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Can Coq10 Cause High Blood Sugar?

Lowering Blood Pressure With Targeted Nutrients

Lowering Blood Pressure With Targeted Nutrients

Learn which vitamins and minerals can support a natural blood pressure–lowering program A diagnosis of high blood pressure doesn't have to mean years of prescription medications. Targeted nutrients, along with blood pressure–lowering diet changes and lifestyle modifications, can bring your numbers down to a healthy level. Nutritional support can be used on its own; however, you'll get the best results if you also make diet and lifestyle changes. Here are my top nutrients for lowering blood pressure: Garlic I don't know of a single nutrient that will help everyone lower their blood pressure, but from my clinical experience, garlic probably helps the widest range of people. For overall health, I recommend at least a clove of garlic each day, raw or cooked. If you have heart problems or are recovering from a stroke, you should take garlic in supplement form as well. Be careful when buying garlic supplements. Many are 99 percent vegetable oil with just a touch of garlic. I have had the best results using SGP odorless, tasteless, powdered garlic capsules. Kyolic is one of the best brands on the market, and it’s available in most health food stores. I recommend one capsule, six times a day (one with each meal, assuming you are eating three nutritious meals per day, plus one capsule mid-morning, mid-afternoon, and in the evening). As your blood pressure starts to normalize, the dosage can be reduced gradually to one to three capsules a day. Potassium This mineral helps balance the amount of salt in the body so the heart and blood pressure remain normal. Conditions that deplete potassium include excessive salt, prolonged diarrhea or vomiting, and the use of diuretics or cortisone-like medications, alcohol, coffee, and sugar. People with digestive diseases may also have lo Continue reading >>

Coenzyme Q10

Coenzyme Q10

Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a substance that helps convert food into energy. CoQ10 is found in almost every cell in the body, and it is a powerful antioxidant. Antioxidants fight damaging particles in the body known as free radicals, which damage cell membranes, tamper with DNA, and even cause cell death. Scientists believe free radicals contribute to the aging process, as well as a number of health problems, including heart disease and cancer. Antioxidants, such as CoQ10, can neutralize free radicals and may reduce or even help prevent some of the damage they cause. Some researchers believe that CoQ10 may help with heart-related conditions, because it can improve energy production in cells, prevent blood clot formation, and act as an antioxidant. Continue reading >>

Fighting Statin-induced Diabetes With Coq10

Fighting Statin-induced Diabetes With Coq10

Statins are cholesterol-lowering drugs sold under trade names such as Lipitor® and Crestor®. They have been shown to benefit people at risk for heart disease caused by elevated LDL-cholesterol and/or C-reactive protein. For appropriate patients, statin drugs reduce cardiovascular death and disability rates.1-3 But despite these benefits, evidence suggests that statins, especially high doses of potent statins, may increase the risk, especially in older patients, of developing diabetes.3-6 Compelling data reveals that supplementing with CoQ10 can significantly reduce these glucose control issues. Facts about Statins and Diabetes Studies show that some statins, such as rosuvastatin (Crestor®), are associated with a 27% increased risk of developing new-onset type II diabetes.7 This is just one of many studies showing this harmful connection.4-6 One meta-analysis that utilized results from 13 statin studies involving more than 91,000 participants demonstrated an across-the-board increased diabetes risk of 9%,8 and found the highest risk in trials involving older subjects. Another meta-analysis showed that those taking higher doses of statins had a 12% higher risk of developing diabetes compared with subjects receiving “moderate” doses.9 These two alarming studies have made it apparent that older patients on more intensive statin regimens are at the greatest risk of developing diabetes from their treatment.3,10 Naturally, this poses a dilemma for anyone who is on, or considering starting, statin therapy. Is lowering the risk of cardiovascular disease worth the risk of developing diabetes which in turn could, paradoxically, increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease?6 Experts generally say it’s a worthwhile gamble, because the benefits for cardiovascular d Continue reading >>

