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Can Bacon Give You Diabetes?

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Breakfast Mistakes To Avoid

I once went to see a friend who has diabetes. Her table was laid out with a wonderful breakfast for the both of us. However, it didn’t look too much like a breakfast a diabetic should be eating. There were carbs, carbs, and more carbs. To me it was a dream, but my thought for her was, “oh geeze, her blood sugar!” It seems innocent enough that we were having; croissants, jam, fruit, and array of fresh juices. For most people, this is a very healthy start. For diabetics, it is missing one key item that will help stall the burn of all those carbs – protein!” Here you will see biggest diabetes breakfast mistakes you’re probably making and you didn’t know you were doing it. Don’t make these breakfast mistakes to keep your blood sugar stable. At the end I have also included list of some commonly asked questions about diabetes breakfast. 1. Skipping Protein When you eat carbohydrates alone, they are digested quickly causing spikes in your blood sugar levels. When paired with a protein, they bind together and take longer to digest and burn up. If you have a bowl of cereal and toast, eat an egg with it. Fruit with Yogurt. Pancakes with Sausage. In a hurry? Just add Peanut Butter to your toast! 2. Smoothies on the Run Smoothies make you feel great! No doubt a good smoothie gives you a rush to get you going, but turns out its mostly a sugar rush. Make sure to check our 8 best smoothies for people with diabetes. Add a scoop of protein powder to slow the burn. Drink a smoothie and nibble a hardboiled egg. Skip the smoothie and have a bowl of oatmeal with some bacon! 3. Not Eating Breakfast You may have been fine without breakfast before diabetes, but after you are diagnosed you may not be anymore. People who skip breakfast actually have higher blood sugars during the Continue reading >>

Better With Bacon Recipes

Better With Bacon Recipes

Diabetic Living / Diabetic Recipes / Pork Crispy, crunchy bacon boosts flavor in any dish -- and when used in moderation, it can be diabetes-friendly, too. From bacon-wrapped appetizers to not-so-traditional BLTs, these recipes are better with bacon! Add some pizzazz to your everyday BLT! Crispy bacon paired with heart-healthy avocado equals a satisfying sandwich packed with vitamin C, protein, and fiber. Get fully-loaded baked beans featuring fresh bacon bits, peppers, and onions and seasoned with brown sugar and Worcestershire sauce. Make these beans your go-to side dish! Bacon brings out the flavor in fresh green beans while providing a low-carb side perfect with beef, chicken, or pork. Crumbled bacon mixed with a colorful medley of corn, soybeans, and jalapeno chile peppers makes this dish better. Drizzle bacon-infused dressing over your favorite salad! Preparing your own dressing saves on calories, carbs, and fat without skimping on delicious bacon flavor. Start your day off right with green sweet peppers, crisp bacon, and mushrooms topped with hot pepper sauce -- a great way to wake you up! Whip up these wraps for an on-the-go lunch or a light dinner. Protein-rich soybeans and bacon blend with jalapeno chile peppers and cilantro for a Mexican-inspired take on the classic BLT. No more boring cereal! Top oat bran with bacon, cheese, and tomatoes for a savory breakfast that leaves you feeling full and satisfied. Pack whole wheat pitas with Canadian-style bacon and scrambled eggs for a quick and easy breakfast. Bonus: Top it off with cheese and green onion for a healthy and satisfying meal with 18 grams of carb per serving. Continue reading >>

Bacon And Recovery From Diabetes 2 ?

Bacon And Recovery From Diabetes 2 ?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community as the newly published research concludes ; that 2 slices of bacon a day increases diabetes threats by 50% , I cant help wondering if the high fat aproach in LCHF is the right way to solve our problems with high blood glucose if the Newcasttle diet/cure is right about clearing the pancreas from fat cures or put the function of the pancreas and maybe hormones back in the right balance Again... is it then the best way to eat tons of high fat foods ? the consequence of the study seems to be that fats from vegetables , nuts and avocado and alike seems to bring the diabetes risk Down and that meat and processed meat dubbles the risk of diabetes manyfolds....scary is it the meat itselv or is it what we add to the meat or is it what happens to the meat when no longer fresh ? all in all it seems to be in tone with the statistics telling that vegans only has one forth of the risk of getting diabetes 2 and vegetarians only about two third the risk of getting it as the newly published research concludes ; that 2 slices of bacon a day increases diabetes threats by 50% , I cant help wondering if the high fat aproach in LCHF is the right way to solve our problems with high blood glucose if the Newcasttle diet/cure is right about clearing the pancreas from fat cures or put the function of the pancreas and maybe hormones back in the right balance Again... is it then the best way to eat tons of high fat foods ? First of all, if it's in the Daily Hatemail you can probably ignore it; and, secondly, do we eat tons of fat? I don't think so Nonsense, meats are a staple for most people on the LCHF, there is always some article with ill advice, personally for me the proof is Continue reading >>

