diabetestalk.net

Can High Blood Sugar Make You Short Of Breath?

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

The American Diabetes Association cites the following symptoms as indicative of high blood sugar: High blood glucose [Editor’s note: Duh] High levels of sugar in the urine Frequent urination Increased thirst And if high blood sugar goes untreated? “Hyperglycemia can be a serious problem if you don’t treat it, so it’s important to treat as soon as you detect it. If you fail to treat hyperglycemia, a condition called ketoacidosis (diabetic coma) could occur. Ketoacidosis develops when your body doesn’t have enough insulin. Without insulin, your body can’t use glucose for fuel, so your body breaks down fats to use for energy. When your body breaks down fats, waste products called ketones are produced. Your body cannot tolerate large amounts of ketones and will try to get rid of them through the urine. Unfortunately, the body cannot release all the ketones and they build up in your blood, which can lead to ketoacidosis.” – ADA website But what does a high blood sugar feel like? Because when you see someone who is working through an elevated blood sugar, they may not look terribly out of sorts. But what is happening inside of them is real, and plays out in a myriad of ways for every person with diabetes. I’ve tried to write about it several times, but each high is different, and affects me in different ways: “It’s a thick feeling in the base of your brain, like someone’s cracked open your head and replaced your gray matter with sticky jam. I find myself zoning out and staring at things, and my eyeballs feel dry and like they’re tethered to my head by frayed ropes instead of optic nerves. Everything is slow and heavy and whipped with heavy cream.” – Oh, High! “There’s something about a high blood sugar that makes my body feel weighted down, l Continue reading >>

Shortness Of Breath (dyspnea): Symptoms & Signs

Shortness Of Breath (dyspnea): Symptoms & Signs

Shortness of breath has many causes affecting either the breathing passages and lungs or the heart or blood vessels. An average 150-pound (70 kilogram) adult will breathe at an average rate of 14 breaths per minute at rest. Excessively rapid breathing is referred to as hyperventilation. Shortness of breath is also referred to as dyspnea. Doctors will further classify dyspnea as either occurring at rest or being associated with activity, exertion, or exercise. They will also want to know if the dyspnea occurs gradually or all of a sudden. Each of these symptoms help to detect the precise cause of the shortness of breath. Shortness of breath can be associated with symptoms of chest pain, pain with inspiration (pleurisy), anxiousness, fatigue, dizziness, fainting, cough, wheezing, bloody sputum, neck pain, and chest injury. REFERENCE: Kasper, D.L., et al., eds. Harrison's Principles of Internal Medicine, 19th Ed. United States: McGraw-Hill Education, 2015. Pictures, Images, Illustrations & Quizzes Causes of Shortness of Breath Chest Wall & Chest Muscle Diseases Numerous diseases of muscles and the nervous system can lead to shortness of breath by weakening the body's capacity for opening the lungs up for respiration. Examples of muscle diseases include muscular dystrophy. Nervous system diseases, such as paralysis, can lead to shortness of breath. Heart Diseases Many conditions that affect the heart and its capacity to move blood through the lungs can lead to shortness of breath. These conditions include valve diseases of the heart and others. Lung Tissue Diseases There are a vast number of lung tissue diseases ranging from common and temporary, to uncommon and chronic. These include infections (pneumonia, acute bronchitis from bacteria, viruses, etc.), cancers that have s Continue reading >>

Heart Attack Symptoms: Do You Know This Key Sign That Isn’t Chest Pain?

Heart Attack Symptoms: Do You Know This Key Sign That Isn’t Chest Pain?

Around 146,000 people have a heart attack every year and for 94,000 of them it proves fatal - making it even more crucial to know how to spot when one’s coming. “Any collection of any symptoms is possible as humans are individual and unique,” said Dr Nicholas Pantazopoulos, Doctify Cardiologist (www.Doctify.co.uk). “Often, but not always, chest pain is a common feature during a heart attack, and it can seem like a tight bra feeling or a belt being tightened across their chest. “Additionally it can feel like heaviness, and the pain may appear in the centre, the sides or just on the left.” While chest pain is a prevalent and well-known symptom, a significant proportion of sufferers don’t experience it - and some just experience an overwhelming feeling of anxiety. However, while chest pain is a prevalent and well-known symptom, a significant proportion of sufferers don’t experience it. “Not everybody gets chest pain though - in fact a third of patients don’t,” explained Dr Pantazopoulos. “For example, people with diabetes may not, as diabetes damages the nerve endings, effectively ‘numbing’ the nerves and stopping the patient from feeling pain in the chest. “Other groups less likely to get chest pain are people older than 75 years, people who have had strokes, or patients with heart failure.” Early warning signs of a heart attack Mon, August 29, 2016 Although chest pain is often severe, sometimes people only suffer minor pain, similar to indigestion. Here are some of the early warning signs and symptoms of a heart attack. According to the NHS, other main heart attack symptoms include shortness of breath, feeling weak or light-headed, and an overwhelming feeling of anxiety. Dr Pantazopoulos said: “The sensation of anxiety may be the only ef Continue reading >>

8 Symptoms Women Over 40 Shouldn’t Ignore

8 Symptoms Women Over 40 Shouldn’t Ignore

Most minor discomfort is a sign of ... not much. Maybe you had a heavy meal, a stressful day, a hard workout — and by the next day you feel fine again. But a handful of trivial-sounding symptoms can sometimes be red flags for something more serious. Since it's often hard to distinguish between the no big deal and the dire, most of us err on the side of ignoring the problem and hoping it goes away. "Women in midlife are often juggling 20 things at once, so they tend to neglect their own health," says Nieca Goldberg, MD, author of "Dr. Nieca Goldberg's Complete Guide to Women's Health." "That's why it's especially important for them to be informed about what really needs medical attention." Here, a guide to eight important symptoms: when you should see a doctor and when you can just keep cruising. Pain and swelling in your calf Likely cause: Pulled muscle Worst-case scenario: Blood clot in the leg Calf pain is the most common symptom of deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a clot in a deep vein, which is a potentially fatal condition that strikes an estimated 350,000 to 600,000 people in the U.S. every year — most of them 40 and over. "The clot blocks blood flow, causing pain and swelling," says Stephan Moll, MD, of the National Alliance for Thrombosis and Thrombophilia. Other signs it may be serious: Symptoms of a clot can be pronounced, with significant swelling, redness, and pain, but they can also be mild and easily mistaken for a cramp. The skin may also be warm to the touch. If you're short of breath, coughing, experiencing chest pain, or having difficulty breathing, a clot may have broken free and traveled to your lungs, clogging a blood vessel there. You're at increased risk for DVT if you're on hormone therapy, the pill, patch, or ring; if you smoke or are pregnant; i Continue reading >>

Shortness Of Breath

Shortness Of Breath

Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath, also called dyspnea, can sometimes be harmless as the result of exercise or nasal congestion. In other situations, it may be a sign of a more serious heart or lung disease. Cases of frequent breathlessness should be evaluated by a physician to determine the cause. When to Call an Ambulance If difficulty breathing is sudden and severe or accompanied by chest pain, call 911. When to Call Your Doctor If you experience frequent breathlessness, are awakened at night by shortness of breath, or experience wheezing or tightness in the throat, contact your physician for further evaluation. Symptoms Whether it is sudden or long term, difficulty breathing should always be taken seriously. If you experience shortness of breath, be sure to take note of when it occurs, how often it occurs and other related symptomatic information to assist your doctor in reviewing your case. If breathlessness is sudden and severe, it may be the result of air around the lung or a blood clot in the lung—both emergency conditions that require urgent and immediate medical attention. Causes There are many causes for shortness of breath, from the benign and temporary to the more serious that may include: Heart disease or heart attack (in this case, shortness of breath may be accompanied by swelling of the feet/ankles). Lung disease. Emphysema. Pneumonia (breathlessness often accompanied by high fever, cough and mucus). Asthma or allergies. Anemia (other symptoms characterized by fatigue and pale skin color). Panic attacks. Airway obstructions, exposure to cigarette smoke or extreme exposure to dust or fumes. Obesity or lack of exercise. High altitudes. Blood flow disruption in getting oxygen to the brain. Intense emotional anxiety or stress. When breathlessnes Continue reading >>

New Who Guideline Clamps Down On Intake Of Free Sugars

New Who Guideline Clamps Down On Intake Of Free Sugars

Refined Sugar is DEADLY Sucrose, maltose, dextrose, fructose, it's all basically the same; they turn into glucose. To test for hypoglycemia you take a GLUCOSE TOLERANCE TEST. Fructose takes a little longer but ends up the same glucose. Refined or concentrated sugar causes excess glucose and from it your cell walls harden. This reduces the ability for nutrients to enter the cell and creates malnutrition of the cell. Sugar sets about unbalancing the body's mineral relationships manifesting itself in degenerative and harmful conditions. Manganese, cobalt, copper, zinc, and magnesium are depleted to utilize sugar. Minerals are synergistic. Throw one out of ratio and the rest are adversely affected. Proteins are digested with the help of trace minerals. Many allergies are caused by undigested proteins. Chromium picolinate is very popular these days. Sugar increases urinary excretion of chromium. Sugar's imbalance of the Calcium phosphorus ratio is a common pathway of stress. Ever since mother's milk, (or sweetened formulae) we have unwisely associated sweetening with nurturing. Sugar is more of a drugging pharmaceutical chemical than it is a nurturing food. "Sugar throws the body out of balance causing food allergies, endocrine problems, arthritis, cancer, hypoglycemia, diabetes, tooth decay, osteoporosis, and all degenerative diseases. "Licking the Sugar Habit", N. Appleton, PhD. Immune system compromise is exacerbated by sugar's upsetting the body's biochemistry. Our children need role models that teach them healthy habits. We need YOUR help. Please encourage natural sweeteners from DILUTED fruit juices. Get rid of ANY form of concentrated sweet and slowly wean our children (and ourselves) from their addiction to it. Like opium, morphine and heroin, sugar is an addictive, Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia

Hyperglycemia

Not to be confused with the opposite disorder, hypoglycemia. Hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar (also spelled hyperglycaemia or hyperglycæmia) is a condition in which an excessive amount of glucose circulates in the blood plasma. This is generally a blood sugar level higher than 11.1 mmol/l (200 mg/dl), but symptoms may not start to become noticeable until even higher values such as 15–20 mmol/l (~250–300 mg/dl). A subject with a consistent range between ~5.6 and ~7 mmol/l (100–126 mg/dl) (American Diabetes Association guidelines) is considered slightly hyperglycemic, while above 7 mmol/l (126 mg/dl) is generally held to have diabetes. For diabetics, glucose levels that are considered to be too hyperglycemic can vary from person to person, mainly due to the person's renal threshold of glucose and overall glucose tolerance. On average however, chronic levels above 10–12 mmol/L (180–216 mg/dL) can produce noticeable organ damage over time. Signs and symptoms[edit] The degree of hyperglycemia can change over time depending on the metabolic cause, for example, impaired glucose tolerance or fasting glucose, and it can depend on treatment.[1] Temporary hyperglycemia is often benign and asymptomatic. Blood glucose levels can rise well above normal and cause pathological and functional changes for significant periods without producing any permanent effects or symptoms. [1] During this asymptomatic period, an abnormality in carbohydrate metabolism can occur which can be tested by measuring plasma glucose. [1] However, chronic hyperglycemia at above normal levels can produce a very wide variety of serious complications over a period of years, including kidney damage, neurological damage, cardiovascular damage, damage to the retina or damage to feet and legs. Diabetic n Continue reading >>

