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Can Blood Sugar Cause Hot Flashes

8 Causes Of Night Sweats

8 Causes Of Night Sweats

Doctors often hear their patients complain of night sweats. Night sweats refer to excess sweating during the night. But if your bedroom is unusually hot or you are wearing too many bedclothes, you may sweat during sleep, and this is normal. True night sweats are severe hot flashes occurring at night that can drench your clothes and sheets and that are not related to an overheated environment. It is important to note that flushing (a warmth and redness of the face or body) may be hard to distinguish from true night sweats. There are many different causes of night sweats. To find the cause, a doctor must get a detailed medical history and order tests to decide if another medical condition is responsible for the night sweats. Some of the known conditions that can cause night sweats are: Menopause. The hot flashes that accompany menopause can occur at night and cause sweating. This is a very common cause of night sweats in women. Idiopathic hyperhidrosis. Idiopathic hyperhidrosis is a condition in which the body chronically produces too much sweat without any identifiable medical cause. Infections. Tuberculosis is the infection most commonly associated with night sweats. But bacterial infections, such as endocarditis (inflammation of the heart valves), osteomyelitis (inflammation in the bones), and abscesses can cause night sweats. Night sweats are also a symptom of HIV infection. Cancers. Night sweats are an early symptom of some cancers. The most common type of cancer associated with night sweats is lymphoma. However, people who have an undiagnosed cancer frequently have other symptoms as well, such as unexplained weight loss and fevers. Medications . Taking certain medications can lead to night sweats. Antidepressant medications are a common type of drug that can lead to Continue reading >>

Low Estrogen Is Not The Only Cause Of Hot Flashes

Low Estrogen Is Not The Only Cause Of Hot Flashes

Dr. Kathy Maupin and Brett Newcomb discuss the causes of hot flashes. Menopause is not the only cause of this symptom, and Dr. Maupin talks about what can be done to treat hot flashes that are caused by other factors. It is well-known that when women go through menopause one of the symptoms they experience is something called, “hot flashes.” Some people even know that it is correlated with the loss of the hormone, estrogen. When women age, their hormone levels begin to decline. It is assumed that this is a part of becoming old and losing the ability to have children. Most women leave it at that, and either get estrogen replacement to stop the symptoms or learn to live with it. Because menopause is the most common cause of hot flashes, I evaluate and treat low estradiol levels—the diagnostic key to menopause. If the hot flashes stop with treatment or the natural estradiol and FSH levels are normal, I look for something else. Other causes of hot flashes include low testosterone, infection, low cortisol, low thyroid, elevated prolactin, head injuries, brain tumors, heart arrhythmias, an elevated ferritin (Hemachromatosis), and hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). I pride myself on approaching a difficult diagnosis like a medical detective. Diagnosing unusual problems is one of the most satisfying things I do in my medical practice. If a woman does not have a low estradiol or high FSH, but is having hot flashes, I evaluate them through other tests in hopes of seeing what the cause of this symptom is. These symptoms could herald dangerous medical conditions. Men even have what they describe as hot flashes when their testosterone is very low. But, men usually experience anxiety with low-testosterone hot flashes. It is often the dismissal of hot flashes as a minor symptom of Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Abnormal Sweating: What Is The Connection?

Diabetes And Abnormal Sweating: What Is The Connection?