About Bacon | Diabetes Health

About Bacon | Diabetes Health

My grandmothers, the type 2 have struggled with their diabetes as long as I could remember. Later my mother followed in her mothers footsteps. Sadly, my brother followed in my mothers footsteps and experienced an early passing at the age of 53. My brother Jamals passing had the greatest impact on me. Probably because were the Irish twins; eleven months apart and his departure devastated me. As I tell most people, diabetes is not a glamorous profession. Most people that work in the industry have a personal connection. This is why I am still here publishing after 26 years. On the flip side of the coin, helping and inspiring people is my mission. I understand the daily challenges you face regardless of your education, IQ and economic circumstance. I am not a healthcare professional. Simply a lay person who has lived with a Type 1 and Type 2 family member who struggled with their disease. My former Type 1 husband was a role model in how to manage your diabetes, while my intelligent family members were role models on how an invisible disease can be misunderstood, devastating the quality of their life while leaving heart broken family members behind. The perils of my experience have taught me to never judge anyone. As knowledgeable as I am, I also realize that I have no idea of the strings that pull at each person heart. What I love about the diabetes community? Once I meet someone and we share that we have a common experience; their diabetes and my life long experience as a care taker, we tend to have an instant bond. Think about it. How many people do you meet who you feel really get you right after your introduction? The conversations that follow tend to be very personal. Not a common experience with all strangers. I started this column because where ever I go, people ten Continue reading >>

Bacon | Diabetic Connect

Bacon | Diabetic Connect

Regular pork bacon is high in fat with little protein. These foods contain nitrates and nitrites, preservatives used in curing meat to counteract the undesirable effects of salt upon color. When exposed to high heat, nitrates and nitrites form nitrosamines, which are carcinogenic (cancer causing). High temperatures used for processing meats like sausage and bacon assist in the formation of nitrosamines. Canadian bacon is very lean and high in protein. But if you eat bacon, Try baking it in the oven on a sheet pan. This method makes it easier to control your doneness and help avoid overcooking which can overheat the nitrites and nitrates. If you have a problem with your diet when you eat bacon you can always try turkey bacon. If you still have a problem you might try the veggen alternatives. They sell it in the frozen section in most grocers. I don't have a problem with bacon, but I still get turkey bacon some times. I like the taste of it. Bacon does have a high fat content of course. So if you are on a strict diet try some of the suggestions I made. I think the sugar content is according to how the bacon was cured. Check the nutrition label to see how much sugar or fat it has. I hope this helps some. I have all ways be told by old timers that any pork would raise your blood sugar. I don't remember why they said it would. I know that when I first started taking insulin in the 80's it was madefrom pig's insulin, some how. The doctor I had at the time told me not to eat pork or be very limited with it. Because it would effect the insulin i was taking. Making it not as strong or ineffective. I don't take that kind any more, but still don't eat a lot of it. I do notice when I do eat it my sugar gos up more. I don't know if it effects all insulins that way. I guess I will a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Threat From Two Slices Of Bacon A Day Increased By 50% | Daily Mail Online

Diabetes Threat From Two Slices Of Bacon A Day Increased By 50% | Daily Mail Online

Two slices of bacon a day increases diabetes threat by 50% Just two rashers of bacon a day can increase the risk of diabetes by more than 50 per cent, scientists claim. Eating a single sausage, small burger or a few slices of salami every day drastically raises the chances of developing the illness. Research has found that just 100g of red meat every day or half a normal size steak increases the likelihood of type 2 diabetes by a fifth. Step away from the bacon butty: Just two rashers can dramatically increase the risk of developing the condition But they found that processed meat, including products made from mince and cold meats such as ham and salami, had a far greater effect. Just 50g a day, the equivalent of two slices of bacon, one sausage or one small burger, increases the risk by more than 50 per cent. At least 2.5million Britons suffer from type 2 diabetes, the form linked to obesity, and experts suspect a further million have the condition but have not yet been diagnosed. Put it away: Bin the amount of burgers to ward off the risk of diabetes It occurs when their body does not produce enough of the hormone insulin to control its blood sugar levels. Symptoms of type 2 diabetes include feeling very thirsty, needing to go to the toilet and constant tiredness. Although the illness is treatable with tablets and injections, it can cause serious complications including blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks and strokes. Researchers at Harvard University looked at the health records and diets of more than 440,000 men and women spanning a period of between 14 and 28 years. The study, published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, found that people who ate 100g of red meat a day were 19 per cent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes. And those who had 50g Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," said Dr. Gerald Bernstein, director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, said Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11 percent for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," Andrews said. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, Andrews said. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabetes. A 16-ounce Continue reading >>

