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Can Diabetes Cause High Cholesterol?

Cholesterol & Diabetes

Cholesterol & Diabetes

Most adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes are at high risk for cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack and stroke. People with diabetes have an increased risk of these diseases even if their low-density lipoprotein, or LDL ("bad") cholesterol, is “normal.” They have an even higher risk if their LDL-cholesterol is elevated. Definitions Cardiovascular disease: Damage to the heart and blood vessels. One cause is narrowing of the blood vessels due to fat deposits on the vessel walls, which limits blood flow. Cholesterol: A fat substance that is naturally present in your blood and cells. There are two main types of cholesterol: LDL and HDL. LDL (low-density lipoprotein): Often called “bad” cholesterol because higher levels of LDL can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. HDL (high-density lipoprotein): Often called “good” cholesterol because higher levels of HDL can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Triglyceride: A form of fat that the body makes from sugar, alcohol or other food sources. Have you had your cholesterol tested lately? Adults with diabetes should have their cholesterol tested yearly or as indicated by your health-care provider. More frequent testing may be necessary for people taking cholesterol medications. Always discuss your cholesterol results with your doctor and other members of your health-care team. Have you been told that you have high cholesterol? High cholesterol usually refers to high LDL (“bad”) cholesterol. The main goal is to lower LDL-cholesterol. Check with your health-care provider to find out if you should be on medication to accomplish this. Weight management, healthy eating and regular physical activity will also help you reach this goal. Diabetes management requires good blood glucose (sugar), blood pr Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And High Cholesterol

Type 2 Diabetes And High Cholesterol

Many people with type 2 diabetes have dangerously high levels of LDL "bad" cholesterol and fat-like substances called triglycerides that circulate in the blood stream. These elevated levels are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Fortunately, this risk can be reduced by managing diabetes more efficiently. As a general rule, the higher your LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels are and the more risk factors like diabetes that you suffer from, the higher your risk for developing cardiovascular disease and having a heart attack. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) leads to an increase in LDL cholesterol by reducing the ability of the body to remove cholesterol. When blood sugars are too high, LDL cholesterol and the receptors for LDL in the liver become coated with sugar (glycosylated), impairing the liver's ability to remove cholesterol from the bloodstream. A 2005 Angiology journal article concluded that hyperglycemia increases the formation of oxidized LDL and glycated LDL cholesterol, which are important factors in the onset of atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) and increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease. (1) Elevated insulin levels have also been shown to increase LDL cholesterol and lead to atherosclerosis. Persons with diabetes can suffer from elevated levels of insulin if they eat diets rich in carbohydrates and have to dose their insulin high to combat abnormal blood sugar levels. Diabetes puts people at especially elevated risk from cholesterol build-up in blood vessels, which restricts or even blocks circulation. So preventative action to reduce LDL cholesterol and triglyceride levels while boosting HDL "good" cholesterol level is crucial. Cholesterol is a soft waxy fat found naturally in the cell membranes of all bo Continue reading >>

How Does Diabetes Affect My Risk For High Cholesterol?

How Does Diabetes Affect My Risk For High Cholesterol?

Up Next Untreated or poorly controlled diabetes can lead to a number of serious health problems, including heart and blood vessel disease. Even if you have your diabetes under control, you're at greater risk for heart attack and stroke than someone who does not have diabetes. This is because diabetes damages blood vessels and increases triglyceride levels. It also decreases HDL - the good cholesterol. Many people with diabetes also have high blood pressure and are overweight. These are two more risk factors for heart disease. How to Reduce Your Risk Take these actions to have a healthier heart. Have regular checkups to make sure you're keeping your blood glucose under control. If you don't know your blood cholesterol level, have it tested. Your goal, according to the newest May 2001 National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines is to have an LDL - or bad - cholesterol less than 100 mg/dL. Talk with your doctor about your risk for heart attack. People who have diabetes are more likely to die if they have a heart attack so they need to take intensive steps to prevent that from occurring. Work with your healthcare team to stay on a healthy, low-fat diet. Work with your healthcare team to get and stay on a program of regular physical activity. To learn more about cholesterol and heart health, visit the following links: Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Having diabetes is now considered a risk factor for heart and circulatory disease. This is because people with diabetes are less efficient at processing blood fats like cholesterol and triglycerides. Many people with diabetes share a common pattern of raised blood fats. This includes: normal or slightly raised levels of cholesterol Small dense LDL cholesterol (bad cholesterol) It is this distinctive pattern of dyslipidaemia (altered blood fats) that increases the risk of heart and circulatory disease in people with diabetes. People with symptoms of pre-diabetes often have the same pattern. Recent guidelines recommend that all adults with diabetes should have their blood fats measured and cardiovascular risk assessed each year. Many people with diabetes are now routinely treated with a statin, especially if over the age of 40. Find out if you might be at risk of type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Cholesterol Linked With Type 2 Diabetes

Cholesterol Linked With Type 2 Diabetes

An international team of scientists have discovered a possible link between accumulation of cholesterol and type 2 diabetes. The study was based at Canada's Vancouver Child and Family Research Institute at the University of British Columbia, and is published online in Nature Medicine. Type 2 diabetes is defined by two things. One is insulin resistance, and the other is reduced insulin production. The second is caused by reduction in insulin release by "beta cells" in the pancreas. Why this happens is poorly understood; however, it has been suggested that the build up of toxic lipids in the cells could be a reason. Using mice, scientists showed that pancreatic beta cells, responsible for insulin release, begin to malfunction when their cholesterol levels build up. They examined the role of a molecular transporter called "ATP-binding cassette transporter A1" (ABCA1). ABCA1 is important for "cholesterol homeostasis" which regulates cholesterol levels in cells. It also affects insulin secretion in pancreatic beta cells. The scientists used genetically engineered mice and switched off their ABCA1 genes. They found that these mice had normal insulin sensitivity, but lower levels of insulin secretion and significantly impaired glucose tolerance, displaying one of the classic symptoms of type 2 diabetes. They effectively became diabetic. When they examined the pancreas of the mice, isolated and tested the cells "in vitro", they found the cholesterol homeostasis was different to normal as was the secretion of insulin. They also found a significant accumulation of cholesterol in the beta cells. Cholesterol plays a number of roles in the human body, and one of these is to keep cell membranes healthy so they allow the right chemicals to pass in and out of the cells. However, the le Continue reading >>

Cholesterol And Diabetes

Cholesterol And Diabetes

When we hear about cholesterol, we think of it building up in our arteries and contributing to long-term health problems, but it isn’t just the bad guy – its healthy levels are vital for our cells to function and to make vitamin D and some hormones. There are two main types – HDL (good cholesterol) and LDL (bad cholesterol). If the levels of your bad cholesterol become too high and the good cholesterol too low you are at increased risk of developing cardiovascular complications. There are also triglycerides, which can have bad effects on your health if levels are high, too. For most people, eating a healthy, balanced diet and being physically active is enough to keep cholesterol levels healthy. But for people with diabetes, it is important that you have your levels checked every year. Do you have high cholesterol? So if you are told your levels are too high, what can you do? Firstly, ask your GP to refer you to a dietitian who can help. They will advise you to cut down on saturated fat and increase your intake of fibre. There are natural foods you can eat to help protect your heart and products on the market than claim to lower your cholesterol – but do they work? We looked into the best foods to eat and looked at the products you can buy. Natural foods that help protect your heart There is evidence that some foods can protect our heart, either by their effect on cholesterol, triglycerides or through other means. The way that you prepare all of these natural foods has a huge effect on your health. It’s better to boil, steam or grill them. Oily fish For example: herring, salmon, sardines and mackerel. Eat 1–2 portions a week. They are good sources of omega-3 fats. For ideas on how to cook with oily fish, visit our recipe finder. Fruit and vegetables Evidence Continue reading >>

High Cholesterol In Dogs

High Cholesterol In Dogs

Hyperlipidemia refers to the elevation in blood lipids (fats) and is fairly common in dogs. After a dog eats a meal, triglycerides and cholesterol levels rise in the blood and then come back down to normal levels again within 3-10 hours. However, in hyperlipidemia, fat levels remain high for over 12 hours. Several metabolic diseases demonstrate hyperlipidemia, including diabetes, hypothyroidism and Cushing’s syndrome. Some dog breeds are genetically predisposed to hyperlipidemia. Hyperlipidemia does not normally lead to heart disease, but can decrease lifespan and cause obesity, neurologic and metabolic issues. Hyperlipidemia is a condition in which the amount of fats (also called lipids) in the blood are elevated. The most important lipids are cholesterol and triglyceride. Hyperlipidemia is a common and under-diagnosed dog health problem that can negatively impact health and longevity. Symptoms may be absent or may correlate with the underlying cause of the hyperlipidemia. Symptoms of hyperlipidemia can include: Decreased appetite Vomiting Diarrhea Abdominal pain Bloated abdomen Cloudy eyes Fatty deposits under the skin Hair loss Itching Seizures Possible causes of hyperlipidemia include: High-fat diets – dietary intake of fats is a common cause of hyperlipidemia Obesity – high body fat and associated issues Steroid medications – progesterone and corticosteroids Diabetes - can cause increased hormone-sensitive lipase activity Hypothyroidism - can cause increased hormone-sensitive lipase activity and increased serum LDL Cushing’s syndrome - can cause increased hormone-sensitive lipase activity Pancreatitis – inflammation of the pancreas Cholestasis – excretion in the bile is the major way the body removes excess fats Nephrotic syndrome – kidney disease c Continue reading >>

Diabetic Hyperlipidemia: High Cholesterol When You Have Diabetes

Diabetic Hyperlipidemia: High Cholesterol When You Have Diabetes

Diabetic hyperlipidemia sounds a bit intimidating, doesn’t it? As we always do here on EndocrineWeb, we’re going to break down that concept for you, and that’s why we’ve put together this Patients’ Guide to Treating High Cholesterol and Diabetes. Diabetic hyperlipidemia is, in fact, having high cholesterol when you have diabetes. The parts of the word hyperlipidemia break into: hyper: high lipid: scientific term referring to fat, cholesterol, and fat-like substances in the body emia: in the blood So all together, hyperlipidemia means that you have too many lipids, especially cholesterol, in your blood. High cholesterol is dangerous for anyone, but as someone with type 2 diabetes, it’s particularly important that you get treatment for high cholesterol. You’re probably aware that diabetes can come with a host of complications—if you don’t take good care of our blood glucose levels and overall health. Cardiovascular complications are common in people with type 2 diabetes, and high cholesterol can also harm your cardiovascular health. Taking care of your high cholesterol will help lower your cardiovascular risk, so in this Patients’ Guide to Treating High Cholesterol and Diabetes, we’ll be covering: cholesterol basics: What is it? What should your numbers be? How often should you be tested? cardiovascular risk in diabetes: Why are you at an increased risk? How does diabetes affect your cardiovascular health? high cholesterol risk factors: Should you be concerned about getting high cholesterol? high cholesterol treatments when you have diabetes: There are medications you can take to help bring down your cholesterol numbers. Also, lifestyle changes are important. eating well to manage cholesterol and diabetes: This lifestyle change is so important that i Continue reading >>

How Obesity, High Cholesterol, And Metabolic Syndrome Are Related

How Obesity, High Cholesterol, And Metabolic Syndrome Are Related

We all know that both obesity and high cholesterol are bad for your heart health. But combine them with one or more other health problems — such as high blood pressure or high blood sugar — and these health risks can create a perfect storm known as metabolic syndrome. Although preventable and treatable, metabolic syndrome increases your likelihood of having serious health problems later, including coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, heart attack, and stroke, according to the American Heart Association (AHA). Unfortunately, the older you are, the more likely you are to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome, which currently affects about one-third of all adults in the United States. What Is Metabolic Syndrome? The word "metabolic" is used when talking about how your body uses food and makes energy, and metabolic syndrome describes a group of factors or conditions that raise your risk for heart disease and other health problems, such as diabetes and stroke. You may be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome if you have three or more of the following, according to the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: Abdominal Obesity This refers to excess belly fat, or carrying a lot of extra weight around your middle. A waistline of 40 inches or more for a man, and 35 inches or more for a woman, increases heart disease risk. Having too much belly fat is more of a risk indicator than having fat in other places on your body. High Blood Sugar This ooccurs when your blood glucose levels are higher than normal when measured while fasting (without any food or drink in your system). Blood glucose higher than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) increases risk of heart disease. High Triglycerides Levels Having too much of this type of fat in your blood raises your heart disease risk. Continue reading >>

Cholesterol: High Cholesterol Diseases

Cholesterol: High Cholesterol Diseases

High cholesterol increases the risk of other conditions, depending on which blood vessels are narrowed or blocked. Some of these diseases include: Coronary heart disease The main risk associated with high cholesterol is coronary heart disease (CHD). Your blood cholesterol level has a lot to do with your chances of getting heart disease. If your cholesterol is too high, it builds up on the walls of your arteries. Over time, this buildup is known as atherosclerosis. This condition causes arteries to become narrowed, and the narrowed blood vessels reduce blood flow to the heart. This can result in angina (chest pain) from not enough blood flow getting to the heart, or a heart attack in cases when a blood vessel is blocked completely and the heart muscle begins to die. Stroke A stroke occurs when a blood vessel that carries oxygen and nutrients to the brain becomes blocked or bursts. A stroke can result if the blood supply to the brain is reduced. When stroke occurs, part of the brain cannot get the blood and oxygen it needs, so it starts to die. Peripheral arterial disease High cholesterol also has been linked to peripheral arterial disease (PAD), which refers to diseases of blood vessels that are outside the heart and brain. In PAD, fatty deposits build up along artery walls and affect blood circulation, mainly in arteries leading to the legs and feet. The arteries of the kidney can also be affected. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes is another disease linked to high cholesterol because diabetes can affect the different cholesterol levels. Even if blood sugar control is good, people with diabetes tend to have increased triglycerides, decreased high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and sometimes increased low-density lipoprotein (LDL). This increases the likelihood of developing a Continue reading >>

How A Short Nap Can Raise The Risk Of Diabetes: Study Finds People Who Have A Siesta Are More Likely To Have High Blood Pressure And High Cholesterol

How A Short Nap Can Raise The Risk Of Diabetes: Study Finds People Who Have A Siesta Are More Likely To Have High Blood Pressure And High Cholesterol

Napping for more than 30 minutes at a time can raise the risk of diabetes, according to a new study It can also increase likelihood of high blood pressure and high cholesterol They were much favoured by Margaret Thatcher, Albert Einstein and Winston Churchill. But while afternoon naps may revitalise tired brains, they can also increase the risk of diabetes, according to new research. A study of more than 27,000 people in China – where taking a post-lunch snooze is very popular – shows napping for more than 30 minutes at a time can raise the chances of developing type two diabetes. Researchers found men and women taking 40 winks were also more likely to have high blood pressure and raised cholesterol levels compared to those who stayed awake through the day. The findings, published in the journal Sleep Medicine, are in contrast to those from other recent studies, which found daytime sleeps could boost brain power and slash the risk of heart attacks and strokes by more than a third. The researchers said it’s the duration of the nap that counts. Those dozing for half an hour or more were more likely to have the early signs of diabetes than those who snoozed for less time or not at all. In 2009, a planned UK National Siesta Day was cancelled when similar research from China found a 26 per cent increase in diabetes risk among those regularly getting their heads down in the afternoon. Diabetes affects an estimated 2.5 million people in the UK. Around ten per cent of cases are due to type one, which is thought to be caused by a malfunctioning immune system and has nothing to do with diet. But the remaining 90 per cent are type two, closely linked to unhealthy diet and lifestyle. The body loses its ability to make use of glucose, a type of sugar that is released when we e Continue reading >>

The Dangers Of High Cholesterol And Diabetes

The Dangers Of High Cholesterol And Diabetes

Scientists are finding evidence that diabetes itself wreaks havoc with cholesterol, significantly increasing the likelihood of a heart attack or stroke even higher. The close ties between these two risk factors mean that if you are diabetic, you have to be extremely vigilant about controlling your cholesterol. Link Between Insulin and Cholesterol Researchers are still figuring out exactly how diabetes changes cholesterol levels at the microscopic cellular level. They do know that high levels of insulin in the blood tend to adversely affect the number of cholesterol particles in the blood. High insulin levels act to raise the amount of LDL-cholesterol (the "bad cholesterol") that tends to form plaques in arteries and lower the number of HDL cholesterol particles ("good cholesterol") that help to clear out dangerous plaques before they break off to cause a heart attack or stroke. Diabetes also tends to cause higher levels of triglycerides, another type of fat circulating in the blood. Similarly, high cholesterol can also be a predictor of diabetes; elevated cholesterol levels are often seen in people with insulin resistance, even before they have developed full-blown diabetes. When LDL levels start to climb, experts recommend paying close attention to blood sugar control and starting a diet and exercise regimen to help stave off diabetes and cardiovascular disease. This is especially important if you have a family history of heart disease. For people with Type 1 diabetes, controlling blood sugar can make a big difference. Good blood sugar control is related to near-normal cholesterol levels, similar to those seen in people without diabetes. But people with poorly controlled Type 1 diabetes have increased triglyceride levels and lower HDL levels, which contribute to the de Continue reading >>

Diabetes, High Blood Pressure And Cholesterol: How One Condition Impacts The Other

Diabetes, High Blood Pressure And Cholesterol: How One Condition Impacts The Other

I was diagnosed with Diabetes Type II in 1999. Prior to that date my blood pressure readings were averaging 147/91. In January of 2000 my doctor put me on Lipitor. Could my HBP be considered a secondary condition that is likely to be caused in part and/or aggravated by the diabetes mellitus? Multiple readers have noted that they have one combination or another of hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus and hyperlipidemia (elevated cholesterol, or triglycerides, or low HDL cholesterol) and asked which came first and whether one is secondary to the other. The relationship is often complex as each can not only worsen the other but also increases the effect upon the adverse problems that can lead to heart disease. In the question that I am answering, the blood pressures were already elevated and we would at least call them “pre hypertensive” before. The reason that we use the term “pre hypertensive” is that people who run high pressure early in life are more likely than others to run even higher pressures as they age. Indeed, the likelihood of having high blood pressure is quite low before age thirty but increases with each decade of life. One of the reasons that blood pressure increases as we get older is arteriosclerosis. Our arteries are quite compliant and expand with each push of blood pumping from the heart. The arteries become a bit stiffer as we age (come to think of it, so are our joints), and no longer cushion the shock of blood coursing through under pressure from the heart. This stiffness causes the pressure within the blood vessels to rise, and this is what we actually measure. As we age, in a “Western” society our unhealthy diets lead us to deposit fat molecules (mostly forms of cholesterol) into the walls of the blood vessels building up “plaque Continue reading >>

Why Diabetics Are At Risk For High Cholesterol

Why Diabetics Are At Risk For High Cholesterol

One of the most important things a diabetic can know is how their blood glucose levels can affect the other parts of the body. Even though the body is broken down into various systems, ie cardiac, respiratory, muscles, etc, they all work together and are affected by one another. Any disorder in the body, even if it is technically isolated to one part, can have effects on other systems. For example, someone with a respiratory disorder has trouble bringing in oxygen. This can make the heart work harder to get oxygen to the rest of the body. Due to the set up of the human body, diabetes can actually cause high cholesterol levels, especially if blood glucose levels are not controlled. The various chemicals (hormones) that are secreted by the pancreas have control over cholesterol levels and blood sugars. Here, we will explain how the pancreas works, and how the effects of diabetes can prevent the body from being able to control your cholesterol levels and vice versa. The Role of the Pancreas The association of high cholesterol and diabetes is because the pancreas has the ability to control both in many situations. However, the effects diabetes has on the pancreas can actually prevent the body from properly managing cholesterol. When you eat, the pancreas secretes several different chemicals. These chemicals are pushed into the digestive system and others into the blood stream to help break down various parts of your meal. This will answer a lot of questions about diabetes, and also make you aware of other problems you could encounter while trying to get your blood glucose levels under control. The first set of chemicals that are secreted are Trypsin and chymotrypsin, which are essentially fancy names for chemicals that break down the proteins found in meats, beans, cheese, Continue reading >>

Cholesterol & Diabetes

Cholesterol & Diabetes

Most adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes are at high risk for cardiovascular diseases such as heart attack and stroke. People with diabetes have an increased risk of these diseases even if their low-density lipoprotein, or LDL ("bad") cholesterol, is “normal.” They have an even higher risk if their LDL-cholesterol is elevated. Definitions Cardiovascular disease: Damage to the heart and blood vessels. One cause is narrowing of the blood vessels due to fat deposits on the vessel walls, which limits blood flow. Cholesterol: A fat substance that is naturally present in your blood and cells. There are two main types of cholesterol: LDL and HDL. LDL (low-density lipoprotein): Often called “bad” cholesterol because higher levels of LDL can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. HDL (high-density lipoprotein): Often called “good” cholesterol because higher levels of HDL can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. Triglyceride: A form of fat that the body makes from sugar, alcohol or other food sources. Have you had your cholesterol tested lately? Adults with diabetes should have their cholesterol tested yearly or as indicated by your health-care provider. More frequent testing may be necessary for people taking cholesterol medications. Always discuss your cholesterol results with your doctor and other members of your health-care team. Have you been told that you have high cholesterol? High cholesterol usually refers to high LDL (“bad”) cholesterol. The main goal is to lower LDL-cholesterol. Check with your health-care provider to find out if you should be on medication to accomplish this. Weight management, healthy eating and regular physical activity will also help you reach this goal. Diabetes management requires good blood glucose (sugar), blood pr Continue reading >>

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