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Can Diabetics Take Zinc Supplements?

4 Minerals That Support Healthy Blood Sugar

4 Minerals That Support Healthy Blood Sugar

There’s a long debate about macronutrients (protein, carbs, and fat) and blood sugar, but there’s a lot less information out there about micronutrients (vitamins and minerals). Here’s a look at four minerals that are important for blood sugar control, plus some ideas for getting them from delicious, nutrient-dense Paleo recipes. A quick review (if you already know what glucose and insulin are, just skip the list): Blood sugar: the amount of sugar (glucose) that’s in your blood. It’s fine and normal for blood sugar to go up after a meal, but then it needs to go back down again. Too much glucose hanging out in your bloodstream for a long time is very dangerous. Insulin: the hormone responsible for clearing sugar (glucose) from the bloodstream. Insulin resistance: when insulin says “please take this glucose out of the bloodstream and put it in a fat/muscle cell” but your body doesn’t “listen” to the insulin and blood sugar stays high. This is very bad news. Type 2 Diabetes: People with type 2 diabetes have chronic insulin resistance, so they have high blood sugar a lot of the time. (Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease and a totally different animal – here, “diabetes” means type 2). There are reams and reams of studies on diabetes because it’s officially a “disease” so it gets a lot of attention. “Problems managing blood sugar” isn’t officially a “disease” until it gets to a particular cut-off, so it doesn’t get as much attention. But type 2 diabetes doesn’t come from nowhere. It starts with problems managing blood sugar that steadily get worse over time. Diabetes is the extreme end of the spectrum, not some new and totally unrelated issue. All of this is to say: there are a lot of studies in this post on diabetes and peopl Continue reading >>

6 Of The Best Dietary Supplements For A Diabetic Diet—and 3 You Should Avoid

6 Of The Best Dietary Supplements For A Diabetic Diet—and 3 You Should Avoid

Should I take supplements? From cinnamon and magnesium to herbal formulas claiming to smack down high blood sugar, “diabetes-friendly” supplements are popping up in health food stores and drugstores and in the medicine cabinets of more and more people with diabetes. More than 50 percent of people with diabetes say they’ve used dietary supplements, according to one 2011 study—and at least one in four has given herbal remedies a try. The big question: Should you? “People with diabetes may be looking for something that seems less potent than a medication or something that will treat other health issues beyond blood sugar control, such as high cholesterol,” notes Laura Shane-McWhorter, PharmD, a University of Utah professor of pharmacotherapy and author of The American Diabetes Association Guide to Herbs & Nutritional Supplements: What You Need to Know from Aloe to Zinc. But experts are reluctant to recommend supplements to people with diabetes for two important health reasons. First, there’s virtually no research on long-term safety. Second, no supplement controls blood sugar as effectively as diabetes drugs (in combination with a healthy lifestyle). “There are no miracle treatments for diabetes,” Shane-McWhorter says. “The most important thing to know if you have diabetes is that no supplement will take care of it for you. Diabetes is a condition that can be well-controlled with a healthy lifestyle plus medication if needed. A supplement can’t replace those.” And new science is changing the supplement landscape. In consulting the latest research as well as supplement experts for this report on the best-studied and most widely used supplements, we found that some popular pills—chromium, we’re talking about you—aren’t living up to their reput Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

Is It Safe To Take Supplements If You Have Diabetes?

You will find supplements for anything and everything these days. Even when you do not suffer from an ailment, supplements are suggested to keep you healthy and ailment-free. According to CDC, use of supplements is common among US adult population – over 50% adults used supplements during 2003-2006, with multivitamins/multiminerals being the most commonly used. So when you are a diabetic, especially if you have prediabetes and type-2 diabetes, you may find yourself confronting a large number of options for supplements that claim to support, reduce and even cure your diabetes. Diabetes is quite a frustrating disorder and you may find yourself tempted to try out these supplements one after another. But is it really safe to take supplements when you are a diabetic? Let us find out. But before that you need to understand what exactly supplements are. Defining Supplements As the name suggests, a supplement is anything that adds on to something. A dietary supplement is therefore something that one takes in addition to one’s diet to get proper nutrition. US Congress in the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act defines dietary supplements as having the following characteristics: It is a product that is intended to supplement the diet; It contains one or more dietary ingredients (including vitamins, minerals, herbs and other botanicals, amino acids, and other substances) or their constituents; It is intended to be taken by mouth as a pill, capsule, tablet, or liquid; It is not represented for use as a conventional food or as sole item of a mean or a diet; and, It is labeled on the front panel as being a dietary supplement. Now let us look at some general benefits and risks of taking supplements. We will discuss these in context of diabetes later in the article. Benefit Continue reading >>