Do Bacon And Hot Dogs Trigger Diabetes?

Do Bacon And Hot Dogs Trigger Diabetes?

Study Shows Processed and Red Meats Increase Risk Sept. 8, 2004 -- Eating more bacon and red meat than ever? You may be increasing your risk of developing diabetes , a new study shows. The long-term safety of meat-heavy diets has been questioned, with some studies linking them to kidney damage and colorectal cancer . Now new research points to a link between eating red meat -- especially processed meats -- and type 2 diabetes . Compared with women who eat less red meat, women who eat red meat frequently have almost a third higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes . Frequently eating bacon, hot dogs, and processed (deli-style) meats was associated with a 43% higher risk of type 2 diabetes in women participating in the large health study. The new findings are reported by investigators from Harvard Medical School in the September issue of the journal Diabetes Care. Researchers followed just more than 37,000 women aged 45 or older for an average of eight years. All of the women completed detailed questionnaires accessing their food choices at study entry, and none had heart disease , cancer , or type 2 diabetes . At follow-up, 1,560 of the women had developed type 2 diabetes. Even after adjusting for other risks associated with the development of diabetes such as age, weight , and exercise , the researchers continued to find associations between the amount of processed and red meats eaten and the development of type 2 diabetes. Women who ate five or more servings of red meat a week were found to have a 29% increase in diabetes risk compare with women who ate red meat less than once a week. While those who ate five or more servings of processed meats had a 43% increase in risk compared with women who ate less than a serving of processed meat a week. Researcher Yiqing Song, Continue reading >>

Hot Dogs, Bacon And Red Meat Tied To Increased Diabetes Risk

Hot Dogs, Bacon And Red Meat Tied To Increased Diabetes Risk

Hot Dogs, Bacon And Red Meat Tied To Increased Diabetes Risk : The Salt A fresh study looks at what happens after people change their meat-eating habits. Those who upped their intake about 3.5 servings more per week saw their risk of developing Type 2 diabetes during four years of follow-up increase by almost 50 percent. Hot Dogs, Bacon And Red Meat Tied To Increased Diabetes Risk Hot Dogs, Bacon And Red Meat Tied To Increased Diabetes Risk Hot Dogs, Bacon And Red Meat Tied To Increased Diabetes Risk Delicious in moderation, folks. Randy Bayne/Flicker Creative Commons hide caption You've likely heard about the link between sugar consumption and Type 2 diabetes . But fresh research ties another dietary pattern to increased risk of the disease, too: eating too much red meat. It's not that we are trying to pick on meat (I'm a meat-eater, in moderation), but the recent studies linking carnivorous habits to health problems seem to be piling up. We've had Salami Suicide and Death By Bacon . Now, there's a study that links red meat consumption to an increased risk of Type 2 diabetes. The researchers tracked what happens after people changed their meat-eating habits, using data from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study and the Nurses' Health Study, which include about 100,000 people. Diet was assessed by food frequency questionnaires. "Some people [in the study] increased their red meat consumption and other people decreased their consumption," says Dr. Frank Hu of the Harvard School of Public Health, one of the co-authors of the paper, which appears in JAMA Internal Medicine. The study found that among those who started eating more red meat, about 3.5 servings more per week, the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes during four years of follow-up increased by almost 50 perce Continue reading >>

