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Can Diabetics Feel Heart Attacks?

Silent Heart Attacks And Type 2 Diabetes

Silent Heart Attacks And Type 2 Diabetes

With commentary by Elsayed Z. Soliman, M.D., MSc., M.S., study senior author and director of the epidemiological cardiology research center at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Not all heart attacks announce themselves with Hollywood-style crushing chest pain and a drenching, cold sweat. When researchers from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, checked the hearts and medical records of 9,498 people over nine years, they found1 nearly equal numbers of untreated, silent heart attacks and recognized heart attacks that had received medical attention. A silent heart attack may be missed because the symptoms are mild or seem like another, less-urgent health issue – such as indigestion, heartburn, the flu, fatigue or an ache-y muscle – notes Elsayed Z. Soliman, M.D., MSc., M.S., study senior author and director of the epidemiological cardiology research center at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. “People may also decide not to go to the hospital if they’re not sure it’s a heart attack, or if the hospital is far away, they don’t have health insurance or are concerned about the cost of care,” Dr. Soliman told EndocrineWeb.com. But in the study, published May 16 in the journal Circulation, that proved deadly. People who’d had silent heart attacks were three times more likely than those who hadn’t had a heart attack at all to die. Typically, people who’ve had a silent heart attack miss out on emergency care that can save heart muscle during a heart attack such as fast treatment with procedures that open blocked arteries in the heart. They may also miss out on stepped-up attention to blood pressure, cholesterol, diet, exercise and stress afterwards that lower risk Continue reading >>

7 Silent Signs Of A Heart Attack

7 Silent Signs Of A Heart Attack

istock/Yuri_Arcurs Dr. Stacey E. Rosen, MD, a Go Red For Women cardiologist at North Shore-LIJ Health System, says this is one of the most common symptoms she sees (especially in women heart attack patients). “In my 25 years of practice, people on the verge of a heart attack report feeling tired and not able to do their usual activities,” she says. During a heart attack, blood flow to the heart is reduced, putting extra stress on the muscle, which could make you feel exhausted, according to WebMD. Don’t be afraid to ask your doctor to do an electrocardiogram (EKG), which checks heart activity. “Sometimes when people present with lethargy, doctors won’t immediately order an EKG, which can detect a heart attack; but you should request one from your doctor, just to be safe,” says Annapoorna Kini, MD, of The Mount Sinai Hospital. Here are some other tests for your heart that could save your life. istock/gpointstudio Noticeable pain or soreness in the back, chest, or either arm is often a silent heart attack sign. As MyHeartSisters.org explains it: “When heart muscle cells begin to run out of oxygen during a heart attack because of a blocked artery preventing oxygenated blood from feeding that muscle, they begin to send off pain signals through the nervous system. Your brain may confuse those nerve signals with signals coming from the arm (or the jaw, shoulder, elbow, neck or upper back) because of the nerve proximity.” Because the pain is often not accompanied by the typical chest heaviness associated with heart attack, people tend to ignore it, says Dr. Rosen. “I’ve had patients say they only felt the pain when they were working out, so they assumed it was just from exercise, but that’s not right,” says Rosen. “If the symptom is something new, tha Continue reading >>

How Do Symptoms Of A Heart Attack Differ In People With Diabetes?

How Do Symptoms Of A Heart Attack Differ In People With Diabetes?

Question: How do symptoms of a heart attack differ in people with diabetes? Answer: Well, if you have diabetes -- particularly for a long time -- it can alter how the body responds to sort of, the heart, the pain the heart is feeling. I've studied this for many years, and we actually describe that individuals with diabetes, like yourself, may not have typical chest pain or angina pectoris when they have a heart attack. Some of these patients actually may have chest pressure, milder pressure; they may not have any pain at all in the chest, instead they may notice the acute onset of shortness of breath, or sweating, or sometimes you may even experience some weird change in your glucose level that you can't explain. And in those cases that could be what's called an equivalent -- an anginal equivalent -- for heart attack. This is a problem in patients like yourself with diabetes, because if you don't recognize you're having a heart attack because of the unusual nature of these symptoms, you may not go to the emergency room as fast as you should. And we know that when you have a heart attack, how quickly delivered those treatments for heart attack are given to you, the better the outcome you will have. So be mindful of the fact that if you have any symptoms that are unusual in the chest or affect your breathing, this could represent sort of the equivalent of heart pain, even though it's not the classic crushing chest pain you may have heard about. Next: Do Women Experience Angina And Heart Attacks Differently Than Men? Previous: How Do I Know When Shortness Of Breath Is Due To Other Conditions Such As Emphysema, Or Heart Disease? Continue reading >>

