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Caffeine And Blood Sugar Spikes

Does Caffeine Raise Your Blood Sugar?

Does Caffeine Raise Your Blood Sugar?

In a nutshell, the answer is: yes. But for some, the answer can be: no. For most, explains Gary Scheiner, CDE and author of “Think Like a Pancreas” and “Until There is a Cure,” caffeine does tend to raise blood sugar levels in people with diabetes approximately 1 hour after consuming it. Meanwhile, some people with diabetes seem to have no reaction at all, even to large servings of caffeine. “It does this,” explains Scheiner, “by promoting the breakdown of fat (rather than sugar) for energy and stimulating the liver’s breakdown of glycogen.” Glycogen is a form of stored energy (glucose) in the liver. But Scheiner emphasizes that small amounts of caffeine probably have little to no impact on blood sugar levels. Just how much caffeine are you getting in your favorite beverages or snacks? “Think Like a Pancreas” shares a thorough list of some common caffeine-containing foods: Jolt energy drink: 280 mg Stay-away pills: 100-200 mg Monster energy drink: 160 mg 5-Hour energy drink: 138 mg 8 oz Brewed coffee: 100-120 mg Espresso/Latte: 100 mg Red Bull: 80 mg 8 oz Instant Coffee: 60-80 mg Tea: 30-50 mg Soda: 30-45 mg Chocolate bar: 20-30 mg But this doesn’t mean you have to accept those high blood sugars as a regular part of your morning coffee! Instead, Scheiner shares this advice on page 187 on “Think Like a Pancreas:” If you suspect that caffeine may be causing your blood sugar to rise, either look for a lower-caffeine substitute or take a little extra rapid-acting insulin when consuming high-caffeine foods/beverages. To determine the amount of insulin you need, test your blood sugar and then consume the caffeinated item with no other food (bolus only for the carbs in the caffeinated item). Check your blod sugar again in three hours and then divide Continue reading >>

10 Things That Can Spike Your Blood Sugar

10 Things That Can Spike Your Blood Sugar

When you first found out you had diabetes, you tested your blood sugar often to understand how food, activity, stress and illness could affect your blood sugar levels. By now, you’ve got it figured out for the most part, right? But suddenly — BAM! Something makes your blood sugar zoom up. You try to adjust it with food or activity or insulin, and it dips low. You’re on that rollercoaster no one with diabetes wants to ride. Knowledge is power! Look out for these surprising triggers that can send your blood sugar soaring: 1 – Heat Extreme heat (in baths or hot tubs) can cause blood vessels to dilate, which makes insulin absorb more quickly and could lead to low blood sugar. 2 – Artificial sweeteners More research needs to be done, but some studies show that they can raise blood sugar. 3 – Coffee Even without sweetener, coffee can raise blood sugar, due to the caffeine. Some people are extra-sensitive to caffeine. 4 – Losing sleep Just one night of poor sleep can make your body use insulin less efficiently. 5 – Skipping breakfast Going without that morning meal can increase blood sugar after both lunch and dinner. 6 – Time of day The later it gets, the harder blood sugar can be to control. 7 – The “Dawn Phenomenon” People have a surge in hormones early in the morning, whether they have diabetes or not. For people with diabetes, this means blood sugar can spike. 8 – Dehydration Less water in your body means a higher blood sugar concentration. 9 – Nasal sprays Some sprays have chemicals that trigger your liver to release more sugar into your bloodstream. 10 – Gum disease It’s both a complication of diabetes and a cause for blood sugar spiking. Watch out for other triggers that can make your blood sugar spike. If an activity, food or situation Continue reading >>