Foods That Cause Diabetes | Prevention

Foods That Cause Diabetes | Prevention

Its great that you fit vegetables into your dietthey provide a healthy blend of nutrients, and a new study found that antioxidants found in produce could help reduce type 2 diabetes risk. However, its best not to pair starchy vegetables with other carbohydrate-rich foods. (Think: rice with sweet potatoes). While too much starch doesnt directly raise your risk of diabetes, it can contribute to weight gain and blood sugar spikes, both of which could up your risk. As with any food, moderation is key. MORE: 7 Sneaky Signs You May Develop DiabetesAnd How To Stay Healthy Many people dont consider vegetables like sweet potatoes, corn, and peas to be sources of starch, says Jenifer Bowman, RD, a dietitian at UCHealth in Fort Collins, Colorado. But if youre trying to regulate your blood sugar, you need to be aware of overall carbohydrate content. To make sure every meal is a balanced one, fill half your plate with non-starchy produce like leafy greens, then fill the rest with equal parts protein and grains or starchy vegetables. (So, quinoaorcornnot both.) It may seem like a healthy snack, but dried fruits can cause blood sugar spikes, and dont ward off hunger like their fresh counterparts. If you eat a whole apricot, youll probably feel somewhat full from just one fruit, says Fatima Cody Stanford, MD, an obesity medicine physician at Massachusetts General Hospital Weight Center. However, if youre eating dried apricot, you probably have to eat quite a few of them for the same effect. This means youre consuming a ton more sugarwithout the fiber that will blunt its effects on your blood sugar. When we dry food, we take away a lot of the fibrous content that promotes satiety and helps to regulate blood sugar, Stanford explains. The occasional dried fruit snack wont hurt you, but S Continue reading >>

The Truth About Red Meat And Diabetes

The Truth About Red Meat And Diabetes

Not all red meat is created equal – some isn’t even good enough to even be considered food. Yet when a news article talks about red meat being bad for you, you can bet the author (or the study behind the news) failed to distinguish between processed meat and unprocessed meat, as well as overcooked meat and properly cooked meat. That’s not even considering grass-fed meat vs. industrial meat, which I’ve blogged about extensively. “Red-meat-is-bad” articles don’t always deserve a rebuttal because *most* red meat actually is bad for you. However, it’s a major mistake to say all red meat is bad for you. This post serves to confront misleading headlines about red meat and diabetes risk. Let’s ask a few questions, see what the science actually says, and talk about the Bulletproof recommendations. Processed meats like hot dogs, bologna, deli meats etc. contain high omega-6’s, often have mold toxins called mycotoxins, and nitrates that can combine with bad gut bacteria. All of these can be correlated with an increased risk of diabetes. Instead, insist on eating grass fed, low toxin meat to promote good health and optimize performance. Research Doesn’t Distinguish Between Processed Red Meat and Unprocessed Red Meat When articles suggest red meat causes chronic diseases like diabetes, you would expect a high degree of specificity and accuracy. Unfortunately all you get are alarming headlines and half-truths. When you see blog posts like “Hot Dogs, Bacon and Red Meat Tied to Increased Diabetes Risk,” you should ask yourself how the authors justify lumping hot dogs (a blend of soy, wheat, MSG, and cast off animal parts) in with meat and what the study design looked like. Of course, the recent news about diabetes referenced a study that did not distinguish h Continue reading >>

Are Bacon And Diabetes Connected?

Are Bacon And Diabetes Connected?

Date: 09/24/2011Written by: Beth Levine 1999-2018 The Baseline of Health Foundation Love that side of bacon with your breakfast? Maybe it's okay as a once in a while treat, but do it too often and you are tremendously increasing your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. And it's not just the bacon that will get you. Regular consumption of all forms of red meat will make you a candidate for diabetes -- at least say the researchers. A recent study a the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, Massachusetts, found that even eating small portions of red meat will greatly raise your risk.1 The researchers compared the medical records and reported diets of more than 440,000 adults over the course of between 14 and 28 years. They discovered that those who ate an average of one 3 ounce serving of unprocessed red meat daily, such as a small pork chop or medium-size hamburger, had a 12 percent higher risk of eventually developing type 2 diabetes. Those who ate processed meat every day -- even if the serving size was less than 2 ounces, such as two slices of bacon or a hot dog -- were found to have an increased risk of 32 percent for developing diabetes. Plenty of earlier research has already established an association between consumption of red meat and diabetes, but this study is one of the largest to do so. It also differentiates between processed and unprocessed meats as risk factors. (However, it does not differentiate between organic, grass-fed meat and commercial corn-fattened, antibiotic laden, hormone injected meat.) The typical American adult eats, on average, more than 100 pounds of red meat in a year. Other studies have shown regular red meat consumption to be related to a multitude of illnesses besides diabetes and higher mortality rates as well. In the United S Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet: Bacon Included