Many people with diabetes will experience times when they sweat too much, too little, or at odd times. Diabetes-related nervous system damage and low blood sugars cause these commonly experienced sweating conditions in people with diabetes. Sweating complications can be a sign of poor diabetes management. Maintaining healthy blood sugar levels is crucial to both prevention and treatment. Contents of this article: Diabetes and sweating problems People sweat for a variety of reasons. Some of these reasons are normal and some are not. Sweating is a natural response to physical and emotional stress. But excessive sweating, when the reason is unclear, is often a sign that something is not right. Some people with sweating conditions will sweat even on a cold day or during minimal activity. Low blood sugar levels and diabetes-related nervous system damage cause the most commonly experienced sweating conditions in people with diabetes. Extremely low blood sugars cause a fight-or-flight response, triggering the release of hormones that increase sweating. When blood sugar levels are too high for too long, a loss of nerve function can occur. This condition is known as diabetic neuropathy. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) claim that around half of people with diabetes experience some form of neuropathy. If the nerves that control the sweat glands are damaged, they may send the wrong message to sweat glands, or none at all. In most cases, neuropathies cause either excessive sweating or an inability to sweat. Sweating caused by hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is a term to describe abnormally low blood sugar levels. For most adults, blood glucose levels below 70 milligrams per deciliter are considered hypoglycemic. Individual targets can vary, however. Many diabetes management medica Continue reading >>

Diabetic Women And Menopause: Coping With Symptoms

Diabetic Women And Menopause: Coping With Symptoms

F rom hot flashes and weight gain to poor sleep, moodiness and a plummeting sex drive, menopause is no picnic. It also mimics diabetes symptoms in women. For diabetic women going through menopause, it's more important than ever to monitor your blood sugar to prevent health issues. Here are 9 ways to navigate “the change”... Menopause is challenging for most of us – but for diabetic women, it can feel like a double whammy. That's because the hormonal imbalances that trigger menopausal health issues – such as weight gain, moodiness, sleep problems, low sex drive, infections, incontinence and hot flashes – can also raise or lower blood glucose levels. That affects how much insulin diabetic women need, says Katherine Sherif, MD, director of Jefferson Women’s Primary Care in Philadelphia. And since the symptoms of diabetes and menopause often are similiar, it’s easy to confuse the two. “What you suspect are run-of-the-mill diabetes symptoms in women might really be a harbinger of menopause,” explains Lauren Streicher, MD, assistant professor of obstetrics and gynecology at Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago and medical director of the Center for Sexual Health and the Center for Menopause.. If you have diabetes and are going through menopause, here are the nine most common challenges and what to do about each. Play Video Play Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Remaining Time -0:00 This is a modal window. Foreground --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Opaque Background --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised D Continue reading >>

Health News U Can Use Tips For Menopause And Low Blood Sugar Issue #001 – March 20, 2003

Health News U Can Use Tips For Menopause And Low Blood Sugar Issue #001 – March 20, 2003

Back to Back Issues Page Health News U Can Use Tips for menopause and low blood sugar Issue #001 – March 20, 2003 In This Issue... Easy Menopause Tips: Start now, regardless of your age! Hypoglycemia, Low Blood Sugar Medicinary News: Estrofactors and Black Cohosh instead of Hormone Replacement Therapy? Recipe: Tofu Even a Truck Driver Would Eat Menopause Tips Many women are menopausal or peri-menopausal. A list of common symptoms can be found on the Key to Health Clinic web page. The most common symptoms are hot flashes, night sweats, mood changes, and menstrual changes. Tips on Entering Smoothly into Menopause Exercise regularly. It keeps the metabolism going and is often helpful with depression, anxiety, stress and weight gain. Weight bearing exercise will help to maintain a healthy bone calcium content and help to prevent osteoporosis. Eat a healthy diet rich in vegetables, fruits, and essential fatty acids. Cold water fish are great sources of essential fatty acids: salmon, halibut, mackerel, sardines, tuna, and herring. Essential fatty acids help to support the nervous system which may be important for memory and brain function. They are also anti-inflammatory and are very important for skin health. Include soy in your diet. It often helps with hot flashes and estrogen regulation in your body. Nuts and seeds can also be added to the diet for a source of fiber, protein, and essential fatty acids. For example, flax seeds are an important source of healthy anti-inflammatory fats and can help regulate estrogen levels. Avoid unnecessary sources of sugar, alcohol, and caffeine. Avoid smoking as it has been linked to more severe hot flashes and night sweats. Remember that balance in the body is what helps to create health. Make sure to nurture your mind to keep it quick Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Hot Flashes After Eating Breakfast