Zinc Supplements Can Help People With Diabetes

Zinc Supplements Can Help People With Diabetes

If you are healthy, you may not need to take a zinc supplement. But if your health isn’t good enough, a new meta-analysis indicates that you probably need to take one. The study categorizes people with type 2 diabetes as “non-healthy.” The mineral zinc plays an important role in how our bodies use insulin and in the metabolism of carbohydrates. When non-healthy people take a zinc supplement, the new study found that they can “significantly reduce total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides.” An earlier meta-analysis focused entirely on people with diabetes. It found that zinc helps us manage both our blood glucose and lipids better. The journal Nutrition and Metabolism published the new meta-analysis in 2015 as “Effects of Zinc supplementation on serum lipids.” Some of these same researchers published the earlier meta-analysis, “Effects of Zinc Supplementation on Diabetes Mellitus,” in the journal Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome in 2015. The full texts of both studies are free online. Low levels of zinc can be deadly One third of all the people in the world are deficient in zinc. Marginal zinc deficiency is common in developed countries, and severe zinc deficiency is common in developing countries. It is a major factor contributing to the deaths of 1.4 percent of people worldwide. It is associated with diabetes, cancer, and many other diseases. The new meta-analysis reviewed and summarized the findings of 32 studies involving more than 14,000 people. The earlier meta-analysis of people who have diabetes included three studies of people with type 1 and 22 studies of people with type 2 diabetes. The earlier study was the first and apparently the only meta-analysis of zinc supplementation for people with diabetes. How much zinc to take You ne Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Patients Improve Fasting Glucose With Zinc

Prediabetes Patients Improve Fasting Glucose With Zinc

Six-month regimen of 30 mg zinc sulfate once daily found effective compared with those on placebo, according to study. In Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice, Australian researchers used a cohort of 55 adults, mean age of 44, to assess whether participants would improve fasting glucose with zinc supplementation. Adults with prediabetes randomly assigned daily zinc supplementation saw improved fasting plasma glucose over 6 months vs. those assigned a placebo, study findings show. They found those in the zinc supplement group also had statistically significant improvements in beta-cell function, insulin resistance and insulin sensitivity. Many genetic variants have been associated with glucose homeostasis and type 2 diabetes in genome-wide association studies. Zinc is an essential micronutrient that is important for β-cell function and glucose homeostasis. So they tested the hypothesis that zinc intake could influence the glucose-raising effect of specific variants. Chronic elevations in fasting or postprandial glucose levels are the cardinal features of type 2 diabetes (T2D), a common complex disease caused by the interplay of genetic and lifestyle factors. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified genetic loci reproducibly associated with glycemic traits or T2D. These studies improved our understanding of the mechanisms underlying impaired glucose homeostasis and T2D, potentially aiding the development of novel and individualized medical therapies. To address these gaps in the literature, they conducted a meta-analysis that included 14 cohorts, totaling up to 45,821 participants, to test the hypothesis that zinc intake modifies the cross-sectional association between fasting glucose levels and genetic variants known to be related to glycemia and zinc m Continue reading >>

