given the alternative of eating real food, such as bananas. glucometer- You can monitor your blood sugar with a glucometer throughout your pregnancy. This is Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Take Glucolin (glucose). Sometime I Got Craving For It When Pregnant.

Is It Safe To Take Glucolin (glucose). Sometime I Got Craving For It When Pregnant.

Is it safe to take Glucolin (Glucose). Sometime I got craving for it when pregnant. Glucolin is basically glucose which is a type of sugar. If you do not have gestational diabetes then it will be alright for you to have it occasionally. Glucolin provides a person mainly with energy, it is therefore suitable for days when you have poor appetite and feel low on energy. Remember that an excess intake of sugar can lead to unintentional weight gain so do practice moderation when taking any sweetened beverages. The health effects of sugar are unfortunately compounded during pregnancy for a number of reasons. Excessive or even moderate sugar intake during pregnancy can have a very direct and negative impact on the health of you and your baby.The sugar story gets worse for pregnant women. During pregnancy, sugar is rapidly absorbed into your blood and in order to regulate this sugar, your body requires larger amounts of insulin which is released by your pancreas. If you are eating excessive or even moderate amounts of sugar, your pancreas is going to have a difficult time keeping up. If your pancreas falls short of its job, then your blood sugar levels stay elevated. This is a problem even if you not develop full blown gestational diabetes (which is insulin intolerance).If you would like to still have a little bit of sweetness in your life go ahead, in moderation, by choosing sweeteners made by mother nature. Enjoy these options in their raw, natural forms and keep in mind that they are still high on the glycemic index and can also contribute to tooth decay. Blackstrap molasses is exceptionally healthy and will add delicious maltiness to coffee and baked goods. Raw, organic honey with propolis is also considered an amazing health food and is an excellent sugar replacement. Continue reading >>

Glucola Pregnancy Glucose Test: What I Do

Glucola Pregnancy Glucose Test: What I Do

In my post about the pregnancy and prenatal care options I chose, I mention that I don’t take the pregnancy glucose test that requires drinking glucola (that syrupy orange or grape drink) and that I use an alternate method of testing. I’ve gotten so many questions about this that I decided it deserved its own post, especially while I am still pregnant and the topic is fresh on my mind. IMPORTANT: Please note that I am only writing about my own personal experience with this and the decisions I made after consulting with my OB or midwife (depending on which pregnancy it was). The information in this post (or any post I write) is not medical advice in any way… I’m just sharing my experience. Always consult with your own medical providers before making health decisions, especially during pregnancy, and make sure that you find providers who are willing to work with you to make the best decision for your pregnancy. All that being said, here’s what I do when it comes to the pregnancy glucose test. What is the Pregnancy Glucose Test? This was one of the sections I found in all of the many pregnancy books I read when pregnant with my first child. Current guidelines call for a glucose challenge test somewhere between 24-28 weeks of pregnancy to test for gestational diabetes. This test typically involves drinking a sweetened drink called Glucola that contains 50, 75, or 100 grams of sugar in different forms. In most cases, the first part of this test is an Oral Glucose Challenge Test (OGCT) that involves drinking the 50 gram solution and having a blood test exactly one hour later to measure blood sugar. If a woman passes this test, she typically won’t be given further testing for gestational diabetes. If a woman does not pass the test, a longer test involving a higher Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar that develops during pregnancy and usually disappears after giving birth. It can occur at any stage of pregnancy, but is more common in the second half. It occurs if your body cannot produce enough insulin – a hormone that helps control blood sugar levels – to meet the extra needs in pregnancy. Gestational diabetes can cause problems for you and your baby during and after birth. But the risk of these problems happening can be reduced if it's detected and well managed. Who's at risk of gestational diabetes Any woman can develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy, but you're at an increased risk if: your body mass index (BMI) is above 30 – use the healthy weight calculator to work out your BMI you previously had a baby who weighed 4.5kg (10lbs) or more at birth you had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy one of your parents or siblings has diabetes your family origins are south Asian, Chinese, African-Caribbean or Middle Eastern If any of these apply to you, you should be offered screening for gestational diabetes during your pregnancy. Symptoms of gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes doesn't usually cause any symptoms. Most cases are only picked up when your blood sugar level is tested during screening for gestational diabetes. Some women may develop symptoms if their blood sugar level gets too high (hyperglycaemia), such as: But some of these symptoms are common during pregnancy anyway and aren't necessarily a sign of a problem. Speak to your midwife or doctor if you're worried about any symptoms you're experiencing. How gestational diabetes can affect your pregnancy Most women with gestational diabetes have otherwise normal pregnancies with healthy babies. However, gestational diabetes can cause problems s Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels For Pregnant Women With Diabetes

