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Can Blood Sugar Cause Hot Flashes

3 Blood Sugar Problems During Menopause

3 Blood Sugar Problems During Menopause

Controlling your blood sugar level is vital… even more so during menopause. Menopause is tough to deal with at best of times. It can be a real pain with uncomfortable symptoms like hot flashes, night sweats, weight gain, and sleeplessness. But what does blood sugar have to do with menopause? Now, to top it all off, women going through menopause are more sensitive to sugar. This means that they are more likely to develop blood sugar related problems like diabetes, oxidation and insulin resistance. Insulin Resistance – Estrogen levels in the body decrease when a woman enters menopause. This can make a woman more vulnerable to insulin resistance. This happens because the lower estrogen levels make the cells store more sugar, which can also lead to other health issues like diabetes, heart disease, and even certain types of cancer. Could you be insulin resistance? Here are 5 Tell-Tale Signs of Insulin Resistance and How to Stop It… Oxidation – The increased numbers of free radicals and the decreased number of antioxidants in the body during menopause can lead to insulin resistance and other blood sugar related problems. Weight Gain – Weight gain during menopause seems to be a huge problem – No pun intended. Most women tend to pick up some weight during menopause. This may lead to increased fat deposits and decreased muscle mass in the body. What can I do to prevent these blood sugar problems? As a drop of estrogen levels are the main reason for menopause, we recommend taking a natural supplement. The Manna Menopause Support helps increase estrogen levels the natural way without any side effects. If you struggle to lose weight, we also recommend taking the Manna Blood Sugar Support. It helps control blood glucose levels, decrease insulin levels, curb cravings and Continue reading >>

What Your Hot Flashes Could Be Telling You

What Your Hot Flashes Could Be Telling You

Women with diabetes tend to experience hot flashes that aren't just a sudden rush of feeling too warm. Instead, you may have noticed your hot flashes come with flushing, sweating or shakiness, as well as confusion and weakness. This might be because these aren't hot flashes like those associated with menopause. The issue here is with your blood sugar. Does diabetes cause hot flashes? Diabetes itself does not directly cause hot flashes. Instead, hot flashes and sweating can come from low blood sugar. In fact, a sudden hot flash can be a sign of hypoglycemia. If you get hot flashes after eating, check how much insulin you're giving yourself. If you take more insulin than the amount of food you just ate requires, your blood sugar can dip too low, causing hot flashes. You might also find yourself with low blood sugar if you don't eat after you take your insulin or you overdo it at the gym. What can you do about hot flashes? The solution to diabetic hot flashes lies in managing your blood glucose levels. If you frequently get hot flashes and have diabetes, you should discuss this with your doctor to see whether your treatment regimen needs adjustment. When you're having a hot flash, the first thing you should do is check your blood sugar. Low blood sugar is very serious and can have severe consequences if you don't address it, so treat your hot flashes as a warning sign from your body and take action. How to treat low blood sugar The first thing you need to do is consume 15 to 20 grams of glucose or simple carbohydrates, according to the American Diabetes Association. This can be in the form of glucose tablets or gel, four ounces of juice, hard candies, or a couple of tablespoons of raisins. Once you've done this, check your blood sugar again in 15 minutes and consume more g Continue reading >>

Menopause And Hot Flashes: The Paleo Solution

Menopause And Hot Flashes: The Paleo Solution

Menopause and hot flashes have a very unfortunately relationship: that is, nearly every woman going through menopause experiences hot flashes at some point. Many women suffer them on a regular basis. And it’s not just about feeling hot… hot flashes can be extraordinarily uncomfortable. They can upset social situations. And perhaps worst of all, they can rob you of a good night’s sleep. Most of the advice out there for hot flashes is vague and unhelpful, and doesn’t really address the root of the problem. But with a keen eye towards the underlying physiology of hot flashes, you can use your brain, your diet, and some lifestyle changes to manage menopause and hot flashes like a pro. Menopause and hot flashes: What are hot flashes Hot flashes are an uncomfortable surge of a “too hot” feeling that can occur at random times, and are known to occur increasingly during perimenopause and menopause, in nearly 75% of women. There is intense warmth, sometimes flushing, sometimes sweating, and maybe a tingling feeling all across the skin over the body. Sometimes they occur at night while you are sleeping, and you can wake up an intensely hot, sweaty mess. Menopause and hot flashes: Standard internet and medical advice Most of the articles you read on the internet about menopause and hot flashes will tell you that hot flashes are a result of “changing hormone levels.” While true – hot flashes are caused (though not solely) by hormonal changes – this is not exactly a helpful response. How do you treat a problem that no one can give you a precise description of? Most websites then advise you…. 1) that Estrogen Replacement Therapy and Estrogen/Progesterone Hormone Replacement Therapy have been helpful for treating women’s symptoms, 2) that a variety of practices Continue reading >>