Coffee’s Effect On Diabetes

Coffee’s Effect On Diabetes

Part 1 of 8 Highlights For people without diabetes, coffee may help reduce the risk of developing diabetes. Caffeine has been shown in the short term to increase both glucose and insulin levels. Because of this, people with diabetes should be cautious when consuming coffee. Once sweetener is added to coffee, it removes the benefits of diabetes prevention. It can actually increase your risk of developing diabetes. Coffee was once condemned as being bad for your health. However, there’s growing evidence that it may protect against certain kinds of cancers, liver disease, depression, and Parkinson’s disease. There’s also compelling research that increasing your coffee intake may actually lower your risk for developing type 2 diabetes. This is good news for those of us who can’t face the day until we get in our cup of java. However, for those who already have type 2 diabetes, coffee could have adverse effects. Whether you’re trying to lower your risk, you have diabetes, or you just can’t go without your cup of joe, learn about coffee’s effects on diabetes. Part 2 of 8 According to the Mayo Clinic, diabetes is a disease (or group of diseases) that affects how your body processes blood glucose (sugar). Blood glucose is important because it is what fuels your brain and gives energy to your muscles and tissues. If you have diabetes, that means that you have too much blood glucose circulating in your body and it can cause serious health concerns. There are a number of different factors that can cause diabetes. Chronic diabetes types are type 1 and type 2. Other types include gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy but tends to go away after birth. Another is prediabetes, which means your blood glucose levels are higher than usual but not as high as woul Continue reading >>

Caffeine Increases Blood Sugar In People With Type 2 Diabetes

Caffeine Increases Blood Sugar In People With Type 2 Diabetes

A small US study suggests that people with type 2 diabetes who drink the equivalent of four cups of coffee or more a day may be causing their blood sugar levels to go up by 8 per cent (compared to non caffeine days), thus making it harder for them to manage their condition. The study was carried out by Dr James Lane, a psychologist at Duke University Medical Center, in Durham, North Carolina, and colleagues, and is published in the February issue of Diabetes Care. Other recent studies have shown that in habitual coffee drinkers with type 2 diabetes, caffeine appears to raise glucose and insulin after intakes of standardized carbohydrate loads. Lane and colleagues decided to investigate if this effect manifested after meals in the everyday life of type 2 diabetics and how it might undermine their efforts to manage their condition. They used small glucose detection devices implanted under the abdominal skin of 10 patients so they could observe the rise and fall of their blood sugar while they went about their normal day for 72 hours, the first time such a thing has been done in relation to caffeine consumption, they said. The patients had established type 2 diabetes and were regular coffee drinkers who consumed at least two cups everyday. They were also trying to manage their diabetes through a combination of diet, exercise and drugs, but not with extra insulin. On one day the patients took caffeine capsules equal to about four cups of coffee and on the other day they took identical capsules except they contained a placebo. The study was a double blind crossover study, so neither the patients nor the drug administrators knew which capsules contained the caffeine and which contained the placebo. The patients all had the same nutrition drink for breakfast but chose their ow Continue reading >>

Relationship Of Caffeine With Adiponectin And Blood Sugar Levels In Subjects With And Without Diabetes

Relationship Of Caffeine With Adiponectin And Blood Sugar Levels In Subjects With And Without Diabetes

Go to: Abstract Introduction: Coffee though not usually thought of as healthy food but can be treated as one of the beneficial drink. Many researchers have found strong evidence that coffee reduces the risk of several serious ailments, including diabetes, heart disease, cirrhosis of the liver, etc. The long term beneficial effect of coffee on diabetes is now understood to be more influential and obliging. Materials and Methods: This study comprised 220 healthy subjects of which 143 consumed coffee and 77 did not. These were matched with 90 diabetic subjects. Among the 90 diabetics, 48 consumed coffee and 42 did not consume coffee. Results: The mean adiponectin value was significantly higher in coffee consumed normal and diabetic subjects than the subjects who did not consume coffee. The decrease in fasting blood sugar and HbA1c values were also observed in normal and diabetic subjects who consumed coffee than the other groups who did not consume coffee. Significant difference (p<0.05) in mean FBG, PPBS, HbA1c and adiponectin were observed between coffee consumed and no coffee consumed groups. Conclusion: The long term use of caffeine is more efficient on blood sugar and adiponectin levels, which needed in the prevention of complications in diabetic subjects. Keywords: Adiponectin, Caffeine, Type 2 diabetes Mean FBG, PPBG, HBA1C, Adiponectin are significantly different at p<0.05 between those that consumed coffee and those that did not consume coffee. There was a significant difference between those that consumed coffee and those that did not consume coffee for the variables FBG, PPBG and Adiponectin Continue reading >>