Associated Conditions

Associated Conditions

Pregnancy is an exciting time for any women, but complications may develop sometimes even in healthy women. Most pregnancy complications can easily be detected and prevented during regular prenatal visits. The two most common complications that arise during pregnancy are high blood pressure and gestational diabetes. Pregnancy Induced High Blood Pressure Pregnancy Induced Hypertension (PIH), also called preeclampsia is a pregnancy complication that usually starts after the 20th week of pregnancy. It is one of the main causes of concern in pregnant women as severe form of hypertension may induce labour very early. Pregnancy induced hypertension might present as high blood pressure alone or accompanied with other conditions such as protein in the urine, swelling and convulsions. The condition can be detected during antenatal visits and should be treated appropriately. If left untreated, this condition can cause serious problems for both the mother and the baby. In mother PIH can cause placental abruption (premature detachment of the placenta from the uterus) and seizures. Pregnancy induced hypertension causes less blood flow to the placenta. Complications in the baby include premature birth, low birth weight, stillbirth, or growth restriction. You should watch for signs such as rapid weight gain of 4-5 lbs in a week, severe headache, blurred vision, severe pain in the stomach under the ribs and consult your doctor immediately. During a routine check-up your doctor will check your blood pressure, urine levels, and may order blood tests which may show if you have preeclampsia. There are treatment options which include medications, dietary modifications, mild exercise and activity along with sufficient rest. In severe cases, your doctor may want your baby to be delivered. It Continue reading >>

What’s The Deal On Fluctuating Blood Sugars?

What’s The Deal On Fluctuating Blood Sugars?

What’s the Deal on Fluctuating Blood Sugars? One of the most persistent problems that my patients tell me about when they come in for their first visit is a lack of energy, sometimes followed by explosive bursts of temper, foggy thinking, and other unpleasant effects from eating a diet high in sugars and carbohydrates. Now, these people didn’t come to me to correct their low energy, or quick temper, and often they don’t even know there is a connection between the way they feel and what they eat. But the connection is clear. These patients are on a daily fun-house ride that seems painfully slow at times, then explosively fast at others. In medicine, we know this to be the result of fluctuating blood sugars. You eat pancakes for breakfast, with syrup, you feel like a million until about 10 am when all of a sudden you find yourself sweaty, cranky, irritable and sometimes even faint. So what do you do? Grab a donut and a cup of coffee? I hope not, but that’s often the answer. Then the fun house starts all over again, ultimately plunging you into a dark, scary place which feels like you’ll never get out. What most of these patients came to see me about is overweight and obesity. Many of them have tried punishing diets with almost no protein or fat, often vegetarian, and with such low calories that their body is thrown into a tantrum of fluctuating blood sugars. The Dangers of Blood Sugar Fluctuation A low level of blood sugar, referred to as hypoglycemia, results in an inadequate supply of glucose to the brain and leads to a considerable amount of malfunction. Hypoglycemia can cause a number unpleasant symptoms including fatigue, weakness, dizziness, inability to concentrate, poor memory, anxiety, depression, irritability, heart palpitations and excessive sweating. Continue reading >>

Shortness Of Breath

Shortness Of Breath

Overview What is shortness of breath? When you are short of breath, you may feel like you can’t get enough air or your chest may feel tight. Sometimes the feeling is worse when you are physically active or when you lie down flat. You may have other symptoms such as a cough, chest pains or a fever. If you are experiencing any of these problems, tell your doctor. Causes & Risk Factors What could be causing my shortness of breath? Shortness of breath can be caused by many things, including the following: If you are short of breath with a cough and/or fever, you may have a chest infection or pneumonia (say: “new-moan-yuh”). Less common causes of breathing problems are lung cancer, a blood clot in the lungs,air leakage around the lungs and scarring of the lung tissue. Other lung diseases, including emphysema (say: “em-fa-see-ma”), which is a lung disease that is most often caused by smoking Diagnosis What tests will my doctor perform? Your doctor can help find the cause of your breathing problem by asking you questions about your symptoms and performing a physical exam. Your doctor also may order some tests. To find the cause of your shortness of breath, your doctor may order a chest X-ray. He or she may also order an electrocardiogram (also called an ECG). During this test, your doctor will have you lie down so your heart can be monitored. The ECG machine creates a picture, or tracing, that shows your heart’s electrical signals. You may need to have a computerized tomography (CT) scan, which is another type of X-ray. Your doctor may measure the strength of your breathing (called a spirometer) and the oxygen level in your blood. You also may need to have a blood test. Treatment What can I do to improve my breathing? Your doctor will treat the cause of your breath Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