News Flash: Hot Flashes And Sugar Control Are Linked

News Flash: Hot Flashes And Sugar Control Are Linked

As a rite of passage, menopause impacts every woman as she enters the later years of life. While menopause offers a bridge to an improved sense of self and peace of mind, this life transition holds the reputation as one of misery. In other words, the beauty of this relatively short season is sometimes overshadowed by the negative. Yes, menopausal symptoms, such as hot flashes, raise dread in those approaching the 50-year mark and complaints from those already there. However, lifestyle changes, particularly diet adjustments, decrease these symptoms. In particular and to the point, sugar control begets hot flash control. Ongoing Body Changes in Women In looking at the link between blood sugar levels and hot flash occurrences, the perspective is important. For women, the body changes continually from childhood growth through puberty, possibly pregnancy, and nursing, through to aging and into menopause. Adapting to these bodily changes can become wearisome if you don’t take care of yourself. Keeping a positive perspective as to the miracle of the female body and adjusting as necessary brings you to menopause in a healthy state of mind. This outlook combats the negative impact of many of the menopausal symptoms you may experience. It may help to keep in mind that the one constant in life is change. Understanding Menopause Simply put, menopause is the cessation of a woman’s menstrual cycle and the closure of her reproductive years. This natural, biological process happens when the ovaries stop releasing eggs. An end to fertility, menopause does not signal an end to sexuality, vitality or health. When and How It Happens Typically, this change of life occurs after age 40 with the average age of around 51 years in the United States. However, hysterectomies, chemotherapy trea Continue reading >>

Hot Flashes

Hot Flashes

Hot flashes, or vasomotor flushes, are characterized by the feeling of heat and sweating, particularly around the head and neck. They are the most common menopausal symptom, affecting anywhere from 50 to 85 percent of women at some point during their climacteric years. Mainstream medicine considers hot flashes to be a result of declining estrogen levels at menopause. Indeed, hot flashes are seen in women with low estrogen; however, women with high estrogen levels or fluctuating estrogen levels also experience hot flashes. It is not uncommon for women to experience hot flashes during pregnancy, and also premenstrually. Hot flashes often start just before or during the menstrual period during perimenopause. While hot flashes tend to go away a year or two after menopause, many women experience hot flashes post-menopausally. Depending on the intensity of a hot flash, some women may get accompanying headaches or feel dizzy, tired, weak, or lose sleep. Others experience heart palpitations or erratic heart beats. Many women flush, sweat and then become chilled afterward. Night sweats are on a continuum with hot flashes. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, 3:00–4:00 A.M. is the most common time for night sweats, which may cause you to awaken, drenched with sweat. Solutions are the same as for hot flashes. What Causes Hot Flashes? Hot flashes occur when blood vessels in the skin of the head and neck open more widely than usual, allowing more blood to shift into the area, creating heat and redness. Researchers believe that this vascular shift is due to changes in neurotransmitter activity that are not full understood, occurring in response to erratic hormone levels. Women with low progesterone but normal estrogen levels may experience hot flashes and night sweats. Other hormones m Continue reading >>

Causes Of Hot Flashes And Night Sweats

Causes Of Hot Flashes And Night Sweats

Hot flashes — a defining symptom of menopause — can seriously disrupt your life. A hot flash can occur without warning, creating embarrassing episodes especially if your face flushes, or if you routinely perspire through your clothes. As night sweats, they can wake you from a sound sleep, with your pajamas and sheets soaked through. “One day I was giving a speech…and the sweat was just pouring off me! My night sweats were so bad I literally would have to change the sheets in the middle of the night. Now, I’m having no symptoms, no night sweats — nothing.” When you have a hot flash, the temperature-regulating area within your brain — in the hypothalamus — is “tricked” into trying to get rid of extra body heat. The hypothalamus sends cool-down signals telling your blood vessels to dilate, your heart rate to increase, and your sweat glands to open up wide. The result is a sudden, intense — and unpleasant — rush of heat, often accompanied by drenching perspiration, dizziness, and even heart palpitations. You may also feel nauseated or weak, and have a crawling sensation on your skin. Hot flashes — indicators that something bigger is going on When your body is trying to juggle a lot of demands — and isn’t getting enough support — the ability to balance hormones is overwhelmed. This resulting hormonal imbalance can send false messages to your hypothalamus, giving rise to hot flashes or night sweats — often the first symptoms women notice as they approach the midlife transition in perimenopause. For many women, hot flashes and night sweats persist right through menopause. Other factors that can contribute to hot flashes: If you have high levels of anxiety, it can make you up to five times more likely to experience hot flashes and night sweat Continue reading >>

Can Sugar Cause Hot Flashes Or Night Sweats?

