diabetestalk.net

Can Diabetes Cause A Migraine?

Migraine And Type 2 Diabetes; Is There Any Association?

Migraine And Type 2 Diabetes; Is There Any Association?

Go to: Abstract Migraine headache prevalence and triggers in type2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) were investigated in previous studies but the results are contradictory. Therefore, in this study we examined the prevalence of migraine headache in diabetic patients in comparison with non-diabetic persons and its predisposing factors in 2014. We enrolled 147 volunteer patients with T2DM and 150 healthy persons referred to the Yazd Diabetes Research Center and the Central Laboratory of Yazd, respectively, in 2014. The data collection instrument was a self-conducted checklist. The checklist contained demographic, anthropometric and clinical characteristics and migraine diagnostic questions according to International Classification of Headache Disorders Second Edition (ICHD-II) criteria. We compared prevalence of migraine between two groups, and also evaluated relationship between above characteristics and migraine prevalence in both groups. The prevalence of migraine in participants of diabetic and non-diabetic was 27.9 and 26 %, respectively (p-value = .406). The prevalence of migraine headache among in diabetic persons was significantly correlated with family history of migraine, diabetes duration and hypoglycemia attacks. Also, the migraine prevalence was significant more prevalent in T2DM patients with duration 6–10 years (p-value = 0.031). The percentage of HbA1C, type of anti-diabetic medication, BMI value and age in diabetic patients did not show any significant association with migraine. Conclusion Although we observed no significant differences in prevalence of migraine between patients with T2DM and non-diabetic age and sex adjusted persons But, the occurrence of hypoglycemia attacks and T2DM duration were related to migraine prevalence. Decreasing hypoglycemia among Continue reading >>

Diabetic Headache Symptoms

Diabetic Headache Symptoms

Diabetes impairs your body’s ability to produce or use insulin, which regulates blood glucose levels and generates energy. In type I diabetes, the pancreas does not produce insulin. Without insulin, too much sugar remains in the blood and becomes toxic, leading to fatigue, neuropathy, headaches, blindness and death if left untreated. Type II diabetes is developmental and involves cellular resistance to insulin, which doctors usually don't diagnose until patients report obvious symptoms such as chronic headaches. Video of the Day Hyperglycemia occurs when too much glucose circulates in the blood owing to either lack of insulin production in the pancreas or cellular resistance to insulin. Hyperglycemia is a hallmark of both types of diabetes and is a serious condition because high concentrations of glucose are toxic to nerves and blood vessels. According to the Mayo Clinic, headache is an early symptom of hyperglycemia and frequently includes blurred vision, fatigue and confusion. In the absence of insulin therapy, hyperglycemia can cause a buildup of ketones, which are waste products in the blood and urine, leading to coma and death. Hypoglycemia occurs when too little glucose is in the blood or getting into cells, where the body uses it for energy. If you have diabetes, hypoglycemia can occur if you mismanage your insulin therapy and take too much. If you don't have diabetes, failure to eat enough nutrients such as carbohydrates that the body can easily break down to glucose molecules can result in hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia is a serious condition because glucose is the primary source of energy for brain function. According to the American Heart Association, a dull headache is a common, early sign of hypoglycemia and often includes related symptoms such as dizziness, Continue reading >>

Signs And Symptoms Of Pituitary Tumors

Signs And Symptoms Of Pituitary Tumors

Not all pituitary tumors (called pituitary adenomas) cause symptoms. But when they do, they can cause many different types of symptoms. The first signs of a pituitary adenoma often depend on whether the tumor is functional (making excess hormones) or non-functional (not making excess hormones). Functional adenomas can cause problems because of the hormones they release. Most of the time, a functional adenoma makes too much of a single pituitary hormone. These tumors are often found while they are still fairly small (microadenomas). Symptoms from functional adenomas are described below, based on which hormone they make. Tumors that aren’t making excess hormones (non-functional adenomas) often become large (macroadenomas) before they are noticed. These tumors don't cause symptoms until they press on nearby nerves, parts of the brain, or other parts of the pituitary. Non-functional adenomas that cause no symptoms are sometimes found because of an MRI or CT scan done for other reasons. These tumors are now being found more often as more MRI and CT scans of the brain are done. These might be the most common pituitary tumors. As long as they aren’t causing problems, they'e often just watched closely without needing treatment. Large tumors (macroadenomas) and pituitary carcinomas Pituitary macroadenomas (benign tumors larger than 1 cm) and carcinomas (cancers), whether functional or not, can be large enough to press on nearby nerves or parts of the brain. This can lead to symptoms such as: Eye muscle weakness so the eyes don't move in the same direction at the same time Blurred or double vision Loss of peripheral vision Sudden blindness Headaches Facial numbness or pain Dizziness Loss of consciousness (passing out) Vision problems occur when the tumor “pinches” the ner Continue reading >>

Causes

Causes

The exact cause of migraines is unknown, but they're thought to be the result of abnormal brain activity temporarily affecting nerve signals, chemicals and blood vessels in the brain. It's not clear what causes this change in brain activity, but it's possible that your genes make you more likely to experience migraines as a result of a specific trigger. Migraine triggers Many possible migraine triggers have been suggested, including hormonal, emotional, physical, dietary, environmental and medicinal factors. These triggers are very individual but it may help to keep a diary to see if you can identify a consistent trigger. It can also sometimes be difficult to tell if something is really a trigger or if what you're experiencing is an early symptom of a migraine attack. Hormonal changes Some women experience migraines around the time of their period, possibly because of changes in the levels of hormones such as oestrogen around this time. These type of migraines usually occur between two days before the start of your period to three days after. Some women only experience migraines around this time, which is known as pure menstrual migraine. However, most women experience them at other times too and this is called menstrual related migraine. Many women find their migraines improve after the menopause, although the menopause can trigger migraines or make them worse in some women. Emotional triggers: stress anxiety tension shock excitement Physical triggers: tiredness shift work poor posture neck or shoulder tension low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia) strenuous exercise, if you're not used to it Dietary triggers: missed, delayed or irregular meals alcohol the food additive tyramine caffeine products, such as tea and coffee specific foods such as chocolate, citrus fruit and chees Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes To Blame For Your Headache?

Is Diabetes To Blame For Your Headache?

Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disease that results in blood sugar, or glucose, abnormalities. This causes a host of symptoms and related complications, some of which can be life-threatening. A common symptom of high or low blood glucose is a headache. Headaches alone aren’t harmful, but they can signal that your blood sugar is out of its target range. If you have frequent headaches, diabetes may be to blame. Find out if diabetes is the cause of your headache so you can take proper action. Can diabetes cause seizures? Learn how to prevent them » Headaches are common in both children and adults. In fact, headaches are the most common source of pain. They’re also a leading cause for days missed from work and school. Headaches are a frequent problem among the American population, but there are numerous causes. Headaches are classified as being primary or secondary. Primary headaches occur when brain cells or nerves, blood vessels, or muscles around the head send pain signals to the brain. Migraines and tension headaches are common examples. Secondary headaches, on the other hand, are not directly caused by the type of pain signals mentioned above. These types of headaches are attributed to underlying health conditions or medical problems. Diabetes is one cause of secondary headaches. Other causes can include: fever or infection injury high blood pressure, or hypertension stroke anxiety or stress hormone fluctuations, such as those occurring during menstrual cycle eye disorders structural abnormalities within the brain Just as causes can vary, the pain associated with secondary headaches can vary. Headaches due to diabetes are often moderate to severe in nature, and are known to occur frequently. These headaches can be a sign that your blood glucose is either too high Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is a condition marked by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that are discovered during pregnancy. It is defined as carbohydrate intolerance. About two to 10 percent of all pregnant women in the U.S. are diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Am I at risk for gestational diabetes? These factors increase your risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy: Being overweight before becoming pregnant (if you are 20% or more over your ideal body weight) Family history of diabetes (if your parents or siblings have diabetes) Being over age 25 Previously giving birth to a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds Previously giving birth to a stillborn baby Having gestational diabetes with an earlier pregnancy Being diagnosed with pre-diabetes Having polycystic ovary syndrome Being African-American, Hispanic/Latino, Asian-American, American Indian, or Pacific Islander American Keep in mind that half of women who develop gestational diabetes have no known risk factors. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is caused by some hormonal changes that occur in all women during pregnancy. The placenta is the organ that connects the baby (by the umbilical cord) to the uterus and transfers nutrients from the mother to the baby. Increased levels of certain hormones made in the placenta can prevent insulin—a hormone that controls blood sugar—from managing glucose properly. This condition is called "insulin resistance." As the placenta grows larger during pregnancy, it produces more hormones and increases this insulin resistance. Usually, the mother’s pancreas is able to produce more insulin (about three times the normal amount) to overcome the insulin resistance. If it cannot, sugar levels will rise, resulting in gestational dia Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Cause Headaches?

Can Diabetes Cause Headaches?

We all get the odd headache. In fact, 15 per cent of Australians will have popped a painkiller to treat one by the time you finish reading this story. People living with diabetes, however, are more likely to be hit with headaches than the rest of the population, and having diabetes may even increase your migraine risk. ‘Headaches are one of the most common complaints doctors are presented with,’ says Dr Tony Bartone, president of the Australian Medical Association (AMA) Victoria. ‘That, combined with the fact they can be caused by a variety of things, means it’s understandable that some people may not make the link between their diabetes and their headaches.’ Find the link and you are halfway to solving the problem. Here’s what to look for… High or low blood glucose levels A headache can be a symptom of hypo- or hyper glycaemia – when blood glucose levels go too low or too high. Low blood glucose levels trigger the release of hormones that cause vasoconstriction – a narrowing of the blood vessels – which may bring on a headache. High BGLs can cause you to run to the loo more often, which sometimes leads to dehydration and, in turn, a headache. THE FIX: As soon as you feel a headache coming on, test your blood glucose levels. This is especially important if you frequently wake up with a pounding head, which could be a sign of nocturnal hypoglycaemia (going too low overnight) if you take insulin or certain other medications. See your doctor if you suspect this is the cause of your headaches. If your levels are low, treat them with 15g of fast-acting carbohydrate and monitor your symptoms as your blood glucose levels return to normal. Once they stabilise, the headache may ease. On the other hand, if your levels are high, exercise may help, but first che Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 In Adults

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 In Adults

What is it? Diabetes (di-uh-BE-tez) is also called diabetes mellitus (MEL-i-tus). There are three main types of diabetes. You have type 2 diabetes. It may be called non-insulin dependent or adult onset diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, your body has trouble using insulin. Your body may also not make enough insulin. If there is not enough insulin or if it is not working right, sugar will build up in your blood. Type 2 diabetes is more common in overweight people who are older than 40 years and are not active. Type 2 diabetes is also being found more often in children who are overweight. There is no cure for diabetes but you can have a long and active life if your diabetes is controlled. How did I get type 2 diabetes? Insulin (IN-sul-in) is a hormone (a special body chemical) made by your pancreas (PAN-kree-us). The pancreas is an organ that lies behind the stomach. Much of the food you eat is turned into sugar in your stomach. This sugar goes into your blood and travels to the cells of your body to be used for energy. Insulin acts as a "key" to help sugar enter the cells. If there is not enough insulin or if it is not working right, sugar will build up in your blood. With type 2 diabetes, you may have better control of your diabetes with the right diet and exercise. You may also need to take oral medicine (pills) to help your body make more insulin or to use insulin better. You may also need insulin shots. No one knows for sure what causes type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes runs in families. You are more likely to get it if someone else in your family has type 2 diabetes. You are also more likely to get type 2 diabetes if you are overweight. Being overweight makes it harder for your body to use the insulin it makes. This is called insulin resistance. In insulin resistance, y Continue reading >>

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Pre Diabetes Symptoms

Here's a fact: Most people diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes had pre diabetes symptoms that if known, could have alerted them to make diet and lifestyle changes before their diagnosis. Most physicians only pay attention to fasting blood sugar when watching for diabetes. For instance, if a patient's blood sugar is between 110-125, mg/dL, it indicates prediabetes. But blood sugar results can test in normal ranges even as diabetes is developing. If people with a type 2 diabetes diagnosis knew ALL of the pre diabetic symptoms for which to watch, it could help them avoid being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. Prediabetes is defined medically as the state in which fasting blood sugar levels are higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as type 2 diabetes. Blood sugars in the prediabetic range (between 100 - 126 mg/dl) indicate insulin resistance is developing, and a metabolic syndrome diagnosis is more likely in the future. Insulin resistance (IR) is a condition in which chronically elevated blood sugar and insulin levels have resulted in an inability of body cells to respond to them normally. IR is the driving factor as insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, prediabetes and diabetes are all linked together on a continuum. Pre Diabetes Symptoms: It's Not Just About Blood Sugar Medical information about pre diabetes comes from medical associations such as the American Diabetes Association. The ADA guidelines say that prediabetes is a function of a fasting blood sugar is between 100-125 mg/dl. However, I am convinced that signs of prediabetes can be spotted even when blood tests indicated blood sugars below 100 mg/dl. I saw this in my own life. Eight years ago, I had many of the pre diabetic symptoms listed below, but my fasting blood sugar was still classified as "n Continue reading >>

Diabetes Insipidus And Hypernatremia

Diabetes Insipidus And Hypernatremia

One of the most common effects of diabetes insipidus on the human body is the development of hypernatremia. This is a medical term that is used to describe the presence of elevated sodium levels within the blood because of an electrolyte imbalance. Hypernatremia is defined by having sodium serum levels measured at 145 mEq/L or above. In addition to the symptoms of diabetes insipidus, people who have hypernatremia may experience a feeling of weakness in their muscles, irritability, fever, and general restlessness. In some instances, migraine headaches may be triggered, seizures may occur, and there may be severe changes to an individual’s blood sugar levels. What Is the Danger of Hypernatremia? When people are suffering from diabetes insipidus, it means their bodies are unable to respond to commands to concentrate urine to preserve hydration. The kidneys begin to pull out all consumable fluids and prepare them to be expelled from the body. Without proper fluid intake, the end result is dehydration because the body is losing more water than what is being consumed. The danger of hypernatremia is that in up to half of all cases that occur because of diabetes insipidus, a condition called adipsia occurs. This is because the hypothalamus is responsible for the thirst mechanisms and if it is malfunctioning already by not producing the necessary levels of anti-diuretic hormone, it may also fool people into thinking that they aren’t thirsty when they really are. This means that an individual may not feel thirsty, be expelling up to 20 liters of urine per day, and wind up with severe dehydration. Many cases of diabetes insipidus involve polydipsia, which means excessive thirst, but when sodium levels are increased, the opposite effect may occur. This generally occurs with cen Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Cause Headaches?-how To Control Headaches Without Medications

Can Diabetes Cause Headaches?-how To Control Headaches Without Medications

What is a headache and what causes it? Headaches are so common for most of us at one time or another. But can diabetes cause headaches? Many things cause headaches and diabetes is can be one of them. While there are medications to take, it’s better to turn and rely on natural headache treatments. For me, they were never really a big problem thankfully. But so many people suffer from cluster, tension, and of course migraine headaches. There can be a zillion causes of this head pain and sometimes we have no idea what causes one particular bout. The more you know about what causes head pain, the easier it is to treat it. I know that many folks treat it with advil, aspirin, ibuprofen, aleve, etc. Taking too much advil is bad for your liver and kidneys. Advil works great for me when I need it but I don’t stay on it for those reasons. The same goes for the others. I do take a baby aspirin each day by doctor’s orders but it’s not for headache pain, just as a blood thinner. Were you aware that the major cause of a headache is dehydration? So the first thing you should do is to drink a glass of water to see if that eliminates the symptoms. Better yet, drink 8 glasses of water a day. That could be causing the issue if you’re not getting enough water. Prevention The best thing for a headache is to prevent it in the first place. Listen, nobody likes any kind of pain no matter where in the body it comes from. Some people have more or less of a tolerance of pain in different areas of the body. I’ve had headaches and at the first sign I wan to treat it because I cannot function at all. I remember one time many years ago I was taking an antibiotic and I had THE worst pain in my head ever. I just laid down on the bed and never forgot it because I had never had a headache lik Continue reading >>

Section 5: Disease Of The Eye (posterior Eye Disease)

Section 5: Disease Of The Eye (posterior Eye Disease)

5.1 Floaters and Spots in the Field of View Floaters (muscae volitantes - "flying flies") are spots before the eyes of different shapes, sizes and number. They appear often when looking at a plain coloured field of view, eg blue sky, a wall. Typically when the patient tries to look at them they report that the spots "run- away". The spots are due to corpuscles circulating in the retinal vessels and specks within the vitreous. These opacities cause shadows to be cast onto the retinal sensory apparatus; the rods and cones; and thereby appear as dark spots in the field of vision. Slight cases or observations require no treatment. There are other retinal and vitreous conditions that may cause increased presence of floaters indicative of more serious complications, for example, vitreous or retinal detachment. It is therefore advisable in the presence of an increased occurrence of floaters that you get a check-up by a eyecare professional. 5.2 Macular Degeneration The macular is the innermost part of the central retina; an area where the retina has the highest concentration of cones (sensory apparatus of vision). The degeneration which occurs within this area of the retina can be due to a breakdown of the retinal receptor cells, leakage of exudate between the retinal layers and occasionally destructive bleeding. As a result of the changes to the retina there is a decrease in central vision, often with little to no involvement in the peripheral retina. Hand magnifiers, spectacle magnifiers and low vision aids can be used by the patient to assist with reading. More information can be obtained from the National Eye Institute located in Bethesda, MD on (301)496-4000. Internet Resources include: URL: (information on preventing macular degeneration with dietary carotenoids a medica Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Children

Diabetes In Children

Type 1 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes in children: 90 to 95 per cent of under 16s with diabetes have this type. It is caused by the inability of the pancreas to produce the hormone insulin. Type 1 diabetes is classified as an autoimmune disease, meaning a condition in which the body's immune system 'attacks' one of the body's own tissues or organs. In Type 1 diabetes it's the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas that are destroyed. How common is it? Childhood diabetes isn't common, but there are marked variations around the world: in England and Wales 17 children per 100,000 develop diabetes each year in Scotland the figure is 25 per 100,000 in Finland it's 43 per 100,000 in Japan it's 3 per 100,000. The last 30 years has seen a threefold increase in the number of cases of childhood diabetes, particularly in the under 5s. In Europe and America, Type 2 diabetes has been seen for the first time in young people. This is mainly caused by the increasing trend towards obesity in our society. But obesity doesn't explain the increase in the numbers of Type 1 diabetes in children – who make up the majority of new cases. What causes childhood diabetes? As with adults, the cause of childhood diabetes is not understood. It probably involves a combination of genes and environmental triggers. The majority of children who develop Type 1 don't have a family history of diabetes. What are the symptoms? The main symptoms are the same as in adults. They tend to come on over a few weeks: drinking more than usual, including overnight frequent urination, including overnight weight loss tiredness. Symptoms that are more typical for children include: Sometimes diabetic ketoacidosis occurs before diabetes is diagnosed, although this happens less often in the UK due to better a Continue reading >>

Hypoglycaemia

Hypoglycaemia

Hypoglycaemia is the medical condition of having an abnormally low blood sugar (glucose) level, and can be responsible for triggering or exacerbating migraine and other headaches The importance of blood-glucose We need energy to function, and most of this energy comes from consuming carbohydrates (sugars). Our bodies convert these carbohydrates into glucose (which is easier to use), and is then carried in the blood to whichever parts of the body need it. The brain requires a continuous supply of glucose from the blood in order to function, and if glucose levels drop (as in hypoglycaemia) the brain is one of the first organs affected. Maintaining blood-glucose levels Our bodies have to keep their blood-glucose levels from becoming too low or too high, and they do this using two fast-acting hormones: insulin and glucagon. When blood-glucose levels get too high, insulin acts to bring them down; when levels get too low, glucagon pushes them back up. Causes of hypoglycaemia If we don’t eat enough calories for our bodies’ needs, then our blood-glucose levels drop too low. This can happen if we skip meals, fast, diet, or exercise on insufficient food. Eating a high-sugar meal can cause ‘reactive hypoglycaemia’, because the sudden rise in blood-glucose from the sugary food triggers an over-production of insulin, which in turn makes the blood-glucose levels fall too low. If diabetes patients inject too much insulin into their bodies, it can also cause their blood-glucose levels to fall too low. Symptoms of hypoglycaemia The brain not receiving enough glucose causes most of the symptoms of hypoglycaemia, which include: headache, migraine, confusion, nausea, sweating, faintness, and hypothermia. If the hypoglycaemia is very severe and prolonged, it can even cause loss-of-c Continue reading >>

Can Metformin Cause Migraines?

Can Metformin Cause Migraines?

Question Originally asked by Community Member SKAM Can Metformin Cause Migraines? I have just been diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes and put on 2000 mg of metformin. I began having “ice pick”-like migraine headaches. Could there be a connection? Answer Hi SKAM, “Ice pick” headaches can be alarming because they start and stop before we really know what’s going on. They often feel like an ice pick is being jammed into our head, hence the name Ice Pick Headace. We have more information for you HERE. Glucophage (Metformin) does have headache listed as one of its potential side effects. Some of these side effects may lessen as your body adjusts to the medication. MyDiabetesCentral.com is a wonderful site that may help you with education and support with your new diagosis. Good luck Nancy You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar