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Can Antibiotics Make Your Blood Sugar Go Up?

Can Steroids Have A Lasting Effect On Blood Glucose?

Can Steroids Have A Lasting Effect On Blood Glucose?

Three years ago, when I was 65, I was prescribed prednisone during a very bad cold. I have type 2 diabetes, which I controlled then with diet and exercise (no medications). After I started taking prednisone, my blood sugar shot up to 300 mg/dl, and it took me three weeks on Actos to bring it back down. My blood sugar has never been the same, and now I am on diabetes meds. Could the prednisone have caused a lasting effect? Continue reading >>

Prednisone And Diabetes: What Is The Connection?

Prednisone And Diabetes: What Is The Connection?

Prednisone is a steroid that works in a similar way to cortisol, which is the hormone normally made by the body's adrenal glands. Steroids are used to treat a wide range of conditions from autoimmune disorders to problems related to inflammation, such as arthritis. They work by reducing the activity of the body's immune system and reducing inflammation and so are useful in preventing tissue damage. However, steroids may also affect how the body reacts to insulin, a hormone that controls the level of sugar in the blood. Contents of this article: How do steroids affect blood sugar levels? Steroids can cause blood sugar levels to rise by making the liver resistant to the insulin produced by the pancreas. When blood sugar levels are high, insulin is secreted from the pancreas and delivered to the liver. When insulin is delivered to the liver, it signals it to reduce the amount of sugar it normally releases to fuel cells. Instead, sugar is transported straight from the bloodstream to the cells. This process reduces the overall blood sugar concentration. Steroids can make the liver less sensitive to insulin. They can make the liver carry on releasing sugar even if the pancreas is releasing insulin, signalling it to stop. If this continues, it causes insulin resistance, where the cells no longer respond to the insulin produced by the body or injected to control diabetes. This condition is called steroid-induced diabetes. Steroid-induced diabetes Diabetes is a condition that causes a person's blood sugar level to become too high. There are two main types of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes: in which the pancreas fails to produce any insulin. Type 2 diabetes: in which the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin, or the body's cells fail to react to the insulin produced. Steroid-induce Continue reading >>

Certain Antibiotics Linked To Blood Glucose Swings

Certain Antibiotics Linked To Blood Glucose Swings

People with diabetes who take a certain class of antibiotics are more likely to experience severe swings in blood glucose, according to new research from Taiwan. Previous research and case reports have raised concern about the possibility of severe high and low blood glucose associated with the use of fluoroquinolones, a class of antibiotics that includes ciprofloxacin (brand name Cipro), levofloxacin (Levaquin), and moxifloxacin (Avelox). One drug in this class, gatifloxacin (Tequin), was removed from the US market due to the risk of blood glucose fluctuations. To assess the risk of severe blood glucose swings in people with diabetes taking these medicines, researchers looked at data from approximately 78,000 people in Taiwan. Specifically, they looked at the subjects’ use of three classes of antibiotics — fluoroquinolones, cephalosporins (cefuroxime [Ceftin, Zinacef], cefaclor [Ceclor], or cefprozil [Cefzil]), and macrolides (clarithromycin [Biaxin] or azithromycin [Zithromax, AzaSite, Zmax]) — along with their rates of emergency-room visits or hospitalizations for severe blood glucose swings in the 30 days after starting the antibiotics. Over the 23-month study period, hospital records indicated that 215 people had had severe high blood glucose while 425 had experienced severe low blood glucose. The researchers found that people who had taken fluoroquinolones were more likely to have developed severe blood glucose swings than those who had taken antibiotics from the other classes, with the risk varying according to which fluoroquinolone had been taken. Overall the risks of severe blood glucose swings were low, being observed in fewer than 1 of every 100 people studied, but the researchers suggest that health-care providers use caution when considering using flu Continue reading >>

