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Can A Diabetic Person Eat Brown Sugar?

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," said Dr. Gerald Bernstein, director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, said Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11 percent for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," Andrews said. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, Andrews said. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabetes. A 16-ounce Continue reading >>

Sweet Truth... Brown Sugar Is No Better Than White - But You Can Still Eat A Chocolate Bar A Day

Sweet Truth... Brown Sugar Is No Better Than White - But You Can Still Eat A Chocolate Bar A Day

You and I will each eat an average of 88lb of sugar this year. Add that up and you're looking at 1.75 tonnes over a lifetime - the equivalent weight of a medium-sized car. Still want to finish that chocolate bar? Worldwide, around 180million tonnes of refined sugar is produced each year and the UK market alone is worth nearly 1billion. Little wonder that no one listened to eminent nutritionist Professor John Yudkin when he called sugar 'pure, white and deadly' back in 1972 and quite rightly warned of the links between excessive consumption and heart disease. Just a spoonful: But the amount of sugar we consume can add up to alarming proportions Expert knowledge: Catherine Collins, chief dietician at St George's Hospital in London And guess what? Skip nearly four decades and researchers now report in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition that a high sugar intake - particularly of sugary drinks - increases the risk of heart attack by 30 per cent in post-menopausal women. It's a worrying statistic. From babies we are conditioned to enjoy the taste - the first sugar we come across being lactose in breast milk (lactose is the only sugar that does not cause tooth decay). Sugars are pure, sweet-tasting carbohydrates that provide instant energy (20 calories per 5g teaspoon) and make our diet more palatable. Imagine the taste of a ripe banana if it had no sweetness? Exactly. Sucrose, made from sugar cane or beet, is often called 'table' sugar. It's found naturally in fruits and some vegetables, such as parsnips, along with glucose and fructose. Malt sugar (maltose) is found in malted drinks and beer, and milk contains lactose. Sugars naturally present in foods are not something that concern dieticians. What we do worry about is sugar added to foods or drinks which increase Continue reading >>

A Sweet Solution - Type 2 Diabetes Center - Everyday Health

A Sweet Solution - Type 2 Diabetes Center - Everyday Health

Ah! The ever-confusing sugar recommendation. Whether it's brown sugar, white sugar, raw sugar, sucrose, or fructose, much debate always surrounds this simple crystal. Admittedly, we physicians typically do not keep abreast of all the cutting-edge science in nutrition, and any real dialogue between nutrition scientists and medical doctors seems almost nonexistent. As a result, most patients look to other sources for information the Internet (which can be misleading), the patient's friends and family (who can propagate myths), and the pharmaceutical industry (which tries to cash in on the growing market for nutritional pharmaceuticals). Here's a basic overview of sugars: Sugar is a form of carbohydrate . There are three types of simple sugars that are important to human beings glucose, fructose, and galactose. Glucose is found in small amounts in some fruits and vegetables. Fructose is the main sugar in honey and fruit; high-fructose corn syrup is also used in many processed foods. Galactose is found in milk, yogurt, and unaged cheese. The most important thing to remember here is that the body converts both fructose and galactose into glucose after digestion. In that light, what's the difference between white and brown sugar? When glucose and fructose are combined, they make another sugar, called sucrose. Beet sugar, cane sugar ("table," or white, sugar), molasses (a by-product of sugar refining), and maple syrup are all types of sucrose. Brown sugar is basically white sugar (sucrose) mixed with molasses (also sucrose); it has slightly more calories than white sugar. In terms of the impact on blood glucose levels , there is not much difference between white and brown sugar. All sucrose sugars are broken down to glucose, which is what you measure in your blood. It is best Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners Or Natural Sugar: Which Is Best For People With Diabetes?

Artificial Sweeteners Or Natural Sugar: Which Is Best For People With Diabetes?

Here's what you need to know to understand the impact of sweeteners—both nutritive and non-nutritive—on your blood sugar. Walk down the supermarket aisles and you’ll find a dizzying array of sweeteners. Everything from ordinary (white) table sugar to newly-formulated sugars, sugar substitutes and more. Some claim benefits for people with diabetes that promise to have no effect on blood sugar. But with so many choices—from ordinary table sugar (aka cane, sucrose), maple sugar and agave to newer arrivals like coconut sugar, monk sugar and stevia, to nonnutritive sweeteners (sucralose, aspartame, etc.)—how do you know which one is best for you and your blood sugar? It's important to know that use of the word natural is not a term regulated by the FDA, nor does it have a clear definition. These so-called “natural” sweeteners, also referred to as nutritive sweeteners, are a type of sugar (typically sucrose), which provide calories from carbohydrates. All nutritive sugars have about 14 calories per teaspoon and contain 5 grams of carbohydrates. Food companies seem to use the word “natural” as a marketing gimmick to give consumers a sense of additional health benefits. Popular nutritive sweetners include: brown sugar, honey, coconut sugar and agave syrup. But remember, sugar is sugar. Whether honey or table sugar, they all contain carbohydrates and will raise blood glucose levels. Having Sugar Knowledge is Important Contrary to popular belief, people with diabetes can consume sugar but it’s best when consumed in foods where it occurs naturally as it does in whole fruits. Understanding the type of sugar you consume and how much, is essential for successful diabetes management. People with pre-diabetes or type 2 diabetes, don’t have the adequate insulin nee Continue reading >>

Diabetes Foods: Is Honey A Good Substitute For Sugar?

Diabetes Foods: Is Honey A Good Substitute For Sugar?

I have diabetes, and I'm wondering if I can substitute honey for sugar in my diet? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. Generally, there's no advantage to substituting honey for sugar in a diabetes eating plan. Both honey and sugar will affect your blood sugar level. Honey is sweeter than granulated sugar, so you might use a smaller amount of honey for sugar in some recipes. But honey actually has slightly more carbohydrates and more calories per teaspoon than does granulated sugar — so any calories and carbohydrates you save will be minimal. If you prefer the taste of honey, go ahead and use it — but only in moderation. Be sure to count the carbohydrates in honey as part of your diabetes eating plan. Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Brown Sugar?

Can Diabetics Eat Brown Sugar?

Although many people associate brown foods with health and nutrition, brown sugar shouldn't be considered a healthy alternative to other sweeteners. By weight, its caloric and carbohydrate values are slightly less than white granulated sugar, but brown sugar still can have a significant effect on your blood glucose levels. Eating too much of it can easily cause high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, and diabetics must avoid hyperglycemia episodes as much as possible. Video of the Day People usually think of brown-colored foods as being more natural and more whole grain, and while you might consider brown sugar to be more natural than other sugars, it certainly does not get its coloration from whole grains. Instead, brown sugar’s coloration comes from the molasses added during processing in different quantities to give it its unique taste and cooking properties. Brown sugar is just as refined as granulated sugar. What's in It Because of the added molasses, brown sugar has a slightly higher moisture content than white granulated sugar. The presence of moisture gives brown sugar a unique texture, and the moisture does help to lower brown sugar’s calorie and carbohydrate content. Nonetheless, 1 tablespoon of brown sugar still contains about 52 calories and 14 grams of carbohydrate, essentially the same as granulated white sugar. As with any other carbohydrate, you should carefully measure and moderate your intake of brown sugar. When you eat brown sugar, carefully measure it out, and do not forget to count the carbohydrates. As with other sweet foods, it is very easy to eat too much brown sugar, especially when you are adding it to other foods. For example, 1 cup of cooked oatmeal at breakfast has 25 grams of carbohydrates. By adding 2 tablespoons of brown sugar to that bo Continue reading >>