10 Surprising Causes Of Blood Sugar Swings You Probably Didn’t Know

10 Surprising Causes Of Blood Sugar Swings You Probably Didn’t Know

1 / 11 What Causes Blood Sugar to Rise and Fall? Whether you were recently diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or have been living with the disease for several years, you know how fickle blood sugar levels can be, and how important it is that they stay controlled. Proper blood sugar control is key for helping ward off potential diabetes complications, such as kidney disease, nerve damage, vision problems, stroke, and heart disease, according to the National Institutes of Health (NIH). If you keep your levels in check on a daily basis, it will help you stay energized, focused, and in a good mood. You’ll know if your diabetes is poorly controlled if you experience symptoms such as frequent urination, sores that won’t heal, blurred vision, and unexplained weight loss. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), proper medication, effective meal planning, regular exercise, and use of a blood glucose meter to track your numbers routinely can all help you keep your levels within a healthy range. The ADA recommends blood glucose be 80 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) before meals, and below 180 mg/dL two hours after the start of a meal. Furthermore, the organization recommends getting an A1C test, which measures your average blood glucose over the past two to three months, at least twice per year if your levels are stable and you are meeting treatment goals. Learning how different habits can cause your blood sugar to fluctuate can help you better predict how your levels will swing. You may be more likely to experience hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar if you have advanced-stage diabetes, according to the ADA. Meanwhile, high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, may be caused by factors such as not using enough insulin or other diabetes medication, not following a prop Continue reading >>

How Does Caffeine Affect Your Blood Sugar?

How Does Caffeine Affect Your Blood Sugar?

Whether it’s from coffee, tea, soda, or chocolate, most Americans get caffeine every day. For healthy people, it’s usually a harmless perk-me-up. But if you have type 2 diabetes, caffeine may make it harder to keep your blood sugar in check. A growing body of research suggests people with type 2 diabetes react to caffeine differently. It can raise blood sugar and insulin levels for those with the disease. One study looked at people with type 2 diabetes who took a 250-milligram caffeine pill at breakfast and another at lunchtime. That’s about the same amount as drinking two cups of coffee with each meal. The result: Their blood sugar was 8% higher than on days when they didn’t have caffeine. Their reading also jumped by more after each meal. That’s because caffeine can affect how your body responds to insulin, the hormone that allows sugar to enter your cells and get changed into energy. Caffeine may lower your insulin sensitivity. That means your cells don’t react to the hormone by as much as they once did. They don’t absorb as much sugar from your blood after you eat or drink. This causes your body to make more insulin, so you have higher levels after meals. If you have type 2 diabetes, your body already doesn’t use insulin well. After meals, your blood sugar rises higher than normal. Caffeine may make it tougher to bring it down to a healthy point. This may lead to too-high blood sugar levels. Over time, this may raise your chance of diabetes complications, like nerve damage or heart disease. Scientists are still learning how caffeine affects your insulin and blood sugar levels. But they think it may work this way: Caffeine raises levels of certain stress hormones, like epinephrine (also called adrenaline). Epinephrine can prevent your cells from proce Continue reading >>

Does Black Coffee Affect Blood Sugar?

Does Black Coffee Affect Blood Sugar?

