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Can I Drink Water While Fasting For Blood Glucose Test?

Fasting Before A Blood Test: What You Need To Know

Fasting Before A Blood Test: What You Need To Know

By Lana Burgess Fasting before a blood test is when people are asked not to eat or drink anything other than water before some blood tests. But which blood tests require fasting and how can people fast safely? Fasting is not always necessary before a blood test, but when it is, it is only for a short time. Even so, the idea of not eating or drinking, even for a small amount of time, can seem daunting. Understanding when and how to fast before a blood test can help to reduce unnecessary worry. This article explores the types of blood tests that require fasting, why fasting is needed, and how a person can do it safely. Contents of this article: When should you fast before a blood test? Whether someone needs to fast or not before a blood test depends on the type of blood test they are having. Some blood tests require fasting to be effective, while others do not. The types of blood test that require fasting are as follows: Fasting blood glucose test Diabetes is a condition that can lead to there being too much sugar in the blood. A fasting blood glucose test measures levels of sugar in the blood to see if they are healthy. It is important that a person has not had anything to eat or drink other than water for 8 to 10 hours before a fasting blood glucose test. Fasting helps ensure that the blood test records an accurate measure of fasting blood sugar levels. The results help a doctor to diagnose or rule out diabetes. Blood cholesterol tests Cholesterol is a fatty substance in the blood. High cholesterol can lead to an increased risk of certain health conditions. Blood cholesterol tests, also known as lipid profiles, assess the quantities of fats in the blood. The different fats tested for include: HDL cholesterol, also known as "good cholesterol" LDL cholesterol, also known Continue reading >>

Can You Drink Water While Fasting For A Blood Glucose Test?

Can You Drink Water While Fasting For A Blood Glucose Test?

Can You Drink Water While Fasting For A Blood Glucose Test? 6 WAYS TO OVERCOME DIABETES (Claim Your FREE eBook) Blood sugar test can we drink water before fasting during the fast for a blood glucose test? Water before Diabetes daily. Should not eat food, drink coffee or Nov 11, 2007 wasabi is offline d. Question about drinking water before blood tests healthy evidence before the fasting sugar test Indian diabetes can I eat and drink a test? Health questions the preparation of the glucose test, the procedure, plus the health line. Search for Googleuser content. For a fasting blood sugar test, do not eat or drink anything other than water for at least 8 hours before taking the sample. But if you undergo a fasting blood test, you will be asked not to eat or drink anything (other than water) in advance. Can we drink water before the blood sugar test while doing a non-fasting check to wait 2 hours or can we get the same control after 1 hour and a half? You may want to schedule a fasting glucose test first thing in the morning so you do not fast during the day. This also applies when you check that the glucose meter at home can eat and drink normally before some blood tests. For fasting lipid and glucose profile tests, you can not eat or drink anything except water for 8 to 12 hours, according to the patient's instructions. October 3, 2017, a test measures the fasting blood level. The fasting process ensures that the results of your blood test are not confused with the foods you have eaten during the last hours the body has completely absorbed. When my blood sugar level is high, I drink water to lower it. The facts about fasting for webmd blood tests. After 1 hour and a half! default icon 2 years ago. Fasting blood sugar summit medical group. Mar 2016 took 3 technicians and Continue reading >>

Can I Drink Water Before A Fasting Blood Test?

Can I Drink Water Before A Fasting Blood Test?

Your doctor may ask you to take a fasting blood test to determine your cholesterol or blood sugar levels. The process of fasting ensures that the results of your blood test will not be confused by foods that you have eaten during the last few hours that your body has not fully absorbed. You should not eat food, drink coffee or take some medications for eight to 12 hours before a fasting blood test, but most physicians agree that you can drink water. Effects of Water on Blood Test Results Although eating food or consuming drinks containing nutrients, calories or sugar will affect the results of your fasting blood test, drinking water will have no measurable impact because it contains no calories, fats or sugars. Dehydration and Drawing Blood If you are dehydrated when the nurse or physician performs your fasting blood test, it can be difficult for them to draw blood from your veins. Drinking water makes your veins plump and easy to access. For this reason it as actually a good idea to drink water before your fasting blood test. Dehydration and Triglycerides Dehydration can also affect your triglyceride count, which is one part of the lipid panel that doctors test along with your cholesterol by means of a fasting lab. It is a good idea to drink water before your lipid panel fasting blood test in order to reduce the risk of a deceptively high triglyceride reading due to dehydration. Continue reading >>

What Is The Fasting Blood Sugar Test?