The Claim: Brown Sugar Is Healthier Than White Sugar

The Claim: Brown Sugar Is Healthier Than White Sugar

Fitness & Nutrition |The Claim: Brown Sugar Is Healthier Than White Sugar We all know that brown rice is better for you than white rice, and whole wheat bread comes out on top over white bread, but does this pattern extend to sugar as well? It is often said that brown sugar is a healthier option than white sugar. But you can chalk that up to clever marketing or plain and simple illusion. In reality, brown sugar is most often ordinary table sugar that is turned brown by the reintroduction of molasses. Normally, molasses is separated and removed when sugar is created from sugarcane plants. In some cases, brown sugar particularly when it is referred to as raw sugar is merely sugar that has not been fully refined. But more often than not, manufacturers prefer to reintroduce molasses to fine white sugar creating a mixture with about 5 percent to 10 percent molasses because it allows them to better control the color and size of the crystals in the final product. So the two varieties of sugar are similar nutritionally. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, brown sugar contains about 17 kilocalories per teaspoon, compared with 16 kilocalories per teaspoon for white sugar. Because of its molasses content, brown sugar does contain certain minerals, most notably calcium, potassium, iron and magnesium (white sugar contains none of these). But since these minerals are present in only minuscule amounts, there is no real health benefit to using brown sugar. The real differences between the two are taste and the effects on baked goods. Nutritionally, brown sugar and white sugar are not much different. A version of this article appears in print on , on Page F5 of the New York edition with the headline: Brown sugar is healthier than white sugar. Order Reprints | Toda Continue reading >>

Coconut Palm Sugar: Can People With Diabetes Eat It?

Coconut Palm Sugar: Can People With Diabetes Eat It?

In order to manage their condition, people with diabetes need to monitor their sugar intake. A good way of doing this might be by choosing a natural sweetener option. One of the more popular choices is coconut palm sugar. In this article, we look at the effect coconut palm sugar has on blood sugar (glucose) levels and whether it may be healthful for people with diabetes. Contents of this article: What is diabetes? People with diabetes have bodies that do not produce enough insulin or use insulin correctly. Insulin is the hormone needed to help the body to normalize blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels are a measurement of the amount of sugar in the bloodstream. Most foods contain sugar. The body stores the sugar and transports it through the bloodstream to the cells, which use it as energy. When insulin is not working properly, sugar cannot enter cells, and they are unable to produce as much energy. When the cells of the body cannot process sugar, diabetes occurs. What is coconut palm sugar? Coconut palm sugar is made from the sap of the coconut palm. The sugar is extracted from the palm by heating it until the moisture evaporates. After processing, the sugar has a caramel color and tastes like brown sugar, making it an easy substitution in any recipe. Coconut palm sugar is considered a healthier option for people with diabetes because it contains less pure fructose than other sweeteners. The digestive tract does not absorb fructose as it does other sugars, which means that the excess fructose finds its way to the liver. Too much fructose in the liver can lead to a host of metabolic problems, including type 2 diabetes. Can people with diabetes eat coconut palm sugar? While the American Diabetes Association (ADA) do find coconut palm sugar to be an acceptable sugar sub Continue reading >>

Oatmeal And Diabetes: The Do’s And Don’ts

Oatmeal And Diabetes: The Do’s And Don’ts

Diabetes is a metabolic condition that affects how the body either produces or uses insulin. This makes it difficult to maintain blood sugar, which is crucial for the health of those with diabetes. When managing blood sugar, it’s important to control the amount of carbohydrates eaten in one sitting, since carbs directly affect blood sugar. The American Diabetes Association’s general recommendation for carb intake is to consume 45-60 grams per main meal, and 15-30 grams for snacks. It’s also important to choose nutrient-dense types of carbohydrates over refined and processed carbs with added sugar. This means that what you eat matters a great deal. Eating foods that are high in fiber and nutrients but low in unhealthy fat and sugar can help maintain a healthy blood sugar level, as well as improve your overall health. Oatmeal offers a host of health benefits, and can be a great go-to food for those with diabetes, as long as the portion is controlled. One cup of cooked oatmeal contains approximately 30 grams of carbs, which can fit into a healthy meal plan for people with diabetes. Oatmeal has long been a common breakfast food. Oatmeal is made of oat groats, which are oat kernels with the husks removed. It’s typically made of steel cut (or chopped), rolled, or “instant” oat goats. Oatmeal is cooked with liquid mixed in and is served warm, often with add-ins like nuts, sweeteners, or fruit. It can be made ahead and reheated in the morning for a quick and easy breakfast. Because oatmeal has a low glycemic index, it can help maintain glucose levels. This can be beneficial for people with diabetes, who especially need to manage their blood sugar levels. Oatmeal in its pure form may reduce the amount of insulin a patient needs. Oatmeal can also promote heart health, Continue reading >>