Black coffee can affect your blood sugar, causing it to rise. For some people, mainly diabetics, this can be a real problem. Controlling your blood sugar may mean you have to cut down on coffee intake. But although this effect is seen in people with diabetes, there is evidence that suggests drinking coffee can help reduce the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Video of the Day A study published in "Diabetes Care" in 2007 looked at the effects of black coffee on blood glucose levels. Ten individuals with well-controlled type 2 diabetes, who habitually drank coffee, received either a 500 mg capsule of caffeine or a placebo. Those taking the caffeine had higher overall glucose levels and higher postprandial glucose levels than the control participants. The researchers say the mechanism behind caffeine and glucose levels may involve the hormonal regulation of uptake. They suggest that the presence of caffeine increases the hormone epinephrine, which reduces glucose metabolism. Another speculation concerns control of the brain's regulation of glucose uptake -- caffeine affects certain receptors inside the brain that might inhibit glucose clearance into the cells. Effect in Non-Diabetics Caffeine intake may actually help prevent the development of type 2 diabetes, explains Science Daily. People without diabetes are able to make up for the rise in glucose through the production of extra insulin. Insulin is the hormone that drives glucose clearance, and the body just needs to pump a little more out to take care of the effects of caffeine on blood glucose. A habitual coffee drinker may be wondering how much caffeine will cause an effect. About 250 mg of daily caffeine can cause blood glucose disruption. This is the equivalent of 2 to 2.5 cups of black coffee per day. If you nee Continue reading >>

Does Caffeine Cause Insulin Release?

Does Caffeine Cause Insulin Release?

Nearly 90 percent of Americans consume caffeine, with the principal source being coffee. Chronic coffee consumption has been linked to a substantially lower risk for type 2 diabetes, particularly if you drink five or more cups daily. In contrast, consumption of caffeine alone is associated with an increase in your blood glucose level and a reduced sensitivity to the insulin released from your pancreas. Thus, caffeine alone does not appear to be responsible for coffee’s benefits. Video of the Day Insulin is a hormone produced by specialized beta cells in your pancreas. Under normal circumstances, insulin is released into your bloodstream whenever your blood glucose level rises, which typically occurs following a meal. Insulin stimulates the cells in your liver, muscles and fat tissue to absorb glucose, thereby lowering your blood glucose level. A study published in the July 2004 issue of “The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition” showed that caffeine does not directly affect beta cell secretion, but it probably enhances insulin secretion indirectly by increasing your body's resistance to insulin. Insulin Resistance Insulin resistance is a condition that occurs when your cells do not respond normally to the insulin secreted by your pancreas. Insulin-resistant cells don’t absorb glucose as readily as they should, which prevents your blood glucose level from falling as rapidly as it usually would after a meal. Persistently elevated blood glucose levels prompt your pancreas to release even more insulin, leading to abnormally high serum insulin levels. Insulin resistance is a hallmark of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome, a disorder that often precedes diabetes. In 2008, scientists at Canada’s University of Guelph demonstrated that caffeinated coffee and deca Continue reading >>

Researchers Link Caffeine, Blood Sugar Spikes

Researchers Link Caffeine, Blood Sugar Spikes

Daily caffeine consumption may cause blood sugar levels to spike in people with Type 2 diabetes, undermining efforts to control the disease, a study suggests. In findings published in the February issue of Diabetes Care, researchers from Duke University Medical Center report, "caffeine exaggerates glucose and insulin responses to standardized carbohydrate loads in habitual coffee drinkers who have type 2 diabetes." Dr. James Lane, the study's lead author, said this is the first time researchers have been able to track the effects of caffeine on patients in everyday life. The study looked at 10 coffee drinkers with Type 2 diabetes who control their disease through diet, exercise and oral medications. The five men and five women were given caffeine pills, equivalent to roughly four cups of coffee, to take with breakfast and lunch. Their blood sugar levels were monitored with a glucose sensor. The researchers found that when the patients consumed caffeine, their average daily sugar levels went up eight per cent. Additionally, the caffeine exaggerated the rise in glucose after meals, boosting it by nine per cent after breakfast, 15 per cent after lunch and 26 per cent after dinner. Lane said the research team was not sure why caffeine triggers a boost in blood sugar levels. "It could be that caffeine interferes with the process that moves glucose from the blood and into muscle and other cells in the body where it is used for fuel," he said in a release. "It may also be that caffeine triggers the release of adrenaline — the 'fight or flight' hormone that we know can also boost sugar levels." The study said the research "raises concerns about the potential hazards of caffeinated beverages for patients with Type 2 diabetes" as consumption of tea, coffee or soft drinks could Continue reading >>

