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Can Donating Blood Cause Low Blood Sugar

Donating Blood With Type 1 Diabetes

Donating Blood With Type 1 Diabetes

According to the American Red Cross, every two seconds someone needs blood. We all know that donating blood is a worthy thing to do. But the donation of blood assumes a cooperative body and a donation system that will accept the blood running through your veins. So what does that mean for those with T1D? Many are under the assumption that a diagnosis means they can’t donate. Wrong. For the most part, giving blood is an option, but it does depend on the following: Where you live Your blood sugar levels What type of insulin you are taking Consider your own safety T1D should not put you at any greater risk of feeling feint or nauseous while donating. Some T1D patients report their BGLs run slightly higher for 3-5 days after donating. Your immediate levels shouldn’t be influenced either way — you won’t suddenly spike or bottom out. Doctors do say your A1c or HbA1c (glycated hemoglobin, which measures one’s 3-month blood sugar level) may be falsely lowered, a temporary effect thought to be caused by blood loss and accelerated red blood cell turnover. If you want to donate, but are concerned about the health consequences, talk to your doctor first. After donating it’s crucial to closely monitor your blood sugar levels and re-nourish your body. Increase your fluid intake and consider eating more iron-rich foods for a few days. Be smart. Use common sense. Take care of yourself the same way you always would. US donor requirements to be in good overall health (the day they plan to donate) have a weight of 110 pounds or more be at least 17 years old (in most states) When you arrive to donate, a donation professional will take you through a screening process requiring you to disclose any health conditions, including T1D. You should be ready to provide additional informa Continue reading >>

Can I Still Donate Blood If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Still Donate Blood If I Have Diabetes?

20 Books People with Diabetes Should Read Your diabetes should be under controlled before you donate blood To donate blood with diabetes, your blood sugar needs to be in your target range . Your A1C should be less than 7%, as recommended by the American Diabetes Association. If your blood sugars and diabetes are not well controlled, you shouldnt donate blood. Its up to you to let the Red Cross know. If you are unsure about the condition of your diabetes, discuss your concerns with your healthcare provider. They will be able to help you decide if giving blood is a good idea, or if you should wait until your diabetes is better managed. You should be in good overall health before you donate blood with diabetes Besides having your blood sugars in control, you should also have other conditions under control. For example, your blood pressure should be less than 180/100 mmHg to give blood, which is higher than 140/90 mmHg that is the recommended blood pressure for people with diabetes. Conversely, if your blood pressure is less than 90/50 mmHg, you wont be able to donate blood. Besides diabetes, they will also ask you about other conditions, and medications which you may be taking. Diabetes medications generally wont keep you from giving blood in the US, but there is a Red Cross list of other medications that shouldnt be taken if you are donating blood, including blood thinners. The Red Cross representative will screen you for conditions and medications which may affect your ability to donate blood with diabetes and related health conditions. Another thing to know is that if you plan to donate platelets, you should not take aspirin or blood thinners for several days prior to your donation. 1 If you have heart complications from your diabetes, there are some things that you ne Continue reading >>

13 Diabetes Myths That Don't Lower Blood Sugar

13 Diabetes Myths That Don't Lower Blood Sugar

Skipping meals could potentially push your blood glucose higher. When you don't eat for several hours because of sleep or other reasons, your body fuels itself on glucose released from the liver. For many people with type 2 diabetes (PWDs type 2), the liver doesn't properly sense that the blood has ample glucose already, so it continues to pour out more. Eating something with a little carbohydrate signals the liver to stop sending glucose into the bloodstream and can tamp down high numbers. Skipping meals can also lead to overeating, which can cause an increase in weight. And if you take certain diabetes medications that stimulate the body's own insulin such as common sulfonylureas, or you take insulin with injections or a pump, you risk having your blood glucose drop too low when you skip or delay meals. Going Low-Carb Low-carb diets "are not balanced and deprive the body of needed fiber, vitamins, and minerals," says Constance Brown-Riggs, M.S.Ed, R.D., CDE, CDN, author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes (Career Press, 2010). Recently, Brown-Riggs counseled a PWD type 2 who ate very little carbohydrate. The result: poor energy and severe headaches. Brown-Riggs helped the person balance out his meal plan by suggesting fruits, grains, and other carb-containing foods. "His headaches subsided, his energy level was restored, and he was happy to learn that he could eat healthy sources of carbohydrate and manage his blood glucose levels successfully," Brown-Riggs says. The keys to success are to manage portions of all foods, spread your food out over your day, and work with your health care team to devise an individualized meal, activity, and medication plan. Eating Pasta Al Dente It is best to eat your spaghetti al dente, says David J. A. Jenkins, M. Continue reading >>

Can Diabetic People Donate Blood?

Can Diabetic People Donate Blood?

In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration does not have any regulatory restrictions against diabetics donating blood other than if the individual has received bovine source insulin since 1980. The concern here is not the diabetes but rather the bovine spongiform encephalopathy. As bovine source insulins were not widely available in the US, the diabetic would have had to specifically import it from Europe. (Of note, the FDA regulations require that is the donor answers that they are not certain whether they received bovine source insulin, they are deferred. Many donors answer "I do not know" and are therefore deferred when in reality they have not been exposed as it was not available in the US.) Donors may mistake this deferral as being due to their having diabetes. Here is the FDA guidance (Each blood collection center in the US can have criteria more stringent that either the FDA and AABB so there is some variability among blood centers. At the collection center where I work, we allow donors with diabetes, whether controlled with diet, oral hypoglycemics, or insulin, to donate. The only instance where I can think where diabetes would have a negative affect on blood product and therefore an adverse effect on the patient would be in the rare instances where we collect granulocytes. If the donor had poor glucose control, this could impair neutrophil function. Since granulocyte donors are usually stimulated with corticosteroids, which would worsen glucose control, diabetics are deferred from granulocyte donation at my institution so this is not an issue. Continue reading >>

Can I Donate Blood If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Donate Blood If I Have Diabetes?

Donating blood is a selfless way to help others. Blood donations help people who need transfusions for many types of medical conditions, and you may decide to donate blood for a variety of reasons. A pint of donated blood may help up to three people. Although you’re allowed donate blood if you have diabetes, there are a few requirements that you’ll need to meet. If you have diabetes and want to donate blood, it’s generally safe for you to do so. People with type 1 and type 2 diabetes are eligible to give blood donations. You should have your condition under control and be in otherwise good health before you donate blood. Having your diabetes under control means that you maintain healthy blood sugar levels. This requires you to be vigilant about your diabetes on a daily basis. You need to be aware of your blood sugar levels throughout each day and make sure you eat a proper diet and exercise sufficiently. Living a healthy lifestyle will contribute to keeping your blood sugar levels in a healthy range. Your doctor may also prescribe certain medications to help manage your diabetes. These medications shouldn’t impact your ability to donate blood. If you want to donate blood but are concerned about your diabetes, talk to your doctor before your donation. They can answer any questions you may have and help you determine whether this is the best option for you. Health screening Blood donation centers have a screening process that requires you to disclose any preexisting health conditions. It’s also a time where a certified Red Cross professional will evaluate you and measure your basic vital statistics, such as your temperature, pulse, and blood pressure. They will take a small blood sample (likely from a finger prick) to determine your hemoglobin levels as well. If Continue reading >>

Whole Blood Donation Affects The Interpretation Of Hemoglobin A1c

Whole Blood Donation Affects The Interpretation Of Hemoglobin A1c

Abstract Several factors, including changed dynamics of erythrocyte formation and degradation, can influence the degree of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) formation thereby affecting its use in monitoring diabetes. This study determines the influence of whole blood donation on HbA1c in both non-diabetic blood donors and blood donors with type 2 diabetes. In this observational study, 23 non-diabetic blood donors and 21 blood donors with type 2 diabetes donated 475 mL whole blood and were followed prospectively for nine weeks. Each week blood samples were collected and analyzed for changes in HbA1c using three secondary reference measurement procedures. Twelve non-diabetic blood donors (52.2%) and 10 (58.8%) blood donors with type 2 diabetes had a significant reduction in HbA1c following blood donation (reduction >-4.28%, P < 0.05). All non-diabetic blood donors with a normal ferritin concentration predonation had a significant reduction in HbA1c. In the non-diabetic group the maximum reduction was -11.9%, in the type 2 diabetes group -12.0%. When eligible to donate again, 52.2% of the non-diabetic blood donors and 41.2% of the blood donors with type 2 diabetes had HbA1c concentrations significantly lower compared to their predonation concentration (reduction >-4.28%, P < 0.05). Patients with type 2 diabetes contributing to whole blood donation programs can be at risk of falsely lowered HbA1c. This could lead to a wrong interpretation of their glycemic control by their general practitioner or internist. Continue reading >>

Common Myths About Blood Donations...

Common Myths About Blood Donations...