Diabetes & Hot Flashes After Eating Breakfast

Diabetes causes changes in blood sugar levels that can occur suddenly, especially after eating. While most diabetics focus on how high their blood sugars rise after eating, a sudden drop in blood sugar, called hypoglycemia, can also cause serious problems. Since neither diabetes nor high blood sugar levels cause hot flashes, a possible cause of what appear to be hot flashes after eating may be hypoglycemia. Video of the Day Diabetics may experience hypoglycemia after eating for a number of reasons. If you take more insulin than needed for the amount of food eaten, your blood sugars can drop too low, because insulin helps glucose enter cells and tissues. Too much insulin removes too much glucose from your blood. Not eating at all after taking insulin or exercising strenuously, which burns up more calories and glucose than usual, can also cause hypoglycemia. Even if you don’t take insulin, your body may release a large amount of insulin in response to a meal high in carbohydrates. Oral hypoglycemics used to treat diabetes can also cause hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia causes flushing, sweating, fast heartbeat, shakiness, confusion and weakness, similar symptoms to hot flashes. If you don’t treat hypoglycemia, you can lose consciousness, go into a coma and in rare cases die or have permanent brain damage. Blood Glucose Levels People without diabetes don’t experience flushing, shakiness and rapid heartbeat until their blood glucose levels fall below 60 mg/dL, The Merck Manual Online Medical Library states. Diabetics may experience symptoms at higher levels, closer to 100 mg/dL, David McCulloch, M.D., of the University of Washington reports on UpToDate. In addition, long-standing diabetics may have hypoglycemia unawareness, the inability to recognize early symptoms of hypog Continue reading >>

Hot Flashes

Hot Flashes

Hot flashes, or vasomotor flushes, are characterized by the feeling of heat and sweating, particularly around the head and neck. They are the most common menopausal symptom, affecting anywhere from 50 to 85 percent of women at some point during their climacteric years. Mainstream medicine considers hot flashes to be a result of declining estrogen levels at menopause. Indeed, hot flashes are seen in women with low estrogen; however, women with high estrogen levels or fluctuating estrogen levels also experience hot flashes. It is not uncommon for women to experience hot flashes during pregnancy, and also premenstrually. Hot flashes often start just before or during the menstrual period during perimenopause. While hot flashes tend to go away a year or two after menopause, many women experience hot flashes post-menopausally. Depending on the intensity of a hot flash, some women may get accompanying headaches or feel dizzy, tired, weak, or lose sleep. Others experience heart palpitations or erratic heart beats. Many women flush, sweat and then become chilled afterward. Night sweats are on a continuum with hot flashes. In Traditional Chinese Medicine, 3:00–4:00 A.M. is the most common time for night sweats, which may cause you to awaken, drenched with sweat. Solutions are the same as for hot flashes. What Causes Hot Flashes? Hot flashes occur when blood vessels in the skin of the head and neck open more widely than usual, allowing more blood to shift into the area, creating heat and redness. Researchers believe that this vascular shift is due to changes in neurotransmitter activity that are not full understood, occurring in response to erratic hormone levels. Women with low progesterone but normal estrogen levels may experience hot flashes and night sweats. Other hormones m Continue reading >>

How Diet Can Cause And Improve Menopause Symptoms

How Diet Can Cause And Improve Menopause Symptoms

1 / 9 Fatigue, weight gain, moodiness, and hot flashes can make you wish for a slice of cake or a second martini, but those choices could actually make these symptoms of menopause worse. “A woman can take a little more control over the consequences of her symptoms by eating better and by exercising,” says nutritionist Mickey Harpaz, PhD, author of Menopause Rest! Reverse Weight Gain, Speed Fat Loss, and Get Your Body Back in 3 Simple Steps. Simple menopause diet choices, such as fruit instead of a sugary dessert, could make all the difference in your day and your mood. Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes And Menopause