The Mystery Of Coffee And Diabetes

The Mystery Of Coffee And Diabetes

Is coffee good or bad for diabetes? Some studies show that coffee is protective, while others say it’s harmful. Some say decaf is better; others say it’s worse. Let’s try to sort this out. For years, various studies have reported that coffee drinkers are less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes. A recent UCLA study found that “women who drink at least four cups of coffee a day are less than half as likely to develop diabetes as non-coffee drinkers.” Lead scientist Simin Liu said that coffee may improve the body’s tolerance to glucose by increasing metabolism or lowering insulin resistance. In 2008, Diabetes Self-Management blogger Amy Campbell reported on several other studies showing benefits for coffee. A study published in Diabetes Care in 2006 followed about 900 adults, roughly 300 of whom had prediabetes, for eight years. The people who drank caffeinated coffee had a 60% lower risk of getting diabetes than those who didn’t drink coffee. Another Diabetes Care study published the same year looked at more than 88,000 women in the Nurses’ Health Study II. It found that women who drank two or more cups of coffee daily had a lower risk (slightly more than half the risk) of getting diabetes than those who drank just one cup of coffee daily, or no coffee at all. And it didn’t matter whether the coffee was regular or decaf. So right there you have a disagreement about caffeine. Meanwhile, other studies have shown that coffee, or the caffeine in coffee, raises after-meal (postprandial) blood glucose levels up to 20% in people with diabetes. These studies have not been large but have received a lot of attention. In the most-reported study, from Duke University, ten subjects, all with diabetes, were tested — given either caffeine capsules or a placebo (inacti Continue reading >>

Does Anybody Know Why My Blood Sugar Spikes After Coffee???????

Does Anybody Know Why My Blood Sugar Spikes After Coffee???????

Does anybody know why my blood sugar spikes after coffee??????? Why did no one suggest it might be the sucrose (Splenda) in the coffee that messed with them? A teaspoon of sugar would not rise my blood sugar from 75 to over 200? Everyone is different, there is no one effect from coffee or artificial sweenteners that fits all. Just a reference point, coffee/caffeine does nothing to my blood sugars....If it did, that would make me a very angry diabetic! "There are lots of things that can kill me, Diabetes will not be one of them" - Promise to myself July 2014 Type 1 since 1997 - Pumping on a Omnipod; Monitoring with a Dexcom G5 HbA1C's: Nothing higher than a 6.4 in 5 years D.D. Family Getting much harder to control What makes me sad is how many no longer post, we had a huge group and very active chat had 20 or more in it. Maybe it might have been the "creamer" in combination with the Splenda used. I know for a fact that caffeine spikes my blood sugar. Before I became diabetic, I used to drink three cups of coffee per day and I would feel terrible anxiety. Once I cut out coffee, things became a lot better. It is not the creamer as cream itself has 0 carbs and 0 sugar. It is the stimulating effects of the caffeine. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control I know for a fact that caffeine spikes my blood sugar. Before I became diabetic, I used to drink three cups of coffee per day and I would feel terrible anxiety. Once I cut out coffee, things became a lot better. It is not the creamer as cream itself has 0 carbs and 0 sugar. It is the stimulating effects of the caffeine. Coffee can't raise blood sugar directly, but anxiety sure can! << Nothing I say or express is medical or DIETARY advice so please do not take it as such. >> Although I may show my enthusiasm about my own Continue reading >>