Zinc And Diabetes

Zinc And Diabetes

Z is the last letter in the alphabet, which means it often receives little or no attention. Yet Z is the first letter in the word “zinc.” How much thought have you ever given to zinc? Maybe some, if you take zinc supplements for a cold, for example. But new research indicates that zinc is something else that people with diabetes should think about. Why? Read on. In case you’re wondering what the heck zinc does, it’s helpful to know that it’s an essential mineral that plays very important roles in the body. The body can’t make zinc, so we must take it in from food sources. Zinc is stored in the muscles, blood cells, retina of the eye, skin, bone, kidney, liver, pancreas, and in men, prostate. What does zinc do for us? Primarily, zinc helps the immune system function properly. It’s also needed for cell growth and division, wound healing, and the breakdown of carbohydrate for energy. We need zinc to maintain our sense of taste and smell, too. Finally, zinc is an antioxidant, protecting our cells from free radicals, or molecules that can wreak havoc and possibly lead to heart disease and cancer. Zinc is found in many foods. The main sources of zinc in the American diet are red meat, poultry, and seafood, but it’s also found in legumes, whole grains, nuts, and dairy foods. Zinc is better absorbed from animal foods than from plant foods, since compounds called phytates that are found in plants can hinder its absorption. Daily zinc requirements are 11 milligrams for adult men and 8 milligrams for adult women. Symptoms of zinc deficiency include stunted growth (in children), hair loss, diarrhea, decreased appetite, eye and skin lesions, delayed wound healing, and weight loss. People with chronic gastrointestinal disorders, such as Crohn disease, are at risk for Continue reading >>

Zinc Supplementation In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Zinc Supplementation In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Does zinc supplementation affect glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes? A lack of zinc has been associated with a number of chronic disorders, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Because zinc may affect glucose levels in both humans and animals, a team led by researchers in the School of Molecular Bioscience at the University of Sydney in Australia explored the effects of taking zinc supplements on the management of diabetes. Their study, “Zinc and glycemic control: A meta-analysis of randomized placebo controlled supplementation trials in humans,” was published online ahead of print in November 2012. It appears in the Journal of Trace Elements in Medicine and Biology. To gauge the effects of zinc supplementation on patients’ fasting blood glucose levels, HbA1c, serum zinc concentration, and serum insulin levels, the researchers conducted a meta-analysis of randomized trials. The analysis included 14 studies published before July 2011, and it compiled data on 3,978 participants. The results showed that there was a small but significant reduction in patients’ fasting glucose when they took zinc supplements. Additionally, HbA1c levels generally decreased in the patients who took zinc, compared to those who did not, while patients’ plasma zinc concentrations increased significantly following supplementation. The researchers did not find significant effects in serum insulin concentrations. The study authors conducted secondary analyses of the effects of zinc supplementation in patients with chronic metabolic disease, including type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. They found that patients who were living with chronic diseases showed larger decreases in glucose concentrations after taking zinc than patients without Continue reading >>

Prospective Study Of Zinc Intake And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes In Women

Prospective Study Of Zinc Intake And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes In Women

OBJECTIVE The aim of this study is to investigate the intake of zinc in relation to risk of type 2 diabetes in U.S. women. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Dietary intakes of zinc and other nutrients were assessed and updated using a validated food frequency questionnaire from 1980 to 2002 among 82,297 women who were aged 33–60 years at baseline in 1980 and followed up to 2004 in the Nurses' Health Study. RESULTS During the 24 years of follow-up, 6,030 incident cases of type 2 diabetes were ascertained. After adjustment of lifestyle and dietary risk factors, the relative risks (RRs) (95% CI) of type 2 diabetes comparing the highest with the lowest quintiles were 0.90 (0.82–0.99) (Ptrend = 0.04) for total zinc intake and 0.92 (0.84–1.00) (Ptrend = 0.009) for dietary zinc intake from food sources, respectively. We further found an inverse association for dietary zinc to heme iron ratio. After multivariate adjustment of covariates, the RRs (95% CI) across quintiles of this ratio were 1.0 (reference), 0.93 (0.86–1.01), 0.86 (0.79–0.94), 0.82 (0.75–0.90), and 0.72 (0.66–0.80), respectively (Ptrend < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS Higher zinc intake may be associated with a slightly lower risk of type 2 diabetes in women. More studies are warranted to confirm this association and to explore potential mechanisms. Zinc is an essential trace element that exists in all cells and is required by thousands of proteins for catalytic, structural, or transcriptional functions. Since the 1930s when zinc was first demonstrated to be an integral element of the insulin crystalline structure (1), many studies have been conducted to shed light on the relationship between zinc and insulin action. Animal studies have shown that zinc is able to not only stabilize and prevent the degradation of i Continue reading >>

Zinc In Relation To Diabetes And Oxidative Disease

Zinc In Relation To Diabetes And Oxidative Disease

Zinc in Relation to Diabetes and Oxidative Disease Human Nutrition & Food Management, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 Search for other works by this author on: The Journal of Nutrition, Volume 130, Issue 5, 1 May 2000, Pages 1509S1511S, Robert A. DiSilvestro; Zinc in Relation to Diabetes and Oxidative Disease, The Journal of Nutrition, Volume 130, Issue 5, 1 May 2000, Pages 1509S1511S, Theoretically, zinc can exert a number of indirect antioxidant functions. Researchers at our laboratory have found evidence to support this concept by studying mild zinc deficiency in rats. This state produces low resistance to chemically induced liver oxidant injury, and it produces high vulnerability of lipoproteins to oxidation. We are building on this work in rats to test a hypothesis in humans that increased zinc intake will protect against oxidant stress in persons with tendencies for both moderate zinc deficiency and high oxidant stress. This hypothesis has been tested in postmenopausal, type 2 diabetic women. A 3-wk supplementation with zinc (30 mg/d as glycine-chelate) raised initially low plasma zinc values to above normal values and increased plasma activities of 5-nucleotidase. However, the latter values were still well below normal. Lipoprotein oxidation tendencies, a measure of oxidant stress, were not altered by the zinc treatment. A new project has been initiated to determine whether both a higher dose and longer duration of zinc treatment will normalize 5-nucleotidase activities and affect the indices of oxidant stress. The latter will be considered in terms of both zinc supplementation and supplementation of zinc plus vitamin C, another problem nutrient for diabetic persons. mild zinc deficiency , rats , humans , diabetes , oxidant stress An antioxidant ma Continue reading >>

Take Zinc If Your Diabetes Is High

Take Zinc If Your Diabetes Is High

If you are healthy, you may not need to take a zinc supplement. But if your health isn’t good enough, a new meta-analysis indicates that you probably need to take one. The study categorizes people with type 2 diabetes as “non-healthy.” The mineral zinc plays an important role in how our bodies use insulin and in the metabolism of carbohydrates. When non-healthy people take a zinc supplement, the new study found that they can “significantly reduce total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and triglycerides.” An earlier meta-analysis focused entirely on people with diabetes. It found that zinc helps us manage both our blood glucose and lipids better. The journal Nutrition and Metabolism published the new meta-analysis in 2015 as “Effects of Zinc supplementation on serum lipids.” Some of these same researchers published the earlier meta-analysis, “Effects of Zinc Supplementation on Diabetes Mellitus,” in the journal Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome in 2015. The full texts of both studies are free online. Low levels of zinc can be deadly One third of all the people in the world are deficient in zinc. Marginal zinc deficiency is common in developed countries, and severe zinc deficiency is common in developing countries. It is a major factor contributing to the deaths of 1.4 percent of people worldwide. It is associated with diabetes, cancer, and many other diseases. The new meta-analysis reviewed and summarized the findings of 32 studies involving more than 14,000 people. The earlier meta-analysis of people who have diabetes included three studies of people with type 1 and 22 studies of people with type 2 diabetes. The earlier study was the first and apparently the only meta-analysis of zinc supplementation for people with diabetes. How much zinc to take You ne Continue reading >>

Zinc Deficiency And Its Association With Diabetes

Zinc Deficiency And Its Association With Diabetes

Zinc Deficiency And Its Association With Diabetes This is an Excerpt from diabetes book, "Reverse Your Type 2 Diabetes, Scientifically. " Copyright All rights reserved. We are facing an Epidemic of Zinc Deficiency with its horrendous health consequences. Zinc is an essential trace element that exists in all cells and is required by thousands of chemical reactions in the body. Zinc is involved in the synthesis, storage and secretion of insulin, as well as insulin action. Zinc is also a strong antioxidant. Several animal studies have shown Zinc deficiency to be associated with high risk of Type 2 as well as Type 1 diabetes, but there are very few human studies. In one such study (1), researchers investigated the relationship between dietary intake of Zinc, and diabetes and coronary artery disease in 1769 rural individuals and 1806 urban individuals in . The authors concluded that low dietary zinc was associated with an increased risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, and coronary artery disease in urban subjects only. In another study (2), "Nurses' Health Study," in which 82,297 women in the were followed for 24 years, researchers concluded that higher Zinc intake may be associated with a slightly lower risk of Type 2 diabetes in women. In addition to low dietary intake, Type 2 diabetics also have increased urinary loss of Zinc if their diabetes is not controlled. Can Zinc Supplementation Help Type 2 Diabetes? In an animal study (3), researchers gave Zinc orally to Type 2 diabetic mice for 4 weeks. They observed a significant improvement in blood glucose level as well as a reduction in insulin resistance. In addition, Zinc treatment caused weight loss and a decrease in high blood pressure (hypertension) in these mice. In another study (4), Zinc supple Continue reading >>

Vitamins And Minerals

Vitamins And Minerals

Tweet Depending on the type of treatment regimen you use to control your diabetes, there are some vitamins and minerals that may be beneficial for your condition. Before adding any vitamins or adding dietary supplements to your daily diet, discuss these changes with your healthcare team and doctor to ensure they are safe alongside any prescribed medication you're on. ALA and GLA ALA (alpha-lipoic acid) is a versatile and potent antioxidant, and may function to help diabetic neuropathy and reduce pain from free-radical damage. Also, some studies link ALA to decreased insulin resistance and thus the control of blood sugar. GLA (gamma-lipoic acid) is another naturally occurring antioxidant that is present in evening primrose oil, borage oil and blackcurrant seed oil. GLA may improve the function of nerves damaged by diabetic neuropathy. Biotin Biotin works in synergy with insulin in the body, and independently increases the activity of the enzyme glucokinase. Glucokinase is responsible for the first step of glucose utilisation, and is therefore an essential component of normal bodily functioning. Glucokinase occurs only in the liver, and in sufferers from diabetes its concentration may be extremely low. Supplements of biotin may have a significant effect on glucose levels for both type 1 and type 2 diabetics. Carnitine (L-Carnitine, Acetyl L-Carnitine) Carnitine is required by the body in order to correctly use body fat in the production of energy. It is naturally occurring and derives from hydrophilic amino acids. Diabetics who try carnitine generally respond well, and high levels of fat in the bloodstream (cholesterol and triglycerides) may fall fast. Carnitine helps to break down fatty acids in the body and binds acyl residues. For these reasons, it may be useful to pre Continue reading >>

A Mineral Every Diabetic Should Know About

A Mineral Every Diabetic Should Know About

Heart disease and diabetes. Add in cancer and you have a trifecta of killer conditions plaguing Americans today. But what if one simple mineral could reduce your risk for two of the three diseases? According to researchers from Sri Lanka, zinc may be that miracle mineral.1 The Zinc-Diabetes Connection We’ve known for years that there is a strong connection between zinc and insulin.2 In fact, people with diabetes frequently have lower levels of zinc than those without diabetes. One reason for this is that diabetics tend to have increased excretion of zinc.3 Additionally, high blood sugar levels — a hallmark of diabetes — create significant oxidative stress. The use of antioxidants has been shown to help improve oxidation, while also enhancing your body’s response to insulin. Unfortunately, the risk of cardiovascular disease among diabetics is more difficult to address. Coronary heart disease is a major cause of death among people with type 2 diabetes. This, of course, is due in large part to obesity, but also to risk factors such as high blood pressure, high LDL cholesterol levels, and an imbalanced ratio of LDL to HDL cholesterol. Taking all of this into account, researchers wanted to know if type 2 diabetics taking a multivitamin with or without zinc would see any improvement in either blood sugar levels or cholesterol levels. Zinc to the Rescue Eighty-six people took part in and completed the study. All had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes for at least two years and were all taking oral diabetes medications (either sulfonylurea, metformin or a combination of the two drugs). Researchers randomly divided the participants into three groups. The first group took a multivitamin/mineral. It contained vitamins A, D3 and E, magnesium, manganese, copper and selenium Continue reading >>

Zinc Benefits For Diabetes: Natural Blood Sugar Control And More

Zinc Benefits For Diabetes: Natural Blood Sugar Control And More

I take zinc when I feel a cold coming on and find that it definitely helps to keep me from getting sick. Many people use zinc for this immune-boosting purpose, but zinc benefits can do more for your body than just that. The benefits of taking zinc include lowering your risk of heart disease, treating Parkinson’s disease, and even helping clear up acne. As if that weren’t enough, yet another reason to love zinc is that it can be helpful for diabetes care. Zinc is highly concentrated in the islet cells of the pancreas, where insulin is produced.[1] Zinc benefits include promoting healthy insulin function, providing natural blood sugar control, and might even help to prevent diabetes in the first place. Zinc Benefits and Insulin Laboratory studies have shown that zinc acts like insulin when administered to insulin-sensitive tissue and that it seems to stimulate insulin action.[1] It binds to insulin receptors, activates insulin signaling pathways, and more, all of which result in glucose uptake by cells and clearance of glucose from the blood.[2] Zinc is also necessary for the correct processing, storage, and secretion of insulin,[1] and it can protect against β-cell loss, a hallmark of diabetes.[3] Because zinc is so closely tied to insulin functioning, zinc deficiency is associated with poor β-cell function and higher incidences of insulin resistance.[3] Reduced Zinc Levels Seen in Diabetic Patients It is not surprising then, to learn that low zinc levels are often associated with diabetes. One study found that prediabetic individuals are more likely to be zinc deficient, and that at any given body mass index (BMI), people with lower zinc levels are more insulin resistant than those with higher zinc levels.[3] Multiple studies have found high rates of zinc deficien Continue reading >>

Effects Of Zinc Supplementation On Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Effects Of Zinc Supplementation On Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review And Meta-analysis

Go to: The number of people with diabetes and pre-diabetes are exponentially increasing. Studies on humans have shown the beneficial effects of Zinc supplementation in patients with diabetes. The present study aims to systematically evaluate the literature and meta-analyze the effects of Zinc supplementation on diabetes. A systematic review of published studies reporting the effects of Zinc supplementations on diabetes mellitus was undertaken. The literature search was conducted in the following databases; PubMed, Web of Science and SciVerse Scopus. A meta-analysis of studies examining the effects of Zinc supplementation on clinical and biochemical parameters in patients with diabetes was performed. The total number of articles included in the present review is 25, which included 3 studies on type-1 diabetes and 22 studies on type-2 diabetes. There were 12 studies comparing the effects of Zinc supplementation on fasting blood glucose in patients with type-2 diabetes. The pooled mean difference in fasting blood glucose between Zinc supplemented and placebo groups was 18.13mg/dl (95%CI:33.85,2.41; p<0.05). 2-h post-prandial blood sugar also shows a similar distinct reduction in (34.87mg/dl [95%CI:75.44; 5.69]) the Zinc treated group. The reduction in HbA1c was 0.54% (95%CI:0.86;0.21) in the Zinc treated group. There were 8 studies comparing the effects of Zinc supplementation on lipid parameters in patients with type-2 diabetes. The pooled mean difference for total cholesterol between Zinc supplemented and placebo groups was 32.37mg/dl (95%CI:57.39,7.35; p<0.05). Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol also showed a similar distinct reduction in the Zinc treated group, the pooled mean difference from random effects analysis was 11.19mg/dl (95%CI:21.14,1.25; p<0.05). Studies h Continue reading >>

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