Clindamycin, Bursitis, And Hyperglycemia

Clindamycin, Bursitis, And Hyperglycemia

I recently saw the following question: I’m a juvenile-onset (type 1) diabetic. I was prescribed clindamycin for olecranon bursitis [inflammation of the fluid-filled sac at the elbow], and have been running higher than normal blood sugar levels since I’ve been taking it. Can clindamycin cause blood sugar levels to rise? My reply: Probably not. I checked at the FDA website, at [email protected], where there are lots of FDA-approved labels for older drugs – clindamycin (brand name Cleocin) was approved back in 1970 or thereabouts. I found no mention of hyperglycemia or other glucose changes in several versions of the label. I also checked the website that contains the British versions of drug labeling information, eMC, for clindamycin and found no mention there, either. Since the event of hyperglycemia hasn’t found its way into any of these labels, it’s probably not a very worrisome event. I’d tend to think that the cause of your glucose levels rising is either the infection that resulted in your physician prescribing this antibiotic, the pain of the injury, or perhaps the lack of physical activity caused by the problem with your elbow. Also, although you didn’t mention it, sometimes physicians treat bursitis with injections of corticosteroid medication into the bursa: if you were injected with steroids, the steroids would have almost inevitably caused your glucose levels to rise. What to do? First of all, continue to check your blood glucose values frequently. Second, plan to temporarily increase your insulin doses to counter the hyperglycemia. Even mild elevations of blood glucose might impair the healing process, and if the values skyrocket, you’d be at an increased risk of diabetic ketoacidosis. Third, if you had an injection into the joint, check with your phy Continue reading >>

Cephalexin And Blood Sugar Level?

Cephalexin And Blood Sugar Level?

QUESTION: Cephalexin and blood sugar level? Does cephalexin increase blood sugar or lower it? No Charge Glucose Meter - OneTouch Verio Flex® Meter Ad Compact Design to Track Your Glucose On-the-Go. Get It At No Charge. OneTouch Learn more ANSWER: Hi there, As you probably know, cephalexin is antibiotic, which means that it has the ability to kill bacteria. In addition, I would like to inform you that the invasion of certain bacteria is considered as stress for the organism. Because of this, the organism has to find a way in purpose to remove the bacteria and generally this “fight” requires a lot of energy and glucose respectively. This explains why when you are ill your blood glucose is high. However, when you are using antibiotic, the invader is removed and the stress for the organism is wiped out. Of course, there is no need for a lot of glucose (energy), which means that you glucose will come back to normal, or it will become lower, depending on the diabetic treatment during the infections. Moreover, I need to inform you that Cephalexin is the generic name of the antibiotic; while you can find it under a lot of brand names. However, you have to remember something. When certain company produces cephalexin, or any other drugs, it is allowed to add certain ingredients to the formula. In other words, when you buy certain brand name of Cephalexin, you will get other substances as well. In addition, I have to tell you that some companies add glucose, or other sweet substances in purpose to improve the taste of the pill or of the beverage. As you can imagine the usage of antibiotic, which has glucose in it as sweetener, will damage your blood glucose control, by causing spikes in your blood glucose concentration. So, speak with your doctor about such things, when he is Continue reading >>

20 Reasons For Blood Sugar Swings

20 Reasons For Blood Sugar Swings

Upswing: Caffeine Your blood sugar can rise after you have coffee -- even black coffee with no calories -- thanks to the caffeine. The same goes for black tea, green tea, and energy drinks. Each person with diabetes reacts to foods and drinks differently, so it's best to keep track of your own responses. Ironically, other compounds in coffee may help prevent type 2 diabetes in healthy people. Many of these will raise your blood sugar levels. Why? They can still have plenty of carbs from starches. Check the total carbohydrates on the Nutrition Facts label before you dig in. You should also pay attention to sugar alcohols such as sorbitol and xylitol. They add sweetness with fewer carbs than sugar (sucrose), but they may still have enough to boost your levels. One study found that people with type 2 diabetes who switched to a vegan (or all vegetable-based) diet had better blood sugar control and needed less insulin. A boost in fiber from whole grains and beans might play a role, by slowing down the digestion of carbs. But scientists need more research to know if going vegan really helps diabetes. Talk to your doctor before you make major diet changes. Blood sugar can dip dangerously low during shut-eye for some people with diabetes, especially if they take insulin. It's best to check your levels at bedtime and when you wake up. A snack before bed may help. For some people, blood sugar can rise in the morning -- even before breakfast -- due to changes in hormones or a drop in insulin. Regular testing is important. One option is a continuous blood glucose monitor, which can alert you to highs and lows. Physical activity is a great health booster for everyone. But people with diabetes should tailor it to what they need. When you work out hard enough to sweat and raise your h Continue reading >>

Certain Antibiotics Tied To Blood Sugar Swings In Diabetics

Certain Antibiotics Tied To Blood Sugar Swings In Diabetics

THURSDAY, Aug. 15 (HealthDay News) -- Diabetes patients who take a certain class of antibiotics are more likely to have severe blood sugar fluctuations than those who take other types of the drugs, a new study finds. The increased risk was low but doctors should consider it when prescribing the class of antibiotics, known as fluoroquinolones, to people with diabetes, the researchers said. This class of antibiotics, which includes drugs such as Cipro (ciprofloxacin), Levaquin (levofloxacin) and Avelox (moxifloxacin), is commonly used to treat conditions such as urinary tract infections and community-acquired pneumonia. One expert said the study should serve as a wake-up call for doctors. "Given a number of alternatives, physicians may consider prescribing alternate antibiotics ... in the place of fluoroquinolones (particularly moxifloxacin) to patients with diabetes," said Dr. Christopher Ochner, assistant professor of pediatrics and adolescent medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City. "In general, this study demonstrates that closer attention needs to be paid to particular drug-condition interactions." The study included about 78,000 people with diabetes in Taiwan. The researchers looked at the patients' use of three classes of antibiotics: fluoroquinolones; second-generation cephalosporins (cefuroxime, cefaclor, or cefprozil); or macrolides (clarithromycin or azithromycin). The investigators also looked for any emergency-room visits or hospitalizations for severe blood sugar swings among the patients in the 30 days after they started taking the antibiotics. The results showed that patients who took fluoroquinolones were more likely to have severe blood sugar swings than those who took antibiotics in the other classes. The level of risk Continue reading >>

Drug-induced Low Blood Sugar

Drug-induced Low Blood Sugar

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is common in people with diabetes who are taking insulin or other medicines to control their diabetes. All of the following can cause blood sugar (glucose) level to drop: Drinking alcohol Getting too much activity Intentionally or unintentionally overdosing on the medicines used to treat diabetes Missing meals Even when diabetes is managed very carefully, the medicines used to treat diabetes can result in drug-induced low blood sugar. The condition may also occur when someone without diabetes takes a medicine used to treat diabetes. In rare cases, non-diabetes-related medicines can cause low blood sugar. Medicines that can cause drug-induced low blood sugar include: Bactrim (an antibiotic) Beta-blockers Haloperidol Insulin MAO inhibitors Metformin when used with sulfonylureas Pentamidine Quinidine Quinine SGLT2 inhibitors (such as dapagliflozin and empagliflozin) Sulfonylureas Thiazolidinediones (such as Actos and Avandia) Continue reading >>

Drug Warning: Levaquin

Drug Warning: Levaquin

Generic name: levofloxacin Manufactured and marketed by: Ortho-McNeil Purpose: Prescribed to treat bacterial infections such as urinary tract and skin infections, bronchitis, and certain types of pneumonia. Side Effects Reported Abdominal pain, loss of appetite, dizziness, itching, and rash. In addition, Levaquin may be linked to a number of harmful side effects. Levaquin may cause fluctuations in levels of blood glucose (blood sugar). Levaquin may also be linked to tendinitis, or the rupturing of tendons in the shoulder, hand, and foot. There may also be a link between Levaquin and peripheral neuropathy. Peripheral neuropathy is a general term referring to damage done to the peripheral nervous system. The peripheral nervous system consists of those motor and sensory nerves connecting the brain and spinal cord to the rest of the body. Levaquin may affect the colon and possibly lead to a condition known as pseudomembranous colitis, also referred to as antibiotic associated colitis. Bacteria in the intestine may overgrow and release toxin while taking antibiotics, which may cause the lining of the colon to become raw and bleed. Industry Report Levaquin made headlines and became widely known as it is also used to treat some forms of inhaled anthrax. Patients being treated with Levaquin should be wary of symptoms of hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) and hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Those patients with preexisting diabetes should have their blood sugar monitored closely. Seeger Weiss is not currently pursuing lawsuits on this drug, but its drug warnings will remain on our radar. By submitting this form I agree to the terms of SeegerWeiss.com Disclaimer and Privacy Policy Continue reading >>