Can Sugar Cause Hot Flashes Or Night Sweats?

Hi. My name is Dr. Ryan Shelton. I’m with lifeclimax.com. I’m a physician and a researcher and for over a decade now, I’ve been a specialist in the field of menopause. I’ve worked with colleagues from around the world developing really comprehensive strategies for the effective evaluation and treatment for women transitioning through menopause. Today, I get to do one of my favorite things, which is answer a question from the public. This is from Diane from Minneapolis. Diane writes, “Does sugar cause hot flashes and night sweats?” So, Diane, it’s well known that refined sugar, refined carbohydrates in the form of sweets and desserts, can cause hot flashes and night sweats in a number of women. That’s pretty clear. Not in all women, but certainly sugar, refined carbohydrates can serve as a trigger for hot flashes and night sweats in some women. Let’s go a little deeper than that, though. What we do know is we’ve studied a lot of women and monitored triggers and seen what happens in the body when they actually experience a hot flash, and we know that women who struggle with reactive hypoglycemia tend to have more problems with hot flashes than those who don’t. Let’s say you go a couple of hours without eating and the first thing you have is something really sweet, your blood sugar spikes up, and then it crashes, and that crash is associated with the experience of a hot flash. Also, low blood sugar, in general, is associated with hot flash triggers, so in a fasting state or if you’re walking around hungry and you haven’t eaten for five/six hours, you’re more likely to get a hot flash during those times. Not only that, but refined sugar and carbohydrates is one of the main causes of metabolic syndrome, which is much higher in incidence postmeno Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar During Peri & Menopause ..

High Blood Sugar During Peri & Menopause ..

Did you know that if you are going through menopause it could be impacting blood sugar levels? This happened to me three years ago during peri menopause, after a fasting blood sugar bllod test, told borderline type 2 diabetes, so, I have to monitor regularly, no family history of diabetes, and not over weight... all in order now, it was peri causing it... but I was not aware until the blood test. Yes, it's true! Your female hormones, estrogens and progesterone affect your cells' sensitivity to insulin. So if you thought as your menopausal symptoms have gotten worse your blood sugar levels have also become less predictable, you are not crazy, it is true. Why does one of your health conditions affect another? It is happening because our hormones impact There are three different estrogens which are produced mainly in the ovaries each month that we have our menstrual cycle. As we move into menopause the levels of estrogen being produced in the ovaries begin to decline. Once in the blood stream, insulin travels to cells to help remove glucose from the blood so it can enter all of our cells easily. Estrogen has a protective effect on pancreas cells and prevents them from premature cell death. It also works on the cells of the pancreas to increase the production of insulin when required by certain conditions, such as diabetes. The decline in estrogen seems to cause our cells to become more insulin resistant, exacerbating blood glucose levels circulating in the body. Insulin resistance causes cells to not absorb glucose from the bloodstream as readily so blood glucose levels get higher. This causes a higher probability of exacerbating high blood sugars and diabetic complications over time. So what is the solution to this seemingly-complicated situation where menopause and diabe Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) definition and facts Hypoglycemia is the medical term for low blood sugar. It typically occurs as a side effect of medications for diabetes. The normal range of blood glucose is from 70 to 100 mg/dL in an individual without diabetes, Most people will feel the effects and symptoms of low blood sugar when blood glucose levels are lower than 50 mg/dL. Low blood sugar is treated by giving a readily absorbed source of sugar, including soft drinks, juice, or foods containing sugar. If the hypoglycemia has progressed to the point at which the patient cannot take anything by mouth, an injection of glucagon may be given. Glucagon is a hormone that causes a fast release of glucose from the liver. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is syndrome that results from low blood sugar. The severity and symptoms of hypoglycemia can vary from person to person. Blood tests can diagnose low blood sugar, and symptoms resolve when the levels of sugar in the blood return to the normal range. The medical term for blood sugar is blood glucose. What can cause low blood sugar? Despite advances in the treatment of diabetes, low blood sugar episodes occur as a side effect of many treatments for diabetes. In fact, these episodes are often the limiting factor in achieving optimal blood sugar control, because many medications that are effective in treating diabetes carry the risk of lowering the blood sugar level too much, causing symptoms. In large scale studies looking at tight control in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, low blood sugars occurred more often in the patients who were managed most intensively. This is important for patients and physicians to recognize, especially as the goal for treating patients with diabetes becomes tighter control of blood sugar. While peopl Continue reading >>

Can You Eat Your Way Out Of Hot Flashes?

