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Blood Sugar Rises Overnight

Foods To Lower The Rise Of Blood Sugar At Night

Foods To Lower The Rise Of Blood Sugar At Night

Controlling high blood sugar levels at night is an important part of overall health for people with diabetes. But, it does not have to be a complicated process. Simple lifestyle changes including a healthy, well-balanced snack before bed can improve blood sugar levels even during the long hours between bedtime and breakfast. Video of the Day Protein is a key to preventing high blood sugar during the night. When digested, protein does not spike blood sugar or insulin levels, making it the best choice in food options before bedtime. A serving of protein should be eaten one to two hours before bedtime to help stabilize blood sugar levels before the extended fasting period during sleep. Good sources of protein include poultry, lean meats, fish, eggs and soy products. Fats also play an important role in controlling blood sugar levels. A small amount of healthy fats, like monounsaturated, polyunsaturated and omega-3 fatty acids, can be added to the evening snack to help the body process the protein being consumed. Examples of healthy fats are low-fat cheeses, seeds, nuts, avocado, and olive oil. Avoid trans fats and saturated fats, which can lead to high cholesterol and heart disease. Carbohydrates are often thought to be the enemy when it comes to high blood sugar. But, the right carbohydrates during an evening snack can actually be beneficial. Adding vegetables, whole-grain breads, or legumes not only provides important nutrients, but also provides fiber. Fiber decreases the risk of heart disease and helps stabilize blood sugar levels. Avoid simple carbohydrates that provide little to no nutritional value and spike insulin and blood sugar levels such as cookies, cakes, white breads and pastas, and sweetened soft drinks or juices. One to two hours before bedtime enjoy a smal Continue reading >>

When Blood Sugars Rise Overnight

When Blood Sugars Rise Overnight

Jewels Doskicz, RN, is a freelance writer, patient advocate, health coach, and long-distance cyclist. She and her daughter both live healthfully with type 1 diabetes. Going to bed with normal blood sugars, but always waking up high? You may be seeing the effects of something called dawn phenomenon. People living with Type 2 diabetes may see blood sugar shifts hallmarked by a rise in early morning blood sugars and high morning glucose readings, according to Diabetes Health. Historically, this phenomenon was thought to only affect those with Type 1 diabetes. What is "Dawn Phenomenon"? This phenomenon reflects an abnormal early morning increase in blood sugars that usually happens between the hours of 2 a.m. and 8 a.m. according to the Mayo Clinic. This is one of the reasons why your health practitioner may ask you to get up and check some middle-of-the-night blood sugars. What causes this phenomenon? Overnight, the body may release increased levels of glucose and hormones. The liver is the culprit for the glucose release and the hormones cortisol, glucagon, and adrenalin may be thrown into the mix as well. The end result is insulin resistance and/or extra glucose dumped into your blood stream in the wee-hours of the morning. All of this may equate to high morning blood sugars. How do I know if this is affecting me? Set your alarm clock between 2-3 a.m. and check overnight blood sugars to help pinpoint trending. Armed with this information at your next appointment, your health care provider can help you trouble shoot those pesky morning highs. High sugars can also result from a bedtime snack, not enough insulin or a need for diabetes medications to be adjusted. Researchers suggest a preventative approach with long acting insulin "before their A1c reaches above 7.0%." To le Continue reading >>

How To Fix High Morning Blood Sugars (dawn Phenomenon)

How To Fix High Morning Blood Sugars (dawn Phenomenon)

There are various possible causes of a high blood sugar level in the morning: The Dawn Phenomenon which is a natural rise in blood sugar due to a surge of hormones secreted at night which trigger your liver to dump sugar into your blood to help prepare you for the day. Having high blood sugar from the night before which continue through the night into the morning. Reactive hyperglycemia which is also called the Somogyi Effect. This is when a low blood sugar in the middle of the night triggers your liver to dump sugar into your blood in an attempt to stabilize your blood sugar. Why Are My Blood Sugars High in the Morning? There is a simple strategy for diagnosing the source of high blood sugars in the morning. Test your blood sugar before bed. Test your blood sugar in the middle of the night. Test your blood sugar in the morning. It takes a little bit of effort, but you only need to do it a few times to diagnose the issue. TheSomogyi Effect is less common than the Dawn Phenomenon, according to an article published by The Polish Journal of Endocrinology. To diagnose either of these phenomena, scientists recommend checking blood sugar levels for several nights specifically between 3 a.m and 5 a.m. or using a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGM). Many healthcare practitioners are now offering the use of a loan CGM for a few days which can be helpful to observe nighttime blood sugar activity. How to Fix High Blood Sugars in the Morning The Dawn Phenomenon refers to a surge of hormones excreted by your body in the early morning hours. These hormones rise each night around the same time to prepare your body to wake. Basically, your body is starting the engine, releasing some fuel, and prepping to go for the day. The Dawn Phenomenon occurs in all humans regardless of whet Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

There are two reasons why your blood sugar levels may be high in the morning – the dawn phenomenon and the Somogyi effect. The dawn phenomenon is the end result of a combination of natural body changes that occur during the sleep cycle and can be explained as follows: Your body has little need for insulin between about midnight and about 3:00 a.m. (a time when your body is sleeping most soundly). Any insulin taken in the evening causes blood sugar levels to drop sharply during this time. Then, between 3:00 a.m. and 8:00 a.m., your body starts churning out stored glucose (sugar) to prepare for the upcoming day as well as releases hormones that reduce the body's sensitivity to insulin. All of these events happen as your bedtime insulin dose is also wearing off. These events, taken together, cause your body's blood sugar levels to rise in the morning (at "dawn"). A second cause of high blood sugar levels in the morning might be due to the Somogyi effect (named after the doctor who first wrote about it). This condition is also called "rebound hyperglycemia." Although the cascade of events and end result – high blood sugar levels in the morning – is the same as in the dawn phenomenon, the cause is more "man-made" (a result of poor diabetes management) in the Somogyi effect. There are two potential causes. In one scenario, your blood sugar may drop too low in the middle of the night and then your body releases hormones to raise the sugar levels. This could happen if you took too much insulin earlier or if you did not have enough of a bedtime snack. The other scenario is when your dose of long-acting insulin at bedtime is not enough and you wake up with a high morning blood sugar. How is it determined if the dawn phenomenon or Somogyi effect is causing the high blood sug Continue reading >>

7 Morning Rituals Proven To Lower Morning Blood Sugar Naturally

7 Morning Rituals Proven To Lower Morning Blood Sugar Naturally

If you’re a diabetic, you may find that your blood sugar levels are at their peak in the morning. This is due to the fasting period overnight. It’s common for blood sugar tests to require a period of fasting beforehand to get the best natural levels. You need to get your blood sugar levels down right away. The good news is you don’t necessarily need to rely on medication. While you will want to take medication in the way that your doctor has prescribed, you will still want to follow these seven-morning rituals. It is possible to reverse type II diabetes and focus on a healthier and more natural lifestyle. Even if you’re not a diabetic, you will want to keep your morning blood sugar levels down. Here are the seven must-follow morning rituals that have proven to lower the blood sugar levels on a morning completely naturally. Wait, Why Is Your Blood Sugar Up In the Morning? Why is it that your blood sugar levels will rise overnight? You don’t eat anything, so how can you possibly add any glucose to your system? Well, those who suffer from type II diabetes will find this is most problematic. The body still creates glucose throughout the night. It needs to, whether you’ve eaten something or not. This natural process is called gluconeogenesis, and there is nothing you can do to stop it – nor would you want to. In a healthy person, this process doesn’t cause a major problem. Those with diabetes will find the gluconeogenesis process is increased. That means your body produces more glucose naturally than it would if you were healthy. Let’s not forget that the stress hormone cortisol also plays a part. This increases slowly on a morning until it reaches a peak early in the morning. The cortisol will elevate the blood sugar levels, so you end up with naturally hi Continue reading >>

Correcting Morning Blood Sugar Highs — Know The Causes Of These Spikes And Ways To Treat Them

Correcting Morning Blood Sugar Highs — Know The Causes Of These Spikes And Ways To Treat Them

Today’s Dietitian Vol. 14 No. 11 P. 18 Jill is frustrated. Her type 1 diabetes seems out of control, and she comes to your office at her wits’ end. She says she’s doing everything right: counting carbs, taking her insulin as prescribed, monitoring her blood glucose levels four times per day. A look at Jill’s testing logs and most recent blood work confirms there’s a problem. She has a hemoglobin A1c of 9.2, and her blood glucose levels are all over the map. Her numbers generally are fine before she goes to bed but incredibly high in the morning. Recently, her physician increased her nighttime basal insulin dose to counteract the morning highs, but things seem worse now than ever. Her breakfast bolus doesn’t seem to be effective, and her high blood glucose levels persist into the afternoon. “Fluctuating blood sugars can be very frustrating,” says Eileen M. Sturner, RD, LDN, CDE, BC-ADM. “RDs can play an important role in helping patients get to the bottom of problems such as morning highs. Working with patients to gather the appropriate data and facilitating the sharing of those data with the healthcare provider that’s managing their diabetes can have life-changing results.” Hyperglycemia In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas can no longer provide either the steady drip of basal insulin that keeps blood sugar levels stable between meals or the bolus release of insulin that directs the uptake of glucose after eating. Patients must take basal insulin to keep their fasting blood sugar levels steady and bolus insulin to match their carbohydrate intake and correct highs. The primary cause of hyperglycemia in type 1 diabetes is carbohydrate intake that isn’t matched with bolus insulin dosing. Perhaps Jill is underreporting her carbohydrate intake, administer Continue reading >>

Sugar Highs Explained

Sugar Highs Explained

You're taking your medications as prescribed and you're keeping an eye on your carbohydrates, yet there still may be times when your blood sugar is too high. There are many reasons for blood sugar surges--I'd like to zero in on two common issues: high morning sugar and sugar that's high after exercising. You'd think that your blood sugar should be lower after a night's sleep. After all, you haven't eaten anything for many hours. But the body needs glucose 24 hours a day, and if you're not getting it from food, your body will turn to stored glucose in the liver. Your pancreas needs to make insulin to deal with this glucose, just as it does for glucose derived from the food you eat. Unfortunately, in many people with diabetes, insulin production during periods of fasting is as meager as (or worse than) during eating. Therefore, the sugar may rise overnight because glucose being produced by the liver is not matched by adequate insulin from the pancreas. Also, certain medications, including glyburide (brand name Micronase or DiaBeta), glipizide (brand name Glipizide) and glimepiride (brand name Amaryl), improve meal-related insulin production more than fasting insulin production. As a result, many people who take these medicines have higher glucose levels in the morning than before bed at night. Sometimes a bedtime snack will actuallyhelp lower morning blood glucose, becausethe sugar (from the carbohydrates in your snack) that hits your bloodstream causes the body to release more insulin than the sugar your liver releases during the night while you're fasting. Ideally, your snack should contain protein, some healthy fat and a slowly absorbed carbohydrate, such as two teaspoons of peanut butter on a half-slice of stone-ground whole-wheat bread.If this doesn't work, using a Continue reading >>

Controlling The Dawn Phenomenon

Controlling The Dawn Phenomenon

Do you wake up with a blood glucose level that’s higher than when you went to bed? You might wonder how this could be. Is this “dawn phenomenon” serious, and what can you do about it? Our reader Mishelle commented here, “I don’t eat [much] during the day. [I take metformin morning and night.] My blood sugar is still too high in the morning…sometimes 125–140ish.” How can Mishelle’s glucose levels go up if she didn’t eat anything? She probably has a mild case of dawn phenomenon. Her glucose is going up from sources other than digested food. Some of it is produced by the liver from stored starch and fatty acids. Livers that produce too much glucose are one of the main ways diabetes causes high blood glucose levels. Other organs also produce small amounts of glucose. This is called “gluconeogenesis” for you science freaks out there. Organs do this to keep blood glucose from going too low at night or other times of not eating. From about 2 AM to 8 AM, most people’s bodies produce hormones, including cortisol, glucagon, and epinephrine. All these hormones increase insulin resistance and tell the liver to make more glucose. The idea is to get you enough glucose to get out of bed and start the day. The whole process is apparently started by growth hormones. Everyone has a dawn phenomenon. Otherwise they’d be too weak to get breakfast. But in people without diabetes, insulin levels also increase to handle the extra glucose. People with diabetes can’t increase insulin levels that much, so their early morning blood glucose levels can rise dramatically. Experts disagree on how many people have a dawn phenomenon. Estimates range from 3% to 50% of Type 2s and from 25% to 50% of Type 1s. Is dawn phenomenon a serious problem? It can be serious. According t Continue reading >>

How Sleep Affects Your Blood Sugar

How Sleep Affects Your Blood Sugar

Your sleep habits can affect many things about your health -- your weight, your immune system, even how well your brain works. But it also plays a key role in controlling your blood sugar (or glucose), which affects your chances of getting diabetes. It’s tied to whether the hormone insulin, which removes glucose from the blood, is working the way it’s supposed to. Blood sugar levels surge while you’re sleeping, usually around 4 to 8 a.m. for someone with a normal sleep schedule. (It’s called the dawn effect.) In a healthy person, insulin can handle the surge by telling muscle, fat, and liver cells to absorb the glucose from the blood, which keeps your levels stable. For people who have diabetes or who are likely to get it, insulin can’t do that job very well, so blood sugar levels will rise higher. While diet and obesity are big contributors to your odds of having diabetes, studies have found that sleep habits are, too, probably because over time, they can affect how well your cells respond to insulin. In one study, more than 4,000 people reported the amount of sleep they got each night. Those who got less than 6 hours were twice as likely to have cells that were less sensitive to insulin or to have full-blown diabetes. This was true even after the researchers took other lifestyle habits into account. Other sleep disruptions and disorders, such as sleep apnea, also seem to raise a person’s odds of having diabetes. But the risk goes up at the other end of the spectrum, too. For reasons that aren’t clear, people who sleep too much -- more than 9 hours a night -- might also have higher chances of getting diabetes. It’s hard to know for certain. Many studies have suggested that short sleepers (those who get less than 6 hours per night) have irregular eating Continue reading >>

Why Are My Blood Sugar Levels Rising Overnight?

Why Are My Blood Sugar Levels Rising Overnight?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Why are my blood sugar levels rising overnight? For about two months now my blood sugar levels have been rising overnight from being 6.6 at bedtime to being as high as 23.0 at 8.00 am the next day. I am Type 1 and have been for over 40 years. I am now treated with insulin pump and have contacted my consultant about this but nothing seems to work. I have done sugar levels throughout the night and seen the levels rise from 2.00 a..m onwards. Even though I treat any sugar level of 12.0 or above with insulin the levels never go down overnight but continue to rise. I have changed basal levels on my pump but that hasn't helped either. I am very worried about this and have never experienced anything like it before. I feel so weak and sick a.m sometimes that I am unable to eat anything until about 11.00 am when my sugar levels have gone back to normal. I am very worried about this lack of control overnight and high sugar levels as I already have sight issues and only have sight in one eye. What is the problem? What can I do about it? Hi Hazel, I don't use a pump , so I'm no the best person to give you any advise. It sounds like a basal issue to me but you say you've already tried this and I'm guessing you've changed everything on the pump that might be at fault. Hopefully by bumping you back up the list someone more qualified than me can help you. Hi Hazel, I don't use a pump , so I'm no the best person to give you any advise. It sounds like a basal issue to me but you say you've already tried this and I'm guessing you've changed everything on the pump that might be at fault. Hopefully by bumping you back up the list someone more qualified than me can help yo Continue reading >>

Why Is My Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

Why Is My Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

That early morning jump in your blood sugar? It's called the dawn phenomenon or the dawn effect. It usually happens between 2 and 8 a.m. But why? Generally, the normal hormonal changes your body makes in the morning will boost your blood sugar, whether you have diabetes or not. If you don't, your body just makes more insulin to balance everything out. You don't even notice that it's happening. But if you have diabetes, it's different. Since your body doesn't respond to insulin the same as most, your fasting blood sugar reading can go up, even if you follow a strict diet. The boost in sugar is your body's way of making sure you have enough energy to get up and start the day. If you have diabetes, your body may not have enough insulin to counteract these hormones. That disrupts the delicate balance that you work so hard to keep, and your sugar readings can be too high by morning. The effects of the dawn phenomenon can vary from person to person, even from day to day. Some researchers believe the natural overnight release of what are called counter-regulatory hormones -- like growth hormones, cortisol, glucagon and epinephrine -- makes your insulin resistance stronger. This will make your blood sugar go up. You may also have high blood sugar in the morning because: You didn't have enough insulin the night before. You took too much or too little medicine. You ate the wrong snack before bedtime. If the dawn phenomenon affects you, try to: Eat dinner earlier in the evening. Do something active after dinner, like going for a walk. Check with your health care provider about the medicine you’re taking. Eat breakfast. It helps bring your blood sugar back to normal, which tells your body that it's time to rein in the anti-insulin hormones. Eat a snack with some carbohydrates and Continue reading >>

The Dawn Phenomenon: What Can You Do?

The Dawn Phenomenon: What Can You Do?

What is the dawn phenomenon that some people with diabetes experience? Can anything be done about it? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. The dawn phenomenon, also called the dawn effect, is the term used to describe an abnormal early-morning increase in blood sugar (glucose) — usually between 2 a.m. and 8 a.m. — in people with diabetes. Some researchers believe the natural overnight release of the so-called counter-regulatory hormones — including growth hormone, cortisol, glucagon and epinephrine — increases insulin resistance, causing blood sugar to rise. High morning blood sugar may also be caused by insufficient insulin the night before, insufficient anti-diabetic medication dosages or carbohydrate snack consumption at bedtime. If you have persistently elevated blood sugar in the morning, checking your blood sugar once during the night — around 2 a.m. or 3 a.m. — for several nights in a row will help you and your doctor determine if you have the dawn phenomenon or if there's another reason for an elevated morning blood sugar reading. What you can do Your doctor may recommend a number of options to help you prevent or correct high blood sugar levels in the morning: Avoid carbohydrates at bedtime. Adjust your dose of medication or insulin. Switch to a different medication. Change the time when you take your medication or insulin from dinnertime to bedtime. Use an insulin pump to administer extra insulin during early-morning hours. Continue reading >>

New To This - Blood Sugar Rises Overnight?

New To This - Blood Sugar Rises Overnight?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community New to this - blood sugar rises overnight? I haven't had an official diagnosis of pre diabetes but am very worried I am heading that way. I am young (30), but overweight (90kg) and with high blood pressure (regularly 158/101 ish). I have not been to the doctors because I have had a few bad experiences with my GP - I am well aware I should go but would preferably like to equip myself with as much knowledge as I can before I make that appointment. I have been testing my blood sugar and it seems to rise overnight - last night it was 5.3 and this morning 5.8 - is this indicative of anything at all? And has anyone had any success reversing pre diabetes or is it more a case of slowing T2? Hi @JRS87 and welcome to the forum. Your fbg (fasting blood glucose) of 5.8 is good. It could have risen because of 'Dawn Phenomenon' where your liver dumps stored glucose into your bloodstream as you wake to get you going. It is quite common, even in non-diabetics. Yes you can reverse pre-diabetes, many on here who are diabetic have reduced their blood sugars by adopting a Low Carbohydrate High Fat (LCHF) approach to eating. Have a read round the threads to see how that works. What makes you think you are pre-diabetic? The readings you have quoted of 5.1 and 5.8 are in the non-diabetic range. And if you have had bad experiences with the GP you usually see you can ask to see any other GP at that practice. I had a bad experience with the GP I am registered with when I first saw her 18 years ago, and have always seen others since. Morning @Prem51 - thank you for replying so speedily - i had read prediabetes was around 5.6 - 7 hence my conclusion but is it a bit more open tha Continue reading >>

The Overnight Blood Sugar Conundrum

The Overnight Blood Sugar Conundrum

How do I stay in range while sleeping? In the past week, I’ve seen these two 24-hour CGM traces: It’s amazing that the same overnight insulin dose produced those two markedly different midnight-to-9am glucose outcomes (left side of each graph). The example on the right, I believe, was caused by: (i) a big late-night dinner after barely eating all day, and (ii) changing my pump’s infusion set and reservoir right before bed, without confirming a few hours later that it was working properly. Whatever the cause, I woke up at 7:50 am on Tuesday at 262 mg/dl – exhausted, frustrated, and late for a team event. I changed my pump site quickly, took a huge six-unit insulin bolus, and decided at the last minute to ride my bike 4.5 miles to the event. Halfway down the steep hill from my house, I had that sinking feeling: “Gah! I should go back home and get glucose tabs, just in case.” I cycled back, grabbed the tabs, and then my prediction turned out to be correct 15 minutes later – halfway to the event, my glucose was dropping faster than I’d ever seen in my life. I ate three tabs as a buffer and luckily avoided going low. By 9:05 am, I had arrived for our team photo event covered in embarrassing business-casual sweat, but back in range. And from there, the workday could actually begin. I tell this story to illustrate a larger point – overnight blood sugar has a major impact on the next day. Unfortunately, keeping glucose in range every single night is very difficult without an automated system. This article shares some of my Bright Spots for beating this nighttime conundrum, gleaned from those nights like the example above on the left. Enjoy, and get all my Bright Spots & Landmines here (free PDF) or at Amazon. Overnight BGs in a tight, safe range (80-140 mg/dl) Continue reading >>

Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

The Dumbest & Smartest Things A Doctor Ever Told Me I eat a low fat diet, so why is my cholesterol level still high? Why are my blood sugars higher in the morning than when I go to bed the night before? This typically occurs due to the dawn phenomenon. The dawn phenomenon is the rise in blood glucose levels in the dawn (that is, the morning) due to excessive release of glucose from the liver into the blood. Here is a graph of a person’s blood glucose readings measured with a device (a “continuous glucose monitor”) that automatically measures the body’s glucose level about 300 times per day (each colour represents a different day): As you can see in the preceding graph, every day starting at about 3am this person’s glucose levels started to go up. This individual, like so very many others living with diabetes who have high blood glucose levels first thing in the morning, blamed themselves and attributed their elevated morning blood glucose to having overeaten or snacked the night before. Not so! What they (and you) eat at bedtime (or suppertime) seldom is a significant factor in leading to high blood glucose levels the next morning; heck, the food you ate the night before is long since digested, absorbed into the body, and metabolized well before the following morning’s breakfast. This graph nicely illustrates that point. One colourful term for the liver’s tendency to release glucose into the blood overnight is a liver leak. How much sugar (glucose) gets released from the liver if you have the dawn phenomenon? How about this: Almost as much as is contained in TWO CANS OF COLA! If you have the dawn phenomenon this is something that is not simply to be accepted. Rather, your therapy should be adjusted to fight it so that your blood glucose levels are kept w Continue reading >>

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