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Can Diabetes Cause Clogged Arteries?

Diabetes & Its Link To Heart Disease

Diabetes & Its Link To Heart Disease

Online Health Chat with Dr. Leslie Cho and Dr. Vinni Makin Introduction Cleveland_Clinic_Host: People with diabetes have an increased risk of developing heart disease at some point in their lives. It is important to control risk factors early on. Join cardiologist Leslie Cho, MD, and endocrinologist, Vinni Makin, MD,online for answers to your questions concerning the link between diabetes and heart disease. Leslie Cho, MD,is Director of Cleveland Clinic’s Women’s Cardiovascular Center. She is also Section Head,Preventive Cardiology and Rehabilitation in the Robert and Suzanne Tomsich Department of Cardiovascular Medicine at Cleveland Clinic. Dr. Cho is board-certified in interventional cardiology, cardiovascular medicine, and internal medicine. Her specialty interests focus on general cardiology, heart disease, and peripheral arterial and vascular disease and their attendant therapies and treatments. Dr. Cho specializes in heart disease in women. A graduate of the University Of Chicago Pritzker School Of Medicine, Dr. Cho completed her residency in internal medicine at University of Washington Medical Center. She completed cardiovascular medicine and interventional cardiology fellowships at Cleveland Clinic. Vinni Makin, MD, is an endocrinologist in Cleveland Clinic’s Endocrinology & Metabolism Institute. She is board certified in endocrinology and internal medicine, and her specialty interests include general endocrinology, diabetes, hirsutism, acne, and thyroid disorders. A graduate of Delhi University’s Lady Hardinge Medical College, Dr. Makin completed her residency in internal medicine at John H. Stroger Jr. Hospital of Cook County in Chicago. She completed her endocrinology fellowship at Cleveland Clinic. Cleveland_Clinic_Host: Welcome to our Online Health Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Prevents Clogged Arteries In Diabetics

Vitamin D Prevents Clogged Arteries In Diabetics

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Vitamin D prevents clogged arteries in diabetics "People with diabetes often develop clogged arteries that cause heart disease, and new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that low vitamin D levels are to blame." They found that in diabetes patients with low vitamin D less than 30 nanograms per milliliter of blood the macrophage cells were more likely to adhere to the walls of blood vessels, which triggers cells to get loaded with cholesterol, eventually causing the vessels to stiffen and block blood flow. We took everything into account, says first author Amy E. Riek, MD, instructor in medicine. We looked at blood pressure, cholesterol, diabetes control, body weight and race. But only vitamin D levels correlated to whether these cells stuck to the blood vessel wall. In the future, we hope to generate medications, potentially even vitamin D itself, that help prevent the deposit of cholesterol in the blood vessels, Bernal-Mizrachi explains. Other work has suggested that vitamin D may improve insulin release from the pancreas and insulin sensitivity. Our ultimate goal is to intervene in people with diabetes and to see whether vitamin D might decrease inflammation, reduce blood pressure and lessen the likelihood that they will develop atherosclerosis or other vascular complications. I recall the DN mentioning the effect long-term of met on Vit D uptake too... the vicious circle gets tighter! 8) We took everything into account, says first author Amy E. Riek, MD, instructor in medicine. We looked at blood pressure, cholesterol, diabetes control, body weight and race. But only vitamin D levels correlated to whether the Continue reading >>