Can You Eat Your Way Out Of Hot Flashes?

Menopause is something I rarely think about. My take is that there’s no reason to anticipate and fret over life events that haven’t yet happened. I’ll dream about my next vacation, even when it’s far off, because it’s a nice respite, but with menopause I’ll deal only when it comes. But new research I just read makes me think that there might be some merit to planning for this life transition. The study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, looked at the connection between hot flashes and what women eat, and offers further support to the notion that diet can relieve these very annoying symptoms. What’s a hot flash? They say that — much like becoming a parent to a newborn — until you get one, you don’t understand what it’s really like. It’s described as a feeling of increased skin temperature and profuse sweating, sometimes accompanied by facial flushing and a rapid heart rate. It’s not dangerous, and it’s extremely common, but when it happens at night it interrupts good sleep, which is the cornerstone of health and well-being, in my opinion. Veggies and Fruit Protective, Fat and Sugar a Risk The Australian study included about 6,000 middle-aged women, who were followed for nine years. The women were asked about night sweats and hot flashes, and about their food habits. After adjustment for confounders such as education level, smoking, obesity, physical activity etc., two food patterns were associated with fewer hot flashes: high fruit intake and Mediterranean-style diet (veggies, garlic, red wine, tomatoes). On the other hand, high-fat and high-sugar diets were associated with high rates of reported hot flashes. What does food have to do with hot flashes? The exact cause of hot flashes is unknown, but it is thought that est Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Hot Flashes After Eating Breakfast

Diabetes & Hot Flashes After Eating Breakfast

Diabetes causes changes in blood sugar levels that can occur suddenly, especially after eating. While most diabetics focus on how high their blood sugars rise after eating, a sudden drop in blood sugar, called hypoglycemia, can also cause serious problems. Since neither diabetes nor high blood sugar levels cause hot flashes, a possible cause of what appear to be hot flashes after eating may be hypoglycemia. Video of the Day Diabetics may experience hypoglycemia after eating for a number of reasons. If you take more insulin than needed for the amount of food eaten, your blood sugars can drop too low, because insulin helps glucose enter cells and tissues. Too much insulin removes too much glucose from your blood. Not eating at all after taking insulin or exercising strenuously, which burns up more calories and glucose than usual, can also cause hypoglycemia. Even if you don’t take insulin, your body may release a large amount of insulin in response to a meal high in carbohydrates. Oral hypoglycemics used to treat diabetes can also cause hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia causes flushing, sweating, fast heartbeat, shakiness, confusion and weakness, similar symptoms to hot flashes. If you don’t treat hypoglycemia, you can lose consciousness, go into a coma and in rare cases die or have permanent brain damage. Blood Glucose Levels People without diabetes don’t experience flushing, shakiness and rapid heartbeat until their blood glucose levels fall below 60 mg/dL, The Merck Manual Online Medical Library states. Diabetics may experience symptoms at higher levels, closer to 100 mg/dL, David McCulloch, M.D., of the University of Washington reports on UpToDate. In addition, long-standing diabetics may have hypoglycemia unawareness, the inability to recognize early symptoms of hypog Continue reading >>

Menopause And Diabetes: Does Menopause Cause Diabetes?

Menopause And Diabetes: Does Menopause Cause Diabetes?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the United States has the highest rate of diabetes cases in the developing world and it is still increasing in an alarm rate. In 2016, it is estimated that 1 in 10 US individuals have type 2 diabetes (the increase rate of type 1 diabetes is much smaller). By 2050, it is estimated that 1 in 3 individuals will suffer from type 2 diabetes. From the statistics, overweight individuals who are age 40 or older are in the highest risk percentile. How does this information important for women? In the United States, diabetes is ranked as the number 6 most common cause of death for females between 45 to 54 years old and the number 4 common cause of death for females who are between 55 to 64 years old. It seems that as women grow older and reach their menopause stage, they become much more susceptible to develop diabetes. The question is whether menopause can drastically increase the risk of developing diabetes? This article will answer this question along with covering various topics that concerns menopause and its effect on diabetes: Can Menopause Can Trigger Diabetes? We would like to give you a straightforward answer for this question. However, sadly, health research scientists are still struggling to find the answer because it is difficult to separate the correlation and effects of menopause from the correlation and effects of age and weight. In 2011, a scientific correlation study suggests that after taking the age factor out from the correlation study, there is “no association between natural menopause or bilateral oophorectomy and diabetes risk” (Kim, 2011). Yet there have been studies suggesting that progesterone is correlated with the development diabetes. Although we cannot give you a straight yes or Continue reading >>

The Effect Of Dietary Intake On Hot Flashes In Menopausal Women

The Effect Of Dietary Intake On Hot Flashes In Menopausal Women

Menopausal hot flashes (HFs) are experienced by approximately 80% of the 20 million women of menopausal age (45-54) in the United States, making this a significant concern during menopause. The incidence is even greater for women who have their ovaries surgically removed with 95% to 100% of this population experiencing HFs (Bachmann, 1999). Hot flashes can disrupt women’s lives and affect work responsibilities, social activities, and sleep (Dormire, 2003; Greendale & Sowers, 1997). The impact of HF on women’s lives is revealed in health care utilization data indicating that the majority of women seeking care related to menopausal symptoms do so because of the discomfort associated with HF (Kronenberg, 1994). Although HFs occur widely, the HF physiological trigger mechanism is unknown. The current standard management for HF is hormone therapy (HT), used by approximately 3 million American women. However, confusion and anxiety about HT have dominated management concerns following the publication of findings regarding increased risk for cardiovascular events and invasive breast cancer in both the Heart and Estrogen Replacement Study II (Grady et al., 2002) and the Women’s Health Initiative (Writing Group for the Women’s Health Initiative Investigators, 2002). The association of breast cancer and cardiovascular events with HT leaves women in the difficult situation of having to choose between these risks and the distress they endure from HF. If the physiological mechanisms of HF were known, alternative management strategies could be developed and directed toward the underlying cause. Research focused on uncovering the HF mechanism has the potential to redirect treatment strategies. An emerging model, the Impaired Glucose Delivery Model of Hot Flashes, indicates that Continue reading >>

Health News U Can Use Tips For Menopause And Low Blood Sugar Issue #001 – March 20, 2003

Health News U Can Use Tips For Menopause And Low Blood Sugar Issue #001 – March 20, 2003

Back to Back Issues Page Health News U Can Use Tips for menopause and low blood sugar Issue #001 – March 20, 2003 In This Issue... Easy Menopause Tips: Start now, regardless of your age! Hypoglycemia, Low Blood Sugar Medicinary News: Estrofactors and Black Cohosh instead of Hormone Replacement Therapy? Recipe: Tofu Even a Truck Driver Would Eat Menopause Tips Many women are menopausal or peri-menopausal. A list of common symptoms can be found on the Key to Health Clinic web page. The most common symptoms are hot flashes, night sweats, mood changes, and menstrual changes. Tips on Entering Smoothly into Menopause Exercise regularly. It keeps the metabolism going and is often helpful with depression, anxiety, stress and weight gain. Weight bearing exercise will help to maintain a healthy bone calcium content and help to prevent osteoporosis. Eat a healthy diet rich in vegetables, fruits, and essential fatty acids. Cold water fish are great sources of essential fatty acids: salmon, halibut, mackerel, sardines, tuna, and herring. Essential fatty acids help to support the nervous system which may be important for memory and brain function. They are also anti-inflammatory and are very important for skin health. Include soy in your diet. It often helps with hot flashes and estrogen regulation in your body. Nuts and seeds can also be added to the diet for a source of fiber, protein, and essential fatty acids. For example, flax seeds are an important source of healthy anti-inflammatory fats and can help regulate estrogen levels. Avoid unnecessary sources of sugar, alcohol, and caffeine. Avoid smoking as it has been linked to more severe hot flashes and night sweats. Remember that balance in the body is what helps to create health. Make sure to nurture your mind to keep it quick Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Cause Hot Flashes?

Can Diabetes Cause Hot Flashes?

Question Originally asked by Community Member Miss Lilly Can Diabetes Cause Hot Flashes? I am 69 years old and was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes (LADA) about one year ago. I continue to have hot flashes night and day. Is this caused by the diabetes? Answer Hi Miss Lilly, The best person to ask this question of is your doctor, who can look at your entire medical history and best diagnose the causes for you condition. I’m not a medical doctor, but I can tell you that some researchers have linked hot flashes in diabetics - particularly ones that come after eating - to not high blood sugar but low blood sugar due to inadequate insulin dosing. There may be other reasons for your hot flashes and your doctor will be able to evaluate them all. In the meantime, here are some links you might find helpful: Best of luck to you! You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Continue reading >>

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