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Can High Blood Sugar Levels Cause Depression?

Symptoms Of Reactive Hypoglycemia And Insulin Resistance

Symptoms Of Reactive Hypoglycemia And Insulin Resistance

Being plagued by excessive fatigue is bad enough, but problems with blood sugar regulation can also lead to even scarier downstream issues including heart disease, stroke, cancer, dementia, and more. Feeling sleepy all the time and being chronically fatigued are classic reactive hypoglycemia and insulin resistance symptoms. The standard American diet, high in simple sugars and processed foods, is notorious for causing problems with blood sugar regulation. In the short term, eating a meal loaded with sugar and refined carbs (like white flour) can cause you to experience wild swings in blood sugar. These large blood sugar swings make you feel tired, anxious, irritable, and hungry for more quickly absorbed sugars. Feeling sleepy all the time and experiencing these other symptoms of blood sugar dysregulation after a high-carb meal is not normal, nor is it healthy. These are the classic signs of what is known as reactive hypoglycemia and they may be insulin resistance symptoms, which is more serious and could be an early warning sign of diabetes down the road according to the medical journal, Current Opinion in Endocrinology, Diabetes and Obesity.[1] So how are sugars and sweets linked to the problem of feeling sleepy all the time along with reactive hypoglycemia and insulin resistance symptoms? Eating this way carries with it a “high glycemic load,” meaning it contains high amounts of the kind of carbohydrates which quickly release their sugars into the bloodstream. High-glycemic-load diets have been shown in human studies to lead to feeling sleepy all the time, daytime fatigue, poorer sleep, and slower cognitive performance.[2,3] In the long term, eating a diet full of empty calories, refined carbohydrates (bread, pasta, rice, potatoes), sugars, and sweetened beverages Continue reading >>

Can My Blood Sugar Levels Cause Anxiety Or Depression?

Can My Blood Sugar Levels Cause Anxiety Or Depression?

Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the body’s inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that accounts for five- to 10-percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes. Type 2 diabetes may account for 90- to 95-percent of all diagnosed cases. The third type of diabetes occurs in pregnancy and is referred to as gestational diabetes. Left untreated, gestational diabetes can cause health issues for pregnant women and their babies. People with diabetes can take preventive steps to control this disease and decrease the risk of further complications. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Depression

Diabetes And Depression

Tweet According to NICE, people who are diagnosed with a chronic physical health problem such as diabetes are 3 times more likely to be diagnosed with depression than people without it. Depression can have a serious impact on a person's well being and their ability and motivation to self-manage their condition. Depression is the most common psychiatric disorder witnessed in the diabetes community. People with diabetes suffering from depression are at greater risk of suffering from an episode of diabetic burnout which collectively can have adverse effects on physical health and potentially instigate more long term complications both to do with diabetes and independent from the condition. What exactly is depression? Depression is the term given when an individual experiences a number of symptoms including: Persistent sadness or anxiety, a feeling of hollowness An overriding feeling of hopelessness and negativity Feeling helpless and powerless to change your situation Loss of interest in activities or pleasures Lower energy and increased fatigue Insomnia, oversleeping, awakening early in the morning Concentration problems, memory problems and indecisiveness Dwelling on death or suicide Restlessness Weight change and decreased or increased appetite A diagnosis of depression is made if many of these symptoms are present, continuously, for a minimum of two weeks. For people with diabetes, dealing with a lifelong condition and managing the risk of complications can seem like an overwhelming task, particularly for newly diagnosed patients. Many diabetics struggle to cope with the requirements, feeling overwhelmed and unmotivated. If diabetes is not faced with an attitude of perseverance and defiance, often depression will prevail. Depression is the perception of life situations Continue reading >>

Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Aggression?

Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Aggression?