A A A High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) (cont.) If hyperglycemia persists for at least two or three days, or if ketones appear in the urine, call a doctor. Generally, people with diabetes should test their blood sugar levels at least four times a day: before meals and at bedtime (or following the schedule advised by the prescribed individual diabetes care plan). The urine should be checked for ketones any time the blood sugar level is over 250 mg/dL. When blood sugar stays high despite following a diabetic diet and plan of care, call the nurse, diabetes health educator, or physician for adjustments in the diet. If blood sugars are high because of illness, check for ketones and contact a health professional. Vomiting Confusion Sleepiness Shortness of breath Dehydration Blood sugar levels that stay above 160 mg/dL for longer than a week Glucose readings higher than 300 mg/dL The presence of ketones in the urine Ketoacidosis or diabetic coma is a medical emergency. Call 911 for emergency transport to a hospital or similar emergency center. Please ask your health care professional about the following: How to recognize high blood sugar levels How to treat a high blood sugar level when it occurs in you, a family member, or coworkers How to prevent the blood sugar level from becoming too high How to contact the medical staff during an emergency What emergency supplies to carry to treat high blood sugar Additional educational materials regarding high blood sugar Check blood sugar levels with a blood glucose meter. If blood sugar level is higher than normal, but there are no symptoms, continue routine care such as: Take all diabetes medications on schedule. Eat regular meals. Drink sugar-free and caffeine-free liquids. Take a blood sugar reading every four hours (write it down) u Continue reading >>

Asthma And Diabetes: What’s The Link?

Asthma And Diabetes: What’s The Link?

So, what’s it like to have diabetes and asthma? Well, diabetes is a condition where the blood has high levels of sugar in it. It is normally caused by the body producing insufficient insulin. Symptoms of diabetes include excessive thirst, increased urination and blurred vision. Asthma is a condition that causes patients to have trouble breathing, because of the swelling of the lungs airways. Symptoms of asthma include shortness of breath, tightening of the chest, wheezing and coughing. So, mix these two together and that is what it’s like to have both diabetes and asthma. However, there is some good news if you have one of them, because there is some light at the end of this tunnel. Is There a Link Between Asthma and Diabetes? When it comes to asthma and diabetes, is there a link between the two? Well, we discussed what the two are and their symptoms above, so now let’s look in to the connection between the two. The answer is that people who have diabetes do have higher rates of having asthma. These patients do tend to have a hard time maintaining their blood glucose levels and keeping their asthma under control. Further reading: Throughout the years, various studies have shown that people who have diabetes that is not under control or is poorly maintained, are the ones who are at a higher risk of developing asthma, because their lung functioning seems to be weaker than those that have diabetes that is properly controlled or maintained. On the reverse side, these studies also concluded that people who suffer from asthma are at a higher risk of developing diabetes and need to be careful. Reasons Steroids and Diabetes Don’t Mix Steroids are used in asthma patients to reduce the inflammation and swelling of the airways of the lungs. The most common steroids are cor Continue reading >>