Coffee And Diabetes

Coffee And Diabetes

Tweet The effect of coffee on diabetes, when presented in the media can often be confusing. News stories can in the same week tout the benefits coffee can have on diabetes and shoot down coffee as being unhelpful for blood sugar levels. This doesn’t mean the articles are contradictory though. Put slightly more simply, coffee contains different chemicals, some of which have beneficial effects whereas others can have a less beneficial effect, such as caffeine which can impair insulin in the short term. Caffeine and blood sugar levels Regular high caffeine consumption, over a 4 week period, has been shown to impair insulin sensitivity in people with type 2 diabetes. [20] Whilst the researchers found a relationship between higher coffee consumption and lower sensitivity to insulin, they recognised that the rapid transition to having more coffee may have produced an atypical or emphasised response by the body. Benefits of coffee Coffee has been shown to lower risks of the following conditions: Coffee contains polyphenols, which are a molecule that anti-oxidant properties which are widely believed to help prevent inflammatory illnesses, such as type 2 diabetes, and anticarcinogenic (anti-cancer) properties. As well as polyphenols, coffee contains the mineral magnesium and chromium. Greater magnesium intake has been linked with lower rates of type 2 diabetes. The blend of these nutrients can be helpful for improving insulin sensitivity, which may help to offset the opposite effects of caffeine. Coffee and prevention of diabetes Coffee and its effect on risks of developing type 2 diabetes have been studied a number of times and has indicated a notably lower risk of type 2 diabetes being associated with coffee drinkers. A 2009 study of 40,000 participants noted that consumptio Continue reading >>

Does Caffeine Affect Blood Sugar?

Does Caffeine Affect Blood Sugar?

The average U.S. adult consumes about two 8-ounce cups (474 milliliters) of coffee a day, which can contain around 280 milligrams of caffeine. For most young, healthy adults, caffeine doesn't appear to noticeably affect blood sugar (glucose) levels, and consumption up to 400 milligrams a day appears to be safe. Some studies suggest that drinking coffee, caffeinated and decaffeinated, may actually reduce your risk of developing diabetes. If you already have diabetes, however, the impact of caffeine on insulin action may be associated with higher or lower blood sugar levels. For some people with diabetes, about 200 milligrams of caffeine — or the equivalent of one to two 8-ounce cups (237 to 474 milliliters) of plain, brewed coffee — may cause this effect. Caffeine affects every person differently. If you have diabetes or you're struggling to control your blood sugar levels, limiting the amount of caffeine in your diet may provide a benefit. Continue reading >>

Does Coffee Raise Blood Sugar? Conclusion.

Does Coffee Raise Blood Sugar? Conclusion.

Last month, I started an experiment to better understand how different foods and lifestyle decisions impact blood sugar, using a constant-glucose-monitoring device. For the last few weeks, I’ve been testing whether or not drinking coffee raises my blood-sugar levels. The answer may seem obvious as coffee contains no sugar, but some people believe coffee can have an effect, and our first coffee experiment indicated just that. Since then, I’ve repeated the experiment twice. Here’s what I found. Planning the coffee experiment I designed the following experiment: I would drink a cup of coffee and measure my blood-sugar levels two hours prior to and after drinking it. Then I would analyze the data to see if drinking coffee seemed to raise my blood-sugar levels. To increase the reliability of the experiment, I made sure of four things: 1. I would drink the coffee black – nothing would be added to it. 2. I wouldn’t eat or drink anything else, feel stressed, nor do any form of exercise, 2 hours prior to and after drinking the coffee. 3. I would eat ketogenic. 4. I would go to bed and wake up around the same time as I normally do. It was coffee time. Drinking coffee The house was quiet, but I was up, feeling excited about doing another experiment. Everything was ready – beans, scale, grinder, and coffeemaker. The glucose sensor was safely installed in my body – constantly monitoring any change in blood-sugar levels. Using the above food scale, I put 0.63 ounces (18 grams) of coffee beans into the grinder (about the same amount as for a double espresso). I turned it on. “Grrrrooooooooooooooooouhhh”, it sounded like an elephant had been let loose in the kitchen! After 20 seconds, the noise finally stopped. I picked up the coffee-bean container, held it to my nose Continue reading >>

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