Relationship Between Blood Glucose Level and Self-Control Blood sugar can make people do crazy things. According to a recent scientific study on the link between low blood glucose level and relationship clashes (Bushman et al, 2014), being hungry makes an individual generally cranky and act more hostile to others. In the study, couples who are hungry tend to have a much higher tendency to exhibit aggression towards each other and become more impulsive in their reactions. This phenomenon is often referred to “hangry” (meaning feeling angry when you are hungry). If this irritable state can happen to any healthy person who experiences a change in their blood glucose level, imagine the ordeals individuals with diabetes frequently go through on a daily basis. However, do not jump to the conclusion that diabetes leads to aggression. In fact, scientists find a more direct correlation between blood glucose level and self-control. I recommend reading the following articles: In a way, you can visualize self-control as a muscle that requires a lot of energy to sustain so that it does not become ineffective quickly. This energy source comes from the glucose in the blood. So what kind of activities can wear out this “muscle”? Any daily activities that require self-discipline such as forcing yourself to get out of bed early to exercise, resisting from having a soda drink or another cookie with your meal, stopping yourself from smoking, dealing with stressful situations at work and at home, and abstaining yourself from road rage. As you can see, self-control plays a crucial part in restraining inappropriate and aggressive behaviors. So when people are low in glucose, the self-control mechanism cannot function properly to prevent these outbursts of hostile actions. In a researc Continue reading >>

-chapter 2- Low Blood Sugar & Mental Health Problems

-chapter 2- Low Blood Sugar & Mental Health Problems

low blood sugar depression and neurotransmitters Natural Treatment and Remedies The premise of this chapter is that in people with mental health problems including depression, anxiety, addiction and bipolar syndrome fluctuations in blood sugar can exacerbate and trigger intense bouts of worse symptoms. The human brain requires a huge amount of fuel to make enough energy to function and it suffers an immediate decline in function when it runs low on fuel. The brain relies almost exclusively on glucose or sugar for energy which it draws directly from the blood, furthermore the brain does not store glucose and only stores tiny amounts of glycogen (reserve glucose) in reserve for times when our blood sugar levels fall. The brains high demand for glucose and its lack of reserves means the brain is highly dependent on a steady supply of sugar from the blood and when blood sugar levels fall either too low or just too quickly the first part of the body to suffer is the brain and consequently our mental function. What happens when blood sugar drops is it diminishes the brains capacity to produce neurotransmitters, transmit signals and perform essential maintenance. Almost everyone will be familiar with this effect, it’s the ‘spaced out’ shaky, irritable feeling and difficulty in concentrating we experience when we haven’t eaten anything for too long. In people without mental health problems this is just an unpleasant experience but in people with mental health problems that already have poor brain function a bout of low blood sugar that compromises brain function even further can trigger a bout of more intense symptoms of the problem, for example it could trigger a wave of increased depression, anxiety or OCD and as you may have already noticed once an intense bout of yo Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Affect My Mood?

Can Diabetes Affect My Mood?

I was recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. I am on two different types of insulin, NovoLog and Levemir (insulin detemir). Can diabetes have any bearing on mood swings or sudden “bad mood episodes”? Continue reading >>

Conquering Anxiety, Depression And Fatigue Without Drugs – The Role Of Hypoglycemia

Conquering Anxiety, Depression And Fatigue Without Drugs – The Role Of Hypoglycemia

The Anxiety & Hypoglycemia Relief Institute e-mail:[email protected] voice-mail:212-479-7805 (For questions regarding anxiety & hypoglycemia and New York City classes, contact Prof. Joel H. Levitt [email protected]) Stress is often blamed as the root cause for anxiety, depression and fatigue, but, although stress can make any problem worse, the source of such problems is often physical in nature. And hypoglycemia is one of the major physical causes. This article covers the following: What is Hypoglycemia? – the cause of hypoglycemia and its effects. Typical Hypoglycemia Symptoms – the wide range of mental, emotional and physical symptoms. Testing for Hypoglycemia – standard medical testing and why it is often unreliable. The Solution to Hypoglycemia – a list of dietary and nutrient recommendations, with special notes and cautions. Recommended Reading – books and other references that will give you a more complete understanding. What is Hypoglycemia? First of all, let’s be clear on one major point – hypoglycemia is not a “disease” in that you either have it or don’t, it is a condition, and, in most cases, it is fully reversible. Some types of hypoglycemia are caused by a tumor or other physical damage to a gland. However, that is rare, and not the focus of this article. The more common type of hypoglycemia – called “functional,” “reactive,” or “fasting” – is your body’s reaction to what you put in it. Hypoglycemia is the body’s inability to properly regulate blood sugar levels, causing the level of sugar in the blood to be too low or to fall too rapidly. Blood sugar, in the form of glucose, is the basic fuel for all brain operation and physical activity, including muscular. If the available fuel is too inadequate, any marginal phys Continue reading >>

