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Can Caffeine Raise Blood Sugar?

Relationship Of Caffeine With Adiponectin And Blood Sugar Levels In Subjects With And Without Diabetes

Relationship Of Caffeine With Adiponectin And Blood Sugar Levels In Subjects With And Without Diabetes

Go to: Abstract Introduction: Coffee though not usually thought of as healthy food but can be treated as one of the beneficial drink. Many researchers have found strong evidence that coffee reduces the risk of several serious ailments, including diabetes, heart disease, cirrhosis of the liver, etc. The long term beneficial effect of coffee on diabetes is now understood to be more influential and obliging. Materials and Methods: This study comprised 220 healthy subjects of which 143 consumed coffee and 77 did not. These were matched with 90 diabetic subjects. Among the 90 diabetics, 48 consumed coffee and 42 did not consume coffee. Results: The mean adiponectin value was significantly higher in coffee consumed normal and diabetic subjects than the subjects who did not consume coffee. The decrease in fasting blood sugar and HbA1c values were also observed in normal and diabetic subjects who consumed coffee than the other groups who did not consume coffee. Significant difference (p<0.05) in mean FBG, PPBS, HbA1c and adiponectin were observed between coffee consumed and no coffee consumed groups. Conclusion: The long term use of caffeine is more efficient on blood sugar and adiponectin levels, which needed in the prevention of complications in diabetic subjects. Keywords: Adiponectin, Caffeine, Type 2 diabetes Mean FBG, PPBG, HBA1C, Adiponectin are significantly different at p<0.05 between those that consumed coffee and those that did not consume coffee. There was a significant difference between those that consumed coffee and those that did not consume coffee for the variables FBG, PPBG and Adiponectin Continue reading >>

Coffee May Make Diabetes Worse

Coffee May Make Diabetes Worse

Daily consumption of caffeine in coffee, tea or soft drinks increases blood sugar levels for people with type 2 diabetes, research suggests. Caffeine pills equivalent to four cups of coffee a day increased blood sugar levels by 8% over the day, US researchers report in Diabetes Care. Cutting caffeine out of the diet may help diabetics control their blood sugar levels, the team said. But UK experts said more research was needed before advice could be given. The ten people who took part in the study were monitored with a tiny glucose monitor embedded under the skin. The device meant that the researchers could track the effects of caffeine over 72-hours as the patients with type 2 diabetes went about their normal lives. Previous studies had shown that caffeine increases the body's resistance to insulin, the hormone responsible for managing the response to glucose levels in the blood. But in healthy people this is not really a problem, said study leader Dr James Lane from Duke University Medical School. In the diabetic patients, who took caffeine pills on one day and a placebo the next, caffeine caused blood sugar levels to rise. The effect was particularly strong after meals with a rise of 9% after breakfast, 15% after lunch and 26% after dinner. Quitting Dr Lane is planning to do another trial in larger number of patients to see if cutting caffeine from the diet can help patients control their blood sugar levels. He said there are two possible ways that caffeine produces the effect. It could be that caffeine interferes with the process that moves glucose from the blood and into muscle and other cells in the body. Caffeine could also trigger the release of adrenaline which can also boost sugar levels. "My advice would be, if patients are having trouble controlling their bl Continue reading >>

Caffeine Raises Blood Sugar Levels In Type 2 Diabetics

Caffeine Raises Blood Sugar Levels In Type 2 Diabetics

It may come as quite a shock to those type 2 diabetics who regularly consume caffeine to hear that studies are now showing that caffeine raises blood sugar levels in type 2 diabetics. Are you trying to maintain healthy blood sugar levels naturally? Sugar Crush products are all natural and organic dietary supplements backed by clinical research to manage your blood sugar levels. Click here to read more. I’m a regular diet coke drinker and I thought that because there is no sugar in diet coke it was safe for me to drink regularly…I was wrong. The American Diabetes Association announced the findings of a Duke University study which showed that caffeine raised the blood glucose levels of type 2 diabetics throughout the day and especially after meals. But I thought caffeine was ok for diabetics? Previous studies on the link between caffeine and diabetes had shown that caffeine consumption lowered the risk of type 2 diabetes. Those who drank the most caffeine were the least likely to develop type 2 diabetes. It was these finding that may have lead to the misconception that caffeine had no ill effect on diabetics. What the Duke University study is now showing is that in people who have type 2 diabetes, caffeine raised their blood sugar levels throughout the day. So even if they drank caffeine in the morning it had an effect on their blood sugar level throughout the entire day making it difficult to keep it under control. So what is suggested? Well, if you are a type 2 diabetic such as myself, and you are finding it difficult to keep your blood glucose levels in the normal range you may want to examine the amount of caffeine you are consuming. Like I said, I am a diet coke drinker. This is the source of any caffeine that I consume. I have been having a hard time controlling Continue reading >>