Type 2 Diabetes Diet: Bacon Included

Editors note: This article is part of a series of personal essays that explore what its like to live with various conditions and diseases. Ive been performing for more than 30 years, with much of that time spent on the road and in record studios. This led to bad eating habits like food on the go and not much of time for exercise. In recent years, I was gaining more weight, which affected my health and performances. I was sluggish, often out of breath, and lethargic onstage. While on tour four years ago, I decided to visit the doctor for dehydration. This would eventually result in a type 2 diabetes diagnosis. It was a life-changing moment for me, and the first step toward a smarter lifestyle. What most people dont know about diabetes is that it doesnt just affect people with weight problems. Artist Shepard Fairey is a slim guy, but inherited the disease when he was younger. So diabetics come in all shapes and sizes, which makes this a disease that can affect anyone. For people like myself, however, a better diet and consistent exercise routine are great preventative measures. Its important for me to self-motivate and make sure I am regularly monitoring blood sugar levels while on tour. With my platform as a rapper, DJ, and TV personality, I also try to educate others about diabetes and spread awareness for those dealing with the disease. Instead of drinking (diet sodas) with artificial sweeteners, drink an all-natural alternative such as Zevia . My favorite flavor is Black Cherry, and Ive been drinking it for years since it uses stevia as a sweetener instead of aspartame. [Editors note: Biz is a brand ambassador for Zevia.] Go for a walk, get on the treadmill, or play with your kids. Any exercise is important to make sure youre staying fit and keeping a positive mindse Continue reading >>

5 Foods To Avoid

5 Foods To Avoid

Tweet We take a look at 5 types of food which are either best avoided or relegated to occasional eating and not only for people with diabetes. The foods we’ve picked out are particularly relevant to people with diabetes that are carrying extra weight but, as none of us are immune from gaining weight, they have some relevance to us all. We’ve decided not to go with the obvious, i.e. sugary foods as this should be, well, obvious. 5. White bread and other 'white' foods White bread often gets a bad rap and frankly, it’s deserved. White starchy foods, such as white bread and white rice, are digested and converted into glucose very quickly by the body meaning they’re almost as quick to raise blood sugar levels as pure sugar. A regular size white bread roll will usually have around 30g of carbohydrate. This means that having a white bap will raise your blood sugar at a rate close to eating 7 teaspoons of sugar. Healthier alternative - whole grain bread: Whole grain bread should have significantly more fibre than white bread meaning that the carbohydrate gets converted into glucose less quickly. Look out for breads with higher fibre content. 4. Pastries and pastry based foods Pastries, such as pies and sausage rolls, hold a special place in the hearts of many of us but beware, pastries contain a significant amount of carbohydrate but also contain fat which together makes them highly calorific. Pastries are very energy dense foods meaning that even a relatively small portion of the food can contain a large number of calories. A 150g individual steak and onion pie, for example, contains 500 calories on its own so it’s easy to hit half your daily calorie intake in a single meal if you were to include potatoes and gravy. Healthier alternative - stew: A close but lower cal Continue reading >>

Can People With Diabetes Eat Peanut Butter?

Can People With Diabetes Eat Peanut Butter?

Peanut butter may help people to manage diabetes, a condition that affects blood sugar levels. How exactly does this popular snack help to control the condition? A diet high in magnesium is thought to offer protective benefits against the development of diabetes. Peanuts are a good source of magnesium. Natural peanut butter and peanuts are also low glycemic index (GI) foods. This means that they have a lower effect on blood sugar levels. This article explores research into the impact of peanut butter on diabetes, to help people with diabetes decide whether eating it could improve their condition. It also considers any risks involved and looks at other healthful snacks for people with diabetes. How GI affects blood sugar GI is a 100-point scale applied to foods. This scale measures how blood sugar and insulin spike after eating specific food types. Foods that are digested slowly and release sugar gradually into the blood stream have a lower GI. Peanuts have a GI score of just 14, making them one of the lowest GI foods. Foods high in GI cause blood sugar and insulin to spike severely after eating them. This is followed by a crash in blood sugar that can result in hunger, cravings, and tiredness. These cycles of spiking and crashing blood sugar and insulin levels are not good for the body. They can contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes. Research into peanut butter and blood sugar By contrast, low-GI foods can help people to better control their blood sugar levels. For example, a 2012 study looked into eating peanut butter or peanuts at breakfast. This helped obese women who were at risk of developing type 2 diabetes to control their blood sugar throughout the day. In the study, the beneficial effects of the peanuts were observed. They were looked at hours later, Continue reading >>

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