Antidepressants That Cause High Blood Sugar

Antidepressants That Cause High Blood Sugar

High blood sugar--abnormal, even dangerous levels of sugar in the blood--is known as hyperglycemia and is most often associated with the disease diabetes mellitus. However, different types of medications may also cause high blood sugar; this is sometimes known as medication-induced, or drug-induced, diabetes. Within the list of drugs are several medications that are used to treat depression. While only one medication is officially considered an "antidepressant," certain antipsychotics--which may also be used in the treatment of depression--may cause hyperglycemia as well. Video of the Day Fluoxetine is a commonly-used antidepressant; it belongs to a class called the “serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitors,” and may also be known by one of its brand names, Prozac. It is used to treat both depression that occurs as a result of major depressive disorder and, in combination with the antipsychotic medication olanzepine, to treat the depression that may occur in patients with bipolar disorder. In addition to its effects on blood sugar levels, fluoxetine may Medline Plus reports that fluoxetine can cause nausea, lack of appetite, weight loss, nervousness, and changes in sex drive. The medical reference UpToDate reports that in patients with diabetes, fluoxetine affects blood sugar regulation in an interesting way. Patients who take fluoxetine may have more episodes of hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar--but when they stop taking fluoxetine, instead of their blood sugar reaching normal levels, patients’ blood sugar level goes above normal. This is called hyperglycemia, and this observation suggests that fluoxetine is somehow impacting the blood sugar regulation mechanism of patients with diabetes. Because of this, a patient who is taking medication for his diabetes and is a Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes is a condition that impacts the way a person's body uses sugar for energy. However, diabetes affects much more than blood sugar. It can impact nearly every body system and have an effect on a person's mood. Stress associated with managing diabetes as well as concerns about potential side effects can all contribute to changes in mood. In addition, the actual highs and lows of blood sugar levels may also cause nervousness, anxiety, and confusion. It is important for people to recognize their own individual symptoms of high or low blood sugar. They must also ensure they seek support for any concerning mental health symptoms they might experience. Watching these mood swings can often be difficult for friends and family to understand. However, learning why a person may experience mood changes related to diabetes and being supportive can help to promote a stronger, healthier relationship. Contents of this article: How do diabetes and mood swings go together? Diabetes can have many effects on a person's mood. For example, managing diabetes can be stressful. A person may be constantly worried about their blood sugar and whether it is too high or too low. Adjustments to their diet and constantly checking their blood sugar can also add to a person's stress and enjoyment of life. As a result, they are more likely to experience feelings of anxiety and depression. Blood sugar swings can cause rapid changes in a person's mood, such as making them sad and irritable. This is especially true during hypoglycemic episodes, where blood sugar levels dip lower than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Hyperglycemic episodes where levels spike higher than 250 mg/dL may cause confusion in people with type 1 diabetes, but are much less likely to in those with type 2 diabetes. When a pe Continue reading >>

What Is The Connection Between Blood Sugar And Emotions?

What Is The Connection Between Blood Sugar And Emotions?

Changes in blood sugar can have a significant impact on how a person feels, including emotionally, because of how sugar affects not just the brain but the entire body. In addition, emotions can also affect how the body regulates blood sugar. Anyone with persistently high or low blood sugar should talk to a doctor to determine if an underlying condition is to blame. Blood sugar is affected by a variety of factors, including food. Blood sugar rises in the hour or two after a meal and then gradually declines. Foods high in carbohydrates can lead to higher spikes in blood sugar, followed by a more rapid decline. Physical activity causes the muscles to burn glucose, leading to lower blood glucose levels. Some medications can affect blood glucose levels, and stress can also lead to an overall increase in blood sugar. Blood Sugar Effects on Emotions Abnormally high or low blood sugar can affect emotions. Unusually low blood sugar --- also known as hypoglycemia --- can cause feelings of anxiety and confusion. Hypoglycemia can also make it hard to complete routine tasks and can lead to abnormal behavior. High blood glucose, on the other hand, can cause fatigue. Persistently high blood glucose due to poorly treated diabetes may also worsen depression. Stress Effect on Blood Sugar The link between emotions and blood sugar goes beyond the symptoms of hypo- and hyperglycemia, as emotions can also affect blood sugar. Stress, whether emotional or physical, leads to the release of hormones such as cortisol and epinephrine. Both of these hormones can cause a rise in blood glucose levels. People with diabetes already have trouble regulating blood sugar, so emotional stress can lead to dangerously high blood sugar levels. Managing Blood Sugar and Emotions Persistently high or low blood su Continue reading >>

Diabetes Can Take A Toll On Your Emotions

Diabetes Can Take A Toll On Your Emotions

And this psychological component may make it harder to control the blood-sugar disorder, experts say Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And "More information" links may no longer work. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional. HealthDay Reporter THURSDAY, May 17, 2012 (HealthDay News) -- Many people know diabetes -- both type 1 and type 2 -- can take a serious toll on physical health. But these blood-sugar disorders also can affect your emotions and, in turn, your emotions can wreak havoc on your diabetes control. Extremes in blood-sugar levels can cause significant mood changes, and new research suggests that frequent changes in blood-sugar levels (called glycemic variability) also can affect mood and quality of life for those with diabetes. Depression has long been linked to diabetes, especially type 2. It's still not clear, however, whether depression somehow triggers diabetes or if having diabetes leads to being depressed. More recent research in people with type 1 diabetes has found that long periods of high blood-sugar levels can trigger the production of a hormone linked to the development of depression. People with type 1 diabetes no longer can make their own insulin; people with type 2 diabetes need insulin treatment because their bodies can no longer produce it in sufficient quantities. "Diabetes gives you so much to worry about that it's exhausting. It can make you feel powerless," said Joe Solowiejczyk, a certified diabetes educator and a manager of diabetes counseling and training at the Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Institute in Milpitas, Calif. "I think it's important to ackno Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar In Cats

High Blood Sugar In Cats

Hyperglycemia in Cats The term hyperglycemia refers to higher than normal levels of glucose in the blood. A simple carbohydrate sugar that circulates in the blood, glucose is a major source of energy for the body, of which normal levels range between 75-120mg. Insulin, a hormone that is produced and released by the pancreas into the bloodstream when glucose levels rise, plays a pivotal role in maintaining the blood sugar levels within normal limits. If insulin concentration is too low or there is absolute deficiency of insulin, levels of glucose rise sharply leading to hyperglycemia. Some of the causes for hyperglycemia may be pancreatitis, and the resulting inability to produce insulin; normally occurring hormones, especially in female cats; diet; and infections of the body (such as teeth, or urinary tract). Middle aged and older cats are more at risk for developing hyperglycemia, but otherwise, no breed is particularly disposed to this condition. Neutered male cats are at increased risk. Cats in general are prone to high blood sugar, typically during times of stress, where glucose levels may reach 300-400mg. This is often a temporary increase in blood sugar, and while it warrants further observation, it may not be cause to diagnose chronic hyperglycemia or diabetes mellitus. Symptoms and Types Clinical symptoms may vary depending on the underlying disease/condition. Your cat may not be showing any serious symptoms, especially those if the increased sugar is thought to be temporary, hormonal, or stress induced hyperglycemia. Some of the more common symptoms include: Depression Weight loss Excessive hunger Dehydration Bloodshot eyes (due to inflamed blood vessels) Liver enlargement Nerve damage in legs Severe depression (in cases of very high blood sugar levels) Non-hea Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance Syndrome