What Is The Fasting Blood Sugar Test?

The fasting blood sugar test (FBS) measures the amount of glucose (sugar) in your blood when you have not had anything to eat or drink for several hours. This test is also called a fasting plasma glucose test (FBS). Why is this test done? The most common use of this test is to check for diabetes. How do I prepare for this test? The simplest way to check for diabetes is to check your blood sugar before you've had anything to eat or drink in the morning. In most cases you will fast overnight, eating nothing and drinking nothing but water after your evening meal and in the morning before your blood is drawn. If you do shift work, it's best to have your blood checked after your usual sleeping time (after at least 6 hours of sleep) and before you start your active day. When you wake up, you should have nothing to eat and nothing to drink except water before your blood is drawn. You may need to avoid taking certain medicines before the test because they might affect the test result. Make sure your healthcare provider knows about any medicines, herbs, or supplements that you are taking. Don't stop any of your regular medicines without first consulting with your healthcare provider. Talk to your healthcare provider if you have any questions. How is the test done? Your healthcare provider may poke your finger with a lancet and fill a small tube with the blood. Or a small amount of blood may be taken from your arm with a needle. The blood is sent to a lab. Having this test will take just a few minutes. Ask your healthcare provider when and how you will get the result of your test. What does the test result mean? The normal fasting blood sugar range in most labs is 70 to 99 milligrams per deciliter (3.9 to 5.5 millimoles per liter). A fasting blood sugar level of 100 to 125 mg/dL Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Test

Blood Glucose Test

What is a blood glucose test? A blood glucose test measures the amount of glucose in your blood. Glucose, a type of simple sugar, is your body’s main source of energy. Your body converts the carbohydrates you eat into glucose. Glucose testing is primarily done to check for type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and gestational diabetes. Diabetes is a condition that causes your blood glucose level to rise. The amount of sugar in your blood is usually controlled by a hormone called insulin. However, if you have diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or the insulin produced doesn’t work properly. This causes sugar to build up in your blood. Increased levels of blood sugar can lead to severe organ damage if left untreated. In some cases, blood glucose testing may also be used to test for hypoglycemia. This condition occurs when the levels of glucose in your blood are too low. Watch a great review of the iHealth blood glucose meter » Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed in children and teenagers whose bodies aren’t able to produce enough insulin. It’s a chronic, or long-term, condition that requires continuous treatment. Late-onset type 1 diabetes has been shown to affect people between the ages of 30 and 40. Type 2 diabetes is usually diagnosed in overweight and obese adults, but it can develop in younger people as well. This condition occurs when your body doesn’t make enough insulin or when the insulin you produce doesn’t work properly. The impact of type 2 diabetes may be reduced through weight loss and healthy eating. Gestational diabetes occurs if you develop diabetes while you’re pregnant. Gestational diabetes usually goes away after you give birth. After receiving a diagnosis of diabetes, you may have to get blood glucose tests to determin Continue reading >>

Why You Can Drink Coffee (or Not) Before A Blood Test

Why You Can Drink Coffee (or Not) Before A Blood Test

What is the latest thinking on avoiding coffee before a blood test? You have a problem. You must fast for 12 hours (overnight) before your blood test, but you have a real dependence on coffee or caffeine. You need that cup of caffeinated energy before you even walk out the door. Otherwise, grogginess, a headache and a general feeling of malaise may set in. May we suggest that you get up earlier than your usual coffee time and arrive at the laboratory as early as possible? The only problem is, many medical testing labs open at 8 a.m., well past the time most people are up and getting ready to take on the day. And the busiest time of the day for most labs is 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. Avoiding coffee before a blood test Drinking coffee and eating are OK before some blood tests but not others, and some doctors say any black coffee at all before is OK even before a cholesterol test as long as you don’t add cream or sugar. Ask your doctor if you can drink coffee before a test. Blood work and coffee Mayo Clinic Medical Laboratories allows some drinking of coffeeup to two hours before some tests: Is having black coffee fasting? Doctors keep telling patients it is all right to have black coffee before fasting blood work (fasting sugar, fasting lipid panel). It depends to some extent on what test is being performed, but for many tests that require fasting, intake of non-carbohydrate containing liquids a few hours before testing will not impact results. We have worked here to make 1 standard definition of “fasting” that encompasses most test requirements. We allow clear liquids (water, black coffee) up until 2 hours before a test or procedure. The definition of fasting should be clarified for all procedures in your institution if possible. This article on Livestrong.com seems to con Continue reading >>