Pros & Cons Of Taking Coq10

Pros & Cons Of Taking Coq10

By Carrie Myers Americans spend more than $28 billion on vitamins and supplements each year and increasingly coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is on their shopping lists. Devotees of the supplement say it can lower blood pressure, reduce migraines, improve symptoms of Parkinson’s and depression, ward off dementia and even halt the aging process. Not surprisingly, there are naysayers who says these claims are overblown. In addition, people taking a wide range of medications — including drugs for diabetes, blood thinners and beta blockers for high blood pressure — have to be careful about using CoQ10 and some may need to avoid it altogether. Potential Drug Interactions The University of Maryland Medical Center (UMM) is a good resource for information regarding the effects (positive and negative) of CoQ10 on certain medications and conditions. For example, it might help reduce the toxic effects certain chemotherapy drugs — daunorubicin (Cerubidin) and doxorubicin (Adriamycin) — on the heart. On the other hand, there is some concern that CoQ10 might lower the effectiveness of some chemotherapy drugs. “There have been no well-controlled studies proving these interactions,” says Natalia Lukina, MS, founder and CEO of Vital Formulas, LCC. “People undergoing chemotherapy should consult their physicians.” CoQ10 might enhance the effectiveness of certain blood pressure medications by adding to their ability to lower blood pressure. While this can be a benefit, it’s important to make sure your health care provider is aware that you are taking CoQ10 so that your blood pressure can be closely monitored and your medication adjusted accordingly to avoid low blood pressure (hypotension). Symptoms of low blood pressure include dizziness and fainting. If left untreated, low blood Continue reading >>

Supplementation Of Coenzyme Q10 Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Supplementation Of Coenzyme Q10 Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Go to: 1. Introduction Diabetes is a major public health concern that affects 29.1 million or more than 9% of the USA population with 90%–95% cases as T2DM [1]. It was the 7th leading cause of death in the USA in 2010. Among the USA population with diabetes, 27.8% or 8.1 million are undiagnosed. According to the International Diabetes Federation Diabetes Atlas, there are 387 million people worldwide who have diabetes and it is estimated that this number will increase to 592 million by 2035 [2]. Patients with T2DM are at significantly high risk of developing serious macro- and micro-vascular complications associated with uncontrolled hyperglycemia such as heart disease, stroke, hypertension, retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. In 2012, the estimated total costs for diabetes in the USA were $245 billion with $176 billion as direct medical costs and $69 billion associated with indirect costs due to disability, work loss, and premature death [1]. Current clinical guideline for T2DM management includes healthy eating, weight control, increased physical activity, antiglycemic medications, and multifactorial risk reduction [3]. Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a complex and chronic disease in which the body fails to respond to the increased level of glucose due to attenuated insulin-stimulated glucose uptake with a normal amount of insulin (insulin resistance) and/or impaired insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells [3]. The pathophysiology of T2DM is complex and involves multiple factors. Insulin resistance is the underlying mechanism of developing T2DM. Secreted from pancreatic β cells, insulin plays important roles in many metabolic processes including regulation of glucose uptake, controlling membrane transport of ions to promote protein synthesis, and control Continue reading >>

The 3 Supplements You Don't Know About (but Probably Need)

The 3 Supplements You Don't Know About (but Probably Need)

Some dietary supplements are like that bad kid in class who ruined it for everyone. Outrageous claims—Boost your bust size! Lose weight fast! Beat cancer!—and a few scattered but widely publicized deaths, notably from use of the herb ephedra, have brought the entire industry under close federal scrutiny. Sadly, the controversy threatens to tarnish other supplements whose worth and promise are supported by decades of impeccable research. More from Prevention: The Vitamin That Won't Cure Your Cold These three supplements are among those with great potential. In their various ways, they've been effective against multiple health problems, including heart disease, cancer, diabetes, and even depression. One may help you shed body fat. Another may help you have smarter children. Researchers studying them use the words "incredible," "extraordinary," and "exciting" when reporting their results. As a consumer, you're wise not to get as carried away. While much of the research is good, in some cases it's still in its infancy stage: done in test tubes, on animals, or with small groups of people. Large-scale trials may still be decades away. Can you try these supplements? Yes, but be sure you make an informed decision. For that, you can start here. [header = The Fat Reducer] Conjugated Linoleic Acid The promise Reduced body fat (particularly abdominal fat); more lean muscle mass; enhanced immunity; cancer prevention; and lower blood sugar, cholesterol, and blood pressure. The back story Twenty years ago, before it even had a name, CLA made the news when a researcher at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, looking for cancer-causing agents in hamburger meat, announced that he had isolated an agent that actually lowered the incidence of cancer in mice. Hamburger? A health food? Ev Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin side effects include diabetic neuropathy, brain fog, and digestive issues. You can address them through diet, Vitamin B12, CoQ10, and exercise. Let us understand the drug Metformin in detail and study different forms of metformin, its uses and common metformin side effects along with how to deal with them. Metformin: What Is It Used For? Metformin is an old warhorse in the pharma battle against diabetes. It has been the mainstay in the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes for more than fifty years, often matching or outperforming newer drugs. In fact, many new combination drugs are often created with metformin as one of the main ingredients. Thanks to its long run in the pharmaceutical world, the side effects of Metformin are also well known. The Metformin-PCOS connection has been studied extensively since a majority of health complications associated with PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) are due to hyperinsulinemia (high amounts of insulin in the blood stream). Metformin is known to reduce circulating insulin levels. The use of this drug in women with PCOS has shown highly encouraging results. RELATED: 10 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Diabetics Most Prescribed Names in Metformin Category Include: Fortamet: It is an extended-release formulation that contains metformin hydrochloride. The tablets are designed for once-a-day administration. They deliver either 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin. The tablet is made using a patented technology called SCOTTM that delivers the active compound slowly and at a constant rate. Glucophage: Glucophage tablets contain metformin hydrochoride. They contain either 500 mg, 850 mg or 1000 mg of the active compound. Glucophage tablets do not contain any special covering and need to be taken multiple times a day until the prescribed dosage is me Continue reading >>

7 Supplements That Could Help Diabetics Stay Healthy

7 Supplements That Could Help Diabetics Stay Healthy

Send to Kindle Most people with diabetes eventually develop a routine. You start to understand how your body works and how it responds to the medications you’re taking. But could some simple changes in that routine help you even more? If you’ve got your blood sugar levels under control – congratulations! You are likely prolonging your life and preventing complications down the road. If you could be paying better attention to your health, don’t feel bad. But we do encourage you to take the right steps. The truth is, even the healthiest diabetic can find new ways to address common issues. Many times, the right natural supplements can become valuable partners in managing your diabetes and maintaining your health. The Basics of Diabetes Diabetes is a condition in which the pancreas either fails to or doesn’t create enough insulin. In other cases, cell receptors in the body do not respond well to the insulin that is being produced. Insulin is a hormone that helps your body manage metabolism of carbohydrates and fats, while also removing potentially toxic levels of glucose from the bloodstream. Type 1 Diabetes – Once referred to as “juvenile diabetes,” but can also occur in adults. People with this form are dependent on insulin and typically take injections or use an insulin pump. Type 2 Diabetes – Sometimes called “adult onset diabetes.” People with this form are resistant to insulin. It may be caused by weight or age-related issues. Often this type of diabetes can be reversed if addressed during early onset. Gestational Diabetes – Similar to Type 2. Develops in 2% to 5% of pregnant women. Diabetes can lead to a wide range of complications and other diseases when left untreated – many relate to the health of your blood vessels. That includes hardeni Continue reading >>

Statin Users, Coq10 Is Your New Best Friend

Statin Users, Coq10 Is Your New Best Friend

Following your doctor prescribed cholesterol-lowering regimen that may include eating healthy, exercising regularly, and taking cholesterol medication such as statins can help keep your cholesterol in check. However, it’s a bit of a double-edged sword. While statins help to keep your cholesterol levels under control, they can also deplete your body of essential compounds and chemicals that keep the body running smoothly. More importantly, if you have high cholesterol and are currently taking statin medication, you run the risk of significantly lowering your normal CoQ10 levels, something that could compromise your normal body functions. According to the University of Maryland Medical Center (UMMC), there is no doubt that statins will “reduce the natural levels of CoQ10 in the body.” In fact, it has been shown that statins can lower CoQ10 levels by up to 40%. This could potentially complicate other health issues and leave you vulnerable to side effects from your prescribed statins. There is some good news, however. The UMMC reports that “taking CoQ10 supplements might help increase levels in the body and reduce problems.” It further suggests that CoQ10 may support healthy cardiovascular function – something worth considering, especially if you have a history of heart disease in your family. What is CoQ10? The term may look like something off the molecular chart from your high school science class, but coenzyme Q10 is the only name we have to describe this essential antioxidant. What does it actually do, though? You could say that CoQ10 is a bright spark in the tinderbox, as it gets everything fired up. From vital organs to muscles, you’ll find CoQ10 in every cell (did you know that the highest concentrations can be found in your heart, liver, and kidneys?), Continue reading >>

Coenzyme Q10

Coenzyme Q10

Where it comes from: Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a naturally-occurring compound found in every cell of the body. It's used to produce energy for cell growth and maintenance, and functions as an antioxidant. CoQ10 in pill form has been approved for heart failure treatment in Japan since 1974. In the United States, it's approved as a dietary supplement. The pills are also sometimes called Q10, vitamin Q10, ubiquinone or ubidecarenone. What it'll do for you: Coenzyme Q10 is a disease-fighting antioxidant and has been used in the treatment of neurological diseases and may (studies are still preliminary) be beneficial in cancer, heart disease, high blood pressure and migraine headache treatment. Cancer In 1961, scientists noticed that people with cancer (such as lymphoma, lung cancer, prostate cancer and colon cancer) had little CoQ10 in their blood. The CoQ10 may help the immune system and may keep anti-tumor drugs from hurting the heart. While the National Institutes of Health and the National Cancer Institute rate the strength of evidence for CoQ10 and cancer benefits as weak, researchers continue to look for affirming indications. In three studies of women with breast cancer, women across the board showed improvement when given supplements. More research is needed in terms of all cancers—particularly ones that inflict men. Cardiovascular conditions After more than 20 years of research, experts still disagree about the benefits of CoQ10 for people with heart failure. Studies show that it has little or no effect in treating heart failure or angina and it's not recommended for people with these health problems. However, studies do show that CoQ10 can help lower blood pressure. A 2001 study examined 83 people with high blood pressure. They took either 60 mg of CoQ10 or a place Continue reading >>

Which Supplements Can Help Lower Or Control My Blood Sugar?

Which Supplements Can Help Lower Or Control My Blood Sugar?

Question: Answer: Many different supplements may help lower or control blood sugar in people with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes who experience hyperglycemia (when blood glucose rises higher than normal). These supplements are discussed below. More details about each, including dosage, drug interactions, potential side effects, and ConsumerLab.com's reviews of products on the market, can be found by clicking on the links. Due to the seriousness of hyperglycemia, it is important to consult with your physician regarding use of these supplements. Cinnamon supplements may modestly improve blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes whose blood sugar is not well controlled with medication. In addition, one small study found that a branded cinnamon extract reduced fasting blood sugar by an average of about 10 mg/dL in prediabetic men and women with metabolic syndrome. Keep in mind, however, that only certain varieties of cinnamon have been shown to have this effect, and long-term safety studies have not been conducted. Curcumin (from turmeric) may improve blood sugar levels, according to preliminary studies, and one study found curcumin to dramatically lower the chances of prediabetes in middle-aged, slightly overweight men and women with somewhat higher than normal blood sugar levels. Alpha lipoic acid may improve insulin sensitivity and blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes, although it may only slightly reduce levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Chromium picolinate may help some people with type 2 diabetes decrease fasting blood glucose levels as well as levels of insulin and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). However, be aware that high doses may worsen insulin sensitivity in healthy people who are not obese or diabetic. Having adequate blood levels of vi Continue reading >>

Coq10 And Diabetes: Just One More Little Pill

Coq10 And Diabetes: Just One More Little Pill

The first time I heard of Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) was over a year ago during a run with some people I didn’t really know. One of the guys I was running with told me, after I mentioned I had diabetes, that I should take CoQ10. He didn’t have diabetes but said that he took it to make his heart stronger. I dismissed it as some more great unsolicited advice. But last week I started taking Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), not because of my diabetes, but because I was told it could help with the pain I’ve been having in my legs, which I have attributed to the statin I’ve been taking. CoQ10 is a substance similar to a vitamin. It is found in every cell of the body. Your body makes CoQ10, and your cells use it to produce energy your body needs for cell growth and maintenance. It also functions as an antioxidant, which protects the body from damage caused by harmful molecules. (WebMD) I’ve been reading more about statins and found this very helpful article by Dr. Mercola on Peak Fitness. The article is very much anti-statin, but it explains what the statins do to the muscle and how CoQ10 can help to combat the damage. According to Dr. Mercola, the primary fuel for your mitochondria is Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), and one of the primary mechanisms of harm from statins in general appears to be related to CoQ10 depletion. This also explains why certain statin users end up with worse aerobic fitness after a steady fitness regimen. Dr. Mercola also says the if you are taking a statin, which I am, without supplementing with CoQ10—or ideally, the reduced form, called ubiquinol, which is far more effective—your health is at serious risk, because CoQ10 is used by every cell in your body, but especially your heart cells. Cardiac muscle cells have up to 200 times more mitochondria, and hence 200 Continue reading >>

Supplements That Lower Blood Sugar Naturally

Supplements That Lower Blood Sugar Naturally

Although diet and exercise are the two most important factors in dealing with Type 2 diabetes, scientific research shows that there are several supplements you can enlist in your blood sugar battle. “I think supplements should be part of the foundation for how people with high blood sugar address their problems,” says Paula H. Mendelsohn, a licensed dietician and functional medicine nutritionist. “Supplements help the diabetics I treat get off of medications and maintain healthy blood sugar levels.” One key element that may be lacking in the diet of many diabetics is the trace mineral chromium, which gives insulin a boost in regulating blood sugar. Although chromium is found in wide range of foods — including egg yolks, whole-grain products, coffee, nuts, green beans, broccoli, meat, and brewer’s yeast — it’s not easily absorbable by the body. What’s more, surveys show that a majority of Americans don’t get the minimum daily requirement of it. Supplements can help make up the difference. “Chromium supplementation, especially in the form of chromium picolinate…can improve both glucose and insulin metabolism” in diabetics, say researchers Dr. William T. Cefalu, and Dr. Frank B. Hu, citing several studies, on the American Diabetes Association Website. A general consensus among experts is that taking 1,000 micrograms of chromium picolinate a day may help diabetics control their blood sugar. But chromium is just one of several supplements that Mendelsohn recommends for Type 2 diabetes patients. “No single supplement is better than all the others,” Mendelsohn tells Newsmax Health. “They all work together synergistically.” Here are some others (just be aware that diabetics shouldn’t take any supplement that may affect blood sugar without fir Continue reading >>

Ubiquinol Side Effects

Ubiquinol Side Effects

It’s All Just Chemistry Everything that goes into your body causes some kind of effect – from the caffeine in your morning coffee to the daily aspirin, and even the vitamins and minerals in your five-a-day fruit and veg. © Copyright Triples in LA and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons License Some of these effects are minor while others are more far-reaching, so it’s good to know what the things we ingest could potentially change about our bodies. Health supplements are no different – it’s important to research properly and decide if your chosen supplements are right for your bodily needs. Ubiquinol is a highly popular health supplement thanks to its wide-ranging positive effects and the low level of risk is poses, but that doesn’t mean it’s right for everyone. Should I Be Taking Ubiquinol? Let’s start by looking at what ubiquinol is: Ubiquinol occurs naturally in all of our cells. It’s electron-rich and high in antioxidants. When we’re young, our bodies adequately synthesize ubiquinone into ubiquinol to deal with free radicals and create enough energy. This changes as you age, usually around the age of 30, to the point where your body can no longer produce enough ubiquinol. Free radicals are then free to cause damage to your cells. These lowered levels of ubiquinol can lead to a loss of energy and accelerated signs of aging. This shows that ubiquinol is a particularly useful supplement for those over 30 and anyone engaged in endurance events, or anything active that expends a large amount of energy. What Could It Do For Me? As stated above, ubiquinol’s main uses include anti-aging effects and increased levels of energy. Ubiquinol intake has also been linked with cardiovascular health, so it’s great for anyone with family history of Continue reading >>

Coenzyme Q10

Coenzyme Q10

Overview Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) is a substance that helps convert food into energy. CoQ10 is found in almost every cell in the body, and it is a powerful antioxidant. Antioxidants fight damaging particles in the body known as free radicals, which damage cell membranes, tamper with DNA, and even cause cell death. Scientists believe free radicals contribute to the aging process, as well as a number of health problems, including heart disease and cancer. Antioxidants, such as CoQ10, can neutralize free radicals and may reduce or even help prevent some of the damage they cause. Some researchers believe that CoQ10 may help with heart-related conditions, because it can improve energy production in cells, prevent blood clot formation, and act as an antioxidant. Uses Some studies suggest that coenzyme Q10 supplements, either by themselves or in with other drug therapies, may help prevent or treat the following conditions: After Heart Attack One clinical study found that people who took daily CoQ10 supplements within 3 days of a heart attack were less likely to have subsequent heart attacks and chest pain. They were also less likely to die of heart disease than those who did not take the supplements. Anyone who has had a heart attack should talk with their health care provider before taking any herbs or supplements, including CoQ10. Heart failure (HF) There is evidence that CoQ10 may help treat heart failure when combined with conventional medications. People who have congestive heart failure, where the heart is not able to pump blood as well as it should may also have low levels of CoQ10. Heart failure can cause blood to pool in parts of the body, such as the lungs and legs. It can also cause shortness of breath. Several clinical studies suggests that CoQ10 supplements help reduc Continue reading >>

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