Repeated Sugar-spikes Damage Your Arteries

Repeated Sugar-spikes Damage Your Arteries

Heart disease stems from damage of the arteries, which eventually affect the heart. There is a common myth that high levels of fat in the blood cause cholesterol to begin to stick to the walls of the arteries. However, without arterial wall damage, cholesterol cannot begin to form a “plaque”, no matter how high your blood lipids may be. Every time your blood sugar spikes, it is causing an inflammatory response that damages the lining “wall” of your arteries. LDL particles become trapped behind the damaged lining, causing atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries). Atherosclerosis is the number one cause of heart disease and stroke.[1] In this stage, plaque continues to build until it ultimately ruptures through the artery wall, forming a clot, which blocks the circulation. This represents a heart attack. People with pre-diabetes or diabetes can have normal fasting readings yet blood sugars can spike after improper eating. If you have diabetes or even pre-diabetes, you already know that every time you eat too many carbohydrates at one time you are spiking your blood sugar levels. But what about people who do not know they have pre-diabetes or diabetes and who are told by the doctor that their fasting glucose levels are within a normal range? These people probably don’t give that pie ala mode a second thought. What they don’t realize is that every day, after a meal they are probably experiencing artery-damaging sugar spikes that far exceed the normal range. Scientific research shows that after-meal spikes in blood sugar are potentially damaging. They not only lead to diabetes and heart disease, but also eye disease, blindness, kidney disease and nerve disease. Studies show that controlling after-meal spikes in blood sugar can help reduce cardiovascular risk.[ Continue reading >>

The Connection Between Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

The Connection Between Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

Aaron contacted TheDiabetesCouncil with some questions related to diabetes and heart disease. Aaron is 57 years old. He has had Type 2 diabetes for 12 years. Aaron visited his doctor related to swelling in his ankles and feet, shortness of breath, and weight gain. After some tests, the doctor informed him that on top of his Type 2 diabetes, he now has congestive heart failure. He was now wondering why did he have heart disease now and was it because of his diabetes? In order to help Aaron and other people with diabetes understand the connection between diabetes and heart disease and how to prevent it, we decided to look into the specific link between the two diseases. What is the connection between diabetes and heart disease? According to the American Heart Association, there exist a relationship between cardiovascular disease and diabetes: 68% percent of people with diabetes who are aged 65 and older die from heart disease and 16% die of a stroke. People with diabetes are more likely to die from a heart disease than those without diabetes. The National Institute of Health states the following for people with diabetes: They have additional causes of heart disease They are at higher risk of heart disease than those who do not have diabetes They may develop heart disease at a younger age Risk assessment must take into account the major risk factors (cigarette smoking, elevated blood pressure, abnormal serum lipids and lipoproteins, and hyperglycemia) and predisposing risk factors (excess body weight and abdominal obesity, physical inactivity, and family history of CVD). Identification of risk factors is a major first step for developing a plan for risk reduction in persons with diabetes. – Scott M. Grundy et al, Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease In two words, the conn Continue reading >>

How Can Diabetes Cause Atherosclerosis?

How Can Diabetes Cause Atherosclerosis?

Atherosclerosis is a form of hardening of the blood vessels, caused by fatty deposits and local tissue reaction in the walls of the arteries. Blood supply beyond the affected parts of the artery is usually compromised by the narrowing and, sometimes, occlusion of the artery. The deposits, called plaques, may rupture with disastrous consequences. Diabetes mellitus is a documented high risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. Heart disease and stroke, arising mainly from the effects of atherosclerosis, account for 65 percent of deaths among diabetics. Other complications of diabetes, such as blindness, gangrene and kidney disease, all have some deficiency of blood supply in their genesis. Video of the Day Normal blood vessels have an inner lining, called endothelium, that keeps blood flowing smoothly by producing local Nitrous oxide (NO). NO serves to relax the smooth muscles in the walls of the vessels and prevent cells from sticking to the walls. A disruption of this mechanism is thought to be at the heart of the increased formation of plaques in diabetes. High blood sugar, elevated fatty acids and triglycerides leads to stickier walls, encouraging the attachment of cells that produce local tissue reaction. The local tissue reaction further traps floating particles and different blood cells, heaping up and hardening the vessel walls. Insulin stimulates the production of NO by the cells lining the blood vessels. In diabetics who are resistant to the actions of insulin, this stimulatory effect is lost, resulting in increased tendencies towards plaque formation. In the presence of raised blood sugar and resistance to insulin, the lining cells of the blood vessels not only reduce production of NO, they also increase the production of substances that constrict the Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Heart Disease Linked By Inflammatory Protein

Type 1 Diabetes And Heart Disease Linked By Inflammatory Protein

NEW YORK, NY — Type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes appears to increase the risk of heart disease, the leading cause of death among people with high blood sugar, partly by stimulating the production of calprotectin, a protein that sparks an inflammatory process that fuels the buildup of artery-clogging plaque. The findings, made in mice and confirmed with human data, suggest new therapeutic targets for reducing heart disease in people with type 1 diabetes. Led by Columbia University Medical Center (CUMC) researchers in collaboration with investigators at New York University and the University of Pittsburgh, the study was published today in the online edition of Cell Metabolism. Diabetes is known to raise the risk for atherosclerosis, a disease in which fatty deposits known as plaque accumulate inside arteries. Over time, the arteries harden and narrow, leading to coronary artery disease and other forms of heart disease. Atherosclerosis is the leading cause of heart attacks, strokes, and peripheral vascular disease—collectively known as coronary heart disease, the leading cause of death in the United States. Scientists have known that diabetes leads to atherosclerosis. The study shows that this is associated with increased circulating levels of inflammatory white blood cells (WBCs), which contribute to the build-up of plaque. “But exactly how diabetes causes white blood cells to proliferate and lead to heart disease has been a mystery,” said study co-leader Ira J. Goldberg, MD, the Dickinson W. Richards Professor of Medicine at CUMC. In studies of mice with type 1 diabetes, Dr. Goldberg and his colleagues found that high blood sugar stimulates a type of inflammatory WBC known as neutrophils to release the protein calprotectin (also known as S100A8/9). The calprote Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Heart Disease

Diabetes And Heart Disease

Diabetes and heart disease Target 1 - your blood glucose Target 2 - your blood pressure Target 3 - your cholesterol Lifestyle changes Why people with diabetes are more likely to get heart disease What can damage my heart and blood vessels? Did you know that if you have diabetes you are at high risk of a heart attack or other heart disease? An estimated 50%-65% of people with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke, compared to less than 33% in the general population. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the number one cause of death in people with diabetes worldwide. The reasons why heart disease goes hand-in-hand with diabetes are becoming clearer. It is now estimated that people who have diabetes are two to five times more likely to develop heart disease than the general population. In type 2 diabetes, it is likely that some of the tissue damage that causes heart disease may have already been done before diabetes is diagnosed. Heart disease is now so closely linked to diabetes that when the government published its national guide Building Healthier Hearts, it advised health professionals to manage the health of people with diabetes in the same way as they manage people who have already had a serious heart problem, like a heart attack. The picture may appear bleak but this is far from the case. You can lower your risks from today. Take control and you can have a major impact on your future health. Relatively small improvements in blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol can greatly reduce the risk. What this means is that as well as taking care of your diabetes, you must also pay close attention to the health of your heart. Monitoring blood pressure, weight, diet, cholesterol and exercise is part and parcel of that. It should go without saying that smoking is a no-no Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

Diabetes, Heart Disease, And Stroke

Having diabetes means that you are more likely to develop heart disease and have a greater chance of a heart attack or a stroke. People with diabetes are also more likely to have certain conditions, or risk factors, that increase the chances of having heart disease or stroke, such as high blood pressure or high cholesterol. If you have diabetes, you can protect your heart and health by managing your blood glucose, also called blood sugar, as well as your blood pressure and cholesterol. If you smoke, get help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood glucose from diabetes can damage your blood vessels and the nerves that control your heart and blood vessels. The longer you have diabetes, the higher the chances that you will develop heart disease.1 People with diabetes tend to develop heart disease at a younger age than people without diabetes. In adults with diabetes, the most common causes of death are heart disease and stroke. Adults with diabetes are nearly twice as likely to die from heart disease or stroke as people without diabetes.2 The good news is that the steps you take to manage your diabetes also help to lower your chances of having heart disease or stroke. What else increases my chances of heart disease or stroke if I have diabetes? If you have diabetes, other factors add to your chances of developing heart disease or having a stroke. Smoking Smoking raises your risk of developing heart disease. If you have diabetes, it is important to stop smoking because both smoking and diabetes narrow blood vessels. Smoking also increases your chances of developing other long-term problems such as lung disease. Smoking also can damage the blood vessels in your legs and increase the risk of lower leg infections, ulcers, a Continue reading >>

Heart Disease Symptoms: Doing This Every Day Could Prevent Clogged Arteries

Heart Disease Symptoms: Doing This Every Day Could Prevent Clogged Arteries

Heart disease symptoms: Doing THIS every day could prevent clogged arteries HEART disease is caused by blocked arteries due to a build up of plaque. Heart disease: It's a leading killer in the UK Arteries are essential for carrying oxygen-rich blood to your heart and other parts of your body, so if they become clogged it can prove fatal. Indeed, heart disease is one of the biggest killers in the UK, with twice the number dying of it than breast cancer. Plaque build up has been attributed to a diet high in saturated fats . Known as atherosclerosis, youre also at a higher risk of it, according to the British Heart Foundation, if you smoke, have type 2 diabetes, have high blood pressure , have high cholesterol levels, are overweight or obese, or are not physically active. Saturated fats: A poor diet can cause clogged arteries In a study by the University of Otago in New Zealand, researchers discovered that short regular brisk walks - and a daily longer one - lowered blood lipids. New research may have discovered a way to lower levels of fatty acids that lead to clogged arteries. In a study by the University of Otago in New Zealand, researchers discovered that short regular brisk walks - and a daily longer one - lowered blood lipids. Around two minutes of walking roughly every half a hour, and one 30-minute walk, each day was all it took to trigger the positive effects. Its because this activity reduces triglyceride - or lipid - levels when measured after a meal consumed around 24 hours after starting the activity. 10 Step plan to eliminate your risk of heart disease Heart disease is the world's biggest killer, claiming 17.5 million lives annually. A new 10-step plan that promises to ELIMINATE your risk of dying from heart disease has been revealed. 10 Step plan to elimina Continue reading >>

Doc: Diabetes’ Underlying Cause Is Insulin Resistance

Doc: Diabetes’ Underlying Cause Is Insulin Resistance

Dear Dr. Roach: I was under the impression that fat was the major cause of Type 2 diabetes. When fat clogs the arteries, it does not allow sugar, from any source (table sugar, potato or Twinkie), to pass through the clogged arteries, which in turn causes the insulin levels to be abnormally heightened. Is this right? I saw nothing of this in your article. R.A.S. Dear R.A.S.: In Type 2 diabetes, the underlying cause is a resistance to insulin and a decreased ability to move sugar into cells. The exact cause for insulin resistance is not yet worked out. The resistance to insulin causes the pancreas to release even more insulin, leading to high insulin levels, which affects fat metabolism, leading to a propensity to gain weight. However, the blockage in arteries from fat deposits is more likely a result of diabetes, and not its cause. Also, because of the resistance to insulin, blood sugar is higher than normal, especially after eating, which also tends to damage blood vessels, particularly small ones. A diet low in simple carbohydrates, especially simple sugars, is critically important for people with Type 2 diabetes. Healthy fats, from nuts or olive oil, for example, slow absorption of sugar and tend to improve blood sugar control, along with good sources of protein. Carbohydrates from plant sources are absorbed much more slowly, and should be the major source of carbohydrate calories. Dear Dr. Roach: I’m a 75-year-old male. A recent endoscopy showed I have Barrett’s esophagus with no dysplasia. I was told to take omeprazole every day to control acid reflux. My concern is that I was not told of anything I might do to prevent Barrett’s esophagus from progressing to cancer. From what I read online, it appears that omeprazole has not been found to halt this progression Continue reading >>

Peripheral Artery Disease: What To Know And Do

Peripheral Artery Disease: What To Know And Do

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) “pads” arteries in your legs (and elsewhere) with gunky plaque that strangles or even cuts off blood flow, causing muscle pain and – grisly but true -- raising risk for amputation, too. It’s a particular health concern for people with diabetes, but new research suggests that cholesterol-lowering drugs can help. “It’s smart to begin getting screened for PAD about five years after you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes,” says San Francisco endocrinologist Alan L. Rubin, MD, author of Diabetes for Dummies and Prediabetes for Dummies. “The test is very simple – your doctor checks blood pressure at your ankle and compares it to blood pressure reading from your arm. Lower blood pressure in your legs is a warning sign.” So is severe pain. Diabetes promotes the build-up of plaque in blood vessels and can also trigger plaque break-ups that clog arteries. As a result, people with type 2 diabetes are three times more likely to have PAD than people without diabetes1 and are also three to eight times more likely to have symptoms like achy legs.2 Higher blood sugar also means higher risk for even more serious problems. Every one-point increase in A1c boosts risk for a PAD-related amputation 44 percent for people with type 2 and 18% for people with type 1 according to a 2010 review from the UK’s Cambridge University Foundation Hospital Trust. 3 PAD is also a sign that you’re at risk for heart disease, heart attacks and stroke, Dr. Rubin says. “Doctors take it very seriously,” he notes. “If you have atherosclerosis in your legs, you have it in arteries elsewhere in your body, too. PAD is treated by controlling blood pressure and reducing high cholesterol levels. It works. In a recent Emory University study4 that followed the Continue reading >>

Type Of Natural Sugar May Prevent Arteries From Clogging

Type Of Natural Sugar May Prevent Arteries From Clogging

Type of natural sugar may prevent arteries from clogging A new study in mice shows that trehalose, a type of natural sugar, may boost the 'housekeeping' abilities of a certain kind of immune cell, thus reducing the buildup of plaque inside the arteries. The new study shows that trehalose may reduce the buildup of plaque inside the aorta. Shown here is the aorta of a mouse, with the red lines depicting the aorta's walls and the yellow section showing the macrophages removing cellular waste. Atherosclerosis occurs when plaque builds up inside the body's arteries. Plaque is made up of fatty deposits, cholesterol , and other "waste" from our cells. The buildup of plaque can narrow the arteries and decrease their elasticity. This, in turn, can lead to a variety of cardiovascular problems, such as increased blood pressure , coronary heart disease , peripheral artery disease , and even heart attack . Although it is not exactly known what causes atherosclerosis, there are a number of risk factors and things that we can do to lower our chances of accumulating plaque inside our arteries. Smoking, high blood pressure , and high levels of the "bad" kind of cholesterol are all known to damage the arteries, so preventing these events from occurring may keep atherosclerosis at bay. New research adds a potential preventive factor to the list. The natural sugar trehalose may have a protective role against atherosclerosis, as this new mouse study shows. The research, whose senior author is Babak Razani, Ph.D., an assistant professor of medicine at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, MO - was published in the journal Nature Communications. Dr. Razani and team set out to examine the possibility of boosting the activity of certain types of immune cells called macrophages Continue reading >>

Vitamin D Prevents Clogged Arteries In Diabetics

Vitamin D Prevents Clogged Arteries In Diabetics

People with diabetes often develop clogged arteries that cause heart disease, and new research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that low vitamin D levels are to blame. In a study published Nov. 9 in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, the researchers report that blood vessels are less likely to clog in people with diabetes who get adequate vitamin D. But in patients with insufficient vitamin D, immune cells bind to blood vessels near the heart, then trap cholesterol to block those blood vessels. “About 26 million Americans now have type 2 diabetes,” says principal investigator Carlos Bernal-Mizrachi, MD. “And as obesity rates rise, we expect even more people will develop diabetes. Those patients are more likely to experience heart problems due to an increase in vascular inflammation, so we have been investigating why this occurs.” In earlier research, Bernal-Mizrachi, an assistant professor of medicine and of cell biology and physiology, and his colleagues found that vitamin D appears to play a key role in heart disease. This new study takes their work a step further, suggesting that when vitamin D levels are low, a particular class of white blood cell is more likely to adhere to cells in the walls of blood vessels. Vitamin D conspires with immune cells called macrophages either to keep arteries clear or to clog them. The macrophages begin their existence as white blood cells called monocytes that circulate in the bloodstream. But when monocytes encounter inflammation, they are transformed into macrophages, which no longer circulate. In the new study, researchers looked at vitamin D levels in 43 people with type 2 diabetes and in 25 others who were similar in age, sex and body weight but didn’t have diabetes. They found that i Continue reading >>

What Types Of Heart Disease Are Linked To Type 2 Diabetes?

What Types Of Heart Disease Are Linked To Type 2 Diabetes?

High blood pressure. This happens when blood pushes against the walls of your blood vessels with a stronger force than normal. It makes your heart work harder than usual and damages your blood vessels. Most people with type 2 diabetes also have high blood pressure. Together, they put a lot of extra strain on your heart, boosting your chance of having serious issues like heart disease and stroke. Peripheral artery disease (PAD). With this condition, you have plaque buildup in the arteries of your legs.It typically causes pain in your calves. You'll feel it when you walk or climb stairs,and it usually goes away with rest. Your legs may also feel heavy, numb, or weak. PAD is also a warning sign. That's because if you have plaque in your legs, you might have it in your heart, too.In fact, PAD raises your odds of having a stroke or heart attack. Stroke. Diabetes also means you're more likely to have a stroke,where blood flow to part of your brain gets cut off. The symptoms may come on suddenly and include: A hard time talking, such as slurred speech Weakness in one arm, making it hard to lift and keep both arms in the air It's a life-threatening problem, and you need to get medical help right away. The sooner you get treatment, the more likely you are to prevent long-term problems. WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Brunilda Nazario, MD on January 02, 2018 National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: "Diabetic Heart Disease," "Coronary Heart Disease," "Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)." Cleveland Clinic: "How Your Diabetes Can Mask Heart Disease -- Or a Heart Attack," "Diabetic Cardiomyopathy: 5 Tips for Cutting Your Risk," "Peripheral Artery Disease." Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Diabetes and Heart Disease." Mayo Clinic: "Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD)," "Silent Heart Attacks: Continue reading >>

Heart Disease And Stroke With Diabetes

Heart Disease And Stroke With Diabetes

Heart and blood vessel damage can affect anyone, but these problems occur more often in people with diabetes and can develop at an earlier age. If your family has a history of high blood pressure, stroke, or heart disease, you might carry some of the same genes that can lead to these problems. If you also have diabetes, the likelihood of blood vessel damage is even greater. No one knows exactly why people with diabetes are more likely to have these problems, but some possible reasons are: Blood-fat levels tend to be high when blood sugar levels are high. High levels of certain blood fats (especially cholesterol, LDL or bad cholesterol, and triglycerides) increase the risk of blood vessel damage and heart attack. High blood pressure, which is more common in people with diabetes than in other people, also increases the chances for heart disease and stroke. How Damage Happens Arteries, the blood vessels that carry blood from your heart to the rest of your body, are like flexible, elastic tubes. Inside the artery walls are slippery to let blood pass through quickly. When fat begins to build up on the artery walls, it makes the artery thick and less flexible. The lining of the artery wall becomes sticky instead of slippery, causing more fat to build up. The fat build-up clogs and blocks the artery. When the artery is blocked, the parts of the body beyond the blockage can't get the oxygen and nutrients they need. This causes damage that can lead to serious health problems including high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, kidney damage, and poor blood flow to the arms, legs, and head. Preventing Heart Disease You can't change the fact that you have diabetes or a family history of high blood pressure, stroke, or heart disease. But there are many things you can do to lower yo Continue reading >>

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