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Can Antibiotics Affect Insulin Levels?

Drugs That Can Worsen Diabetes Control

Drugs That Can Worsen Diabetes Control

One of the main goals of any diabetes control regimen is keeping blood glucose levels in the near-normal range. The cornerstones of most plans to achieve that goal include following a healthy diet, getting regular exercise, and taking insulin or other medicines as necessary. However, it’s not uncommon for people with diabetes to have other medical conditions that also require taking medicines, and sometimes these drugs can interfere with efforts to control blood glucose. A few medicines, including some commonly prescribed to treat high blood pressure and heart disease, have even been implicated as the cause of some cases of diabetes. This article lists some of the medicines that can worsen blood glucose control, the reasons they have that effect, the usual magnitude of the blood glucose changes, as well as the pros and cons of using these drugs in people who have diabetes. Where the problems occur To understand how various medicines can worsen blood glucose control, it helps to understand how insulin, the hormone responsible for lowering blood glucose, works in the body. Insulin is released from the beta cells of the pancreas in response to rising levels of glucose in the bloodstream, rising levels of a hormone called GLP-1 (which is released from the intestines in response to glucose), and signals from the nerve connections to the pancreas. The secretion of insulin occurs in two phases: a rapid first phase and a delayed second phase. Both of these phases are dependent on levels of potassium and calcium in the pancreas. Insulin acts on three major organs: the liver, the muscles, and fat tissue. In the liver, insulin enhances the uptake of glucose and prevents the liver from forming new glucose, which it normally does to maintain fasting glucose levels. In muscle and f Continue reading >>

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

What Medicines Can Make Your Blood Sugar Spike?

If you have diabetes or high blood sugar, you probably know some of the things that cause your glucose (another name for blood sugar) to go up. Like a meal with too many carbohydrates, or not enough exercise. But other medicines you might take to keep yourself healthy can cause a spike, too. Know Your Meds Medicines you get with a prescription and some that you buy over the counter (OTC) can be a problem for people who need to control their blood sugar. Prescription medicines that can raise your glucose include: Steroids (also called corticosteroids). They treat diseases caused by inflammation, like rheumatoid arthritis, lupus, and allergies. Common steroids include hydrocortisone and prednisone. But steroid creams (for a rash) or inhalers (for asthma) aren’t a problem. Drugs that treat high blood pressure, such as beta-blockers and thiazide diuretics High doses of asthma medicines, or drugs that you inject for asthma treatment OTC medicines that can raise your blood sugar include: Cough syrup. Ask your doctor if you should take regular or sugar-free. How Do You Decide What to Take? Even though these medicines can raise your blood sugar, it doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t take them if you need them. The most important thing is to work with your doctor on the right way to use them. If you have diabetes or you’re watching your blood sugar, ask your doctor before you take new medicines or change any medicines, even if it’s just something for a cough or cold. (Remember, just being sick can raise your blood sugar.) Make sure your doctor knows all the medicines you take -- for diabetes or any other reason. If one of them may affect your blood sugar, she may prescribe a lower dose or tell you to take the medicine for a shorter time. You may need to check your blood s Continue reading >>

Fluoroquinolone Antibiotics And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Fluoroquinolone Antibiotics And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Abstract Exposure to fluoroquinolone antibiotics is postulated as a risk factor for subsequent development of type 2 diabetes. It is hypothesized that fluoroquinolones induce an intracellular magnesium deficit that can lead to insulin resistance. A temporal correlation is reported between the rate of outpatient prescription of quinolones and the incidence of diabetes during the period 1980–2011 with a lag of approximately two years (R2 = 0.86, P < 10−9). The increase in incidence of diabetes after 1990 and the recent decrease in the number of new cases are both reflected in the fluoroquinolone prescription rates. A geographical correlation is reported (adj. R2 = 0.7, P < 0.0001) between rates of increase in prevalence of diabetes in each U.S. state and a model using only local rates of outpatient fluoroquinolone prescription, local rates of increase in the prevalence of obesity, and local rates of population growth as predictor variables. Prescription rates of non-quinolone antibiotics correlated less well with the local rates of increase in prevalence of diabetes. The data are consistent with fluoroquinolone exposure predisposing an individual to develop diabetes with a probability that strongly depends upon factors that also lead to an increase in obesity. According to the hypothesis, much of the increase in the incidence of type 2 diabetes in the U.S. from 1990 to the present can be attributed to fluoroquinolone exposure. Continue reading >>

Drug-induced Low Blood Sugar

Drug-induced Low Blood Sugar

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is common in people with diabetes who are taking insulin or other medicines to control their diabetes. All of the following can cause blood sugar (glucose) level to drop: Drinking alcohol Getting too much activity Intentionally or unintentionally overdosing on the medicines used to treat diabetes Missing meals Even when diabetes is managed very carefully, the medicines used to treat diabetes can result in drug-induced low blood sugar. The condition may also occur when someone without diabetes takes a medicine used to treat diabetes. In rare cases, non-diabetes-related medicines can cause low blood sugar. Medicines that can cause drug-induced low blood sugar include: Bactrim (an antibiotic) Beta-blockers Haloperidol Insulin MAO inhibitors Metformin when used with sulfonylureas Pentamidine Quinidine Quinine SGLT2 inhibitors (such as dapagliflozin and empagliflozin) Sulfonylureas Thiazolidinediones (such as Actos and Avandia) Continue reading >>

How Many Factors Actually Affect Blood Glucose?

How Many Factors Actually Affect Blood Glucose?

A printable, colorful PDF version of this article can be found here. twitter summary: Adam identifies at least 22 things that affect blood glucose, including food, medication, activity, biological, & environmental factors. short summary: As patients, we tend to blame ourselves for out of range blood sugars – after all, the equation to “good diabetes management” is supposedly simple (eating, exercise, medication). But have you ever done everything right and still had a glucose that was too high or too low? In this article, I look into the wide variety of things that can actually affect blood glucose - at least 22! – including food, medication, activity, and both biological and environmental factors. The bottom line is that diabetes is very complicated, and for even the most educated and diligent patients, it’s nearly impossible to keep track of everything that affects blood glucose. So when you see an out-of-range glucose value, don’t judge yourself – use it as information to make better decisions. As a patient, I always fall into the trap of thinking I’m at fault for out of range blood sugars. By taking my medication, monitoring my blood glucose, watching what I eat, and exercising, I would like to have perfect in-range values all the time. But after 13 years of type 1 diabetes, I’ve learned it’s just not that simple. There are all kinds of factors that affect blood glucose, many of which are impossible to control, remember, or even account for. Based on personal experience, conversations with experts, and scientific research, here’s a non-exhaustive list of 22 factors that can affect blood glucose. They are separated into five areas – Food, Medication, Activity, Biological factors, and Environmental factors. I’ve provided arrows to show the ge Continue reading >>

Effect Of Antibiotics On Gut Microbiota, Gut Hormones And Glucose Metabolism

Effect Of Antibiotics On Gut Microbiota, Gut Hormones And Glucose Metabolism

Effect of Antibiotics on Gut Microbiota, Gut Hormones and Glucose Metabolism 1Center for Diabetes Research, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hellerup, Denmark 2NNF Centre for Basic Metabolic Research and Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark 2NNF Centre for Basic Metabolic Research and Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark 2NNF Centre for Basic Metabolic Research and Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark 3Endocrine Research Unit, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark 2NNF Centre for Basic Metabolic Research and Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark 1Center for Diabetes Research, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hellerup, Denmark 2NNF Centre for Basic Metabolic Research and Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark 1Center for Diabetes Research, Gentofte Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Hellerup, Denmark 2NNF Centre for Basic Metabolic Research and Department of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark 3Endocrine Research Unit, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark 4National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Sborg, Denmark 5Department of Clinical Microbiology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark 6Department of Surgery, Herlev Hospital, University of Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark 7Department of Clinical Biochemistry, R Continue reading >>

Antibiotics Can Cause Dangerous Blood Sugar Swings In Diabetics

Antibiotics Can Cause Dangerous Blood Sugar Swings In Diabetics

Diabetes patients who take a certain class of antibiotics are more likely to have severe blood sugar fluctuations than those who take other types of the drugs, a new study finds. The increased risk was low but doctors should consider it when prescribing the class of antibiotics, known as fluoroquinolones, to people with diabetes, the researchers said. This class of antibiotics, which includes drugs such as Cipro (ciprofloxacin), Levaquin (levofloxacin) and Avelox (moxifloxacin), is commonly used to treat conditions such as urinary tract infections and community-acquired pneumonia. One expert said the study should serve as a wake-up call for doctors. "Given a number of alternatives, physicians may consider prescribing alternate antibiotics ... in the place of fluoroquinolones (particularly moxifloxacin) to patients with diabetes," said Dr. Christopher Ochner, assistant professor of pediatrics and adolescent medicine at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, in New York City. "In general, this study demonstrates that closer attention needs to be paid to particular drug-condition interactions." The study included about 78,000 people with diabetes in Taiwan. The researchers looked at the patients' use of three classes of antibiotics: fluoroquinolones; second-generation cephalosporins (cefuroxime, cefaclor, or cefprozil); or macrolides (clarithromycin or azithromycin). The investigators also looked for any emergency-room visits or hospitalizations for severe blood sugar swings among the patients in the 30 days after they started taking the antibiotics. The results showed that patients who took fluoroquinolones were more likely to have severe blood sugar swings than those who took antibiotics in the other classes. The level of risk varied according to the specific fluor Continue reading >>

Use Of Antibiotics And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: A Population-based Case-control Study

Use Of Antibiotics And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes: A Population-based Case-control Study

Go to: Abstract Context and objective: Evidence that bacteria in the human gut may influence nutrient metabolism is accumulating. We investigated whether use of antibiotics influences the risk of developing type 2 diabetes and whether the effect can be attributed to specific types of antibiotics. We conducted a population-based case-control study of incident type 2 diabetes cases in Denmark (population 5.6 million) between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2012. Data from the Danish National Registry of Patients, the Danish National Prescription Registry, and the Danish Person Registry were combined. Results: The odds ratio (OR) associating type 2 diabetes with exposure to antibiotics of any type was 1.53 (95% confidence interval 1.50–1.55) with redemption of more than or equal to 5 versus 0–1 prescriptions. Although no individual group of antibiotics was specifically associated with type 2 diabetes risk, slightly higher ORs for type 2 diabetes were seen with narrow-spectrum and bactericidal antibiotics (OR 1.55 and 1.48) compared to broad-spectrum and bacteriostatic types of antibiotics (OR 1.31 and 1.39), respectively. A clear dose-response effect was seen with increasing cumulative load of antibiotics. The increased use of antibiotics in patients with type 2 diabetes was found up to 15 years before diagnosis of type 2 diabetes as well as after the diagnosis. Our results could support the possibility that antibiotics exposure increases type 2 diabetes risk. However, the findings may also represent an increased demand for antibiotics from increased risk of infections in patients with yet-undiagnosed diabetes. Continue reading >>

Medications To Avoid When Taking Insulin

Medications To Avoid When Taking Insulin

At last count, there are more than 700 medications that potentially interact with insulin with varying degrees of significance. Typically a negative drug interaction either decreases or increases insulin's effects, posing the risk of high or low blood glucose. But rather than insisting that you avoid these medications, it's more likely your doctor will want to adjust your insulin dosage for the period you take them. Commonly prescribed drugs for chronic conditions that may require an adjustment in insulin dosage include: Prednisone Olanzapine thyroid hormones ACE inhibitors selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) sulfonamides disopyramide quinine and quinidine In addition, some drugs that are prescribed for temporary conditions, such as antibiotics for infection, may require an adjustment to your insulin dosage. It's best to check drug interaction information with your pharmacist or physician, and to double-check with your pharmacist each time you refill a prescription of insulin. By Joyce A. Generali, M.S. FASHP, R.Ph., director of the University of Kansas Drug Information Center and the author of The Pharmacy Technician’s Pocket Drug Reference From our sister publication, Diabetes Focus, Summer 2011 Publication Review By: the Editorial Staff at HealthCommunities.com Last Modified: 11 Sep 2015 Continue reading >>

Diabetes Case Study: A New Perspective On Type 1 And Type 2

Diabetes Case Study: A New Perspective On Type 1 And Type 2

< PREV HOME NEXT > Antibiotics As I have pointed out before, infections increase blood glucose levels drastically. I have noticed through careful observation that my infections are rather chronic and can be present for a long time before they show any major symptoms. I have occasionally had flair-ups of mouth sores, inflammation and joint pain in various parts of my body. I have for a long time suspected latent infections to be the cause. My infections seem to be curable with heavy duty antibiotics, and the antibiotics lower my blood glucose load, thus requiring an immediate drop in the amount of insulin that I use. Overall, I rarely use antibiotics. Perhaps you have noticed more signs of hypoglycemia than usual when taking antibiotics? In some cases, people are allergic to Penicillin. Could some of these allergic reactions simply be the symptoms of hypoglycemia? Some signs of hypoglycemia include: sweating, dizziness, palpitation, tremor, agitation, hunger, restlessness, headache, seizures, confusion, disorientation, anxiety, fear, death, etc. I have observed rapid hypoglycemic action when using antibiotics. What I observed was not mentioned on the antibiotics warning labels. The labels did warn of “False positive urine glucose test results on urine test strips.” I have observed this phenomenon myself. I have to accept the warning as fact, but it may not be “false” after all. If the antibiotics kill bacteria (which caused the glucose load), and thus rapidly cause hypoglycemia, then where does the glucose load end up? The blood is purged of the excess glucose. Since the blood purge does not occur with insulin by storing it into fat, it may end up in the urine, resulting in a high urine glucose level when using antibiotics. Only after the diet and healthy lifesty Continue reading >>

Antibiotic Use Tied To Diabetes Risk

Antibiotic Use Tied To Diabetes Risk

Well | Antibiotic Use Tied to Diabetes Risk Danish researchers have found an association between the use of antibiotics and the development of Type 2 diabetes. In 2012, the researchers identified 170,504 cases of Type 2 diabetes and matched them with 1,364,008 controls without diabetes. Then they used Danish government databases to check the participants antibiotic use over the previous 13 years. Compared with having filled no prescription for antibiotics, those who filled two to four prescriptions had a 23 percent higher risk for diabetes, and those who filled five or more had a 53 percent higher risk. The study, in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism , acknowledges that reverse causation is a possibility in other words, people who have diabetes or are at risk of developing the disease may take more antibiotics than others. Still, the risk was apparent up to 15 years before a diabetes diagnosis, which argues against this reverse causation. The scientists suggest that antibiotics may disrupt the gut biota, causing changes in insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, which can lead to diabetes. In animal studies, antibiotic treatment has been shown to affect glucose and insulin metabolism, said the lead author, Dr. Kristian Hallundbaek Mikkelsen of the Center for Diabetes Research at Gentofte Hospital in Copenhagen. What we see in animals may be happening in people, and if so, then there are more good reasons to be strict about antibiotic prescription policy. For more fitness, food and wellness news, follow us on Facebook and Twitter , or sign up for our newsletter. Continue reading >>

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

Drugs That Can Raise Bg

By the dLife Editors Some medicines that are used for treating other medical conditions can cause elevated blood sugar in people with diabetes. You may need to monitor your blood glucose more closely if you take one of the medicines listed below. It’s important to note that just because a medicine has the possibility of raising blood sugar, it does not mean the medicine is unsafe for a person with diabetes. For instance, many people with type 2 diabetes need to take a diuretic and a statin to lower blood pressure and cholesterol. In these and many other cases, the pros will almost always outweigh the cons. Don’t ever take matters of medication into your own hands. Discuss any concerns you have with your healthcare provider. Certain Antibiotics Of all the different antibiotics, the ones known as quinolones are the only ones that may affect blood glucose. They are prescribed for certain types of infection. Levofloxacin (Levaquin) Ofloxacin (Floxin) Moxifloxacin (Avelox) Ciprofloxacin (Cipro, Cipro XR, Proquin XR) Gemifloxacin (Factive) Second Generation Antipsychotics These medicines are used for a variety of mental health conditions. There is a strong association between these medicines and elevated blood sugar, and frequent monitoring is recommended. Clozapine (Clozaril) Olanzapine (Zyprexa) Paliperidone (Invega) Quietiapine (Seroquel, Seroquel XR) Risperidone (Risperdal) Aripiprazole (Abilify) Ziprasidone (Geodon) Iloperidone (Fanapt) Lurasidone (Latuda) Pemavanserin (Nuplazid) Asenapine (Saphris) Beta Blockers Beta blockers are used to treat high blood pressure and certain heart conditions. Not all available beta blockers have been shown to cause high blood sugar. Atenolol Metoprolol Propranolol Corticosteroids Corticosteroids are used to treat conditions where th Continue reading >>

Amoxicillin & Insulin

Amoxicillin & Insulin

Amoxicillin is an antibiotic used to treat various types of infection. If you are taking insulin for diabetes or other diseases, taking amoxicillin might give you cause for concern. In most cases, amoxicillin does not interact with insulin, although the infection it is treating might cause changes in your blood sugar levels. Consult your doctor if you have any concerns about taking amoxicillin. Video of the Day The drug amoxicillin is a penicillin antibiotic primarily used to treat infections caused by bacteria, such as bladder infections or pneumonia. Amoxicillin does not treat viral infections. According to consumer website Drugs.com, amoxicillin can cause issues if you have asthma, liver disease, kidney disease or mononucleosis. It is not known to cause issues with insulin or in those with diabetes. However, you should not take amoxicillin if you are allergic to penicillin. Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas. The primary function of insulin is to control the level of glucose, or blood sugar, in the body. When you consume foods in the form of basic sugars or carbohydrates, your body breaks them down into glucose, which it then absorbs into your bloodstream. If the level of glucose in your blood gets too high, your pancreas secretes insulin, which then prompts cells in your fat tissues, liver and muscle tissues to take up glucose and store it in the form of glycogen for later use. In those with diabetes and other insulin-related diseases, the ability of the body to secrete or take up insulin is impaired, leading to potentially harmful levels of blood glucose. Taking amoxicillin does not directly interfere with the level of insulin in your body, according to Dr. Sheetal Kaul of the Ask Doctor Free website. However, the infection you are treating with the amox Continue reading >>

A Rare But Serious Side Effect Of Levofloxacin

A Rare But Serious Side Effect Of Levofloxacin

Hypoglycemia in a geriatric patient Drugs should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of hypoglycemia. Fluoroquinolones have rarely been associated with hypoglycemia (1,2). Levofloxacine, which belongs to the fluoroquinolone group of antibiotics, has previously been reported to cause hypoglycemia in only one patient who was also receiving oral antidiabetic drugs (2). Herein, we describe an elderly patient with hypoglycemia associated with levofloxacine therapy who did use oral antidiabetic drugs or insulin. A 64-year-old female with type 2 diabetes treated only by diet was interned for urinary infection and pneumonia. She had no history of malabsorbtion or oral intolerance. The patient’s weight was 84 kg, and she was 157 cm tall (corresponding to a BMI of 34.1 kg/m2). Her current medications included coraspin, omeprazole, and atorvastatin. Cefuroxime 3 × 750 mg/day i.v. was started. During cefuroxime therapy, her blood glucose levels were within normal limits with diet. C-reactive protein level was not decreased. On the 3rd day of treatment, cefuroxime was replaced with levofloxacin (500 mg/day) because of unresponsiveness. During treatment with levofloxacin, the symptoms of diseases diminished significantly, but the patient complained of generalized weakness. On the 2nd day of levofloxacin therapy, the patient became lethargic and disoriented. Blood pressure was 126/72 mmHg, heart rate was 82 bpm and regular, and body temperature was normal. Meningial irritation signs were absent, and pupils were intermediate, symmetric, and reactive. Optic fundi were normal, and no focal neurologic deficit was detected. Other physical findings were unremarkable. Her blood glucose level was measured as 32 mg/dl. The simultaneous blood insulin level was 6.7 IU (normal r Continue reading >>

390 Drugs That Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels

390 Drugs That Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels

Knowing the drugs that can affect blood glucose levels is essential in properly caring for your diabetes patients. Some medicines raise blood sugar in patients while others might lower their levels. However, not all drugs affect patients the same way. 390 Drugs that Can Affect Blood Glucose Levels is also available for purchase in ebook format. 390 Drugs that can affect blood glucose Level Table of Contents: Drugs that May Cause Hyper- or Hypoglycemia Drugs That May Cause Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar) (GENERIC NAME | BRAND NAME) Abacavir | (Ziagen®) Abacavir + lamivudine,zidovudine | (Trizivir®) Abacavir + dolutegravir + lamivudine | (Triumeq®) Abiraterone | (Zytiga®) Acetazolamide | (Diamox®) Acitretin | (Soriatane®) Aletinib | (Alecensa®) Albuterol | (Ventolin®, Proventil®) Albuterol + ipratropium | (Combivent®) Aliskiren + amlodipine + hydrochlorothiazide | (Amturnide®) Aliskiren + amlodipine | (Tekamlo®) Ammonium chloride Amphotericin B | (Amphocin®, Fungizone®) Amphotericin B lipid formulations IV | (Abelcet®) Amprenavir | (Agenerase®) Anidulafungin | (Eraxis®) Aripiprazole | (Abilify®) Arsenic trioxide | (Trisenox®) Asparaginase | (Elspar®, Erwinaze®) Atazanavir | (Reyataz ®) Atazanavir + cobistat | (Evotaz®) Atenolol + chlorthalidone | (Tenoretic®) Atorvastatin | (Lipitor®) Atovaquone | (Mepron®) Baclofen | (Lioresal®) Belatacept | (Nulojix®) Benazepril + hydrochlorothiazide | (Lotension®) Drugs That May Cause Hyperglycemia (High Blood Sugar) – Continued (GENERIC NAME | BRAND NAME) Betamethasone topical | (Alphatrex®, Betatrex®, Beta-Val®, Diprolene®, Diprolene® AF, Diprolene® Lotion, Luxiq®, Maxivate®) Betamethasone +clotrimazole | (Lotrisone® topical) Betaxolol Betoptic® eyedrops, | (Kerlone® oral) Bexarotene | (Targ Continue reading >>

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