Insulin Resistance Syndrome

A Common Cause of Carbohydrate Cravings, Fatigue, Depression and Obesity Many people with fatigue, depression, hypoglycemia, overweight, or sugar/starch cravings are suffering from dysglycemia, which is a disruption in blood sugar metabolism caused primarily by diet. Other conditions that can also be linked to this problem include high blood pressure, some types of high cholesterol, metabolic syndrome, prediabetes, adult onset diabetes, and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Blood sugar problems occur on spectrum of disease with fatigue, depression, hypoglycemia, and cravings at one end, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in the middle, and prediabetes and adult-onset diabetes at the other end. ---------|-----------------------|----------------------|---------------------|---------------------|----------------------|---- Hypoglycemia Fatigue Depression Weight gain Insulin resistance Metabolic syndrome Prediabetes Diabetes All of these conditions are caused by the same basic problem, dysglycemia, with where you are on the spectrum indicating the severity of your disease. It is important to point out here that not everyone with fatigue, depression, high cholesterol or high blood pressure has dysglycemia or insulin resistance, but many of them do. Virtually everyone with metabolic syndrome, prediabetes, or adult-onset diabetes, however, does have insulin resistance. Insulin Resistance Insulin resistance occurs when cells which would normally take sugar out of the blood, and hence lower blood sugar, become resistant to the action of insulin. It therefore takes more insulin to keep a person’s blood sugar in check. People with insulin resistance syndrome will consequently have normal blood sugar levels and elevated insulin levels. People with insulin resistance tend Continue reading >>

5 Foods That Will Put You In A Rotten Mood

5 Foods That Will Put You In A Rotten Mood

Your diet can really wreck your mood—and not just because you still feel guilty for plowing through a pint of praline pecan ice cream the other night. "My clients easily make the connection between being hungry and being in a bad mood—a.k.a. 'hangry'—but they don't often realize that what they eat on a daily basis can also have a direct impact on their mood," says Emily Edison, RD, a dietitian and sports nutritionist in Seattle. There's plenty of research proving the food-mood connection as well—feasting regularly on the wrong menu can spiral you into real depression. Here, the top offenders: 1. Refined carbohydrates In recent years, simple carbs have been vilified for their fat-promoting, nutrient-lacking qualities. Recently, researchers at Columbia University decided to see if having refined carbohydrates in your diet can make you depressed. Well, dust off the Paleo cookbook, because the answer is yes: Using data from the Women's Health Initiative—which is tracking more than 70,000 women—the researchers found that the higher a woman's blood sugar rose after eating sugar and refined grains, the higher her risk of depression. In the study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, the researchers also found the reverse to be true: A diet high in whole grains and produce actually lowers a woman's risk of depression. (Lose up to 15 pounds WITHOUT dieting with Eat Clean to Get Lean, our 21-day clean-eating meal plan.) 2. Sugar Considering the research on refined carbs, it's easy to see how sugar would also contribute to a higher risk of depression. Sure enough, multiple studies suggest a link. A diet high in sugar can raise levels of inflammation throughout the body and brain—and now research is tying inflammation to higher incidences of depres Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Depression

Diabetes And Depression

The impact of this widespread disease on the brain is often overlooked. The complications of uncontrolled diabetes are well recognized: nerve damage, kidney disease, blindness, and circulation problems that affect the extremities. The disease’s impact on the brain, however, is often overlooked. This oversight could spell trouble for millions of Americans who face the daily challenge of controlling their blood sugar. Get more news from "On the Brain" the Harvard Mahoney Neuroscience Institute newsletter An estimated 26 million Americans have diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. Another 79 million have prediabetes, a condition in which blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough for a diabetes diagnosis. A growing body of evidence suggests that the cognitive health of millions with the disease is as much at risk as are other body systems from the effects of out-of-control blood sugar. “Unlike for certain other diseases, scientists originally didn’t know where to look in the brain for the effects of diabetes,” said Gail Musen, an HMS assistant professor of psychiatry and assistant investigator in the Section on Clinical, Behavioral, and Outcomes Research at Joslin Diabetes Center. “We knew, theoretically, that because it affects so much else in the body, it also could affect the brain,” she said. Since Musen’s first study of diabetes and brain function nearly a decade ago, the scientific community has gained a greater understanding of how diabetes—primarily type 1 diabetes—affects brain function. Shrinking brain Musen’s 2006 study, reported in the journal Diabetes, was the first comprehensive study of density changes in the brain’s gray matter as a result of type 1 diabetes. Its findings suggested that persistent Continue reading >>

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