Water And Diabetes

Water And Diabetes

Tweet As water contains no carbohydrate or calories, it is the perfect drink for people with diabetes. Studies have also shown that drinking water could help control blood glucose levels. Lowering blood glucose levels The bodies of people with diabetes require more fluid when blood glucose levels are high. This can lead to the kidneys attempting to excrete excess sugar through urine. Water will not raise blood glucose levels, which is why it is so beneficial to drink when people with diabetes have high blood sugar, as it enables more glucose to be flushed out of the blood. Dehydration and diabetes Having high blood glucose levels can also increase the risk of dehydration, which is a risk for people with diabetes mellitus. People with diabetes insipidus also have a heightened dehydration risk, but this is not linked to high blood glucose levels. Diabetes mellitus Drinking water helps to rehydrate the blood when the body tries to remove excess glucose through urine. Otherwise, the body may draw on other sources of available water, such as saliva and tears. If water access is limited, glucose may not be passed out of the urine, leading to further dehydration. Diabetes insipidus Diabetes inspidus is not associated with high blood glucose levels, but leads to the body producing a large amount of urine. This can leave people regularly feeling thirsty, and at a higher risk of dehydration. Increasing how much water you drink can ease these symptoms, and you may be advised to drink a specific amount of water a day by your doctor. Read more on dehydration and diabetes How much water should we drink? The European Food Safety Authority advises that we take in the following quantities of water on average each day: Women: 1.6 litres - around eight 200ml glasses per day Men: 2 litres Continue reading >>

Can You Drink Tea In The Morning Before A Fasting Blood Test?

Can You Drink Tea In The Morning Before A Fasting Blood Test?

Can You Drink Tea in the Morning Before a Fasting Blood Test? Janet Renee is a clinical dietitian with a special interest in weight management, sports dietetics, medical nutrition therapy and diet trends. She earned her Master of Science in nutrition from the University of Chicago and has contributed to health and wellness magazines, including Prevention, Self, Shape and Cooking Light. You can take tea in a thermos to drink after the blood test.Photo Credit: Jupiterimages/Pixland/Getty Images When your physician orders certain tests, you may need to fast for several hours prior to the test assure accuracy. Nutrients in the foods you eat and beverages you drink can influence test results. For some tests, even the stimulation of digestion enzymes interferes with test results. The amount of time you need to fast can vary between eight and 12 hours. Glucose and cholesterol tests are examples of blood tests that require fasting. A fasting blood test requires that you avoid eating or drinking anything except water for a certain period of time before your blood test. This means you won't be able to drink tea until after your blood is drawn. It's best to schedule an early-morning appointment for your blood test so you don't have to go all day without eating. This way, you can sleep through your fast and go directly to your appointment. Take a snack and beverage with you so you can eat and drink as soon as your blood is drawn. If you have questions about your blood test, ask your health care provider. Lose Weight. Feel Great!Change your life with MyPlate by LIVESTRONG.COM Continue reading >>

Can I Eat And Drink Before Having A Blood Test?

Can I Eat And Drink Before Having A Blood Test?

It depends on the type of blood test you're having. The healthcare professional arranging your test will tell you if you need to do anything to prepare for it. You can eat and drink as normal before some blood tests. But if you're having a "fasting blood test", you will be told not to eat or drink anything (other than water) beforehand. You may also be told not to smoke before your test. Common fasting blood tests Examples of blood tests that require you to fast include: a fasting blood glucose test (used to test for diabetes) – you fast for 8 to 10 hours before the test an iron blood test (used to diagnose conditions such as iron deficiency anaemia) – you fast for 12 hours before the test For more information about a wider range of blood tests, go to Lab Tests Online. Further information: Continue reading >>