Sugar Substitutes For Diabetics: Five Sugars That Are Ok To Eat

Sugar Substitutes For Diabetics: Five Sugars That Are Ok To Eat

(NaturalNews) Over the past 25 years, the prevalence of diabetes has risen substantially in the U.S. (1) Today, nearly 26 million Americans have diabetes, including 7 million people who have not been diagnosed. Almost 2 million men and women are diagnosed with diabetes each year -- that's more than 5,200 each day. What's more, diabetes plays a primary or contributing role in nearly a quarter-million deaths annually in the U.S. (2) For those struggling with diabetes, learning to control cravings for specific foods is central to managing the disease. Most experts advise avoiding eating sweet and sugary foods to help ensure that blood glucose and insulin levels remain as stable as possible, but cutting out sugar entirely isn't realistic for most people. Luckily, there are several natural sugar substitutes that make satisfying your sweet tooth a tasty possibility -- and many have health benefits in addition to their sweet taste. Here are five alternatives you should consider if you're looking for a substitute for refined sugars: A gift from the bees and flowers, honey is available in 300 distinct varietals in the U.S., all of which have unique flavors based on the nectar source. Raw honey -- especially the darker varieties like buckwheat -- contains antioxidants that can help fight cell-damaging free radicals, as well as strong antibacterial properties. Because it can be easily used by the body, some studies have reported that consuming honey can improve athletic performance compared to other carb sources. Made from the sap of the coconut palm, coconut sugar has gained a lot of attention in recent years, thanks to results of initial studies which show that it may have a lower glycemic index than refined sugars, preventing the spikes in blood sugar levels that can interfere Continue reading >>

Is Brown Sugar Better Than White Sugar? You Will Be Surprised!

Is Brown Sugar Better Than White Sugar? You Will Be Surprised!

Is Brown Sugar Better than White Sugar? You Will be Surprised! Both white sugar and brown sugar are similar It has slightly less concentrated sweetness with its tiny bit of syrup If you are a health conscious person, chances are that you take your diet very seriously. Everything you eat, or buy at the grocery store, is bought knowing the health benefits of each item. Every time you eat out, your portions are measured and choices deliberate. Chances are you have picked up many healthy habits along the way and make sure you abide by them all the time. Is giving up on white sugar and switching to brown sugar one of these 'healthy choices'? A lot has been said and written about the adverse effects of consuming white sugar on a regular basis. All this negative publicity has made it's darker cousin - brown sugar - look so much better in comparison. However, is there really a difference between the two and is brown sugar, in fact, a better alternative? Here's what you need to know.Brown sugar Vs white sugar: What is the difference? According to Clinical Nutritionist Dr. Rupali Datta, "Both white sugar and brown sugar are similar, nutritionally and also calorie-wise. The only difference lies in the flavour, colour and the process these both go through." Basically, brown sugar is white sugar with molasses and is considered as raw sugar majorly because it goes through lesser chemical processing as compared to white sugar. Both white sugar and brown sugar are similar, nutritionally and also calorie-wise Mixing white sugar crystals with amounts of molasses results in a soft and lumpy brown sugar. Both white and brown sugars can be swapped in recipes considering they are almost similar in calories and nutritive value. Does the less processing makes brown sugar a better option?Accor Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. White Bread Refined starches — white bread, white rice, white pasta, and anything made with white flour — act a lot like sugar once the body starts to digest them. Therefore, just like sugar, refined starches interfere with glucose control and should be avoided by those with diabetes. Whole grains are a better choice because they’re richer in fiber and generally cause a slower, steadier rise in blood sugar. Instead of white bread or a bagel for breakfast, opt for a toasted whole grain English Muffin (topped with a slice of reduced-fat cheese or scrambled egg for protein). At lunch and dinner, replace white carbs with healthier whole grain options such as brown or wild rice, barley, quinoa, and whole-wheat bread to minimize the impact on your blood sugar. Even high-quality, whole grain starches elevate blood glucose to some degree, so it’s still important to limit portions — stick with ½ to ¾ cup cooked grains or just 1 slice of bread at meals. Continue reading >>

Sugar Is Sugar, By Any Other Name… Or Is It? (part 1)

Sugar Is Sugar, By Any Other Name… Or Is It? (part 1)

By now you’re probably aware of the news: People with diabetes can eat sugar! No, sugar isn’t going to spike up your blood glucose levels (unless you happen to pour the entire contents of the sugar bowl into your mouth). But sugar isn’t so simple anymore. For those of you who’ve decided to sneak some back into your eating plan, you’re now faced with some choices. Years ago, your sugar decisions boiled down to granulated, light brown, dark brown, and confectioner’s. Now there’s a whole new world of sugar to choose from, depending on what your tastes are: coarse sugar, sanding sugar, turbinado sugar, muscovado sugar, demerara sugar…and that’s not even counting other forms of sugar, such as honey, molasses, dextrose, maltodextrin, and high-fructose corn syrup. We’ve looked at this topic before in past blog posts (see “Having Your Cake and Eating It Too: Fitting Sugar Into Your Meal Plan”), so I won’t reiterate too much about it here. But, as a quick recap, let’s look at what we know about sugar and diabetes: Eating sugar (or foods that contain sugar) doesn’t cause diabetes. People with diabetes can fit sugar into their eating plan, as long as it’s accounted for. Sugar is a type of carbohydrate, just as starch is a carbohydrate. Gram for gram, sugar doesn’t raise blood glucose levels any more than eating another carbohydrate food, such as bread or cereal. One teaspoon of sugar contains 15 calories and 4 grams of carbohydrate. One tablespoon of sugar contains 16 grams of carbohydrate, the same amount of carb that’s in a slice of bread. Too much sugar is linked to obesity and dental cavities. The point is, then, that sugar isn’t as evil as some folks make it out to be. Sugar is all natural and comes from sugar beet or sugar cane plants. O Continue reading >>

White Sugar Vs. Brown Sugar: What Is The Healthiest Option?

White Sugar Vs. Brown Sugar: What Is The Healthiest Option?

Home / Nutrition / Sugar / White Sugar vs. Brown Sugar: What is the Healthiest Option? White Sugar vs. Brown Sugar: What is the Healthiest Option? By Holly Klamer, RD Leave a Comment Researched Based Article It is recommended to cut back on added sugar from the diet because there is a relationship between sugar intake, obesity and chronic disease risk. Sugar is naturally found in grains, fruits, vegetables and legumes. However, sugar is added to many foods, and this is what most health experts advocate to cut from the diet. Sweets, commercially made bread, cereals, sauces, dressings, frozen foods, canned soups, etc. can all be sources of added sugar , and most people get more than the recommended less than 10% of daily calories from added sugar. Sugar can hide as many names from dextrose, high fructose corn syrup , rice syrup , raw sugar or sucrose. Brown sugar is also another name for sugar, and some people may think its a heathier option compared to white sugar. However, brown sugar is not really superior to white sugar nutritionally, although there are some differences for baking purposes. Both intake of white and brown sugar should be limited. The calories from brown or white sugar are virtually the same; both provide about 16 calories per teaspoon ( 1 ). Sugar is made from either cane or beet. The process of getting table sugar starts with smashing up the sugar cane into a liquid form. The liquid is filtered to remove any impurities. The liquid is heated to get raw sugar crystals. A byproduct of this process is molasses. White sugar is made from melting the raw sugar and adding chemicals and heating again to get uniform white crystals of white sugar. Brown sugar is made from adding a small amount of molasses to the white sugar crystals ( 2 ). This is the main diff Continue reading >>

5 Sugar Substitutes For Type 2 Diabetes

5 Sugar Substitutes For Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 6 A Small Amount of Real Sugar Is Best, but Sugar Substitutes Can Help If you think that people with diabetes should always avoid sugar, think again — they can enjoy the sweet stuff, in moderation. "The best bet is to use a very minimal amount of real sugar as part of a balanced diabetic diet," says Keri Glassman, MS, RD, CDN, of Nutritious Life, a nutrition practice based in New York City. That being said, sugar substitutes offer sweetness while controlling carbohydrate intake and blood glucose. There are many sugar substitutes to choose from, but they’re not all calorie-free and they vary in terms of their impact on blood sugar. "The major difference between the sugar substitutes is whether they are nutritive or non-nutritive sweeteners," says Melissa Mullins, MS, RD, a certified diabetes educator with Johnston Memorial Hospital in Abingdon, Va. "Non-nutritive sweeteners provide no calories and no changes in blood glucose levels, which is perfect for people with diabetes.” Here are six sweet options to consider. Continue reading >>

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