Blood Sugar Levels For Pregnant Women With Diabetes

Whether you had diabetes before you got pregnant or you developed diabetes during your pregnancy, you'll need to keep a close eye on your blood sugar levels. Tight control will help you avoid complications and long-term health problems for both you and your baby. You're eating differently because your body needs more energy to help your baby grow and be healthy. And your changing hormones affect how your body makes and uses insulin. In the later parts of your pregnancy, you may become more insulin resistant, so blood sugar builds up to higher levels. How often should you check your blood sugar? Pre-existing diabetes: Before and after meals and before bedtime If you are pregnant and have type 1 diabetes, your doctor might sometimes ask you to check your blood sugar in the middle of the night, around 3 a.m. You should check your fasting urine ketones every day, too. For every type of diabetes, if you're pregant you need to see your doctor at least once a month, perhaps as often as once a week. Continue reading >>

Glucose Screening Tests During Pregnancy

Glucose Screening Tests During Pregnancy

TWO-STEP TESTING During the first step, you will have a glucose screening test: You DO NOT need to prepare or change your diet in any way. You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose. Your blood will be drawn 1 hour after you drink the glucose solution to check your blood glucose level. If your blood glucose from the first step is too high, you will need to come back for a 3-hour glucose tolerance test. For this test: DO NOT eat or drink anything (other than sips of water) for 8 to 14 hours before your test. (You also cannot eat during the test.) You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose, 100 grams (g) . You will have blood drawn before you drink the liquid, and again 3 more times every 60 minutes after you drink it. Each time, your blood glucose level will be checked. Allow at least 3 hours for this test. ONE-STEP TESTING You need to go to the lab one time for a 2-hour glucose tolerance test. For this test: DO NOT eat or drink anything (other than sips of water) for 8 to 14 hours before your test. (You also cannot eat during the test.) You will be asked to drink a liquid that contains glucose (75 g). You will have blood drawn before you drink the liquid, and again 2 more times every 60 minutes after you drink it. Each time, your blood glucose level will be checked. Allow at least 2 hours for this test. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Please Don’t Drink The “glucola” Without Reading The Label

Gestational Diabetes: Please Don’t Drink The “glucola” Without Reading The Label

I’m a midwife and MD who specializes in the health and wellness of pregnant mommas. While I’m one of the original crunchy mamas, I got the science thing down tight in my medical training at Yale, so I can keep you informed on what’s safe, what’s not, and what are the best alternatives. This article, in which I take on the toxic ingredients in oral glucose test drinks, is the first in a 3-part series on gestational diabetes. If you’re pregnant, planning to be pregnant, or working with pregnant mommas – this series is for you! Is Gestational Diabetes Really an Issue? In the past decade obesity has become rampant in our country. With it the rates of diabetes in the general population, and gestational diabetes (GDM) – which is an excessive increase in glucose intolerance in pregnancy (some increase in glucose intolerance is actually normal and allows more sugar to get to the baby for growth) – have risen dramatically. Current estimates are that 5%-7% of pregnant women in the U.S. develop GDM. Gestational diabetes increases the risk of a host of serious medical problems for mom and baby. However, at levels even lower than those that would qualify a woman for a GDM diagnosis, chronically elevated blood sugar also puts mom and baby at much higher risk of pregnancy and birth complications. Elevated blood sugar creates a condition in the body called “oxidative stress” and in pregnancy, which is already a state of somewhat increased oxidative stress, this can lead to high blood pressure, preeclampsia, and preterm birth. Also, babies born to overweight or diabetic moms have a much higher lifetime likelihood of developing chronic health problems associated with obesity and diabetes. Women who develop GDM also have at least a 50% change of becoming diabetic later Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

only happens during pregnancy. It means you have high blood sugar levels, but those levels were normal before you were pregnant. If you have it, you can still have a healthy baby with help from your doctor and by doing simple things to manage your blood sugar, also called blood glucose. After your baby is born, gestational diabetes usually goes away. Gestational diabetes makes you more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, but it won’t definitely happen. During pregnancy, the placenta makes hormones that can lead to a buildup of glucose in your blood. Usually, your pancreas can make enough insulin to handle that. If not, your blood sugar levels will rise and can cause gestational diabetes. It affects between 2% and 10% of pregnancies each year. You are more likely to get gestational diabetes if you: Were overweight before you got pregnant Are African-American, Asian, Hispanic, or Native American Have high blood sugar levels, but not high enough to be diabetes Have a family history of diabetes Have had gestational diabetes before Have high blood pressure or other medical complications Have given birth to a large baby before (greater than 9 pounds) Have given birth to a baby that was stillborn or had certain birth defects Gestational diabetes usually happens in the second half of pregnancy. Your doctor will check to see if you have gestational diabetes between weeks 24 and 28 of your pregnancy. Your doctor may test sooner if you're at high risk. To test for gestational diabetes, you will quickly drink a sugary drink. This will raise your blood sugar levels. An hour later, you’ll take a blood test to see how your body handled all that sugar. If the results show that your blood sugar is higher than a certain cutoff (anywhere from 130 milligrams per deciliter [mg/dL] or hig Continue reading >>

Glucose Test During Pregnancy For Gestational Diabetes

Glucose Test During Pregnancy For Gestational Diabetes

Congratulations! A baby is on the way. Your nine months will be filled with preparations, from decorating the nursery to stocking up on bibs and booties to going for regular checkups to ensure that you and your baby are as healthy as possible. One of the tests that you’ll have during this time is to check for gestational diabetes. A few weeks ago, we looked at Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Gestational diabetes, which is growing more common among pregnant women, will be our focus this week. What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes, or GDM for short, is diabetes that occurs during pregnancy. In fact, it only occurs during pregnancy. (Gestational diabetes is not the same as diabetes in women who have existing diabetes and become pregnant). Diabetes, as most of you know, is a condition in which blood glucose levels go too high. High blood glucose levels can be harmful to you and, in the case of pregnancy, to your unborn child. Fortunately, blood glucose, or sugar, levels can be controlled during pregnancy, and in most instances, high blood sugar levels return to normal after the baby is delivered. According to the National Institutes of Health, up to 10% of pregnant women in the United States have gestational diabetes. What causes gestational diabetes? A lot of changes occur in the body during pregnancy, many of them occurring due to widely fluctuating hormone levels. The placenta, which is what connects the baby to the mother’s uterine lining, makes various hormones, and while this is a good thing, these hormones can sometimes make it hard for the body’s insulin to work properly (a condition called insulin resistance). As a result, blood sugar levels can start to climb in women who cannot produce enough insulin to deal with the insulin resistance. How do you Continue reading >>

Glucose Screening And Glucose Tolerance Tests

Glucose Screening And Glucose Tolerance Tests

Why do I need a glucose screening test during pregnancy? Most healthcare practitioners routinely recommend a glucose screening test (also called a glucose challenge test or GCT) between 24 and 28 weeks of pregnancy to check for gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes is a high blood sugar condition that some women get during pregnancy. Between 2 and 5 percent of expectant mothers develop this condition, making it one of the most common health problems during pregnancy. And because the condition rarely causes any symptoms, testing is the only way to find out whether you have it. Like any screening test, the GCT won't give you a diagnosis. Instead, it's designed to identify as many women as possible who may have a problem and need more testing to find out. So a positive result doesn't mean that you have gestational diabetes. In fact, only about a third of women who test positive on the glucose screen actually have the condition. If you test positive on the screening, you'll need to take the glucose tolerance test (GTT) – a longer, more definitive test that tells you for sure whether you have gestational diabetes. Your practitioner may want you to be screened earlier than 24 weeks if a routine urine test shows a lot of sugar in your urine or if you're considered high risk. If the results are normal, you'll be screened again at 24 to 28 weeks. Of course, if you were diagnosed with diabetes before pregnancy, you won't need to be screened. Instead, you'll continue to work with your practitioner to manage your condition during pregnancy. How is the glucose screening test done? When you arrive for the test, you're given a sugar solution that contains 50 grams of glucose. The stuff tastes like a very sweet soda pop (it comes in cola, orange, or lime flavor), and you have to Continue reading >>

Pregnancy If You Have Diabetes

Pregnancy If You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes and plan to have a baby, you should try to get your blood glucose levels close to your target range before you get pregnant. Staying in your target range during pregnancy, which may be different than when you aren’t pregnant, is also important. High blood glucose, also called blood sugar, can harm your baby during the first weeks of pregnancy, even before you know you are pregnant. If you have diabetes and are already pregnant, see your doctor as soon as possible to make a plan to manage your diabetes. Working with your health care team and following your diabetes management plan can help you have a healthy pregnancy and a healthy baby. If you develop diabetes for the first time while you are pregnant, you have gestational diabetes. How can diabetes affect my baby? A baby’s organs, such as the brain, heart, kidneys, and lungs, start forming during the first 8 weeks of pregnancy. High blood glucose levels can be harmful during this early stage and can increase the chance that your baby will have birth defects, such as heart defects or defects of the brain or spine. High blood glucose levels during pregnancy can also increase the chance that your baby will be born too early, weigh too much, or have breathing problems or low blood glucose right after birth. High blood glucose also can increase the chance that you will have a miscarriage or a stillborn baby.1 Stillborn means the baby dies in the womb during the second half of pregnancy. How can my diabetes affect me during pregnancy? Hormonal and other changes in your body during pregnancy affect your blood glucose levels, so you might need to change how you manage your diabetes. Even if you’ve had diabetes for years, you may need to change your meal plan, physical activity routine, and medicines. Continue reading >>

Is The Glucose Test During Pregnancy Optional?