Controlling Blood Sugar With Cinnamon And Coffee Fruit

Controlling Blood Sugar With Cinnamon And Coffee Fruit

Even people who pay careful attention to what they eat may see their blood sugar levels increase as they get older. Likewise, aging is associated with a potentially hazardous decline in insulin sensitivity. The regrettable outcome is that an ever-growing number of adults are diabetic or pre-diabetic, with glucose levels that are slowly but surely rising above the desired threshold of 100 mg/dL. Fortunately, scientists have discovered that, in addition to weight loss and exercise, certain phytonutrients can help your body defend itself against these dangers. Natural plant chemicals from cinnamon and coffee fruit can help control blood sugar in several ways, thus offering protection against dangerous conditions such as metabolic syndrome and diabetes. How the Body Controls Blood Sugar The body regulates blood sugar levels in several ways. The one most commonly understood involves insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas that delivers glucose to cells throughout the body. When you eat a meal, the pancreas responds by releasing insulin to transport the glucose into the cells. As long as receptors on the cell walls remain sensitive to insulin, the channeling of glucose out of the bloodstream occurs relatively quickly and without excessive insulin production. Sometimes, however, the cells become resistant to insulin’s effects. When this happens, the pancreas pumps out ever-greater amounts of insulin in an attempt to force the glucose into the cells. This effort is only partially effective in most instances, and may result in higher blood glucose levels and eventually type II diabetes. Nutrients such as chromium and lipoic acid may help to improve insulin sensitivity.1 Unfortunately, in some non-insulin-dependent diabetics and obese individuals, the body’s internal gluc Continue reading >>

How Does Coffee Affect Blood Sugar And Diabetes?

How Does Coffee Affect Blood Sugar And Diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes is a massive health problem worldwide. About 29 million people, or 9% of all US adults, had type 2 diabetes in the year 2012 (1). Interestingly, long-term studies have linked coffee drinking with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes (2, 3). Yet, oddly enough, many short-term studies have shown that coffee and caffeine can raise blood sugar and insulin levels (4, 5, 6). Why this happens is not fully known, but there are several theories. This article examines the short-term and long-term effects of coffee on blood sugar and diabetes. The health benefits of drinking coffee are well-documented. In observational studies, coffee is linked to reduced blood sugar and insulin levels, which are major risk factors for type 2 diabetes (7). Furthermore, consuming regular or decaf coffee on a regular basis is linked to a 23–50% lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes (3, 8, 9, 10, 11). Studies have also shown that each daily cup of coffee you consume may reduce this risk by 4–8% (3, 8). Additionally, people who drink 4–6 cups of coffee each day have a lower risk of type 2 diabetes than people who drink less than 2 cups each day (12). Regular coffee drinking has been linked to a 23–50% lower risk of type 2 diabetes. Each daily cup is linked to a 4-8% lower risk. A major paradox exists between the long-term and short-term effects of coffee. Short-term studies have linked caffeine and coffee consumption with increased blood sugar levels and insulin resistance (13). A recent study showed that a single serving of coffee, containing 100 mg of caffeine, can negatively affect blood sugar control in healthy but overweight men (14). Other short-term studies -- both in healthy individuals and in type 2 diabetics -- show that consuming caffeinated coffee impaired blood sug Continue reading >>

Does Black Coffee Affect Blood Sugar, Prevent Diabetes?

Does Black Coffee Affect Blood Sugar, Prevent Diabetes?

A few studies have indicated that drinking black coffee is somehow related to a lesser risk of developing diabetes mellitus. You may have seen one of these articles presented on a recent Good Mourning America show which said that drinking black coffee at lunch correlated with lower levels of developing diabetes. But the study went on to state that drinking coffee in the morning or at night time did not have the same affect. So let me get this right, black coffee can help prevent diabetes, but only if drank at midday? I guess you could label me skeptical about these findings. The problem with most of the studies, especially with coffee, is that the results are all over the map. It seems as if one week there will be news of a story suggesting that coffee is good for you in one way or another, and the next week there will be another study proclaiming the exact opposite. It’s hard for the average Joe to understand what the truth is because the truth seems to be constantly changing. That is because at the current time we really don’t know the truth about coffee and how it relates to diabetes, we are just piecing together information as we go. Each of these studies provides one snapshot that needs to be taken together to provide a big picture understanding of the subject. The problem with this particular subject however, is that the results are all over the map. The truth is that some people find that black coffee helps to lower their blood sugar levels, and other people find that it adversely raises them. Although many blanket statements can be made about diabetes, not all people react to the same food in the same way. The only way to know for sure is to drink coffee or any other food, and then test your blood sugar levels yourself to know for sure. I personally happen t Continue reading >>

Does Caffeine Increase Blood Sugar Levels?

Does Caffeine Increase Blood Sugar Levels?

Researchers at Duke University have been taking aim at caffeine for some years now, and they think that people with type 2 diabetes should avoid coffee. According to the results of two small but significant studies, Dr. James Lane believes that caffeine affects the way that diabetics metabolize carbohydrates and leads to increased blood sugar levels. Back in 2004, Dr. James Lane and fellow researchers tested the effects of caffeine in 14 people with type 2 diabetes. They tested the fasting blood sugar levels of each person, then gave them two caffeine pills and tested blood sugar levels an hour later. Each person then drank a high-carb meal replacement drink with a third caffeine pill, and blood sugar levels were tested one hour and two hours after their ‘meal’. Each person was tested on two different days. On one of those days, half the group got real caffeine and the other half took a placebo. On the second day, those who got a placebo on day one got the real deal, and those who got caffeine the first study day took a placebo. Neither researchers nor subjects knew which was which. Even though fasting blood sugar levels weren’t affected by the caffeine, the blood sugar levels of those who took the caffeine pills showed significantly higher levels of blood sugar after meals than those who did not. The researchers concluded that caffeine has some effect on the interaction between glucose and insulin, though the study could not determine exactly what the mechanism was. They did advise, based on the results of the study, that people with diabetes might do better to avoid coffee or drink decaf. In January 2008, the same group of researchers released the results of a second study. In this study, which included ten participants with type 2 diabetes, researchers implante Continue reading >>

Does Caffeine Raise Blood Sugar Levels?

Does Caffeine Raise Blood Sugar Levels?

Continue Learning about Coffee & Health Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs. Continue reading >>

Cut Out Coffee Diabetics Urged

Cut Out Coffee Diabetics Urged

Diabetics have been urged to cut out coffee, according to a news article in the Daily Mail. The newspaper reports that an American study has shown that “a daily dose of caffeine raises blood sugar by 8 per cent”. They go on to say that drinking caffeine may undermine the effects of medication and that simply giving up drinks containing caffeine may be a way of lowering blood sugar. The researchers used a sensor implanted under the skin of 10 people with type 2 diabetes to measure changes in glucose when the participants took caffeine capsules containing the equivalent of about four cups of brewed coffee a day. The design of this study, the small number of participants and the short timescale all indicate that it is unwise to issue advice based on this research alone. Confirmatory research using randomised designs and larger numbers of patients is needed. Where did the story come from? Dr James Lane and colleagues from the Duke University Medical Centre, Durham, USA carried out the research. It is not clear from the online version, which was published ahead of print, who funded the study. The study was published online in the peer reviewed medical journal: Diabetes Care. What kind of scientific study was this? This laboratory study used a crossover design, in which patients acted as their own controls in an unrandomised observation of glucose levels. The researchers picked five men and five women (average age 63) from their clinic who were habitual drinkers of brewed coffee. All the participants had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes at least six months before the study began, and their condition was being managed by a stable regimen of diet, exercise, and oral tablets, but not insulin injections. Other than diabetes, they were all free of major medical disorders, w Continue reading >>

10 Surprising Things That Can Spike Your Blood Sugar

10 Surprising Things That Can Spike Your Blood Sugar

When you first found out you had diabetes, you tested your blood sugar often to understand how food, activity, stress, and illness could affect your blood sugar levels. By now, you’ve got it figured out for the most part. But then—bam! Something makes your blood sugar zoom up. You try to adjust it with food or activity or insulin, and it dips really low. You’re on a rollercoaster no one with diabetes wants to ride. Knowledge is power! Look out for these surprising triggers that can send your blood sugar soaring: Sunburn—the pain causes stress, and stress increases blood sugar levels. Artificial sweeteners—more research needs to be done, but some studies show they can raise blood sugar. Coffee—even without sweetener. Some people’s blood sugar is extra-sensitive to caffeine. Losing sleep—even just one night of too little sleep can make your body use insulin less efficiently. Skipping breakfast—going without that morning meal can increase blood sugar after both lunch and dinner. Time of day—blood sugar can be harder to control the later it gets. Dawn phenomenon—people have a surge in hormones early in the morning whether they have diabetes or not. For people with diabetes, blood sugar can spike. Dehydration—less water in your body means a higher blood sugar concentration. Nose spray—some have chemicals that trigger your liver to make more blood sugar. Gum disease—it’s both a complication of diabetes and a blood sugar spiker. Watch out for other triggers that can make your blood sugar fall. For example, extreme heat can cause blood vessels to dilate, which makes insulin absorb more quickly and could lead to low blood sugar. If an activity or food or situation is new, be sure to check your blood sugar levels before and after to see how you respo Continue reading >>

You May Want To Skip The Splenda

You May Want To Skip The Splenda

Before you sweeten your coffee with the contents of a little yellow packet, read this. A popular artificial sweetener known as sucralose and marketed as Splenda can adversely affect how some people metabolize sugar, according to a new study from researchers at Washington University in St. Louis. The study compared overweight people with normal sugar metabolism to see how they reacted when they were given either water or sucralose—about as much as is in one can of diet soda—to drink before a glucose challenge test, which involves drinking a glucose mixture and then having blood taken at multiple intervals. Researchers found a kind of insulin-and-blood-sugar roller-coaster scenario. People’s blood sugar levels peaked higher if they got sucralose, rather than water, before the glucose challenge test. Insulin levels also climbed higher. And, a few hours into the test, at the lowest blood sugar point, sucralose consumption led to lower blood sugar levels than did water, which can set the stage for carb cravings. “Everyone got the same amount of glucose, both times, but their bodies secreted much more insulin when they got sucralose first,” says M. Yanina Pepino, PhD, the study’s main researcher. Insulin is needed for the body to use sugar for energy, but too much is harmful, Dr. Pepino says. High blood levels of insulin keep fat from being broken down for energy, making it hard to lose weight. And chronically high insulin levels can lead to insulin resistance, a precursor to type-2 diabetes. Does that mean that people who drink diet soda all the time are setting themselves up for type-2 diabetes? No one knows, Dr. Pepino says. However, in two large population studies, consumption of non-nutritive sweeteners (think all of those pastel packets at your local coffee Continue reading >>

Intermittent Fasting, Cortisol And Blood Sugar

Intermittent Fasting, Cortisol And Blood Sugar

There’s been a lot of discussion about the benefits of intermittent fasting (IF) in the paleo community lately. Paul Jaminet mentions it’s role in boosting the immune system in his book, The Perfect Health Diet, and IF can also be helpful for those trying to lose weight and tune their metabolism. From an evolutionary perspective, intermittent fasting was probably the normal state of affairs. There were no grocery stores, restaurants or convenience stores, and food was not nearly as readily available or easy to come by as it is today. Nor were there watches, schedules, lunch breaks or the kind of structure and routine we have in the modern world. This means it’s likely that our paleo ancestors often did go 12-16 hours between meals on a regular basis, and perhaps had full days when they ate lightly or didn’t eat at all. So, while I agree that IF is part of our heritage, and that it can be helpful in certain situations, I don’t believe it’s an appropriate strategy for everyone. Why? Because fasting can elevate cortisol levels. One of cortisol’s effects is that it raises blood sugar. So, in someone with blood sugar regulation issues, fasting can actually make them worse. I’ve seen this time and time again with my patients. Almost all of my patients have blood sugar imbalances. And it’s usually not as simple as “high blood sugar” or “low blood sugar”. They often have a combination of both (reactive hypoglycemia), or strange blood sugar patterns that, on the surface, don’t make much sense. These folks aren’t eating a Standard American Diet. Most of them are already on a paleo-type or low-carb diet. Yet they still have blood sugar issues. In these cases, cortisol dysregulation is almost always the culprit. When these patients try intermittent fas Continue reading >>

Nine Reasons Your Blood Sugar Can Go Up

Nine Reasons Your Blood Sugar Can Go Up

Diet is the primary way diabetics control the level of sugar in our blood. Doing so, however, is not simple. Here are 9 reasons why blood glucose levels can increase. In order to prevent type 2 diabetes destroying our bodies, we diabetics need to control the glucose floating around in our bloodstream. Many of us are succeeding in doing so by the diets we eat. Sometimes however our diets do not work very well and our blood sugar readings rise for reasons we cannot fathom easily. This may be because of a lack of knowledge of how certain foods or other things can affect the level of glucose in our blood. Here are 9 typical reasons why our blood sugar can rise unexpectedly: caffeine sugar-free food fat-heavy food bagels sports drinks dried fruits a bad cold or flu stress steroids and diuretics Caffeine Drinking coffee, black tea, green tea, and energy drinks, all containing caffeine, has been associated with a small, but detectable rise in blood sugar levels, particularly after meals. This can happen, even if you drink black coffee with zero calories. Two to three cups a day (250mg of caffeine) can have this effect. In one experiment conducted on 10 people with type 2 diabetes, the subjects were given capsules of caffeine (the equivalent of four cups), rather than coffee. This increased their blood glucose levels by up to 8%. But how caffeine raises blood sugar has not been figured out yet. The irony is that coffee, both caffeinated and decaffeinated, has other components that reduce blood glucose, and coffee has been associated with a reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Each person reacts differently to drinks containing caffeine, so it’s best to track your own responses to this little kicker and figure out for yourself whether the effect of caffeine on your bloo Continue reading >>

Keeping Your Blood Sugars Balanced With Food

Keeping Your Blood Sugars Balanced With Food

They say what goes up must come down- and this is often the case with blood sugar. Blood sugar that is too low or too high can have an effect on your health, especially if you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes or have blood sugar levels above or below the normal range. Read on for advice on what to put on your dinner plate to help keep your blood sugars stable. What happens when you blood sugar is too high or low? Also known as hyperglycaemia, high blood sugar is when your body isn’t able to carry sugar from your blood into your cells. It tends to affect people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, along with pregnant women who develop gestational diabetes. Sometimes, it can also affect people that have a serious infection or have just had a stroke or heart attack. As they grow, children and young adults may also experience temporary periods of high blood sugar. The medical name for low blood sugar is hypoglycaemia, when our bodies react to blood sugar levels dropping too low. This is often triggered by missing a meal, too much exercise, drinking too much alcohol or taking too much insulin. On some occasions, medicines can make blood sugar levels drop. How can you raise your blood sugar levels? To treat an attack of low blood sugar, it’s important to drink or eat something sugary that contains 15 to 20g of fast-acting carbohydrate. This could be a few sweets, up to five dextrose tablets, a glass of fruit juice or a sugary soft drink. How can you lower your blood sugar levels? If your blood sugar levels are too high, there are a number of ways to help keep them under control: Watch your intake of carbohydrates When we eat carbohydrates, our bodies break them down into glucose which raises our blood sugar. This is why cutting down on refined or processed carbs like white b Continue reading >>

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Caffeine Blocks Insulin A survey reported in JAMA showed that drinking coffee reduces risk for developing type II diabetes, but other studies suggest that once you have diabetes, drinking coffee may be unwise. A report from the Netherlands showed that caffeine in coffee raises blood sugar levels. Diabetics suffer blindness, deafness, heart attacks, strokes, kidney failure, burning foot syndrome and many other serious side effects, and all are caused by a high-rise in blood sugar after meals. Anything that raises blood sugar levels too high increases cell damage in diabetics. This study shows that caffeine raises blood sugar levels by causing the body to put out large amounts of adrenalin that makes cells less responsive to insulin. When caffeine was removed from the coffee, blood sugar levels did not rise higher than normal. On the basis of this study, diabetics should drink decaffeinated coffee, rather than one with caffeine, in addition to severely restricting sugar-added foods, bakery products, pastas, fruit juices and they should eat root vegetables and fruits only with meals. Canadian researchers writing in Diabetes Care showed that caffeine significantly reduced insulin sensitivity. In another study in the same journal, scientists from Duke University Medical Center reported that drinking coffee could upset a diabetic’s ability to metabolize sugar. Blood sugar levels are supposed to rise after you eat. To keep your blood sugar levels from rising too high, your pancreas releases insulin. The researchers found that taking caffeine causes blood sugar and insulin levels to rise even higher after meals. If your blood sugar rises too high, sugar sticks to cells. Once sugar is stuck on a cell membrane, it cannot be released and is converted to a poison called sorbitol Continue reading >>

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