Pcos: Preparing For Your Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

Pcos: Preparing For Your Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

If you have PCOS and you’re getting ready to have an oral glucose tolerance test, you may be wondering how to prepare for the test and what the results may mean. The test can help your health care provider figure out whether you have a high risk of developing diabetes and whether lifestyle changes and medications such as Metformin might be helpful in treating your PCOS. What is Glucose? Glucose is a type of sugar and the main source of energy used by your body. The glucose that your body uses for energy comes from many kinds of foods called carbohydrates, such as cereal, bread, rice, pasta, and other grains, not just sugary foods. Dairy products, fruits, and vegetables all contain carbohydrates as well. Your body uses the glucose it needs and then stores the rest as “glycogen” in your liver and muscles. What is an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT)? An OGTT is a way to measure your body’s ability to use glucose. Your pancreas (a gland located behind the stomach) makes a hormone called insulin, which helps your body use the glucose in your blood. If your pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin or if your body is unable to use the insulin it makes, you may have a high blood glucose level. The OGTT involves fasting overnight and then having your blood checked early in the morning. You will then drink a special glucose drink and have your blood tested again after 2 hours. Sometimes blood sugar levels are also checked at other times such as 1 hour, 3 hours, or 4 hours after the glucose drink. What if my blood glucose level is high? If the OGTT shows that your blood glucose levels are higher than normal, your health care provider may tell you that you have “impaired glucose tolerance”. This often means that you are at risk for developing diabetes. Rarely, diabetes Continue reading >>

Things That Impact A Fasting Glucose Blood Test

Things That Impact A Fasting Glucose Blood Test

A fasting blood sugar level is usually ordered by a physician either to check for a new diagnosis of diabetes or to monitor a person who is known to have diabetes. Ideally fasting blood sugar is tested shortly after you get up in the morning, 8 to 12 hours after eating or drinking anything other than water. The normal range is from 70 to 99 mg/dL. Levels above 100 mg/dL may indicate impaired glucose metabolism. Various factors can affect fasting blood sugar levels. Any foods eaten within 8 hours of the test may cause glucose levels to be elevated. After food is digested, higher levels of glucose remain in the blood for some time. Alcoholic beverages consumed even the night before the test may cause a drop in blood sugar. Medications such as corticosteroids, estrogen -- present in birth control pills, some diuretics, certain antidepressants, anti-seizure medication and even plain aspirin can increase glucose levels. Glucose levels can be decreased by medications that include insulin, oral hypoglycemic agents, anabolic steroids and even acetaminophen. Exercise can cause an increase or a decrease in blood sugar levels. During exercise, insulin becomes more efficient. This effect can persist, lowering blood sugar levels for hours afterward. An hour of afternoon exercise may lower glucose levels until the next morning, affecting the fasting blood sugar test. Exercise can also affect glucose levels by releasing adrenaline. This raises blood sugar temporarily. Physical exertion or other activities that cause excitement may increase fasting sugar levels if performed shortly before the test. Many medical conditions can affect blood sugar levels, such as liver disease, disorders of the pancreas and disorders of the thyroid gland. Acute and severe trauma -- such as major surgery, Continue reading >>

Fasting Blood Tests & Black Coffee

Fasting Blood Tests & Black Coffee

Caffeine addicts must pay special attention to their doctors' orders for blood tests needed for routine health checks and diagnostics. Depending on the type of blood work, typical laboratory protocols can upset your coffee-shop routine with temporary dietary restrictions. Your doctor may request a blood specimen that requires previous fasting for accurate analysis. In most cases, you will have to suspend your indulgence in food, coffee, tea, energy drinks and other beverages for several hours in order to produce a viable blood sample. Video of the Day Common fasting tests evaluate blood levels of glucose, triglycerides, HDL cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, and C-reactive protein to gauge diabetes and cardiovascular risks and conditions. If your health care provider adds non-fasting tests such as red blood cell counts or kidney function tests to a fasting blood profile, you will still have to fast. This means going without food or drink other than water for a certain period of time. Black Coffee Effects You may think that a water-brewed drink such as black coffee won’t upset your fast, but the caffeine and other organic compounds in coffee beans that infuse the water will. These substances can change your blood chemistry or alter body functions to do so and therefore threaten the objectivity of your blood sample analysis. The Food and Drug Administration reports that caffeine remains in your system for up to six hours, causing your stomach to secrete larger amounts of acid and your kidneys to excrete more water. This causes a pH and body fluid imbalance that may affect the outcome of your blood test. Even decaffeinated coffee contains some caffeine and other compounds that can taint your blood sample. A water-only fast involves not eating or drinking anything but water Continue reading >>

Can I Have Coffee If I'm Fasting Before Blood Work?

Can I Have Coffee If I'm Fasting Before Blood Work?