Is The Glucose Test During Pregnancy Optional?

Doctors recommend having a glucose test for gestational diabetes, but it's not mandatory. Here's what you need to know to make an informed choice. It’s an appointment on the calendar most pregnant women dread: the glucose test (or oral glucose screening), usually scheduled around week 26 to week 28 of pregnancy. You’ve no doubt seen many Instagram or Facebook pics posted by women tasked with drinking the super-sweet, typically orange liquid to gauge their body’s ability to handle glucose. This test is one of the ways to screen for gestational diabetes, a temporary form of diabetes that occurs only in pregnancy and typically resolves after delivery. The mama-to-be drinks the juice, hangs out for an hour in the waiting room, and then has blood taken to measure her glucose levels. (Ask your doctor, midwife or blood lab if you should fast beforehand or not—it can vary by clinic.) Your care provider may also specify a time constraint, like drinking the whole bottle in three to five minutes. A reading higher than 7.7 millimoles/L on the gestational diabetes chart calls for further follow-up testing, often called the glucose tolerance test. A reading higher than 11.1 millimoles/L likely means a gestational diabetes diagnosis. When I was expecting my second baby, the nurse at my bloodwork clinic told me there are two kinds of women when it comes to the glucose test: chuggers and sippers. I was totally a chugger. I downed that syrupy drink in just a few mouthfuls, to get the test over with as soon as possible. But a couple of days later, the doctor’s office called me back. There had been an error at the lab. I had to do the test again. I chugged the second time, too, eager to get back to work. That time my results were borderline, just a hair above acceptable levels, a Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Test: What To Expect

Gestational Diabetes Test: What To Expect

Gestational diabetes occurs only during pregnancy, and it usually goes away once you’ve delivered your baby. Pregnant women with gestational diabetes have higher than normal blood sugar. This is because their bodies aren’t producing enough insulin. Insulin is a hormone that regulates blood sugar. Gestational diabetes can happen at almost any time during pregnancy, but it typically occurs between 24 to 28 weeks. This is also when testing typically takes place. Getting tested for gestational diabetes is an important part of prenatal care. Doctors test all pregnant women at least once during pregnancy. Your doctor will consider your risk factors when determining when you should have this test and how often you should have it. Learn what to expect during this test and how to prepare. Many women who have gestational diabetes have no symptoms. If symptoms do appear, it’s possible you may overlook them because they’re similar to typical pregnancy symptoms. These symptoms may include: frequent urination extreme thirst fatigue snoring You should call your doctor if you’re experiencing these symptoms to a greater degree than is normal for you. The exact cause of gestational diabetes is unknown, but it may be due to hormones your placenta produces. These hormones help your baby grow, but they can also stop insulin from doing its job. If your body can’t make enough insulin, the sugar in your bloodstream stays put. The sugar is then unable to convert into energy in the cell. This is called insulin resistance. If it’s left untreated, gestational diabetes can have significant consequences for both you and your baby. Once your doctor knows you have this condition, they’ll work with you on a treatment plan to ensure your and your baby’s health. Any pregnant woman can g Continue reading >>

Glucose Screening And Glucose Tolerance Test

Glucose Screening And Glucose Tolerance Test

Nearly 1 in 10 women will develop gestational diabetes (GD or GDM) during pregnancy — which is why almost all practitioners screen for it in all their patients. Fortunately, gestational diabetes is also one of the most easily managed pregnancy complications. When blood sugar is closely controlled through diet, exercise and, if necessary, medication, women with gestational diabetes are likely to have perfectly normal pregnancies and healthy babies. When a glucose screening is done The glucose screen is usually done between week 24 of pregnancy and week 28 of pregnancy. Some practitioners may test earlier if you're at higher risk for the disorder, including if you're obese, 35 or older, have a family history of diabetes or had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy. How a glucose screening is done The glucose screening is simple, especially if you have a sweet tooth. First, you'll drink a very sweet glucose (aka sugar) drink, which usually tastes like flat orange soda. Then you'll wait for one hour before having some blood drawn and tested for glucose. Most women chug the stuff with no problem and no side effects; a few, especially those who don't have a taste for sweet liquids, feel a little queasy afterwards. How a glucose tolerance test is done If the results of your glucose screening show elevated levels of glucose in your blood, it's possible that you might not be producing enough insulin to process the extra glucose in your system. Your doctor may then order a glucose tolerance test. For this diagnostic test, you'll be asked to fast overnight. Your blood will be drawn in the morning, and then you'll drink a higher-concentration glucose mixture. Your blood will be drawn three more times, at one, two, and three hours later. If a glucose tolerance test diagnose Continue reading >>

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