Heart Attack

Heart Attack

Tweet A heart attack occurs if blood supply to the heart is cut off. This can lead to pronounced symptoms of pain in the chest but symptoms can vary. The medical term for a heart attack is myocardial infarction (MI) or acute myocardial infarction (AMI). It is important that an ambulance is called immediately as damage to the heart muscle is more likely to occur if treatment is delayed. Note that cardiac arrest, when the heart stops beating, is different to a heart attack. A heart attack can be a cause of cardiac arrest however. Symptoms of a heart attack The classic symptoms of a heart attack include a pressing or squeezing pain in your chest. The pain may radiate out to your neck, jaw, arms or back. A heart attack can feel like indigestion in some people. Other symptoms which may also be present include: Shortness of breath Feeling lightheaded or dizzy Feeling nauseous Strong anxiety Sweating In some cases, a heart attack can occur without you being aware of the symptoms. This is referred to as silent ischemia. If you think you are having a heart attack, or if someone else appears to be suffering from one, call 999 for an ambulance immediately. It is important that a heart attack is treated quickly as the longer treatment is delayed, the more chance that permanent damage will occur to the heart muscle. If you think you are having a heart attack, it's important to rest. If you are not allergic to aspirin, and someone can get you an aspirin, it can help to slowly chew an aspirin whilst help arrives. Causes of heart attack Common causes of heart attacks are the result of either a blood clot in the coronary arteries or a severe narrowing within the coronary artery. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose leve Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Heart Disease

Diabetes And Heart Disease

Tweet Heart disease is a complication that may affect people with diabetes if their condition is not managed well for a prolonged period of time.. Coronary heart disease is recognized to be the cause of death for 80% of people with diabetes, however, the NHS states that heart attacks are largely preventable. [48] How are heart disease and diabetes linked? People suffering from type 1 and type 2 diabetes are more likely to be at risk from heart attacks, strokes and high blood pressure. Vascular problems, such as poor circulation to the legs and feet, are also more likely to affect diabetes patients. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication. Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes due to its occurrence mainly in people over 40. However, type 2 diabetes is now becoming more common in young adults, teens and children and accounts for roughly 90% of all diabetes cases worldwide. How serious i Continue reading >>

Silent Heart Attack

Silent Heart Attack

A heart attack that does not produce the hallmark symptoms of chest pain and difficulty breathing. It is estimated that as many as 4 million Americans have had silent heart attacks, and diabetes raises the risk of having one. A heart attack, also known as a myocardial infarction, occurs when low blood flow to the heart starves it of oxygen, damaging it. Most heart attacks are caused by a blood clot that blocks one of the coronary arteries, the arteries that carry blood and oxygen to the heart muscle. A clot most often forms in a coronary artery that has been narrowed by atherosclerotic plaque. Risk factors for heart attacks include a family history of heart attack, being male, diabetes, older age, high blood pressure, smoking, and blood lipid abnormalities, especially high LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels and low HDL (“good”) cholesterol levels. Typically, a heart attack produces chest pain, which may radiate to the arms, shoulders, neck, teeth, jaw, abdomen, or back. Other common symptoms include shortness of breath, nausea or vomiting, and anxiety. Anyone experiencing these symptoms should seek medical care immediately. But people with diabetes may not feel these symptoms due to diabetic neuropathy (nerve disease), which can damage the nerves that control the heart, as well as mask the chest and back pain that usually accompanies an attack. Continue reading >>

How Diabetes Can Mask The Symptoms Of A Heart Attack

How Diabetes Can Mask The Symptoms Of A Heart Attack

Weird, whispering symptoms are easy to overlook; how to prevent and recognize this risk for people with diabetes. In a new study of more than 9,000 people, silent heart attacks—with warning signs so quiet or so unusual that people didn’t seek medical help—were nearly as common as classic heart attacks with well-known symptoms like crushing chest pain. And they were almost as lethal in the long run, tripling the odds of dying during the 9-year study compared to people who didn’t have a heart attack of any kind. It’s a wake-up call for anyone at risk for heart disease, but heart experts say people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes should pay particular attention. “People with diabetes are at higher risk for silent heart attacks for several reasons,” says Om P. Ganda, M.D., medical director of the Lipid Clinic at the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston and an associate clinical professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. “High blood sugar can lead to autonomic nerve damage that reduces the ability to feel pain, including heart-attack pain. Your only symptom might be shortness of breath. And people with diabetes are already at two to three time’s higher risk for heart disease than people without diabetes, which also increases the chances for a silent heart attack.” In a 2013 British study of 5,102 people with type 2, heart tests showed that 16%— about one in six—had likely had silent heart attacks. People with type 1 diabetes may also be at higher-than-average risk, Dr. Ganda says, due to nerve damage and overall heart-disease risk. Lead researcher Elsayed Z. Soliman, M.D., MSc., M.S., director of the epidemiological cardiology research center at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, says silent heart attacks are dangerou Continue reading >>

The Silent Heart Attacks That Can Strike Diabetics Without Warning

The Silent Heart Attacks That Can Strike Diabetics Without Warning

Property consultant Michael Green was adamant that his type 2 diabetes was nothing to worry about. 'It's the non-serious type,' he'd say dismissively. Michael's laid-back attitude is in some ways understandable. The father-of-one had never suffered any obvious ill-effects from the condition he'd lived with for 28 years, and he'd been diagnosed not as a result of any troubling symptoms, but by chance following a routine blood test. Compared to a family friend who had type 1 diabetes, he was lucky, he insisted. At least he didn't have to monitor his blood sugar levels every few hours, and inject insulin. Then one night, two years ago, he went to sleep and never woke up. At just 53, he'd suffered a 'silent heart attack' - a little-known complication of diabetes. A silent attack is almost symptomless and occurs without any of the chest pain normally associated with a heart attack. Yet they can be just as dangerous - if not more so - as a normal heart attack. They're also surprisingly common. It is estimated that around a quarter of the 175,000 heart attacks in the UK each year are the silent type - and people with diabetes are at greatest risk. This is because the nerve damage linked to their condition can prevent warning signals being transmitted in the usual way. This, in turn, can lead to a delay in seeking treatment and result in damage to the blood vessels and heart muscle that make the heart attack more lethal. Heart attacks occur when there is a blockage in the artery supplying blood to the heart. Normally, this is as a result of a fatty plaque breaking off from the artery wall, triggering a blood clot. When the blood supply to the heart is reduced, the body produces chemicals that affect nerves and trigger pain. Often, people describe the pain of a heart attack as a Continue reading >>

How Your Diabetes Can Mask Heart Disease Or A Heart Attack

How Your Diabetes Can Mask Heart Disease Or A Heart Attack

If you have diabetes, you likely know that it sometimes causes neuropathy or nerve damage. But you may not realize that diabetes-related neuropathy can sometimes mask the signs of heart disease or cause you to miss important signs of a heart attack. Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy More than two-thirds of people with diabetes will end up having some form of neuropathy . The most common type is peripheral nerve damage , which creates numbness, tingling or weakness in the hands and feet. But there is another, more serious type — autonomic neuropathy — that can damage the nerves that lead to your heart, bladder, intestines and blood vessels. When this occurs, the body is sometimes unable to regulate functions like urination or feel sensations like pain in these areas. This is a double-whammy if you have diabetes. Not only are you at higher risk for neuropathy, but you’re also more likely to have heart disease. If the neuropathy dulls the nerves leading to your heart, you may not notice symptoms of heart disease  such as chest pain. If you have diabetes, get in tune with your body. Learn to listen closely and act on what it’s telling you. If you have any symptoms of a heart attack, report them to your doctor. Don’t wait to see if the pain goes away. For instance, indigestion that doesn’t pass quickly is sometimes a sign of a heart attack. Make sure to visit your doctor for regular checkups. Annual tests can reveal a problem before symptoms occur. Early treatment can reduce the likelihood that small issues turn into larger ones. If you have neuropathy, symptoms that might be very apparent in someone else a Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Silent Heart Attacks

Type 2 Diabetes And Silent Heart Attacks

You probably don't think of a heart attack as the kind of thing that could happen without you even knowing it. But it can, and it's more common than you might think. It's called a silent heart attack. It can happen to anyone, but diabetes makes you more likely to have one. You might not feel anything at all. Or it could feel mild, like heartburn or the odd ache or pain. It might seem so minor that you just shrug it off and think it's just part of getting older. But a heart attack is serious business, whether you have symptoms or not. That makes it really important to keep up with all your regular checkups. Make sure you get in tune with your body so you're aware of subtle changes. One of the common effects of diabetes is a type of nerve damage called neuropathy. Usually it causes problems like numbness, tingling, or weakness in your hands and feet. But it doesn't always stop there. You can also have damage in nerves that lead to your heart, bladder, and blood vessels. When that happens, you might not get important warning signs like pain or discomfort. So during a heart attack that might normally cause big-time pain in your chest, arm, or jaw, you might not notice a thing. It's like someone presses a big mute button on what you're able to feel. But the damage does happen, and the dangerous consequences of a silent heart attack are real. You can help protect yourself by keeping a close eye out for nerve damage. If you catch it early, you might be able to slow it down. Feeling dizzy or fainting when you stand up Sweating way more than usual or not at all Trouble digesting food, like bloating and stomach upset Some people don't have any symptoms at all. If you do have them, they may be mild and go away quickly. And you might feel totally fine once the silent attack is don Continue reading >>

Does Diabetes Make A Heart Attack Feel Different?

Does Diabetes Make A Heart Attack Feel Different?

(Reuters Health) - People with diabetes may not always feel classic symptoms like acute chest pain when they have a heart attack, according to a small study that offers a potential explanation for why these episodes are more deadly for diabetics. Researchers examined data from detailed interviews with 39 adults in the UK who had been diagnosed with diabetes and had also experienced a heart attack. Most of the participants reported feeling some chest pain, but they often said it didn’t feel like they expected or that they didn’t think it was really a heart attack. “Long term diabetes damages your heart in many ways (increased blocking of the heart’s blood vessels), but it also damages your nerves,” said study co-author Dr. Melvyn Jones of University College London. “So a bit like a diabetic might not feel the stubbing of their toe, they also feel less pain from damaged heart muscle when the blood supply gets cut off, so they don’t get the classical crushing chest pain of a heart attack,” Jones said by email. People with diabetes are three times more likely to die from heart disease than the general population and possibly six times more likely to have a heart attack, Jones added. All patients in the study received care at one of three hospitals in London, and they ranged in age from 40 to 90. Most were male, and roughly half were white. The majority had what’s known as type 2 diabetes, which is tied to aging and obesity and happens when the body can’t properly use insulin to convert blood sugar into energy. Four of them had type 1 diabetes, a lifelong condition that develops when the pancreas produces little or no insulin, a hormone needed to allow blood sugar to enter cells. Many of the participants described heart attack symptoms such as chest pain Continue reading >>

Heart Attack

Heart Attack

Fast Action Needed When a heart attack strikes, time is of the essence. Intuitively, we all know it: The faster we get help, the better the outcome. Doctors say that “time is muscle,” because the longer a heart attack goes untreated, the more heart muscle dies and is irrevocably lost. But statistics show that most people don’t receive treatment within the critical 60–90 minutes after a heart attack starts. Emergency departments have worked hard to reduce the time it takes for a person to receive treatment, and local emergency medical services have improved significantly in the past few decades. As it turns out, however, the biggest delay in treatment occurs before the professionals even get involved. The most common reason for delay in treatment of a heart attack, according the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), is the time it takes the person to seek help. The NHLBI says that median time from onset of symptoms to calling for help ranges from 2 to 6.4 hours. All people need to be more aware of the symptoms of a heart attack and know how to respond quickly, but it’s even more important for people with diabetes because they have a 2–4 times higher risk of heart attack and other heart disease. They’re more likely to die before reaching the hospital with a first heart attack and more likely to die in the hospital while undergoing a cardiac procedure, and they do less well following a heart attack or an intervention such as surgery. The rate of death for the five years following a heart attack is as high as 50%, or twice that of people without diabetes. In the general population, heart attack risk is higher in men than in women under 50 years of age. Diabetes erases that difference, causing an increased risk in women with diabetes. There also ar Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

The Connection Between Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

Aaron contacted TheDiabetesCouncil with some questions related to diabetes and heart disease. Aaron is 57 years old. He has had Type 2 diabetes for 12 years. Aaron visited his doctor related to swelling in his ankles and feet, shortness of breath, and weight gain. After some tests, the doctor informed him that on top of his Type 2 diabetes, he now has congestive heart failure. He was now wondering why did he have heart disease now and was it because of his diabetes? In order to help Aaron and other people with diabetes understand the connection between diabetes and heart disease and how to prevent it, we decided to look into the specific link between the two diseases. What is the connection between diabetes and heart disease? According to the American Heart Association, there exist a relationship between cardiovascular disease and diabetes: 68% percent of people with diabetes who are aged 65 and older die from heart disease and 16% die of a stroke. People with diabetes are more likely to die from a heart disease than those without diabetes. The National Institute of Health states the following for people with diabetes: They have additional causes of heart disease They are at higher risk of heart disease than those who do not have diabetes They may develop heart disease at a younger age Risk assessment must take into account the major risk factors (cigarette smoking, elevated blood pressure, abnormal serum lipids and lipoproteins, and hyperglycemia) and predisposing risk factors (excess body weight and abdominal obesity, physical inactivity, and family history of CVD). Identification of risk factors is a major first step for developing a plan for risk reduction in persons with diabetes. – Scott M. Grundy et al, Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease In two words, the conn Continue reading >>

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes

Cardiovascular Disease & Diabetes

The following statistics speak loud and clear that there is a strong correlation between cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes. At least 68 percent of people age 65 or olderwith diabetes die from some form of heart disease; and 16% die of stroke. Adults with diabetes are two to four times more likely to die from heart disease than adults without diabetes. The American Heart Association considers diabetes to be one of theseven major controllable risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Why are people with diabetes at increased risk for CVD? Diabetes is treatable, but even when glucose levels are under control it greatly increases the risk of heart disease and stroke. That's because people with diabetes, particularly type 2 diabetes,may have the following conditions that contribute to their risk for developing cardiovascular disease. High blood pressure has long been recognized as a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Studies report a positive association between hypertension and insulin resistance. When patients have both hypertension and diabetes, which is a common combination, their risk for cardiovascular disease doubles. Abnormal cholesterol and high triglycerides Patients with diabetes often have unhealthy cholesterol levels including high LDL ("bad") cholesterol, low HDL ("good") cholesterol, and high triglycerides. This triad of poor lipid counts often occurs in patients with premature coronary heart disease. It is also characteristic of a lipid disorder associated with insulin resistance called atherogenic dyslipidemia, or diabetic dyslipidemia in those patients with diabetes. Learn more about cholesterol abnormalities as they relate to diabetes. Obesity is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease and has been strongly associated with insulin Continue reading >>

The Danger Of “silent” Heart Attacks

The Danger Of “silent” Heart Attacks

About half of all heart attacks are mistaken for less serious problems and can increase your risk of dying from coronary artery disease. You can have a heart attack and not even know it. A silent heart attack, known as a silent myocardial infarction (SMI), account for 45% of heart attacks and strike men more than women. They are described as "silent" because when they occur, their symptoms lack the intensity of a classic heart attack, such as extreme chest pain and pressure; stabbing pain in the arm, neck, or jaw; sudden shortness of breath; sweating, and dizziness. Subscribe to Harvard Health Online for immediate access to health news and information from Harvard Medical School. Continue reading >>

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