What's holding you back from giving life to your community? Each day, hundreds of people roll up their sleeve to give their incredible and lifesaving gift to area hospital patients. One of the things that keeps many from donating blood is a misunderstanding about their eligibility. In truth, there are very few things that may prevent an otherwise healthy person from donating blood. Here are some of the common myths and truths about blood donation. Myth 1 I can't give blood because I have seasonal allergies. Allergies, even those that need to be controlled by medication, will not prevent you from donating blood. Myth 2 I can't give blood because I have high blood pressure. As long as your blood pressure is below 180 systolic (first number) and 100 diastolic (second number) at the time of your donation, you may give blood. Furthermore, medications that you may be taking for high blood pressure do not disqualify you from donating. Myth 3 I can't give blood because I have high cholesterol. A high cholesterol level does not disqualify you from donating, even if medication is used to control it. Myth 4 I can't give blood because I had cancer. While some types of cancer may disqualify you from donating, there are many circumstances under which you may give blood after an appropriate waiting period. Myth 5 I can't give blood because I'm diabetic. Diabetics may give blood as long as the other medical requirements are met. However, the use of bovine-derived insulin will result in deferral from blood donation. Myth 6 I can't give blood because I have epilepsy or seizures. Epilepsy or seizures do not disqualify you from giving as long as you have had no seizures for one year. Myth 7 I can't donate because I'm anemic. Your hemoglobin (iron) level will be checked prior to donating bl Continue reading >>

Why Do People Pass Out While Giving Blood?

Why Do People Pass Out While Giving Blood?

Why Do People Pass Out While Giving Blood? Leigh Ann Morgan began working as a writer in 2004. She has extensive experience in the business field having served as the manager of a $34 million rental property portfolio. Morgan also appeared as a guest on an episode of National Public Radio's "Marketplace Money" in 2005. Some people pass out during blood donation. Blood donation has several benefits for those who have serious injuries and diseases. The Mayo Clinic reports that each blood donation can help up to three people since donor centers divide whole blood into platelets, red blood cells and plasma. Because donation involves the removal of blood from the circulatory system, some people pass out while giving blood or after the blood donation process. During the donation process, a phlebotomist or nurse inserts a needle into the vein of the donor. The collection process itself takes 8 to 10 minutes, according to the American Red Cross. Blood collection continues until 1 pint of blood has accumulated. After this procedure, the phlebotomist or nurse puts a bandage on the donor’s arm to stop any bleeding. During the blood collection process, blood volume decreases, causing a sudden drop in blood pressure. This sudden drop causes some people to pass out while they give blood. Sudden decreases in blood sugar level also cause fainting during blood donation. "Men’s Health" magazine indicates that blood donation also has an emotional component. During emotional stress, the body directs blood flow to the muscles to prepare for the flight or fight response to danger. This diverts blood from the brain, increasing the risk that someone will pass out during the donation process. Some people experience symptoms before they pass out. The Heart Rhythm Society defines the Continue reading >>

10 Surprising Causes Of Blood Sugar Swings You Probably Didn’t Know

10 Surprising Causes Of Blood Sugar Swings You Probably Didn’t Know

1 / 11 What Causes Blood Sugar to Rise and Fall? Whether you were recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or have been living with the disease for several years, you know how fickle blood sugar levels can be, and how important it is that they stay controlled. Proper blood sugar control is key for helping ward off potential diabetes complications, such as kidney disease, nerve damage, vision problems, stroke, and heart disease, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). If you keep your levels in check on a daily basis, it will help you stay energized, focused, and in a good mood. You’ll know if your diabetes is poorly controlled if you experience symptoms such as frequent urination, sores that won’t heal, blurred vision, and unexplained weight loss. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), proper medication, effective meal planning, regular exercise, and use of a blood glucose meter to track your numbers routinely can all help you keep your levels within a healthy range. The ADA recommends blood glucose be 80 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) before meals, and below 180 mg/dL two hours after the start of a meal. Furthermore, the organization recommends getting an A1C test, which measures your average blood glucose over the past two to three months, at least twice per year if your levels are stable and you are meeting treatment goals. Learning how different habits can cause your blood sugar to fluctuate can help you better predict how your levels will swing. You may be more likely to experience hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar if you have advanced-stage diabetes, according to the ADA. Meanwhile, high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, may be caused by factors such as not using enough insulin or other diabetes medication, not following a prop Continue reading >>