10 Surprising Causes Of Blood Sugar Swings You Probably Didn’t Know

10 Surprising Causes Of Blood Sugar Swings You Probably Didn’t Know

1 / 11 What Causes Blood Sugar to Rise and Fall? Whether you were recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or have been living with the disease for several years, you know how fickle blood sugar levels can be, and how important it is that they stay controlled. Proper blood sugar control is key for helping ward off potential diabetes complications, such as kidney disease, nerve damage, vision problems, stroke, and heart disease, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). If you keep your levels in check on a daily basis, it will help you stay energized, focused, and in a good mood. You’ll know if your diabetes is poorly controlled if you experience symptoms such as frequent urination, sores that won’t heal, blurred vision, and unexplained weight loss. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), proper medication, effective meal planning, regular exercise, and use of a blood glucose meter to track your numbers routinely can all help you keep your levels within a healthy range. The ADA recommends blood glucose be 80 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) before meals, and below 180 mg/dL two hours after the start of a meal. Furthermore, the organization recommends getting an A1C test, which measures your average blood glucose over the past two to three months, at least twice per year if your levels are stable and you are meeting treatment goals. Learning how different habits can cause your blood sugar to fluctuate can help you better predict how your levels will swing. You may be more likely to experience hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar if you have advanced-stage diabetes, according to the ADA. Meanwhile, high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, may be caused by factors such as not using enough insulin or other diabetes medication, not following a prop Continue reading >>

Why Does Pulmonary Hypertension Cause Shortness Of Breath?

Why Does Pulmonary Hypertension Cause Shortness Of Breath?

Catching one’s breath after mild or no activity could be a sign of a rare but serious condition affecting the body’s ability to circulate oxygenated blood to the heart. There are many reasons a person might feel winded after climbing a few flights of stairs or some other brief physical activity. Among them? Pulmonary hypertension — or high blood pressure in the loop of vessels connecting the heart and lungs. Shortness of breath is a telltale sign of the condition. “That is the most common presenting symptom,” says Vallerie McLaughlin, M.D., director of the Pulmonary Hypertension Program at the University of Michigan Frankel Cardiovascular Center. It’s because “the right side of the heart is having trouble pushing blood flow through the lungs — and it’s not getting to the left side of the heart and body,” McLaughlin says. “It puts strain on the right side of the heart, which is not used to pushing against the high pressure.” Patients with PH have blocked or narrowed arteries in their lungs. As a result, the system designed to carry fresh, oxygenated blood into the left side of the heart and then to the rest of the body is affected. Other indicators of PH include fatigue, lightheadedness, chest pain, racing heartbeat and swelling in the ankles or legs. Despite those distinct warnings, PH is often misdiagnosed. “Your primary care doctor is going to rule out the common stuff first,” McLaughlin says, such as asthma or another heart or lung problem. Patients, she adds, should request an echocardiogram — an ultrasound of the heart — if a cause of the symptoms isn’t found. That could prompt a right-heart catheterization, which can measure the pressure of the heart and lungs. Other tests may follow to determine the underlying cause of an individ Continue reading >>

What Does Bad Breath Have To Do With Diabetes?

What Does Bad Breath Have To Do With Diabetes?

Your breath has an interesting ability to provide clues to your overall health. A sweet, fruity odor can be a sign of ketoacidosis, an acute complication of diabetes. An odor of ammonia is associated with kidney disease. Similarly, a very foul, fruity odor may be a sign of anorexia nervosa. Other diseases, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, and liver disease, also can cause distinct odors on the breath. Bad breath, also called halitosis, can be so telling that doctors may even be able to use it to identify diabetes. Recently, researchers have found that infrared breath analyzers can be effective in identifying prediabetes or early-stage diabetes. Diabetes-related halitosis has two main causes: periodontal disease and high levels of ketones in the blood. Periodontal diseases Periodontal diseases, also called gum diseases, include gingivitis, mild periodontitis, and advanced periodontitis. In these inflammatory diseases, bacteria attack the tissues and bone that support your teeth. Inflammation can affect metabolism and increase your blood sugar, which worsens diabetes. While diabetes can lead to periodontal diseases, these diseases can also create further problems for people with diabetes. According to a report in IOSR Journal of Dental and Medical Sciences, an estimated one in three people with diabetes will also experience periodontal diseases. Heart disease and stroke, which can be complications of diabetes, are also linked to periodontal disease. Diabetes can damage blood vessels, which can reduce blood flow throughout your body, including your gums. If your gums and teeth aren’t receiving a proper supply of blood, they may become weak and more prone to infection. Diabetes may also raise glucose levels in your mouth, promoting bacteria growth, infection, Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar