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Can Diabetes Cause You To Go On Dialysis?

Diabetic Kidney Disease

Diabetic Kidney Disease

Diabetic kidney disease is a complication that occurs in some people with diabetes. It can progress to kidney failure in some cases. Treatment aims to prevent or delay the progression of the disease. Also, it aims to reduce the risk of developing cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack and stroke which are much more common than average in people with this disease. To find out more about the kidneys and urine see also separate leaflet called The Kidneys and Urinary Tract. What is diabetic kidney disease? Diabetic kidney disease (diabetic nephropathy) is a complication that occurs in some people with diabetes. In this condition the filters of the kidneys, the glomeruli, become damaged. Because of this the kidneys 'leak' abnormal amounts of protein from the blood into the urine. The main protein that leaks out from the damaged kidneys is called albumin. In normal healthy kidneys only a tiny amount of albumin is found in the urine. A raised level of albumin in the urine is the typical first sign that the kidneys have become damaged by diabetes. Diabetic kidney disease is divided into two main categories, depending on how much albumin is lost through the kidneys: Microalbuminuria: in this condition, the amount of albumin that leaks into the urine is between 30 and 300 mg per day. It is sometimes called incipient nephropathy. Proteinuria: in this condition the amount of albumin that leaks into the urine is more than 300 mg per day. It is sometimes called macroalbuminuria or overt nephropathy. How does diabetic kidney disease develop and progress? A raised blood sugar (glucose) level that occurs in people with diabetes can cause a rise in the level of some chemicals within the kidney. These chemicals tend to make the glomeruli more 'leaky' which then allows albumin to lea Continue reading >>

Kidney Disease Of Diabetes

Kidney Disease Of Diabetes

Kidney Disease of Diabetes Facts* *Kidney Disease of Diabetes Facts Medically Edited by: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis, Treatment, Medication Medical Author: Melissa Conrad Stoppler, MD Medical Editor: Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) Proper nutrition is essential for anyone living with diabetes. Control of blood glucose levels is only one goal of a healthy eating plan for people with diabetes. A diet for those with diabetes should also help achieve and maintain a normal body weight as well as prevent heart and vascular disease, which are frequent complications of diabetes. There is no prescribed diet plan for those with diabetes. Rather, eating plans are tailored to fit an individual's needs, schedules, and eating habits. A diabetes diet plan must also be balanced with the intake of insulin and oral diabetes medications. In general, the principles of a healthy diabetes diet are the same for everyone. Consumption of a variety of foods including whole grains, fruits, non-fat dairy products, beans, and lean meats or vegetarian substitutes, poultry and fish is recommended to achieve a healthy diet. Each year in the United States, more than 100,000 people are diagnosed with kidney failure, a serious condition in which the kidneys fail to rid the body of wastes. Kidney failure is the final stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Diabetes is the most common cause of kidney failure, accounting for nearly 44 percent of new cases. Even when diabetes is controlled, the disease can lead to chronic kidney disease and kidney failure. Most people with diabetes do not develop chronic kidney disease that is severe enough to progress to kidney failure. Nearly 24 million people in the United States have diabetes, and nearly 200,000 people are living with kidney failure a Continue reading >>

Preventing Chronic Kidney Disease When You Have Diabetes

Preventing Chronic Kidney Disease When You Have Diabetes

According to The Cleveland Clinic Foundation, diabetes is the cause of approximately 44% of all new cases of diabetic nephropathy. Nephropathy is a medical term for kidney disease. Diabetes can cause damage to the filters in your kidneys over time. As more damage occurs, chronic kidney disease (CKD) can develop. CKD is a serious complication of diabetes. It cannot be cured, only managed. Getting an early diagnosis of nephropathy and treating your diabetes can help limit the kidney damage and may prevent kidney failure where dialysis becomes necessary. An early diagnosis An early diagnosis of diabetes can help your doctor treat the condition before it does more damage to your body. Type 1 diabetes (also known as juvenile or insulin dependent diabetes) is easily diagnosed in its early stages, before kidney damage occurs. However, Type 2 diabetes (also known as adult-onset or non-insulin dependent diabetes) often goes undiagnosed for years. Many people who have Type 2 diabetes do not realize it. Because Type 2 diabetes may have been present for many years before it is diagnosed, this means the high glucose (sugar) content in the blood has had time to damage the tiny blood vessels in the kidneys. When these blood vessels are damaged, protein that is meant to remain in the body can leak into the urine. This is a condition called microalbuminuria, and it is an early symptom of kidney disease. If you have been diagnosed with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, you should have a microalbumin test done annually. This will help your doctor detect any kidney damage. If your urine tests positive for albumin (a protein), steps can be taken to help prevent more damage to your kidneys. Control your blood glucose levels Because the high glucose content in your bloodstream can damage the kidneys Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Renal (kidney) Dialysis

Diabetes And Renal (kidney) Dialysis

Dialysis must be done three times per week to both purify the blood and remove excess liquid. Diabetes frequently causes complications in kidney function. These complications compromise the kidneys’ filtration system, requiring the use of one of two techniques to purify the blood: • hemodialysis • peritoneal dialysis In both cases, the treatment disrupts people's lives due to its frequency and the time required. Adapting to this new lifestyle is often difficult at the beginning of treatment, but most people can expect to benefit from an acceptable quality of life for many years. Treatment choice The choice between the two forms of treatment depends on several factors: medical, personal and social. Most people are free to choose their preferred method. Hemodialysis requires adhering to a fixed schedule and living close to a dialysis centre. Even if you can receive treatment outside the centre, this option can make travelling complicated. However, this option offers more freedom between dialysis sessions. Peritoneal dialysis requires self-care, but you only need a medical visit once a month. However, it is important to organize your schedule at home and at work to accommodate your treatments. Peritoneal dialysis demands a strict aseptic technique, because any contamination can cause intra-abdominal infections. Hemodialysis Hemodialysis (cleaning the blood) uses a dialyzer (artificial kidney) to purify the blood of people suffering from severe renal (kidney) failure. The treatment The treatment usually takes 4 hours. Dialysis must be done three times per week to both purify the blood and remove excess liquid. Hemodialysis treatment does not cure kidney disease; it acts as a substitute kidney. Therefore, it must continue indefinitely, unless you get a kidney transplan Continue reading >>

The Diabetic Dialysis Diet

The Diabetic Dialysis Diet

What is a diabetic dialysis diet? The diabetic dialysis diet is specifically for patients who have stage 5 chronic kidney disease (CKD), also called end stage renal disease (ESRD), in addition to diabetes. The diet’s goal is to manage blood glucose levels and help you feel your best. What can I eat? Like the other dialysis diets, the diabetic dialysis diet is filled with nutritious foods. You will work closely with your dietitian to create a balanced eating plan that will feature high-quality proteins and the proper balance of carbohydrates and fats to meet your individual needs. What can’t I eat? Your diet will have restrictions regarding foods that contain high amounts of phosphorus, sodium and potassium. But because of your diabetes, your carbohydrate intake will be tightly controlled in order to manage your blood glucose levels. High-sugar foods increase blood glucose. All carbohydrate-containing foods ( e.g., bread, cereal, pasta, rice, starchy vegetables, fruits, juices, many sugar-free desserts) increase blood glucose levels. Therefore, the total amount of carbohydrates you eat will be balanced with your medicines and activity level. Your dietitian may teach you a system called carbohydrate counting to keep your carbohydrate intake balanced. Why do I have to eat this way? Your dietitian and doctor will advise you to eat this way to reduce the risk of other health problems associated with diabetes and kidney disease. How does it help? Diabetes affects your entire body. It can cause nerve damage, problems in blood circulation and blindness as well as kidney disease. By following this eating plan, you can control your blood glucose levels and lessen the likelihood of developing other diabetes-related problems. Phosphorus isn’t cleared well through dialysis. It Continue reading >>

Diabetic Kidney Disease

Diabetic Kidney Disease

What is diabetic kidney disease? Diabetic kidney disease is a type of kidney disease caused by diabetes. Diabetes is the leading cause of kidney disease. About 1 out of 4 adults with diabetes has kidney disease.1 The main job of the kidneys is to filter wastes and extra water out of your blood to make urine. Your kidneys also help control blood pressure and make hormones that your body needs to stay healthy. When your kidneys are damaged, they can’t filter blood like they should, which can cause wastes to build up in your body. Kidney damage can also cause other health problems. Kidney damage caused by diabetes usually occurs slowly, over many years. You can take steps to protect your kidneys and to prevent or delay kidney damage. What are other names for diabetic kidney disease? Diabetic kidney disease is also called DKD, chronic kidney disease, CKD, kidney disease of diabetes, or diabetic nephropathy. How does diabetes cause kidney disease? High blood glucose, also called blood sugar, can damage the blood vessels in your kidneys. When the blood vessels are damaged, they don’t work as well. Many people with diabetes also develop high blood pressure, which can also damage your kidneys. Learn more about high blood pressure and kidney disease. What increases my chances of developing diabetic kidney disease? Having diabetes for a longer time increases the chances that you will have kidney damage. If you have diabetes, you are more likely to develop kidney disease if your blood glucose is too high blood pressure is too high African Americans, American Indians, and Hispanics/Latinos develop diabetes, kidney disease, and kidney failure at a higher rate than Caucasians. You are also more likely to develop kidney disease if you have diabetes and smoke don’t follow your di Continue reading >>

Did You Know That Waste Buildup May Be Causing Diabetes In Non-diabetic Dialysis Patients?

Did You Know That Waste Buildup May Be Causing Diabetes In Non-diabetic Dialysis Patients?

Recommended Reading: The Reality About Life With A Kidney Transplant: Must-Know Facts For CKD And Dialysis Patients Researchers have discovered a once unknown link between Chronic Kidney Disease and Diabetes. Basically, since Dialysis patients are no longer able to naturally eliminate toxins from their bodies as a result of Kidney Failure,urea is a potent cocktail of waste that accumulates in the blood and works to impair insulin function which leads to Diabetes. Recommended Reading: Confirmed: There Is Much Higher Risk Of Cancer In CKD Patients Conducting Dialysis Ironically, In nephrology textbooks, urea is presented as a harmless product," said Nephrologist, Dr. Laetitia Koppe. Yet, these unprecedented (never done or known before) findings suggest otherwise,and reveal that urea is directly responsible for disrupting insulin secretion which causes an imbalance of blood glucose and Diabetes in non-Diabetic Chronic Kidney Disease patients. Recommended Reading: To Those Who Think CKD And Dialysis Patients Cant Be That Sick: You Are Wrong! Dr. Vincent Poitout (Principal Investigator of the study and professor at the University of Montreal) noted that further studies are required to explore these findings. However, if true, there are actions that non-Diabetic Dialysis patients may take to limit their risk of Diabetes. One might consider discussing the idea of taking antioxidants with their Nephrologist. Antioxidants such as vitamin C or E may protect the pancreas and reduce the risk of developing Diabetes, suggested Poitout. Recommended Reading: The Frequency Of Life Threatening Dosage Errors Is Under-appreciated By CKD & Dialysis Patients. Also, Dialysis patients should ensure that they remove the appropriate amount of waste during their treatments. Note that the Urea Re Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes In Hemodialysis Patients: Observations And Recommendations

Managing Diabetes In Hemodialysis Patients: Observations And Recommendations

Although diabetes is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) worldwide, accounting for 44.2% of ESRD patients in the US Renal Data System in 2005,1 data are scarce on how diabetes should best be treated in patients in ESRD. We do know that blood glucose levels need to be well controlled in these patients. Several observational studies and one nonrandomized interventional study2–10 showed that higher levels of hemoglobin A1c were associated with higher death rates in patients with diabetes and chronic kidney disease after adjusting for markers of inflammation and malnutrition. However, ESRD significantly alters glycemic control, the results of hemoglobin A1c testing, and the excretion of antidiabetic medications. The various and opposing effects of ESRD and dialysis can make blood glucose levels fluctuate widely, placing patients at risk of hypoglycemia—and presenting a challenge for nephrologists and internists. In this review, we summarize the available evidence and make practical recommendations for managing diabetes in patients on hemodialysis. GLUCOSE LEVELS MAY FLUCTUATE WIDELY In ESRD, both uremia and dialysis can complicate glycemic control by affecting the secretion, clearance, and peripheral tissue sensitivity of insulin. Several factors, including uremic toxins, may increase insulin resistance in ESRD, leading to a blunted ability to suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis and regulate peripheral glucose utilization. In type 2 diabetes without kidney disease, insulin resistance leads to increased insulin secretion. This does not occur in ESRD because of concomitant metabolic acidosis, deficiency of 1,25 dihydroxyvitamin D, and secondary hyperparathyroidism.11,12 Hemodialysis further alters insulin secretion, clearance, and resistance as the result Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Nephropathy?

What Is Diabetic Nephropathy?

Diabetic nephropathy -- kidney disease that results from diabetes -- is the number one cause of kidney failure. Almost a third of people with diabetes develop diabetic nephropathy. People with diabetes and kidney disease do worse overall than people with kidney disease alone. This is because people with diabetes tend to have other long-standing medical conditions, like high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and blood vessel disease (atherosclerosis). People with diabetes also are more likely to have other kidney-related problems, such as bladder infections and nerve damage to the bladder. Kidney disease in type 1 diabetes is slightly different than in type 2 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, kidney disease rarely begins in the first 10 years after diagnosis of diabetes. In type 2 diabetes, some patients already have kidney disease by the time they are diagnosed with diabetes. There are often no symptoms with early diabetic nephropathy. As the kidney function worsens, symptoms may include: Swelling of the hands, feet, and face Trouble sleeping or concentrating Poor appetite Itching (end-stage kidney disease) and extremely dry skin Drowsiness (end-stage kidney disease) Abnormalities in the hearts' regular rhythm, because of increased potassium in the blood Muscle twitching As kidney damage progresses, your kidneys cannot remove the waste from your blood. The waste then builds up in your body and can reach poisonous levels, a condition known as uremia. People with uremia are often confused and occasionally become comatose. Certain blood tests that look for specific blood chemistry can be used to diagnose kidney damage. It also can be detected early by finding protein in the urine. Treatments are available that can help slow progression to kidney failure. That's why you should Continue reading >>

Diabetic Kidney Problems

Diabetic Kidney Problems

If you have diabetes, your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. Over time, this can damage your kidneys. Your kidneys clean your blood. If they are damaged, waste and fluids build up in your blood instead of leaving your body. Kidney damage from diabetes is called diabetic nephropathy. It begins long before you have symptoms. People with diabetes should get regular screenings for kidney disease. Tests include a urine test to detect protein in your urine and a blood test to show how well your kidneys are working. If the damage continues, your kidneys could fail. In fact, diabetes is the most common cause of kidney failure in the United States. People with kidney failure need either dialysis or a kidney transplant. You can slow down kidney damage or keep it from getting worse. Controlling your blood sugar and blood pressure, taking your medicines and not eating too much protein can help. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Summary Thirty to forty percent of people with diabetes may eventually develop kidney complications. The causes and treatments for diabetes are also explained. Diabetes Is the most common cause of end stage renal failure (ERSF) requiring dialysis or a kidney transplant in the UK. About 20% of those starting dialysis in the UK have diabetes The condition is becoming more common and it is estimated that numbers will double in the UK over the next few years. Mainly this is due to the type of food eaten and lifestyle – diabetes is more common in the overweight. 30-40% of people with diabetes may eventually develop kidney complications, known as diabetic nephropathy. What is it and what are the causes? Type I diabetes (Insulin dependent) - people are unable to produce enough insulin and need regular insulin injections as a life saving treatment. This type more often starts in young children or adolescents. It is usually caused by autoimmunity – the body’s immune system attacks the insulin–producing cells in the pancreas. Type 2 diabetes (Maturity onset). Usually occurs after age 40, and usually in people who are overweight. Insulin is still produced by the pancreas but the body becomes resistant to it and needs more. This form is commonly controlled with drugs and by diet, but some people need insulin. It is this type of diabetes that is increasing alarmingly, and now occurring in younger people. How does it affect the kidneys? Up to 40% of people with diabetes will develop serious kidney trouble in their lifetime. Taking things in the order that they occur: Kidney function seems to improve at first - glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is increased. (For an explanation of GFR see Glomerulonephritis) An increased GFR is common in poorly controlled diabetes and an early Continue reading >>

Diabetic Kidney Disease And Dialysis

Diabetic Kidney Disease And Dialysis

Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) occurs due to the long-term damage caused by diabetes to the kidneys. In severe cases, this leads to kidney failure that requires dialysis, which is the clinical purification of blood to artificially substitute for normal kidney function. It is expensive and requires many lifestyle changes like dietary alterations, but a relatively normal life in terms of work and recreation can still be led provided they do not interfere with treatment. One cannot live without the kidneys, because they play important roles, such as maintaining pH homeostasis and balancing blood electrolytes in addition to removing waste products and regulating blood pressure. While the etiology of DKD is not fully understood, several factors have been implicated in the pathogenesis. These include hyperglycemia, glycation end products, and the activation of pro-inflammatory cytokines, like transforming growth factor B (TGF-B). These slowly cause damage to the kidneys overtime, which can be asymptomatic for many years before the appearance of clinical signs and symptoms. Additional environmental and familial and/or genetic factors may also play a role in developing DKD. These include smoking, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and having roots from ethnic groups, such as African Americans, Hispanics, and native American Indians. Signs and Symptoms Regular tests for kidney function are imperative, because the early stages of DKD are asymptomatic and early damage caused by diabetes may be reversed. Signs of failing kidneys are many. Some of the first signs of progressive kidney insufficiency include albuminuria, increasing blood pressure, and edema (i.e., the excess accumulation of fluid in bodily tissues or cavities), most notably in the ankles and legs. Other signs and sy Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Renal Failure: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetes And Renal Failure: Everything You Need To Know

Unfortunately, renal failure or nephropathy (commonly referred to as kidney failure) and unmanaged diabetes go hand in hand. In addition, 50 percent of people with diabetes will experience some form of kidney damage in their lifetime, even if they never experience kidney failure or end up on dialysis. In this article, we will look at how renal failure and insufficiency can have an impact on people with diabetes, and how people with diabetes can avoid renal failure and dialysis. We will look at risk factors, causes, and symptoms, as we explore the relationship between renal failure, diabetes, and high blood glucose. We will also look at what happens to a person with diabetes when their kidneys fail. We will discuss dialysis and kidney transplantation. First, let’s see what Lydia had to say when she contacted TheDiabetesCouncil. Lydia’s story Lydia had received a laboratory result from her doctor that was very alarming to her. She had an excess amount of protein in her urine, usually an early sign of kidney damage. He informed Lydia that her kidneys were being affected by her diabetes, and she needed to work on self-managing her diabetes. He ordered some more tests to further look at her kidneys. Was Lydia headed to the kidney dialysis center? Her friend Tracey, whom she’d met in a diabetes support group had been the first person she knew who was on dialysis. Tracey seemed to have a very difficult life in and out of the dialysis center. Lydia was afraid to end up like Tracey. Lydia knew that she hadn’t been efficiently self-managing her diabetes. Her A1C had been greater than 8 percent a few times over the last few years. While most of the time she kept it around 7.5 percent, she was aware that her doctor wanted her to get it below 7 percent, and keep it there in Continue reading >>

What Is Diabetic Nephropathy?

What Is Diabetic Nephropathy?

Diabetic nephropathy refers to kidney disease that occurs in people with diabetes. The kidneys help regulate the amount of fluids and salts in the body, which helps to control blood pressure and releases different types of hormones. Nephropathy is the term used when the kidneys start to incur damage, which can ultimately lead to kidney failure. In this article, we look at the link between diabetes and kidney failure. Contents of this article: What is diabetic nephropathy? Kidney problems are relatively common in people with diabetes. This is because diabetes affects the arteries in the body and the kidney filters blood from those arteries. It is estimated that around 40 percent of people who have type 2 diabetes develop nephropathy. People with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes can be affected by nephropathy. Diabetic nephropathy is a significant cause of long-term kidney disease and end-stage renal disease (ESRD), which is when the kidneys no longer work well enough to meet the needs of daily life. There are five stages of diabetic nephropathy, and ESRD is the last. Diabetic nephropathy is the most frequent cause of ESRD in the United States, with between 40 and 50 percent of all ESRD cases directly related to it. A person with ESRD will require dialysis. Causes Diabetic nephropathy is when the kidneys become leaky, allowing albumin (a protein made by the liver) to pass into the urine. The condition worsens as the level of albumin increases. Diabetic nephropathy develops slowly and is more common in people who have had diabetes for 20 years or more. Diabetic nephropathy is more likely to develop in people with diabetes who also have higher blood glucose levels. Doctors also believe that nephropathy is directly influenced by high blood pressure (hypertension), which may Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Kidney Failure

Diabetes And Kidney Failure

One of the causes of kidney failure is diabetes mellitus, a condition characterised by high blood glucose (sugar) levels. Over time, the high levels of sugar in the blood damage the millions of tiny filtering units within each kidney. There is no cure, and treatment must become ever more aggressive as the kidneys deteriorate towards failure. Treatment options include medications, dialysis and kidney transplant. On this page: The main job of the kidneys is to remove waste from the blood and return the cleaned blood back to the body. Kidney failure means the kidneys are no longer able to remove waste and maintain the level of fluid and salts that the body needs. One cause of kidney failure is diabetes mellitus, a condition characterised by high blood glucose (sugar) levels. Over time, the high levels of sugar in the blood damage the millions of tiny filtering units within each kidney. This eventually leads to kidney failure. Around 20 to 30 per cent of people with diabetes develop kidney disease (diabetic nephropathy), although not all of these will progress to kidney failure. A person with diabetes is susceptible to nephropathy whether they use insulin or not. The risk is related to the length of time the person has diabetes. There is no cure for diabetic nephropathy, and treatment is lifelong. Another name for the condition is diabetic glomerulosclerosis. People with diabetes are also at risk of other kidney problems, including narrowing of the arteries to the kidneys, called renal artery stenosis or renovascular disease. Symptoms of kidney failure For people with diabetes, kidney problems are usually picked up during a check-up by their doctor. Occasionally, a person can have type 2 diabetes without knowing it. This means their unchecked high blood sugar levels may be Continue reading >>

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