An Unintended Consequence Of Diet Soda: Disrupting Friendly Bacteria And Raising Blood Sugar

An Unintended Consequence Of Diet Soda: Disrupting Friendly Bacteria And Raising Blood Sugar

Diet drinks may have zero calories but those artificial sweeteners are not necessarily sliding through your digestive system unnoticed. According to new research, sugar substitutes can change the guest list at that bacterial party in your intestines known as your microbiota. The researchers who made the finding say that in mice, at least, this disturbance in the internal ecosystem actually raised blood sugar, thus defeating the purpose of these products by increasing risk for type 2 diabetes and obesity. The findings, released today in the Journal Nature, add to a growing understanding that our internal communities of symbiotic bacteria have a profound influence on metabolism and immunity. “It’s a neglected organ,” said the lead researcher on the paper, Eran Elinav, an immunologist with the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. He said he thinks of the human microbiota as a complex ecosystem with thousands of species and sub-species. While bacterial cells are small, they far outnumber those cells we think of as ours. The new results may finally offer an explanation for previous observations and studies showing that people who used a lot of artificial sweeteners don’t always lose weight. But understanding cause and effect is complicated by the fact that being overweight or at risk of diabetes may cause people to choose artificial sweeteners, rather than the sweeteners causing people to gain weight and develop elevated blood sugar. This new research included a handful of experiments on mice and people. One striking observation, said Elinav, was that after 11 weeks, mice given artificial sweeteners in solution ended up the same weight as mice given a sugar solution, even though they consumed fewer calories, and the ones on the artificial stuff had higher blood s Continue reading >>

Nine Reasons Your Blood Sugar Can Go Up

Nine Reasons Your Blood Sugar Can Go Up

Diet is the primary way diabetics control the level of sugar in our blood. Doing so, however, is not simple. Here are 9 reasons why blood glucose levels can increase. In order to prevent type 2 diabetes destroying our bodies, we diabetics need to control the glucose floating around in our bloodstream. Many of us are succeeding in doing so by the diets we eat. Sometimes however our diets do not work very well and our blood sugar readings rise for reasons we cannot fathom easily. This may be because of a lack of knowledge of how certain foods or other things can affect the level of glucose in our blood. Here are 9 typical reasons why our blood sugar can rise unexpectedly: caffeine sugar-free food fat-heavy food bagels sports drinks dried fruits a bad cold or flu stress steroids and diuretics Caffeine Drinking coffee, black tea, green tea, and energy drinks, all containing caffeine, has been associated with a small, but detectable rise in blood sugar levels, particularly after meals. This can happen, even if you drink black coffee with zero calories. Two to three cups a day (250mg of caffeine) can have this effect. In one experiment conducted on 10 people with type 2 diabetes, the subjects were given capsules of caffeine (the equivalent of four cups), rather than coffee. This increased their blood glucose levels by up to 8%. But how caffeine raises blood sugar has not been figured out yet. The irony is that coffee, both caffeinated and decaffeinated, has other components that reduce blood glucose, and coffee has been associated with a reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Each person reacts differently to drinks containing caffeine, so it’s best to track your own responses to this little kicker and figure out for yourself whether the effect of caffeine on your bloo Continue reading >>

Drugs That Raise Your Blood Sugar

Drugs That Raise Your Blood Sugar

If you have been diagnosed with diabetes, you probably know about the different types of food and drink that can increase your blood sugar (glucose). But did you know some prescription medicines can do this as well? This is why you should tell everyone who prescribes medicines for you—doctors, dentists, or nurse practitioners—that you have diabetes. At the same time, it’s important for the doctor or nurse practitioner managing your diabetes treatment to know of any new medicines you may be taking that were prescribed by someone else. There are many medicines that can raise blood sugar and cause hyperglycemia, or blood sugar levels above normal. If you aren’t sure about a medication you’ve been prescribed, ask your doctor or pharmacist if it will affect your blood sugar before you start taking it. Common medicines that raise blood sugar levels include: Steroids Corticosteroids, called steroids for short, are often prescribed to treat conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and asthma, among others. While they can be very effective in managing those types of problems, they can also wreak havoc on your blood sugar levels. Luckily, when the steroid doses decrease or when you're told you can stop taking the medication, usually your sugar levels will return to their previous readings. Some examples of steroids include prednisone and prednisolone. Antipsychotics Patients with certain mental illnesses, like schizophrenia, rely on medications such as antipsychotics to manage their symptoms. While these medicines can be life saving, they are also known to raise blood sugar levels, especially clozapine (Clozaril, FazaClo, Versacloz), olanzapine (Zyprexa, Zyprexa, Zydis), risperidone (Risperdal), aripiprazole (Abilify), quetiapine fumarate (Seroquel), and ziprasidone (Geo Continue reading >>

Ciprofloxacin Injection

Ciprofloxacin Injection

Generic Name: Ciprofloxacin Injection (SIP roe FLOX a sin) Brand Name: Cipro I.V. Warning This medicine may cause very bad side effects. These include irritated or torn tendons; nerve problems in the arms, hands, legs, or feet; and nervous system problems. These side effects can happen alone or at the same time. They can happen within hours to weeks after starting this drug. Some of these side effects may not go away, and may lead to disability or death. Talk with the doctor. The chance of irritated or torn tendons is greater in people over the age of 60; heart, kidney, or lung transplant patients; or people taking steroid drugs. Tendon problems can happen as long as several months after treatment. Call your doctor right away if you have pain, bruising, or swelling in the back of the ankle, shoulder, hand, or other joints. Call you doctor right away if you are not able to move or bear weight on a joint or if you hear or feel a snap or pop. Call your doctor right away if you have signs of nerve problems. These may include not being able to handle heat or cold; change in sense of touch; or burning, numbness, tingling, pain, or weakness in the arms, hands, legs, or feet. Call your doctor right away if you have signs of nervous system problems. These may include anxiety, bad dreams, trouble sleeping, change in eyesight, dizziness, feeling confused, feeling nervous or agitated, feeling restless, hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that are not there), new or worse behavior or mood changes like depression or thoughts of killing yourself, seizures, or very bad headaches. Do not take if you have myasthenia gravis. Very bad and sometimes deadly breathing problems have happened with ciprofloxacin injection in people who have myasthenia gravis. For some health problems, this Continue reading >>

Metronidazole (flagyl, Flagyl Er)

Metronidazole (flagyl, Flagyl Er)

Search results below include Worst Pills, Best Pills Newsletter Articles where your selected drug is a primary subject of discussion Combining Diabetes Drugs With Certain Antibiotics May Cause Dangerous Drops in Blood Sugar Levels [hide all summaries] (November 2014) Serious adverse reactions often occur when different drugs are taken together. Find out which antibiotics diabetic patients taking glipizide (GLUCOTROL, GLUCOTROL XL) or glyburide (DIABETA, GLUCOVANCE, GLYNASE) should avoid because of an increased risk of life-threatening drops in blood sugar levels. Oral Drugs for Diabetes: Avoiding Hypoglycemia [hide all summaries] (May 2010) After explaining the symptoms of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) the article lists 42 prescription drugs that can interact with one or more diabetes drugs to increase the chance of hypoglycemia. Muscle Damage from Interactions Between Statins and Other Commonly Prescribed Drugs [hide all summaries] (July 2009) The article lists 38 prescription drugs that can harmfully interact with statin drugs. The article also advises that No matter what statin you are taking and regardless of any interacting drugs, you should notify your prescriber immediately if you develop muscle pain, weakness or a darkening of your urine. . Drug Induced Psychiatric Symptoms (Part 2) [hide all summaries] (November 2002) This is the second of a two-part series on drug-induced psychiatric symptoms that began in last month’s Worst Pills, Best Pills News. The information is based on the July 8, 2002 issue of The Medical Letter on Drugs and Therapeutics. Article lists drugs and adverse effects. Continue reading >>

Medicines And Type 2 Diabetes

Medicines And Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes will often need to take prescription medicines to help control their blood glucose levels. They may also need medicines to help manage other health conditions such as high blood pressure or high cholesterol. People with type 2 diabetes, and their healthcare professionals, should also be aware that some medicines can cause blood glucose levels to increase or decrease and this can change the effect of any diabetes medicine. Continue reading >>

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