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Can Diabetes Cause A Migraine?

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 In Adults

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 In Adults

What is it? Diabetes (di-uh-BE-tez) is also called diabetes mellitus (MEL-i-tus). There are three main types of diabetes. You have type 2 diabetes. It may be called non-insulin dependent or adult onset diabetes. With type 2 diabetes, your body has trouble using insulin. Your body may also not make enough insulin. If there is not enough insulin or if it is not working right, sugar will build up in your blood. Type 2 diabetes is more common in overweight people who are older than 40 years and are not active. Type 2 diabetes is also being found more often in children who are overweight. There is no cure for diabetes but you can have a long and active life if your diabetes is controlled. How did I get type 2 diabetes? Insulin (IN-sul-in) is a hormone (a special body chemical) made by your pancreas (PAN-kree-us). The pancreas is an organ that lies behind the stomach. Much of the food you eat is turned into sugar in your stomach. This sugar goes into your blood and travels to the cells of your body to be used for energy. Insulin acts as a "key" to help sugar enter the cells. If there is not enough insulin or if it is not working right, sugar will build up in your blood. With type 2 diabetes, you may have better control of your diabetes with the right diet and exercise. You may also need to take oral medicine (pills) to help your body make more insulin or to use insulin better. You may also need insulin shots. No one knows for sure what causes type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes runs in families. You are more likely to get it if someone else in your family has type 2 diabetes. You are also more likely to get type 2 diabetes if you are overweight. Being overweight makes it harder for your body to use the insulin it makes. This is called insulin resistance. In insulin resistance, y Continue reading >>

Causes

Causes

The exact cause of migraines is unknown, but they're thought to be the result of abnormal brain activity temporarily affecting nerve signals, chemicals and blood vessels in the brain. It's not clear what causes this change in brain activity, but it's possible that your genes make you more likely to experience migraines as a result of a specific trigger. Migraine triggers Many possible migraine triggers have been suggested, including hormonal, emotional, physical, dietary, environmental and medicinal factors. These triggers are very individual but it may help to keep a diary to see if you can identify a consistent trigger. It can also sometimes be difficult to tell if something is really a trigger or if what you're experiencing is an early symptom of a migraine attack. Hormonal changes Some women experience migraines around the time of their period, possibly because of changes in the levels of hormones such as oestrogen around this time. These type of migraines usually occur between two days before the start of your period to three days after. Some women only experience migraines around this time, which is known as pure menstrual migraine. However, most women experience them at other times too and this is called menstrual related migraine. Many women find their migraines improve after the menopause, although the menopause can trigger migraines or make them worse in some women. Emotional triggers: stress anxiety tension shock excitement Physical triggers: tiredness shift work poor posture neck or shoulder tension low blood sugar (hypoglycaemia) strenuous exercise, if you're not used to it Dietary triggers: missed, delayed or irregular meals alcohol the food additive tyramine caffeine products, such as tea and coffee specific foods such as chocolate, citrus fruit and chees Continue reading >>

Brainstorm Health: Migraine Drugs, Zika Gene Vaccine, Weight Loss And Diabetes

Brainstorm Health: Migraine Drugs, Zika Gene Vaccine, Weight Loss And Diabetes

Hey there, readers! This is Sy. Migraines are the Big Bads in the world of headaches, to appropriate a TV trope. They often show up preceded by warning signs—literally called “auras”—that may mess with your vision, cause mood changes, and even induce auditory hallucinations. Once they really get going, migraines can last for days while making it difficult to deal with even semi-bright light and may nausea and vomiting. Some truly unfortunate souls can experience these debilitating episodes frequently; and, unfortunately, the current treatment landscape centers on certain migraine symptoms rather than the root causes of the condition itself. But two new drugs could change the way we treat migraines altogether, according to a pair of large studies published in a new report in the New England Journal of Medicine. The condition is complex and can be affected by multiple factors, which is partly why it’s so difficult to treat, the study authors note. That’s why the go-to medical route usually involves therapies meant for other conditions, such as blood pressure or depression medicines. But the two drugs being explored—fremanezumab and erenumab‬—are antibodies that go after parts of the brain at the crux of migraine-induced pain. And they’ve shown promise in preventing many of the most frustrating migraine symptoms, from the nausea to the visual-auditory effects to the headaches themselves. In fact, some of the chronic migraine patients in the studies had no migraines at all following treatment. Now, here’s the twist: The placebo arm of the study also had significant drops in migraine frequency (although not as much as the participants taking the actual drugs did). Still, the effects were significant enough that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) may Continue reading >>

Relief For Diabetic Headache

Relief For Diabetic Headache

Type 2 diabetics are more prone to both migraines and regular headaches than an otherwise healthy person. However, relief for a diabetic headache should not come in an over-the-counter painkiller. More often than not, your headache is trying to tell you that your blood sugar levels are out of balance. So instead of treating the headache and masking the problem, learn to associate the pain with your blood sugar levels and treat the cause of your pain. Hypoglycemia Low blood sugar--also known as hypoglycemia or insulin reaction-- is a common cause of headache in diabetics. A hypoglycemia-related headache often results after missing a meal, over-exercising, drinking alcohol, or taking too much insulin or other medication. If you think your headache is related to low blood sugar, confirm it by checking your blood glucose level with your meter. If your levels are below 70 mg/dL, take one of these remedies immediately: 3 glucose tablets or 1 serving of glucose gel 1/2 cup of fruit juice 1/2 cup of soda (not diet) 1 cup of milk 1 tbsp. of sugar or honey (However, be advised that if you are taking Acarbose or Miglitol your blood glucose levels can only be raised by taking a pure glucose tablet or gel.) After the dose, re-check your blood glucose level to make sure that it is above 70 mg/dL. Then, have a snack if your next meal is more than an hour away. Hyperglycemia High blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, also can cause headaches in diabetics. High blood sugar can develop over several days or hours and can be the result of eating too much or too frequently, exercising too little, taking too little diabetes medication, stress, illness or injury. If your headache arrives in conjunction with any of those factors or your meter reading is high for you, eat a piece of vinegar soaked in Continue reading >>

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

7 Warning Signs Of Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 8 What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes? More than 100 million American adults are living with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, according to the latest estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). But the number of people who know they have the diseases — which can lead to life-threatening complications, like blindness and heart disease — is far lower. Data from the CDC suggests that of the estimated 30.3 million Americans with type 2 diabetes, 7.2 million, or 1 in 4 adults living with the disease, are not aware of it. And among those people living with prediabetes, only 11.6 percent are aware that they have the disease. Prediabetes is marked by higher than normal blood sugar levels — though not high enough to qualify as diabetes. The CDC notes that this condition often leads to full-blown type 2 diabetes within five years if it's left untreated through diet and lifestyle modifications. Type 2 diabetes, which is often diagnosed when a person has an A1C of at least 7 on two separate occasions, can lead to potentially serious issues, like neuropathy, or nerve damage; vision problems; an increased risk of heart disease; and other diabetes complications. A person’s A1C is the two- to three-month average of his or her blood sugar levels. According to the Mayo Clinic, doctors may use other tests to diagnose diabetes. For example, they may conduct a fasting blood glucose test, which is a blood glucose test done after a night of fasting. While a fasting blood sugar level of less than 100 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is normal, one that is between 100 to 125 mg/dL signals prediabetes, and a reading that reaches 126 mg/dL on two separate occasions means you have diabetes. People with full-blown type 2 diabetes are not able to use the h Continue reading >>

Ultimate Guide To Migraines That Cause Pain And Misery For More People Than Asthma, Diabetes And Epilepsy Combined

Ultimate Guide To Migraines That Cause Pain And Misery For More People Than Asthma, Diabetes And Epilepsy Combined

Migraine affects one in seven people – that’s over eight million people in the UK alone – making it more prevalent than diabetes, epilepsy and asthma combined. The World Health Organisation recognises it as one of the most disabling lifetime conditions, yet awareness and understanding is low. To mark Migraine Awareness Week, check out our ultimate guide... Is it a migraine? “Migraines often have other symptoms in addition to head pain,” says Dr Clare Morrison, GP at online doctor and pharmacy, MedExpress ( www.medexpress.co.uk ). “These include nausea, pain behind an eye or ear and extra sensitivity to light or sound.” Around 20-25% of people experience a migraine with aura (visual or sensory disturbances). Experts now believe there is a genetic link that could make people more sensitive to migraine attacks, says Dr Riccardo Di Cuffa, Director and GP at Your Doctor www.your-doctor.co.uk . There are many triggers which contribute to a migraine. “Migraine and stress are strongly connected,” he adds. “Anxiety, excitement and any form of tension can lead to a migraine attack.” Other possible causes are too much caffeine, dehydration, skipping meals or eating high sugary foods. Treatment Aspirin or non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (such as ibuprofen) can relieve some of the pain. For regular migraines that don’t respond to regular painkillers, your doctor may prescribe a triptan, which narrows the blood vessels in the head and also blocks the transmission of pain. But it’s important to act fast, warns Dr Morrison. “The first 20 minutes are critical in order to prevent a migraine from spreading throughout the entire nervous system. Alternative solutions An ice pack works by numbing the pain and cooling the blood passing through the vessels – 77% Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Cause Headaches?

Can Diabetes Cause Headaches?

We all get the odd headache. In fact, 15 per cent of Australians will have popped a painkiller to treat one by the time you finish reading this story. People living with diabetes, however, are more likely to be hit with headaches than the rest of the population, and having diabetes may even increase your migraine risk. ‘Headaches are one of the most common complaints doctors are presented with,’ says Dr Tony Bartone, president of the Australian Medical Association (AMA) Victoria. ‘That, combined with the fact they can be caused by a variety of things, means it’s understandable that some people may not make the link between their diabetes and their headaches.’ Find the link and you are halfway to solving the problem. Here’s what to look for… High or low blood glucose levels A headache can be a symptom of hypo- or hyper glycaemia – when blood glucose levels go too low or too high. Low blood glucose levels trigger the release of hormones that cause vasoconstriction – a narrowing of the blood vessels – which may bring on a headache. High BGLs can cause you to run to the loo more often, which sometimes leads to dehydration and, in turn, a headache. THE FIX: As soon as you feel a headache coming on, test your blood glucose levels. This is especially important if you frequently wake up with a pounding head, which could be a sign of nocturnal hypoglycaemia (going too low overnight) if you take insulin or certain other medications. See your doctor if you suspect this is the cause of your headaches. If your levels are low, treat them with 15g of fast-acting carbohydrate and monitor your symptoms as your blood glucose levels return to normal. Once they stabilise, the headache may ease. On the other hand, if your levels are high, exercise may help, but first che Continue reading >>

Diabetes Headache

Diabetes Headache

Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that causes high blood glucose levels and a host of secondary symptoms, some of which can be dangerous. A less serious side effect of having type 1 or type 2 diabetes is having a headache. You can have a headache in diabetes any time that your blood sugar levels are too high or too low. While headaches in diabetes aren’t inherently dangerous, they can become a signal to you that the blood sugar values are out of control. If you are experiencing a headache and also have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you should check your blood sugar right away and take measures to bring your blood sugar under good control. Headache Information Headaches are extremely common and can be seen in both adults and children. Headaches are perhaps the most common type of pain a person can have. They are a major cause of work loss as well as missed days from school. There are many causes of headaches, including out of control diabetes and low blood sugar. Headaches can be primary or secondary headaches. Primary headaches have no underlying cause but occur when the nerve cells of the brain, the muscles around the scalp, or the blood vessels in the brain send pain signals to the part of the brain that registers pain. Common primary headaches include tension headaches and migraine headaches, which may or may not be related to having diabetes. Secondary headaches are those headaches that have some kind of underlying cause. One cause of secondary headaches is diabetes. Other things that can trigger secondary headaches include the following: Brain abnormalities such as an aneurysm or brain tumor Problems with the eyes and vision Hormonal changes, such as those seen in women from their menstrual cycle Stress or anxiety Hemorrhagic stroke Hypertension (high blood Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Cause Headaches?-how To Control Headaches Without Medications

Can Diabetes Cause Headaches?-how To Control Headaches Without Medications

What is a headache and what causes it? Headaches are so common for most of us at one time or another. But can diabetes cause headaches? Many things cause headaches and diabetes is can be one of them. While there are medications to take, it’s better to turn and rely on natural headache treatments. For me, they were never really a big problem thankfully. But so many people suffer from cluster, tension, and of course migraine headaches. There can be a zillion causes of this head pain and sometimes we have no idea what causes one particular bout. The more you know about what causes head pain, the easier it is to treat it. I know that many folks treat it with advil, aspirin, ibuprofen, aleve, etc. Taking too much advil is bad for your liver and kidneys. Advil works great for me when I need it but I don’t stay on it for those reasons. The same goes for the others. I do take a baby aspirin each day by doctor’s orders but it’s not for headache pain, just as a blood thinner. Were you aware that the major cause of a headache is dehydration? So the first thing you should do is to drink a glass of water to see if that eliminates the symptoms. Better yet, drink 8 glasses of water a day. That could be causing the issue if you’re not getting enough water. Prevention The best thing for a headache is to prevent it in the first place. Listen, nobody likes any kind of pain no matter where in the body it comes from. Some people have more or less of a tolerance of pain in different areas of the body. I’ve had headaches and at the first sign I wan to treat it because I cannot function at all. I remember one time many years ago I was taking an antibiotic and I had THE worst pain in my head ever. I just laid down on the bed and never forgot it because I had never had a headache lik Continue reading >>

Guest Post: Diabetes And Headaches

Guest Post: Diabetes And Headaches

If you're new here, you may want to subscribe to my RSS feed. Thanks for visiting! Today I would like to welcome Erich Y. Schultz, J.D., M.B.A., who will be telling us a little about the diabetes and headaches connection. Here he is! Unfortunately, there is a strong connection between diabetes and headaches. In fact, diabetics are more likely to suffer from a headache than non-diabetics. No, this does not mean that every time you get a headache you should be worried that you have diabetes. Instead, it only means that a headache is a common symptom of complications arising from poorly controlled diabetes. Let’s take a closer look at why this happens. What is Diabetes? There are three main types of diabetes: Type 1, Type 2, and gestational. All diabetes types affect how our bodies break-down and process food. When food enters the stomach and intestines, our body converts the food into energy called glucose. Glucose is simply a form of sugar in our blood. In a non-diabetic, the glucose flows from the blood into our cells, providing the individual cells with the necessary energy to run properly. Insulin, produced by the pancreas, is the substance that facilitates the transfer of the glucose from the blood to the cells. In a diabetic, this process does not work properly. Insulin is either not produced at all or not enough is produced to process the glucose. Alternatively, the individual cells may be resistant to the insulin, thus the glucose is not transferred. Regardless of the reason, the glucose is not processed and will build up in the blood and/or passes through the body through urination. The net result is that the body does not get enough energy and dangerous amounts of glucose can build up in the blood causing complications, if not death. All in all, neither s Continue reading >>

Why Does Sugar Give Me A Headache?

Why Does Sugar Give Me A Headache?

Why Does Sugar Give Me a Headache? Does eating sugar give you a headache? You are not alone. The sugar headache, otherwise known as the Holiday Headache (because we eat so much sugar on Easter, Halloween, Christmas and other holidays) has a lot in common with a hangover but it can strike at any time we overdose on sugar. While most of us have experienced a sugar headache at some time in their lives it is not well-known in medical circles. It might even surprise you to learn that the exact causes of all headaches are a bit of a mystery. Scientists have discovered that both migraines and cluster headaches change blood flow in the brain, but exactly how blood flow changes create a headache is unknown. The same is true of the sugar headache. I view the sugar headache as a toxicity or dehydration event and while it might be an annoyance, it could also be the sign of something more dangerous. Let’s look at dehydration and toxicity and see how they might cause a headache. Sugar Dehydration Dehydration is a common way to get a headache and sugar can lead to dehydration. Eating too much sugar pulls water out of your body in two ways. Dilution: When you eat too much sugar, your body has to dilute that sugar to keep it from harming your body. This means that water is pulled from all parts of your body to balance the large amount of sugar in your blood stream. While this water-pulling effect happens all over the body, it is your head that suffers the most. Urination: One of the ways that your body has of getting rid of excess sugar is to dump it in your urine. This is especially true of diabetics, who have to go to the bathroom a lot. Toxicity The other way to think about sugar is to consider it a toxic event. While your body runs on glucose (a simple sugar) it was never meant to Continue reading >>

Dizziness (dizzy)

Dizziness (dizzy)

Dizziness is a symptom that is often applies to a variety of sensations including lightheadedness and vertigo. Vertigo is the sensation of spinning, while lightheadedness is typically described as near fainting, and weakness. Some of the conditions that may cause lightheadedness in a patient include low blood pressure, high blood pressure, dehydration, medications, postural or orthostatic hypotension, diabetes, endocrine disorders, hyperventilation, heart conditions, and vasovagal syncope. Vertigo is most often caused by a problem in the balance centers of the inner ear called the vestibular system and causes the sensation of the room spinning. It may be associated with vomiting. Symptoms often are made worse with position changes. Those with significant symptoms and vomiting may need intravenous medication and hospitalization. Vertigo is also the presenting symptom in patients with Meniere's Disease and acoustic neuroma, conditions that often require referral to an ENT specialist. Vertigo may also be a symptom of stroke. Most often, dizziness or lightheadedness is a temporary situation that resolves spontaneously without a specific diagnosis being made. Introduction to dizziness (feeling dizzy) Dizziness is one of the most common symptoms that will prompt a person to seek medical care. The term dizziness is sometimes difficult to understand since it means different things to different people. It is either the sensation of feeling lightheaded as if the individual is weak and will pass out, or it describes vertigo or the sensation of spinning, as if the affected person just got off a merry-go-round. Lightheadedness is often caused by a decrease in blood supply to the brain, while vertigo may be caused by disturbances of the inner ear and the balance centers of the brain. Continue reading >>

Is Your Diabetes A Pain In The… Head?

Is Your Diabetes A Pain In The… Head?

An Explanation of the Diabetes Headache What is causing your diabetes headache? Is it your blood sugars? Your new treatment? What exactly is going on? You’ve recently been placed on insulin for management of your diabetes. Your head is pounding. You have a history of migraines. Is the headache caused by your diabetes, or is it a migraine? Well, sometimes it can be hard to tell. However, diabetes can certainly contribute to diabetes headaches. It is important to note that having diabetes does not mean that you’ll get headaches. However, the more your blood sugar levels fluctuate, the more likely you are to have headaches related to your diabetes. When your blood sugar has a rapid drop, your brain senses that it doesn’t have enough glucose to function properly and the blood vessels in your brain can then spasm, causing a headache. When your sugars quickly climb too high, you will feel that familiar lack of concentration and sluggishness (like a food coma). If this goes on too long, your body will try to eliminate excess sugars through increased urination, which can cause dehydration. And, as we know, dehydration can cause headaches. Hypoglycemia and Hyperglycemia Hypoglycemia is when your blood sugar level is at or below 70 mg/dl. However, if your blood sugar levels are consistently high, you may have symptoms of hypoglycemia at a higher level. Symptoms of hypoglycemia include headaches (of course!), shakiness, sweatiness, dizziness, anxiety, confusion, and hunger. Hyperglycemia is when your blood sugar level is at or above 180 mg/dl. A headache is a common symptom of hyperglycemia, although often you may have no symptoms associated with hyperglycemia. However, symptoms typically become more apparent the higher the blood sugar level. When your blood sugar levels vac Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia – A Major Cause Of Migraines

Hypoglycemia – A Major Cause Of Migraines

Hypoglycemia is a state of low blood sugar in the body. It has been recognized since the early 1900’s that missing a meal may lead to headache. Today, studies are showing that ingesting simple sugars can also trigger a migraine attack. A review in Expert Review of Neurotherapies showed that two specific dietary factors frequently induced headaches. These factors are fasting and relatively mild reactive hypoglycemia that can follow after a consumption of a large carbohydrate meal. Furthermore, a study cited in Headache The Journal of Head and Neck pain, showed that 4 out of 36 patients suffering from diabetes reported migraine attacks that were associated with hypoglycemia during night time. There are two types of Diabetes Mellitus, type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes, commonly seen in children, is chronic disease. Type 1 diabetes is caused due to autoimmune destruction of the beta cells in the pancreas which leads to an inability of insulin production by the pancreas. In comparison, type 2 diabetes mellitus, commonly seen in adults is characterized by high glucose levels, resistance and inadequate secretion of the hormone insulin and inappropriate secretion of hormone glucagon. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recorded in 2011 that nearly 26 million people in U.S.A suffer from diabetes. Although the disease is usually asymptomatic, some of the classic symptoms associated with the disease are large production or passage of urine, excessive thirst and fatigue. Since the high incidence of diabetes is associated with diet, it only seems proper to talk about the role of diet in the development of this disease. When an individual consumes foods that are rich in carbohydrate, especially processed carbohydrates, the levels of glucose in the blood increase very qu Continue reading >>

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic Retinopathy

On this page: Diabetes and diabetic retinopathy • DR symptoms • Types of diabetic eye disease • Who gets diabetic retinopathy? • Minorities and diabetic eye disease • When is DR a disability? • Eye exam assistance program • Prevention • Diabetic retinopathy videos Diabetic retinopathy — vision-threatening damage to the retina of the eye caused by diabetes — is the leading cause of blindness among working-age Americans. The good news: Diabetic retinopathy often can be prevented with early detection, proper management of your diabetes and routine eye exams performed by your optometrist or ophthalmologist. According to the International Diabetes Federation (IDF), the United States has the highest rate of diabetes among 38 developed nations, with approximately 30 million Americans — roughly 11 percent of the U.S. population between the ages of 20 and 79 — having the disease. About 90 percent of Americans with diabetes have type 2 diabetes, which develops when the the body fails to produce enough insulin — a hormone secreted by the pancreas that enables dietary sugar to enter the cells of the body — or the body becomes resistant to insulin. This causes glucose (sugar) levels in the bloodstream to rise and can eventually damage the eyes, kidneys, nerves or heart, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include obesity, an unhealthful diet and physical inactivity. Unfortunately, the prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes has increased significantly in the United States over the past 30 years. According to data released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in December 2015, there were 1.4 million new cases of diabetes reported in the U.S. in 2014. Though this annual number is d Continue reading >>

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