Managing Diabetes And Menopause

In 2010, business owner Deena Pierott, 53, of Vancouver, WA, began to notice her menopausal symptoms—mood swings, hot flashes and fatigue—were intensifying. “I was in the early stages of type 2 diabetes,” says Pierott. “[The combination] was the perfect storm.” “Together, diabetes and menopause are even more challenging,” confirms endocrinologist Asha Thomas, MD, a director with the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism at Sinai Hospital of Baltimore. Fluctuating levels of estrogen and progesterone can cause blood sugar levels to seesaw. The hormonal changes can also increase the risk of vaginal and urinary-tract infections, already higher in women with diabetes. And night sweats and hot flashes wreak havoc with slumber—a problem because “not sleeping can also disrupt hormones like cortisol, resulting in more uneven blood sugars,” says Dr. Thomas. Bone thinning can also escalate after menopause, a particular concern for women with diabetes as they are more prone to bone and joint problems. Finally, menopause also brings metabolic changes that can cause pounds to pile on, exacerbating a woman with diabetes’ already high risk of heart disease. But anticipating menopausal changes can help you keep your diabetes under control. Follow these tips: Know the landscape. “Have a conversation with your endocrinologist and your gynecologist before menopause about possible changes,” says Dr. Thomas. “And begin to check your blood sugar more frequently to [monitor] changes.” How frequently you check depends on your symptoms and how well your glucose has been controlled. Ask your endocrinologist to review other health factors that menopause can affect, such as blood pressure and blood lipids (fats), important for controlling heart disease risk. Overh Continue reading >>

Drinking Excessive Fluids, Excessive Sweating, Fatigue And Hot Flashes

Drinking Excessive Fluids, Excessive Sweating, Fatigue And Hot Flashes

WebMD Symptom Checker helps you find the most common medical conditions indicated by the symptoms drinking excessive fluids, excessive sweating, fatigue and hot flashes including Diabetes, type 2, Panic attack, and Generalized anxiety disorder. There are 89 conditions associated with drinking excessive fluids, excessive sweating, fatigue and hot flashes. The links below will provide you with more detailed information on these medical conditions from the WebMD Symptom Checker and help provide a better understanding of causes and treatment of these related conditions. Diabetes, type 2 Diabetes can make you feel hungry, tired, or thirsty; you may urinate more than normal and have blurry vision. Panic attack When someone has a panic attack, that person feels a sudden, intense fear that can't be controlled. Generalized anxiety disorder Generalized anxiety disorder is a condition in which a person has nearly constant anxiety. Dehydration (Children) Dehydration, or not getting enough fluid, causes dry and sticky mouth, tearless crying, and more in children. Medication reaction or side-effect Medication side effects include nausea, vomiting, stomach upset, weakness, dizziness, seizures, and more. Mononucleosis Mononucleosis is a viral infection causing extreme fatigue, sore throat, fever, rash, muscle aches, and more. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Low blood sugar, or low glucose levels, causes shakiness, anxiety, clammy skin, irritability, hunger, and more. Multiple sclerosis Multiple sclerosis is a disease of the nervous system causing difficulties with balance, speech, and movement. Diabetes, type 1 Diabetes can make you feel hungry, tired, or thirsty; you may urinate more than normal and have blurry vision. Supraventricular tachycardia Supraventricular tachycardia is fast h Continue reading >>

Is It Hot Flashes Or Low Blood Sugar?

Is It Hot Flashes Or Low Blood Sugar?

Menopause gets a bad rap and deservedly so, but some menopausal symptoms may not be caused by menopause. It might be because we’re not taking proper care of ourselves. Here’s my story (remember, it’s my story and not medical advice). I’m well within my menopause years and had suffered from my share of hot flashes. I found a solution to my hot flashes so I no longer suffer with them. Unexpected Night Sweats Not too long ago I started suffering from night sweats. These night sweats weren’t like hot flashes. With hot flashes I used to get the pre-flash tingling. There was no tingling with these night sweats. The only clue of my nightly sweats was damp sleep wear. I wasn’t uncomfortable or overheated, just noticed that my night clothes had been sweat through. Around the same week of my night sweats, I also noticed periodic heart palpitations during the day. In addition to the palpitations, I developed a headache that wouldn’t quit. Normally when I get a headache I know that it’s my body’s way of telling me that something wasn’t right. Usually I’m dehydrated, hungry or tired. When I first got the headache in the beginning of the week I increased my fluid intake which didn’t do anything to mitigate the headache. Then I ate a meal thinking that would help it but it didn’t. I knew I was in trouble when the headache persisted during my sleep hours. I’ve never had a headache that hurt when I slept. Solving the Night Sweat Problem After the third day, I knew I had to ramp things up a bit. What I discovered that I was causing my own problems. I have a tendency to go for long stretches of time between meals (I’m talking 6, 7 or 8-hour gaps). I’m not one to run to the doctor often so I thought I’d do a quick research online to find out what the possi Continue reading >>

Hot Flashes After Eating Or Drinking: Causes And Treatment Tips

Hot Flashes After Eating Or Drinking: Causes And Treatment Tips

If you have ever had hot flashes after eating or drinking, you are not alone. This is something that many people experience yet may not fully understand, especially when it comes to the cause. Here we take a look at what getting hot flashes after eating could mean and how to get rid of them. Hot flashes are usually caused by a hormonal imbalance and are common when a woman goes through menopause. In fact, studies show that three out of four menopausal women experience hot flashes. Some people have menopause hot flashes after eating while others have hot flashes related to endocrinal disorders. The most common condition associated with this is diabetes. The problem with hot flashes is that they can be uncomfortable and in some cases, embarrassing. The embarrassment is usually a result of the sweating that a person just can’t control. What does a hot flash feel like? For those who have not experienced sweating after eating or hot flashes during menopause, it can be hard to imagine. While the symptoms do vary from person to person, they typically include a sudden sensation of heat and flushing followed by perspiration. Other signs include trembling, confusion, and general weakness. What causes hot flashes after eating? Sweating after eating a meal has been the subject of much research, yet the exact cause is still a mystery. We do know that hot flashes occur when estrogen decreases in the female body. You could say that this disrupts a woman’s internal thermostat. This is a phenomenon associated with menopause. Certain foods and drink or even eating a large meal can also bring on hot flashes. For instance, hot flashes after eating spicy food are not unusual. Caffeine and alcohol are also known to cause hot flashes. The heat sensation normally occurs in healthy adults o Continue reading >>

How To Deal With Hot Flashes During Pregnancy?

How To Deal With Hot Flashes During Pregnancy?

Table Of Contents: Did you know that about 35% women report hot flashes during pregnancy, and 29% women experience them after delivery? Though hot flashes are typical symptoms of menopause, over one-third pregnant women experience them during pregnancy and postpartum (1), and this can be annoying. But what are hot flashes anyway and what causes them? Are there any ways of preventing them? MomJunction helps you find answers to all your worries, here! What Does A Hot Flash Feel Like? Hot flashes are the heat originating from the neck and head, and spreading down to the chest, lasting for about 30 seconds to five minutes. In some cases, the heat generates from the lower body. You will perspire as your body tries to cool down after a sudden flash. The flashes are unique as the frequency and intensity vary. Remember that hot flashes and fevers are different as the former do not elevate your body temperature whereas the latter do. Are Hot Flashes Normal During Pregnancy? Yes, it is normal to have hot flashes during pregnancy. They usually occur in the first and second trimesters at night (2). In some cases, they continue after delivery as your body produces milk for breastfeeding. The fluctuating hormones increase the blood flow to your skin surface, making you feel warm and flushed. The surging blood raises the skin temperature, especially in your chest area, neck, and head, giving them a red and blotchy look. [ Read: Overheating During Pregnancy ] What Causes Hot Flashes During Pregnancy? The precise reasons for hot flashes are not yet known, but, studies have identified certain factors that could trigger hot flashes during pregnancy. 1. Hormonal action: Hormonal fluctuations (primarily estrogen) are common during pregnancy. This stimulates the brain to release more epineph Continue reading >>

The Hidden Ingredient Making Your Menopause Symptoms Worse

The Hidden Ingredient Making Your Menopause Symptoms Worse

If you’re currently going through menopause, you’re likely experiencing all the joys of hot flashes, mood swings, and maybe some stubborn belly fat. (Can you hear my sarcasm yet?) Hormonal fluctuations during menopause can bring on a whole host of unpleasant symptoms, and while there is plenty of advice on how to deal with menopause, there’s one dietary culprit you may not know that’s exacerbating your symptoms: sugar. Read on to learn how sugar affects your menopause symptoms, and what to eat instead to regulate your hormones. The Connection Between Sugar & Estrogen Studies have shown that women with diets high in sugar can experience worse menopausal symptoms than women with diets low in sugar. One study in particular followed 6,000 women for 9 years, and the results showed that women whose diets were high in sugar were 20% more likely to experience hot flashes and night sweats than their lower-sugar counterparts. Why did this occur? It all has to do with estrogen. Estrogen levels fluctuate a lot during estrogen. It’s these dramatic spikes and falls in estrogen that can cause uncomfortable symptoms like hot flashes and night sweats. And after you consume a lot of sugar, your insulin levels spike, which simultaneously lowers the amount of a protein in your body called SHBG. SHBG stands for Sex Hormone Binding Globulin, and when your SHBG decreases, your estrogen goes up. In essence, eating a lot of sugar will cause an estrogen spike. So if you’re consuming a lot of sugar, your body’s already-fluctuating estrogen will take bigger spikes and falls, worsening your menopausal symptoms. How To Make Dietary Choices That Keep You Healthy During Menopause So now you know excess sugar can pose a problem for your night sweats and hot flashes, but just how much is t Continue reading >>

What Your Hot Flashes Could Be Telling You

What Your Hot Flashes Could Be Telling You

Women with diabetes tend to experience hot flashes that aren't just a sudden rush of feeling too warm. Instead, you may have noticed your hot flashes come with flushing, sweating or shakiness, as well as confusion and weakness. This might be because these aren't hot flashes like those associated with menopause. The issue here is with your blood sugar. Does diabetes cause hot flashes? Diabetes itself does not directly cause hot flashes. Instead, hot flashes and sweating can come from low blood sugar. In fact, a sudden hot flash can be a sign of hypoglycemia. If you get hot flashes after eating, check how much insulin you're giving yourself. If you take more insulin than the amount of food you just ate requires, your blood sugar can dip too low, causing hot flashes. You might also find yourself with low blood sugar if you don't eat after you take your insulin or you overdo it at the gym. What can you do about hot flashes? The solution to diabetic hot flashes lies in managing your blood glucose levels. If you frequently get hot flashes and have diabetes, you should discuss this with your doctor to see whether your treatment regimen needs adjustment. When you're having a hot flash, the first thing you should do is check your blood sugar. Low blood sugar is very serious and can have severe consequences if you don't address it, so treat your hot flashes as a warning sign from your body and take action. How to treat low blood sugar The first thing you need to do is consume 15 to 20 grams of glucose or simple carbohydrates, according to the American Diabetes Association. This can be in the form of glucose tablets or gel, four ounces of juice, hard candies, or a couple of tablespoons of raisins. Once you've done this, check your blood sugar again in 15 minutes and consume more g Continue reading >>

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