As part of a routine physical examination, your health care provider may prescribe blood work to assess your physical condition. Checking your blood for accurate nutrient levels and blood cell counts may sometimes require you to fast for a brief period, usually overnight, before a practitioner draws your blood in the laboratory. You must avoid anything that might change the outcome of your test – even a cup of coffee. Video of the Day Fasting Blood Work Other than water, food and drinks that you consume can add to or alter components in your blood that affect your sample and your doctor’s interpretation of your health. Blood tests that need a dietary clean slate can include individual samples to measure blood glucose, cholesterol or triglyceride levels or multiple screens such as lipid or basic metabolic panels. You might also need to fast if your doctor merges nonfasting tests such as complete blood counts and checks for enzymes, vitamin D or other nutrient levels with tests that do require fasting. Some blood work, such as glucose tolerance tests, is performed on two or more separate occasions to ensure accuracy. The investigating laboratory may instruct you not to eat after dinner the night before and to hold off on your morning breakfast, coffee or tea until after the blood draw. Fasting Requirements Fasting is defined as eating and drinking nothing but water. These narrow parameters allow lab technicians and physicians the greatest diagnostic margin by introducing no dietary variables into the procedure. While you may consider black coffee little more than water, drinking it causes you to absorb caffeine and other organic compounds into your bloodstream. You need only plain water, without added vitamins, flavoring or carbonation, to achieve the correct fluid an Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose: About This Test

Blood Glucose: About This Test

What is it? A blood glucose test measures the amount of a type of sugar, called glucose, in your blood. Several different types of blood glucose tests are used. Fasting blood sugar (FBS) measures blood glucose after you have not eaten for at least 8 hours. It is often the first test done to check for prediabetes and diabetes. If you have diabetes, check with your doctor to find out how long you need to fast. You may be asked to wait until you have had your blood tested before taking your morning dose of insulin or diabetes medicine. Random blood sugar (RBS) measures blood glucose regardless of when you last ate. Oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) may be used to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes. This test is a series of blood glucose measurements taken after you drink a sweet liquid that contains glucose. This test is mostly used for pregnant women to check for gestational diabetes. The A1c is a different type of blood test that can be used to diagnose diabetes or to check your average blood sugar level over the past 2 to 3 months. Why is this test done? Blood glucose tests are done to: Check for diabetes. See how well treatment for diabetes is working. How can you prepare for the test? Be sure to tell your doctor about all the non-prescription and prescription medicines and herbs or other natural health products you take. There are many medicines and natural health products that can affect the results of these tests. Fasting blood sugar (FBS) For a fasting blood sugar test, do not eat or drink anything other than water for at least 8 hours before the blood sample is taken. If you have diabetes, check with your doctor to find out how long you need to fast. You may be asked to wait until you have had your blood tested before taking your morning dose of insulin or diabete Continue reading >>

Question About Drinking Water Prior To Blood Labs

Question About Drinking Water Prior To Blood Labs

I couldn't find a suitable category for this question but I hope to get some advise on this question. I recently had lab blood drawn for my hormones. It took 3 techs and 5 needle sticks before they got it accomplished all the while being "berated" for not drinking enough water. Now my family physician wants me to get blood labs done for my lipids. I was told to "fast" for it. I asked does that include water and was told only a small sip to get my routine meds down. Prior to my hormone labs I did indeed drink as much water as possible knowing everyone has a hard time getting to my veins. Now, I am told I cannot drink water for this lipid test. Is the limited amount of water so terribly important? What can I do with this problem that I have? I don't think I can stand to get stuck 3 more times again, much less 5! I've never heard anything about not drinking water affecting being able to get a good blood sample. Some people just have more prominent veins than others, and I believe it's genetic? I would follow your Drs advice of fasting, if the phlebotomists complain refer them to your Drs advice, and consider complaining if they're giving you an especially hard time. If your lipids (cholesterol) comes back 'high' write your story up on Thyroid Uk here on Health Unlocked, there is a high cholesterol low thyroid connection. Years ago before thyroid bloods Doctors knew high cholesterol pointed to Low Thyroid (Hypothyroidism) They treated the thyroid with thyroid medication and the cholesterol level usually went back down to normal. Do google - Low Thyroid and high cholesterol. also google - 'The Great cholesterol con by Dr. Malcolm Kendrick' Do NOT take dangerous statins. Heart problems are now known to be caused by Statins, heart Doctors have been reporting low or normal chol Continue reading >>

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