Giving Blood May Provide Health Benefits For Obese

Giving Blood May Provide Health Benefits For Obese

Some obese people may improve their health by donating blood, a preliminary study from Germany suggests. In the study, obese people with metabolic syndrome who had blood drawn experienced a reduction in blood pressure, along with other changes that linked with a reduced risk of heart disease, the researchers said. Metabolic syndrome is a collection of symptoms associated with heart disease, including high blood sugar, high blood pressureand low levels of "good" cholesterol. The syndrome has been linked with increased risks of stroke, coronary artery disease and Type 2 diabetes. The main treatment is weight loss. The findings suggest doctors might consider blood donation as a possible treatment for people with metabolic syndrome who have above-normal iron levels (a common situation), said study researcher Andreas Michalsen, of the Charité-University Medical Centre in Berlin. However larger trials are needed to confirm the results and evaluate the long-term risks of such a treatment, Michalsen said. Dr. Pieter Cohen, an assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and a general internist at Cambridge Health Alliance, said blood donation should not be recommended as a treatment for metabolic syndrome unless more studies are done. "You want to know [that] it would make them live longer," or reduce the actual risk of heart attack and stroke, not just markers linked with those conditions, Cohen said. Blood pressure drop Previous studies have shown high iron levels are associated with metabolic syndrome and Type 2 diabetes, the researchers said. And one small study found that bloodletting reduced blood pressure in patients with treatment-resistant high blood pressure. However, the effects of blood withdrawal on people with metabolic syndrome have not been rigorou Continue reading >>

Type 1 & 2 Diabetes: Five Simple Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Type 1 & 2 Diabetes: Five Simple Ways To Lower Your Blood Sugar

Diabetes can seem complicated and overwhelming, full of charts and devices and concerned-looking medical professionals. There’s talk of hormones and endocrine systems, of obscure organizations and dietary plans. It all comes down to this: What it’s really about-the one, single thing it’s about-is lowering that sky-high blood sugar number. That’s it. Everything follows from getting that blood sugar number down. It doesn’t matter how you got there, and it doesn’t matter what you did. What’s important, what’s critical for you right here, right now, is to lower that number. Here are five simple ways to lower your blood sugar. The list doesn’t including the most obvious choices (medication) because you know them already. These are some methods you might not have thought about. 1. Stay on your feet The simple answer that doctors give diabetics (especially type 2s) who want lower their blood sugars is to exercise. And it works! But what if you’re not the exercising type? What if the sight of a treadmill or exercise bike or running shoes gives you the fits? That’s okay, too, actually. You might want to consider simply spending a chunk of each day on your feet. According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, simple activities like sweeping the floor or dusting the shelves or taking the dog out for a walk are all healthy ways to stay active. You will burn calories, and you will move that blood sugar number down. 2. Drink water Believe it or not, evidence suggests that staying hydrated can have an effect on blood sugars and whether or not people develop type 2 diabetes. Is the effect it a big one? We’re not sure yet. But a 3,000-person study cited in the New York Times showed that people who drank the most water-17 to 34 ounces a day-were 30 Continue reading >>

How To Stabilize Blood Sugar After Blood Donation

How To Stabilize Blood Sugar After Blood Donation

How to Stabilize Blood Sugar After Blood Donation. People give blood for many reasons. Whether it's for medical testing or a Red Cross blood donation, a reduction in fluids and minerals can make some people feel dizzy and light headed afterward. To combat these effects, there are things you can do to stabilize blood sugar after blood donation. Prepare in advance. Giving blood means a drop in your energy level. Provide your body with the fuel it needs to fight this drop. When you plan to give blood, eat regular meals and drink plenty of fluids beforehand unless your doctor gives you other instructions. (Some types of testing require fasting beforehand, for example.) Take advantage of available snacks and drinks after donating blood. Often, there will be cookies and juice available at Red Cross blood donation centers. The purpose is twofold; as a courtesy and to assist you in restoring the fluids and nutrients that you've lost through blood donation. Without this replenishment, you may feel light-headed and dizzy. Fainting after blood donation can also be a problem. It's important to eat and drink after donating blood; particularly before attempting to drive. Bring a small snack; especially if you're undergoing blood testing where snacks may not be readily available. A high energy granola bar and a sports drink can be good choices to help return your body to healthy blood sugar levels. Drink plenty of fluids right after donation, and also throughout the remainder of the day. Dehydration caused in part from blood donation can cause headaches and cramping that makes you feel unwell. Make certain you overcome any feelings of dizziness or light-headedness before leaving the donation area. If necessary, find a comfortable seat and stay a short while until you feel like yoursel Continue reading >>

Myths And Facts About Donating Blood - Indiatimes.com

Myths And Facts About Donating Blood - Indiatimes.com

Thought of as a selfless act, donating blood is a noble cause indeed. And yet very few of us take the time out to donate blood at blood donation drives or attend blood donor awareness campaigns. From blood donation causes weakness to the threat of catching diseases, several myths about blood donations abound. Today, Dr. Rani Prem Kumar, Consultant, Blood Bank at Moolchand Medcity , helps clear the air and tells us which myths and facts about donating blood are true, and which false. Fact: False. However, many people feel that donating blood makes them feel weak. Again, this isnt true. The thread of truth here arises from the fact that it takes a day or two to replenish the fluid volume in the body and three months for the regeneration of red cells to donate more blood. Myth: One is advised to take complete rest for a day after donating blood. Fact: False. One can easily resume his or her normal day-to-day routine after donating blood, but should take care of the following: Drink at least 10-12 glasses of water including juices within 24 hours following blood donation. Myth: Blood donation is a painful procedure. Fact: False. Donating blood is not painful at all. One only feels a slight pinching sensation when the needle pricks the arms. Myth: I should not donate blood frequently; it will make my body weak. Fact: False. A healthy person can donate blood four times a year with a minimum a 3 months gap between each blood donation. Myth: Can donating blood make me feel stressed with episodes of severe headache and vomiting? Fact: No, blood donation can not cause episodes of headache and vomiting if the blood pressure of the donor is within normal limits prior to donation. Myth: I should not donate blood frequently; it will lower my bodys immunity level. Fact: No, your body Continue reading >>

Dos And Donts Of Blood Donation

Dos And Donts Of Blood Donation

First Published: Mon, Jun 17 2013. 07 38 PM IST Eat before and after blood donation to avoid fatigue Delhi-based entrepreneur Neelam Saraf , 40, had to rush back to work after donating blood. She had started the day with a minimal breakfast (a toast and a cup of tea) and did not have the biscuits and tea offered after the blood donation at the hospital. As soon as she reached office, she felt nauseous and faint. She felt better after she had had some juice. But she couldnt understand what had gone wrong. Karuna Chaturvedi , consultant, dietetics and clinical nutrition, Saket City Hospital, Delhi, says Saraf was wrong on two counts. One, she didnt fuel up properly in the morning before donating blood and second, she did not hydrate herself immediately after the donation. There are some simple but essential diet Dos and Donts that must be followed both before and after blood donation. The first and most important rulenever donate blood on an empty stomach. Eat a wholesome meal about 2-3 hours before donating to keep your blood sugar stable, says Dr Chaturvedi. The timing of the meal is important too. You need to allow the food to be digested properly before the blood is drawn. Eating just before donation might unsettle your stomach a bit and make you nauseous, says Dr Chaturvedi. In the case of regular donors, she adds, it is better not to be on a strict diet around the time of donation. If youre a regular donor (you are permitted to donate blood once every three months), eat iron-rich foods at least a week or two before the date (an iron-rich meal on the day of donation does not help as iron stores take time to build up), says Annapurna Agrawal , nutritionist at the gym and fitness centre Snap Fitness India, Bangalore. Removing red blood cells removes iron stores from y Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In People Without Diabetes - Topic Overview

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In People Without Diabetes - Topic Overview

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is most common in people who have diabetes. If you have already been diagnosed with diabetes and need more information about low blood sugar, see the topics: You may have briefly felt the effects of low blood sugar when you've gotten really hungry or exercised hard without eating enough. This happens to nearly everyone from time to time. It's easy to correct and usually nothing to worry about. But low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, can also be an ongoing problem. It occurs when the level of sugar in your blood drops too low to give your body energy. Ongoing problems with low blood sugar can be caused by: Medicines. Metabolic problems. Alcohol use. Symptoms can be different depending on how low your blood sugar level drops. Mild hypoglycemia can make you feel hungry or like you want to vomit. You could also feel jittery or nervous. Your heart may beat fast. You may sweat. Or your skin might turn cold and clammy. Moderate hypoglycemia often makes people feel short-tempered, nervous, afraid, or confused. Your vision may blur. You could also feel unsteady or have trouble walking. Severe hypoglycemia can cause you to pass out. You could have seizures. It could even cause a coma or death. If you've had hypoglycemia during the night, you may wake up tired or with a headache. And you may have nightmares. Or you may sweat so much during the night that your pajamas or sheets are damp when you wake up. To diagnose hypoglycemia, your doctor will do a physical exam and ask you questions about your health and any medicines you take. You will need blood tests to check your blood sugar levels. Some tests might include not eating (fasting) and watching for symptoms. Other tests might involve eating a meal that could cause symptoms of low blood sugar seve Continue reading >>

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