diabetestalk.net

Can Diabetes Cause You To Gain Weight?

Pre-diabetes And Weight Gain

Pre-diabetes And Weight Gain

Obesity is a root cause of Insulin Resistance, which, in turn, is a key factor in the development of reversible Pre-Diabetes. If neglected, this latter condition severely increases the risk of developing Type 2 Diabetes, which, in the vast majority of cases, can only be managed for the rest of the Diabetic's life and may require daily injections of insulin. Reversing Insulin Resistance can be a crucial factor in the prevention of Pre- and Type 2 Diabetes and its attendant risk of Cardiovascular Disease. Insulin is the hormone responsible for allowing glucose, or blood sugar, to be absorbed by the cells of the body, where it is converted to energy. If you are Insulin Resistant, your cells react sluggishly to insulin. When you eat a meal, whether it's steak, fish or vegetables, the body breaks it down into a usable energy form, namely glucose. In a simplified explanation, the food you consume becomes sugar that will be transported to the tissues, muscles and organs of the body via the blood stream to be converted into energy. Following a meal, particularly one that is high in carbohydrates, you will have elevated levels of glucose in the blood stream, which signal the pancreas to release even more insulin until the excess glucose is absorbed by the cells. When you are Insulin Resistant, excessive amounts of free-floating unconverted glucose remain in the blood stream until they are sent to the liver and converted to excess body fat. In addition, hyperinsulinemia (elevated insulin in the blood) encourages your liver to produce even more triglycerides which are directly related to a greater risk of heart disease. Insulin Resistance and Serious Health Conditions Insulin Resistance promotes fat storage because glucose cannot properly enter the cells to be used as energy. Elev Continue reading >>

Top 5 Signs You May Have Prediabetes

Top 5 Signs You May Have Prediabetes

Prediabetes is a diagnosis of risk for diabetes, which is a metabolism disorder in which the body cannot regulate insulin. This results in unhealthy levels of glucose in the blood. If a person has prediabetes, their blood glucose levels are high, but not considered high enough to merit a diabetes diagnosis. A prediabetes diagnosis should be taken seriously, as it is advanced warning of a preventable serious disease. Unless diet and lifestyle changes are made, prediabetes can develop into type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association reports that some people may not show any signs of prediabetes other than a higher than normal blood glucose level. However, these five signs have been associated with a prediabetes diagnoses and may merit the advice of a physician: Urgent: Discover Your Risk for Heart Disease, Take the Test Now! 1. Increased thirst and urination: When insulin levels are not being regulated, the kidneys have to work overtime to remove glucose from the bloodstream. This causes increased urination, which then causes dehydration and excessive thirst. 2. Weight gain: A common sign of prediabetes is unexplained weight gain even when eating habits have remained the same. In addition, increased exercise may have no effect on weight loss. Insulin is the hormone that is released by the pancreas to regulate blood sugar, which is converted into energy. If the body has become insulin resistant, blood sugar cannot be used as energy and is converted to fat by the liver instead. 3. Unexplained fatigue: Fatigue that is not due to a lack of sleep, poor nutrition, excessive stress, or other illnesses may be a sign of prediabetes. According to Natural Health Advisory, "The experience of fatigue and other low blood sugar symptoms 2-4 hours after a high-carb meal may be a w Continue reading >>

Skipping Meals Makes You Gain Weight: Fasting Causes Belly Fat And Increases The Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Skipping Meals Makes You Gain Weight: Fasting Causes Belly Fat And Increases The Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

In an effort to squeeze into an super slinky dress, many of us decide to skip a meal or two. But going without breakfast, lunch or dinner can actually make you gain weight, a study has found. Fasting sets off a host of processes in the body which trigger fat to be stored around the middle. This type of fat is dangerous and increases the risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease, researchers warned. They discovered that going without food causes the liver cells to stop responding to insulin - the hormone that breaks down sugar. The liver normally produces glucose to be used by the body, such as when someone is asleep . But stops this production when it detects insulin in the blood, such as when someone has eaten. If it becomes resistant to insulin, it doesn't get the signal to stop producing glucose - and keeps pumping it into the blood. This excess glucose (sugar) in the bloodstream is stored in the body as fat. It also damages organs and can trigger type 2 diabetes over time. The findings suggest eating small meals often could help with weight loss, researchers said. In the study, they fed one group of mice all of their food as a single meal, so the rodents fasted for the rest of the day. Another group of mice were freely allowed to nibble all day long. The mice fed just one meal developed insulin resistance, which scientists consider a tell-tale sign of pre-diabetes. This is a condition in which levels of glucose in the blood are abnormally high, which can lead to type 2 diabetes over time. Initially, the mice fed one meal a day lost weight compared to the mice that had unlimited access to food. For three days, these mice received half of the calories that were consumed daily by the mice whose diet was unrestricted. Food was gradually added so that by day six, all mic Continue reading >>

> Weight And Diabetes

> Weight And Diabetes

A balanced diet and an active lifestyle can help all kids maintain a healthy weight. For kids with diabetes, diet and exercise are even more important because weight can affect diabetes and diabetes can affect weight. This is true for kids and teens with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes. In diabetes, the body doesn't use glucose properly. Glucose, a sugar, is the main source of energy for the body. Glucose levels are controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is made in the pancreas. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas does not make enough insulin. Undiagnosed or untreated type 1 diabetes can cause weight loss. Glucose builds up in the bloodstream if insulin isn't available to move it to the muscles. When glucose levels become high, the kidneys work to get rid of it through urine. This causes weight loss due to dehydration and loss of calories from the sugar that wasn't used as energy. Kids who develop type 1 diabetes often lose weight even though they have a normal or increased appetite. Once kids are diagnosed and treated for type 1 diabetes, weight usually returns to normal. Developing type 1 diabetes isn't related to being overweight, but keeping a healthy weight is important. Too much fat tissue can make it hard for insulin to work properly, leading to both higher insulin needs and trouble controlling blood sugar. In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas still makes insulin, but the insulin doesn't work in the body like it should and blood sugar levels get too high. Most kids and teens are overweight when they're diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Being overweight or obese increases the risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Also, weight gain in people with type 2 diabetes makes blood sugar levels even harder to control. People with type 2 diabetes have a condition called ins Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Insulin-related Weight Gain

How To Avoid Insulin-related Weight Gain

Managing diabetes sometimes requires insulin treatment, which may lead to weight gain. Find out why and learn how to manage your weight while using insulin. When diet, exercise, and oral diabetes medications aren't enough to control diabetes, adding insulin can help get your blood sugar under control. Although insulin is an important part of diabetes treatment, some people may have an issue with weight gain after starting on it. If insulin has been prescribed as part of your treatment plan, you may need to pay extra attention to your weight management efforts in addition to blood sugar management. "Insulin weight gain is a well-known problem and concern for people with type 2 diabetes," says Amber L. Taylor, MD, an endocrinologist who directs the Diabetes Center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore. "This is problematic because weight gain can make managing diabetes more difficult." Why Is Weight Gain an Insulin Side Effect? A study published in the journal Clinical Medicine Insights: Endocrinology and Diabetes focused on 102 people with type 2 diabetes who had recently started taking insulin. After the first year of insulin therapy, both men and women in the study had increased their body weight by about 2.5 percent. The science behind why this happens is clear. When you’re not managing diabetes well, your body can't use the glucose (sugar) from your food for energy. That means the sugar builds up in your blood, which can lead to diabetes complications. You may feel hungry because you’re not getting enough energy, and thirsty because your body is trying to flush all that sugar out of your bloodstream. Here’s what happens when you add insulin: Insulin helps the sugar in your blood to be absorbed by your cells, where it's used and stored for energy. Because you’r Continue reading >>

Your Weight And Diabetes

Your Weight And Diabetes

Diabetes is a group of disorders characterized by chronic high blood glucose levels (hyperglycemia) due to the body's failure to produce any or enough insulin to regulate high glucose levels. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, which often occurs in children or adolescents, is caused by the body's inability to make insulin or type 2 diabetes, which occurs as a result of the body's inability to react properly to insulin (insulin resistance). Type 2 diabetes is more prevalent than type 1 diabetes and is therefore seen in roughly 90% of all diabetes cases. Type 2 diabetes is predominantly diagnosed after the age of forty, however, it is now being found in all age ranges, including children and adolescents. The impact of diabetes goes beyond chronic hyperglycemia. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness (diabetic retinopathy), end stage kidney diseases (diabetic nephropathy) and non-traumatic lower extremity amputations (diabetic neuropathy) in working-age adults. People with diabetes are also two to four times more likely to experience cardiovascular complications and strokes. Diabetes and its related complications result in an estimated 200,000+ deaths each year, making diabetes one of the major causes of mortality in the U.S. In 2012, the NIH reported an estimated 29.1 million Americans (9.3% of the population) living with diabetes. Of these, an estimated 8.1 million persons were unaware that they had the disease. How does my weight relate to type 2 diabetes? There are many risk factors for type 2 diabetes such as age, race, pregnancy, stress, certain medications, genetics or family history, high cholesterol and obesity. However, the single best predictor of type 2 diabetes is overweight or obesity. Almost 90% of people living with type 2 diabetes a Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance: The Real Reason Why You Aren’t Losing Weight

Insulin Resistance: The Real Reason Why You Aren’t Losing Weight

Many people have weight loss as one of their key resolutions. Sadly, 35 percent of people also give up on that goal before the month even ends. It’s not necessarily lack of time or willpower that causes you to struggle with weight loss year after year. The real reason that you may have struggled to lose weight is insulin resistance, or a condition I call metabolism dysfunction. So you may be thinking, “Why is it so hard for me to lose weight?” I’m doing “everything right,” and yet still weight loss is difficult. Perhaps (like many of my patients) you’re already following a strict diet and working out several times a week, but to no avail. The weight still won’t come off — or, worse, you are gaining weight for seemingly no reason at all! You have become resigned to being overweight. Weight problems aren’t a permanent and immovable fixture for the rest of your life. If you’re finding that weight is easy to gain and hard to lose, it’s not your fault! Weight problems aren’t just about overeating or under exercising — they’re about metabolic changes (The MD Factor Diet, 2015) that are collectively known as insulin resistance. Lab tests conducted in my practice have confirmed that over 89 percent of my patients have this real and often undiagnosed issue. So the good news is that the right combination of diet, exercise, and will to succeed you can reverse your MD factor and finally find success in losing weight and keeping it off for good. In a nutshell, insulin resistance is the inability of your body to properly convert the food that you eat into energy to fuel your cells. People with the MD Factor have difficulty regulating their blood sugar, which is often due to insulin resistance or even diabetes. In both instances, their bodies are unable t Continue reading >>

How To Gain Weight And Maintain Blood Glucose

How To Gain Weight And Maintain Blood Glucose

By Lara Rondinelli-Hamilton, RD, LDN, CDE Yes, you read the title correctly—there are people with diabetes that are actually trying to gain weight. These people are underweight and need to put on a few pounds without creating extremely high blood sugar levels. Note: If you have diabetes and are losing weight or having difficulty gaining weight, your first step is making sure the issue isn’t due to high blood glucose levels. Uncontrolled hyperglycemia, which is typical with undiagnosed type 1 diabetes (or misdiagnosed type 2), can lead to weight loss and is a dangerous state for your body. If your weight loss or inability to gain weight is unexpected, make sure to discuss it right away with your doctor. It may be that your medication needs to be adjusted for better glycemic control. If, on the other hand, your blood glucose levels are controlled, here are few tips to help you gain weight without spiking your sugar. 1. Eat three meals a day. Don’t skip meals. If you are trying to gain weight, you need to increase your daily caloric intake. If you skip breakfast (or any meal), you could be missing out on an extra 400 to 500 calories per day, which if done consistently could lead to a one-pound weight loss per week. So, even if you are not a breakfast person, find some foods that you can eat for breakfast, such as a fruit-vegetable smoothie (you can add flax seed and coconut oil to increase calories, fiber, and satiety). A quick smoothie could be a few handfuls of spinach, 1 cup frozen berries, ½ banana, 1-2 tablespoons coconut oil, 1 tablespoon ground flax seed and ½-1 cup coconut milk. Serve the smoothie with a side of egg and chicken sausage. You might also try an egg, cheese, and avocado sandwich on a low-carb wrap or tortilla. 2. Eat snacks. Snacks and small me Continue reading >>

10 Ways Stress Makes You Fat And Diabetic

10 Ways Stress Makes You Fat And Diabetic

In the first part of this series on diabesity, we “got under the hood” to look at the underlying mechanisms of both obesity and diabetes. We’ve now moved on to discussing the environmental and lifestyle risk factors that drive these conditions. In the last article we learned about the top 3 dietary causes of diabesity. In this article, we’re going to see how stress can independently cause both obesity and diabetes. A huge – and I mean huge – amount of research over the past two decades shows that stress causes both obesity and diabetes in a variety of ways. Studies also show that stress makes it hard to lose weight. This is one reason why some people just can’t seem to lose weight no matter how well they eat or how much they exercise. I believe stress is one of the most important – yet most often ignored – factors driving the diabesity epidemic. Stress is a bigger problem than you think Hans Selye, the famous physiologist who coined the term “stress”, defined it this way: …the nonspecific response of the body to any demand made upon it. The prominent psychologist Richard Lazarus offers a similar definition: …any event in which environmental demands, internal demands, or both tax or exceed the adaptive resources of an individual… Most people only think of psychological stress when they hear the term “stress”. When asked what causes stress, they might say things like losing a job, having a fight with your spouse, driving in traffic or getting audited by the IRS. While it’s true that psychological challenges like this are major stressors, what many people don’t realize is that stress is also caused by physiological challenges, such as: insomnia chronic infections inflammation autoimmune disease environmental toxins dieting too much exerc Continue reading >>

Gaining Weight On Medication

Gaining Weight On Medication

Tweet A number of widely prescribed diabetes medications have been linked with increased weight gain. It can be hugely frustrating when medicines which we take to improve our blood glucose levels and diabetes control make it harder for us to manage our weight. However, it's important to remember that even if your diabetes medication is contributing to increases in weight, it’s not an inescapable trap and there are actions you can take, with your doctor’s help, to combat and reverse weight gain. Insulin Insulin allows glucose to move from out of the bloodstream and into the cells of the body, thereby helping to lower levels of blood glucose. However, insulin is also known as a fat storage hormone. Excess glucose in the blood, if not being used as energy by the muscles, is stored as fat and insulin is the hormone that allows this to happen. A problem that can happen for many people who take insulin is that the benchmark of how much needs to be eaten is set by the insulin dose. So, invariably, taking insulin is going to require you, at some point, to eat more than you would otherwise to prevent blood glucose levels going too low. The key to minimising this problem is to ensure you are not taking too much insulin. There is a balance to strike, of course, as taking too little insulin for what you’ eat will result in too high blood sugar levels. If you are putting on weight on insulin, it will help to speak to your doctor about gradually reducing both your insulin and your dietary intake, particularly with regard to carbohydrate. Hypos, hunger and weight gain Insulin has additional problems for weight management. If insulin causes blood glucose levels to go too low (hypoglycemia), it can leave with you a strong feeling of hunger. The best response to strong hunger or in Continue reading >>

Why Did I Gain Weight When I Started Taking Insulin?

Why Did I Gain Weight When I Started Taking Insulin?

There are several factors at work to lead you to believe that insulin is "to blame" for your weight gain. People who have poorly controlled diabetes also sometimes experience weight loss because their bodies are unable to properly convert food into energy. This is because they either are not producing enough insulin or their bodies are unable to use the insulin they produce properly. This food winds up as excess glucose circulating in the blood (resulting in high blood glucose!). Ultimately the body can't use all that extra glucose circulating in the blood and so it is eliminated in the urine. When your blood glucose runs high, you can become dehydrated as your body works to clear itself of all that excess glucose — which makes you think you've lost weight, but you've only lost water. Then, when you start taking insulin and get your blood glucose under better control, you start over-retaining fluids initially to make up for your dehydration, which makes you think you've rapidly gained a lot of weight. You associate it with taking insulin, but really what is happening is taking your insulin properly is just enabling your body to better use food and maintain a proper water balance. Also, once you start taking insulin injections and start getting your blood glucose under control, you now have enough insulin circulating in your blood to help the glucose get into the body's cells where it can be used as energy. So the glucose produced by the food you eat is no longer spending time in your bloodstream and being excreted out as urine. You gain weight. Your high blood glucose may have also made you feel more hungry because not all the food you were eating was able to get into the cells as energy to nourish the cells. Then, you started taking insulin — and continued to eat t Continue reading >>

Why Does Diabetes Cause Weight Loss In Some People And Weight Gain In Some Others?

Why Does Diabetes Cause Weight Loss In Some People And Weight Gain In Some Others?

To understand dynamics of body weight first we have to understand Energy balance equation which states Calorie intake - calorie lost = Weight So if, Calorie intake > calorie lost = Weight Gain Calorie intake < calorie lost = Weight Loss Calorie intake = calorie lost = Weight is maintained Let's try to understand it in patients with diabetes Scenarios causing weight gain in Diabetes 1. In patients with type 2 Diabetes some may have predominantly insulin resistance ( cells are not as much sensitive to action of insulin as they should be ) This makes their pancreas to secrete excess insulin in an attempt to overcome this resistance . Excessive insulin coupled with high calorie intake causes weight gain 2. A patient of Type 1 Diabetes or type 2 Diabetes who has good control of glucose but consumes excess calories than he needs is bound to gain weight . A good number of patients resort to defensive eating for the fear of hypoglycemia and this also causes weight gain Scenarios causing weight loss in Diabetes 1. Any patient with uncontrolled diabetes will usually have weight loss . This is due to the fact that cells of our body are deprived of glucose as a source of energy and therefore body resorts to using fat and protein as alternative sources causing weight loss 2. A patient of Type 1 Diabetes or type 2 Diabetes who has good control of glucose but consumes less calories than he needs loses weight . In addition associated thyroid disorders may also have some influence on weight . Continue reading >>

Insulin And Weight Gain: Keep The Pounds Off

Insulin And Weight Gain: Keep The Pounds Off

Insulin and weight gain often go hand in hand, but weight control is possible. If you need insulin therapy, here's how to minimize — or avoid — weight gain. Weight gain is a common side effect for people who take insulin — a hormone that regulates the absorption of sugar (glucose) by cells. This can be frustrating because maintaining a healthy weight is an important part of your overall diabetes management plan. The good news is that it is possible to maintain your weight while taking insulin. The link between insulin and weight gain When you take insulin, glucose is able to enter your cells, and glucose levels in your blood drop. This is the desired treatment goal. But if you take in more calories than you need to maintain a healthy weight — given your level of activity — your cells will get more glucose than they need. Glucose that your cells don't use accumulates as fat. Avoid weight gain while taking insulin Eating healthy foods and being physically active most days of the week can help you prevent unwanted weight gain. The following tips can help you keep the pounds off: Count calories. Eating and drinking fewer calories helps you prevent weight gain. Stock the refrigerator and pantry with fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Plan for every meal to have the right mix of starches, fruits and vegetables, proteins, and fats. Generally, experts recommend that meals consist of half non starchy vegetable, one-quarter protein and one quarter a starch such as rice or a starchy vegetable such as corn or peas. Trim your portion sizes, skip second helpings and drink water instead of high-calorie drinks. Talk to your doctor, nurse or a dietitian about meal-planning strategies and resources. Don't skip meals. Don't try to cut calories by skipping meals. When you skip Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: How To Lose Weight

Type 2 Diabetes: How To Lose Weight

Weight loss is a common recommendation for treatment for type 2 diabetes. Many people are overweight when they’re first diagnosed, and that extra fat actually increases their insulin resistance (when their bodies can’t properly use the hormone insulin). By losing weight, people with type 2 diabetes can become less insulin resistant, and they’re able to use insulin better. (To learn more about how the hormone insulin works, read our article on how insulin regulates blood glucose levels.) If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes and you're overweight, you should get started as soon as possible on a weight loss plan. It is important to work with a registered dietitian to help you figure out a plan that will work for you—a healthy meal plan, physical activity, and realistic goals will help you reach a healthy weight. There are many advantages to losing weight (and not just diabetes-related ones): Boost your energy level Lower your cholesterol levels (especially important for people with type 2 diabetes) Protect your heart (also important for people with diabetes, since heart-related complications are very common) Make it easier to control your blood glucose level As you may already know, losing weight can be a challenge, but don’t let that stop you. Do whatever you need to in order to stay motivated. It is the amount of calories we eat that contributes to weight gain. Make small changes. Learn portion sizes and reduce the amount of snacks in your day to reduce the total amount of calories you consume each day. Find cookbooks with healthier recipes using low-fat options. For a little fun, take our carb counting quiz to see how well you know the carb content of certain foods; this can help you make healthier choices. Work with a registered dietitian Continue reading >>

Insulin-associated Weight Gain In Diabetes--causes, Effects And Coping Strategies.

Insulin-associated Weight Gain In Diabetes--causes, Effects And Coping Strategies.

Abstract Insulin therapy or intensification of insulin therapy commonly results in weight gain in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. This weight gain can be excessive, adversely affecting cardiovascular risk profile. The spectre of weight gain can increase diabetic morbidity and mortality when it acts as a psychological barrier to the initiation or intensification of insulin, or affects adherence with prescribed regimens. Insulin-associated weight gain may result from a reduction of blood glucose to levels below the renal threshold without a compensatory reduction in calorie intake, a defensive or unconscious increase in calorie intake caused by the fear or experience of hypoglycaemia, or the 'unphysiological' pharmacokinetic and metabolic profiles that follow subcutaneous administration. There is, however, scope for limiting insulin-associated weight gain. Strategies include limiting dose by increasing insulin sensitivity through diet and exercise or by using adjunctive anorectic or insulin-sparing pharmacotherapies such as pramlintide or metformin. Insulin replacement regimens that attempt to mimic physiological norms should also enable insulin to be dosed with maximum efficiency. The novel acylated analogue, insulin detemir, appears to lack the usual propensity for causing weight gain. Elucidation of the pharmacological mechanisms underlying this property might help clarify the mechanisms linking insulin with weight regulation. Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar