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Blood Sugar Over 600

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes-related High And Low Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes-Related High and Low Blood Sugar Levels When you have diabetes , you may have high blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) or low blood sugar levels ( hypoglycemia ) from time to time. A cold, the flu, or other sudden illness can cause high blood sugar levels. You will learn to recognize the symptoms and distinguish between high and low blood sugar levels. Insulin and some types of diabetes medicines can cause low blood sugar levels. Learn how to recognize and manage high and low blood sugar levels to help you avoid levels that can lead to medical emergencies, such as diabetic ketoacidosis or dehydration from high blood sugar levels or loss of consciousness from severe low blood sugar levels. Most high or low blood sugar problems can be managed at home by following your doctor's instructions. You can help avoid blood sugar problems by following your doctor's instructions on the use of insulin or diabetes medicines, diet, and exercise. Home blood sugar testing will help you determine whether your blood sugar is within your target range . If you have had very low blood sugar, you may be tempted to let your sugar level run high so that you do not have another low blood sugar problem. But it is most important that you keep your blood sugar in your target range. You can do this by following your treatment plan and checking your blood sugar regularly. Sometimes a pregnant woman can get diabetes during her pregnancy. This is called gestational diabetes . Blood sugar levels are checked regularly during the pregnancy to keep levels within a target range. Children who have diabetes need their parents' help to keep their blood sugar levels in a target range and to exercise safely. Be sure that children learn the symptoms of both high and low blood sugar so they can tell other Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma Symptoms

Diabetic Coma Symptoms

A diabetic coma is one of the most life-threatening complications of diabetes. The main symptom is unconsciousness. A diabetic coma can be the result of having a blood glucose level that is too high (hyperglycemia) or a blood glucose level that is too low (hypoglycemia). The diabetic in a diabetic coma is unconscious and can die if the condition is not treated. Symptoms of Diabetic Coma Before you lapse into a diabetic coma, there are usually warning signs of blood sugar levels that are too low or blood sugar levels that are too high. For example, if the blood sugar is too high, the you may experience tiredness, abdominal pain, shortness of breath, increased urination, increased thirst, a rapid heart rate, a dry mouth, and a fruity smell to your breath. If the blood sugar is too low, you may experience signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia, including weakness, tiredness, anxiety, tremulousness, nervousness, nausea, confusion, problems communicating, light-headedness, hunger, or dizziness. If you have had diabetes for many years, you may not have many symptoms of low blood sugar and won’t know you have the condition prior to falling into a coma. If you suspect that you have either high blood sugar or low blood sugar, you need to check your blood glucose levels and do what your doctor has recommended for you to treat the disease. If you don’t feel better after trying home remedies, you need to call 911 and get some kind of emergency care. Causes of Diabetic Coma The main cause of a diabetic coma is an extremely high blood sugar or an extremely low blood sugar. The following medical conditions can cause a diabetic coma: Diabetic hyperosmolar syndrome. This is a condition in which the blood sugar is as high as 600 mg/d: or 33.3 mmol per liter. There are no ketones in the u Continue reading >>

What Can Happen To My Body If My Sugar Is Higher Than 600 For Many Hours?

What Can Happen To My Body If My Sugar Is Higher Than 600 For Many Hours?

Dangerously high blood sugar levels cause ketoacidosis. A blood sugar level over 600 for many hours is considered extremely dangerous and should be treated at a hospital. Hyperglycemia is the medical term for elevated blood sugar levels. According to the American Diabetes Association, blood sugars more than 240 can cause ketoacidosis – a condition where the body starts using fat for energy. Ketoacidosis can lead to coma and death. Video of the Day Ketones And High Blood Sugar When blood sugar levels are high for prolonged periods of time and the body starts using fat for energy, toxic ketones are produced. The presence of ketones can be measured in the urine. They are the acid byproduct of fat breakdown. Diabetes is the most common cause of high blood sugar levels. Hyperglycemia can also be caused by acute pancreatitis. Early symptoms include frequent urination that leads to dehydration and excessive thirst. Blood sugar more than 600 for many hours could then lead to difficulty breathing, weakness, confusion and decreased level of consciousness. Blood sugar levels become dangerously high when the body does not have enough insulin, which is produced in the pancreas. When ketones develop in the body, the liver produces more glucose to correct the problem, but without insulin, blood sugar levels continue to rise. For patients diagnosed with diabetes, ketoacidosis can develop from missed insulin doses, not enough insulin, infection, trauma or other acute illness. Prolonged high blood sugar levels can cause swelling in the brain – cerebral edema. Children are more susceptible, but adult cases have been documented, according to Elliot J. Crane, MD, Departments of Pediatrics and Anesthesiology, Stanford University Medical Center. Other complications include organ damage fr Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia) In Diabetes

High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia) In Diabetes

What is high blood sugar? High blood sugar means that the level of sugar in your blood is higher than recommended for you. If you don’t keep your blood sugar at a normal, healthy level most of the time, you will increase your risk of heart and blood vessel disease, stroke, kidney problems, and loss of vision. The medical term for high blood sugar is hyperglycemia. Blood sugar is also called blood glucose. What is the cause? Blood sugar that stays high is the main problem of diabetes. Your body breaks down some of the foods you eat into sugar. Normally the hormone insulin moves this sugar into your cells, where your body uses it for energy. In diabetes the insulin is not moving the sugar into the cells, so it builds up in the bloodstream and starts to cause problems. Sometimes you may have high blood sugar even though you are taking diabetes medicine. This can happen for many reasons but it always means that your diabetes is not in good control. Some reasons why your sugar might go too high are: Skipping your diabetes medicine Not taking the right amount of diabetes medicine Taking certain medicines that increase your blood sugar or make your blood sugar medicines work less well Taking in too many calories by eating large portions of food, choosing too many high-calorie foods, or drinking too many high-sugar beverages Eating too many carbohydrates, such as foods made mainly with sugar, white flour (in bread, biscuits, pancakes, for example), white potatoes, or white rice Not getting enough physical activity (exercise lowers your blood sugar) Having increased emotional or physical stress Being sick, including colds, flu, an infected tooth, or a urinary tract infection, especially if you have a fever If you are using insulin, having a problem with your insulin (for examp Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Of 600 And No Insurance

Blood Sugar Of 600 And No Insurance

Someone recently asked: “My sugars have been at 600 on numerous times. I no longer take insulin. I have NO insurance. I was advised to go to emergency immediately or I could have a stroke or go into a coma. Is this true? I have been diabetic for over 10 years on 70/30 insulin and metformin 1000 mg twice a day. I was using 30units in am 20units at noon and 30units at night before meals. Again I haven’t taken insulin in over 3 months, as I have no more insurance.” My reply: Yes, it is true that if your blood sugar levels are in the range of 600, you are at risk of life-threatening complications because the level is so high. One problem that might occur is diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) (which is more common if you had type 1 diabetes, which I doubt you have or you’d already be unconscious). The other complication, which is likely in people with very poorly-controlled type 2 diabetes, is called by several names. It’s often called Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Nonketotic Syndrome (HHNS) (see an article about this in Diabetes Forecast for the gory details). The main concern when your glucose is this high is that any event that leads to dehydration will cause your glucose level to skyrocket further, and for you to lose consciousness or develop a stroke or other disaster. Symptoms of the high sugar include extreme thirst, dry mouth, and huge volumes of urine. Your body may be able to tolerate these symptoms for several months, but if you become nauseated or have diarrhea, you are only a short step from coma and death. Basically, you need more medication to control your diabetes. Metformin is inexpensive (and indeed it’s free at many supermarket drugstores), so stay on it. You’re on about the highest dose that’s likely to work (2000 mg/day), so don’t try increasing Continue reading >>

What Are The Dangers Of A Sugar Count Over 500?

What Are The Dangers Of A Sugar Count Over 500?

Blood sugar control is a critical aspect of diabetes management. People without diabetes typically have fasting blood sugar readings below 100 milligrams per deciliter. If you are diabetic, your doctor sets an individualized blood sugar goal that you aim for with the help of an individualized treatment regimen. A reading higher than your target indicates your blood sugar is not under control, and having a reading over 500 is a medical emergency. Your body needs glucose to function properly, but it's unhealthy for high levels to circulate in your bloodstream. The hormone insulin regulates blood sugar by allowing glucose to get into your cells. Typically, blood sugar is considered high when it's 160 milligrams per deciliter or above your glucose target, notes the Joslin Diabetes Center. Your doctor may need to adjust your treatment plan if your glucose remains above 180 milligrams per deciliter for three consecutive days. If glucose stays elevated for a long time, it can affect your eyes, kidneys and heart. Ketoacidosis A dangerously high blood sugar level increases your risk for diabetes-related ketoacidosis. When glucose circulates in your bloodstream and can't get into your cells, your cells don't get the energy they need. To compensate, your body begins to burn fat for fuel, producing acids called ketones. These acids build up in your bloodstream and can poison your body when levels get too high. This happens when your body doesn't have enough insulin and is more common with Type 1 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association recommends checking your urine for ketones when your glucose is higher than 240 milligrams per deciliter. Hyperosmolar Syndrome Your kidneys typically excrete extra glucose to help compensate for high blood sugar levels, but when glucose is extrem Continue reading >>

Treating High Blood Sugar - Topic Overview

Treating High Blood Sugar - Topic Overview

If you have diabetes, your doctor will give you blood sugar goals and recommendations for treating high blood sugar. Here are some general guidelines. Follow these steps if blood sugar is over the target range set by your doctor, for example, over 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) for two or more readings a few hours apart. If the usual dose of diabetes medicine was missed, give the missed dose. If the doctor has prescribed a dose of fast-acting insulin based on the blood sugar level (sliding scale), give the appropriate dose. If not, call the doctor for advice. Test for ketones, if the doctor has advised you to do so. If the results of the ketone test show a moderate-to-large amount of ketones, call the doctor for advice. Wait 30 minutes after giving the extra insulin or the missed medicine. Check the blood sugar again. Extra liquids are needed to replace the fluids lost through the urine. Water and sugar-free drinks are best. If symptoms of high blood sugar become more noticeable or if the blood sugar level continues to rise, call the doctor. If your child's blood sugar continues to rise, for example, above 240 mg/dL, and if he or she starts to feel drowsy or loses consciousness, take your child to an emergency room or call or other emergency services immediately. Stay with your child until emergency help arrives. For adults, if you start to feel drowsy or disoriented or if your blood sugar continues to rise, for example, above 350 mg/dL, call or other emergency services immediately. It's best to have someone with you if your blood sugar is this elevated so that the person can call for you. Follow these steps if blood sugar is extremely high, for example, over 400 mg/dL in a child or over 600 mg/dL in an adult. Some blood sugar meters read only levels up to about 4 Continue reading >>

Understanding And Preventing Diabetic Coma

Understanding And Preventing Diabetic Coma

Diabetic coma is a serious, potentially life-threatening complication associated with diabetes. A diabetic coma causes unconsciousness that you cannot awaken from without medical care. Most cases of diabetic coma occur in people with type 1 diabetes. But people with other types of diabetes are also at risk. If you have diabetes, it’s important to learn about diabetic coma, including its causes and symptoms. Doing so will help prevent this dangerous complication and help you get the treatment you need right away. Diabetic coma can occur when blood sugar levels are out of control. It has three main causes: Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia occurs when you don’t have enough glucose, or sugar, in your blood. Low sugar levels can happen to anyone from time to time. If you treat mild to moderate hypoglycemia immediately, it usually resolves without progressing to severe hypoglycemia. People on insulin have the highest risk, though people who take oral diabetes medications that increase insulin levels in the body may also be at risk. Untreated or unresponsive low blood sugars can lead to severe hypoglycemia. This is the most common cause of diabetic coma. You should take extra precautions if you have difficulty detecting symptoms of hypoglycemia. This diabetes phenomenon is known as hypoglycemia unawareness. DKA Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) occurs when your body lacks insulin and uses fat instead of glucose for energy. Ketone bodies accumulate in the bloodstream. DKA occurs in both forms of diabetes, but it’s more common in type 1. Ketone bodies may be detected with special blood glucose meters or with urine strips to check for DKA. The American Diabetes Association recommends checking for ketone bodies and DKA if your blood glucose is over 240 mg/dl. When left untreated, DKA can Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugars (ketoacidosis)

High Blood Sugars (ketoacidosis)

Fri, 11/19/2010 - 14:41 -- Richard Morris Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome Severe high blood sugars, ketosis (the presence of ketones prior to acidification of the blood), and ketoacidosis (DKA) are serious and potentially life-threatening medical problems which can occur in diabetes. High blood sugars become life-threatening in Type 1 or long-term Type 2 diabetes only when that person does not receive enough insulin from injections or an insulin pump. This can be caused by skipping insulin or not receiving enough insulin when large amounts are required due to an infection or other major stress. Ketoacidosis surprisingly occurs almost as often in Type 2 diabetes as it does in Type 1. However, people with Type 2 diabetes also encounter another dangerous condition called hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome, which is roughly translated as thick blood due to very high blood sugars. Here, coma and death can occur simply because the blood sugar is so high. The blood will have ketones at higher levels but does not become acidotic. HHS usually occurs with blood sugar readings above 700 mg/dl (40 mmol) as the brain and other functions begin to shut down. When insulin levels are low, the body cannot use glucose present at high levels in the blood. The body then starts burning excessive amounts of fat which causes the blood to become acidic as excess ketone byproducts are produced. Even though the blood pH which measures acidity only drops from its normal level of 7.4 down to 7.1 or 7.0, this small drop is enough to inactivate enzymes that depend on a precise acid-base balance to operate. High blood sugars and ketoacidosis can be triggered by: In Type 1 diabetes, ketoacidosis often occurs under the duress of an infection, and is also frequently present when a Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma

Print Overview A diabetic coma is a life-threatening diabetes complication that causes unconsciousness. If you have diabetes, dangerously high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) or dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can lead to a diabetic coma. If you lapse into a diabetic coma, you're alive — but you can't awaken or respond purposefully to sights, sounds or other types of stimulation. Left untreated, a diabetic coma can be fatal. The prospect of a diabetic coma is scary, but fortunately you can take steps to help prevent it. Start by following your diabetes treatment plan. Symptoms Before developing a diabetic coma, you'll usually experience signs and symptoms of high blood sugar or low blood sugar. High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) If your blood sugar level is too high, you may experience: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Stomach pain Fruity breath odor A very dry mouth A rapid heartbeat Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Signs and symptoms of a low blood sugar level may include: Shakiness or nervousness Anxiety Fatigue Weakness Sweating Hunger Nausea Dizziness or light-headedness Difficulty speaking Confusion Some people, especially those who've had diabetes for a long time, develop a condition known as hypoglycemia unawareness and won't have the warning signs that signal a drop in blood sugar. If you experience any symptoms of high or low blood sugar, test your blood sugar and follow your diabetes treatment plan based on the test results. If you don't start to feel better quickly, or you start to feel worse, call for emergency help. When to see a doctor A diabetic coma is a medical emergency. If you feel extreme high or low blood sugar signs or symptoms and think you might pass out, call 911 or your local emergency nu Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia: When Your Blood Glucose Level Goes Too High

Hyperglycemia: When Your Blood Glucose Level Goes Too High

Hyperglycemia means high (hyper) glucose (gly) in the blood (emia). Your body needs glucose to properly function. Your cells rely on glucose for energy. Hyperglycemia is a defining characteristic of diabetes—when the blood glucose level is too high because the body isn't properly using or doesn't make the hormone insulin. You get glucose from the foods you eat. Carbohydrates, such as fruit, milk, potatoes, bread, and rice, are the biggest source of glucose in a typical diet. Your body breaks down carbohydrates into glucose, and then transports the glucose to the cells via the bloodstream. Body Needs Insulin However, in order to use the glucose, your body needs insulin. This is a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin helps transport glucose into the cells, particularly the muscle cells. People with type 1 diabetes no longer make insulin to help their bodies use glucose, so they have to take insulin, which is injected under the skin. People with type 2 diabetes may have enough insulin, but their body doesn't use it well; they're insulin resistant. Some people with type 2 diabetes may not produce enough insulin. People with diabetes may become hyperglycemic if they don't keep their blood glucose level under control (by using insulin, medications, and appropriate meal planning). For example, if someone with type 1 diabetes doesn't take enough insulin before eating, the glucose their body makes from that food can build up in their blood and lead to hyperglycemia. Your endocrinologist will tell you what your target blood glucose levels are. Your levels may be different from what is usually considered as normal because of age, pregnancy, and/or other factors. Fasting hyperglycemia is defined as when you don't eat for at least eight hours. Recommended range without diabet Continue reading >>

Complications

Complications

Low and high blood glucose levels Fluctuating blood glucose levels in the form of mild hypoglycaemic episodes and slightly elevated blood glucose values are constant companions during insulin therapy. However, in order to prevent hypoglycaemic emergencies in a timely manner, it is important to be aware of your symptoms and treatment options. Hypoglycaemia – Low blood glucose Preventing hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose) is the greatest challenge to achieving the most physiologically normal blood glucose levels possible (like those of non-diabetics). It must be borne in mind here that a hypoglycaemic emergency can develop very quickly, within just a few minutes. If there is more insulin in the blood than is necessary in order to regulate the blood glucose value, then the blood glucose level will drop. A hypoglycaemic episode is considered an emergency starting at a value of 50 mg/dL (2.8 mmol/L). Initial signs usually appear in advance, including Trembling Sweating Heart palpitations Sudden ravenous hunger Weakness Restlessness At the first sign of a hypoglycaemic episode and/or if blood glucose levels drop below 65 mg/dL (3.6 mmol/L) a rapid response is vital in order to prevent blood glucose levels from dropping even further. Always remember to remain calm and eat something first before you measure your blood glucose. Immediately consume some form of fast-acting sugar (20 g carbohydrates), such as glucose (available in tablet, liquid or chewable tablet form). Alternatively, consume a sweetened drink, such as orange juice or cola (100 mL = approx. 10 g carbohydrates). Measure your blood glucose level and then measure it again in 15 minutes. Then consume some long-acting carbohydrates, such as whole grain bread, bananas or yogurt to ensure that your blood glucose level Continue reading >>

My Blood Sugar Level Is Over 600 What To Do?

My Blood Sugar Level Is Over 600 What To Do?

My Blood Sugar Level Is Over 600 What To Do? My Blood Sugar Level Is Over 600 What To Do? If a blood sugar level exceeds 600 mg/dL, you are highly vulnerable to ketoacidosis . If it remains the same for hours, it is very deadly and you must be hospitalized. This condition is also known as Hyperglycemia. The risk of developing ketoacidosis is increased severely if blood sugars are above 240, as reported by the American Diabetes Association. Body starts using its fat to generate energy in this condition. If not treated well, it can cause coma and even death. If blood sugar level remains high for longer time period and body uses fat to use energy, ketones are the toxic elements which start to develop. One can measure ketones in the form of urine. High blood sugar and diabetes often go hand in hand. Acute pancreatitis is the major cause of hyperglycemia . Some of early symptoms are excessive thirst and dehydration because you have to pee more often. If blood sugar exceeds 600 milligrams per deciliter and remains for long time, it could cause fatigue, breathing problems, reduced consciousness, and confusion. When body lacks insulin severely (produced in pancreas), blood sugar levels go extremely high. To deal with ketones, liver generates more amount of glucose. But there is no control over increasing blood sugar without insulin. If you have diabetes and miss insulin doses, you might be at higher risk of developing ketoacidosis due to lack of insulin, trauma, and infection. If blood pressure levels remain severely high for an extended period of time, it can cause cerebral edema (swelling in your brain). In addition, children are more vulnerable to this condition. Some other complications you may have are kidney failure, heart attack, and organ damage due to low blood pressu Continue reading >>

When You Need To Go To The Emergency Room With High Blood Sugars

When You Need To Go To The Emergency Room With High Blood Sugars

My uncle, like all his family, was a bit of a cheapskate. He hated to spend money unless it was absolutely necessary. He was thin and active, having only recently given up a career as a singer and dancer performing weekly on a nationally televised variety show. So when he felt unwell one weekend night, he turned down his wife's suggestion that she drive him to the emergency room and told her he'd wait til Monday when he could see his family doctor. Why waste all that money on an ER visit that was probably unnecessary? As it turned out, he didn't need to see his doctor on Monday. He died that night. He was a few years younger than I am now and the fatal heart attack he experienced was the first symptom he had of our family's odd form of inherited diabetes. But this is why, even though I've inherited the family "cheap" gene, if there's any possibility something dangerous is going on, I head for the ER. Usually it is a waste of money. I was in a small car accident a few weeks ago that left me with nerve pain running up and down my arms and legs. I sat for four hours at our local ER, saw the doctor for five minutes, and was sent home. The diagnosis, whiplash. The treatment, wait and see if it gets worse. The bill? Over $900. I went to the ER because I'd called my family doctor's office and they told me to. Whiplash usually resolves on its own, but occasionally it can cause swelling in your neck that can kill you. I'm not equipped to judge what kind I had, and unlike my uncle, I wasn't about to gamble. So with this in mind, you can understand my reaction when a stranger contacted me recently, after reading my web page, and told me that his blood sugar, which had been normal until very recently, was testing in the 500s on his meter except when his meter wasn't able to give hi Continue reading >>

Is There A Glucose Meter That Read A Higher Than 600mg/dl?

Is There A Glucose Meter That Read A Higher Than 600mg/dl?

Portable glucometers are designed for self-monitoring blood glucose levels for patients. They are deliberately topped off at 600mg/dl for two reasons: 1) not accurate enough; 2) if a patient is hyperglycemic enough to reach near the top limit, he or she ought to be seeing a physician long before getting to that level. To answer your question specifically, no there are no portable glucometers that exceed 600mg/dl that I can recall. If someone recently has introduced a meter that is independent of hematocrit, allowing you to dilute the blood sample, you should be able to read as high a reading as you wish. In the absence of the above option, if you have access to a clinical lab style machine or a bench-top Beckman Glucometer, which uses glucose oxidase reagent, you can measure any level you wish by simply diluting the sample and keeping track of dilution factor - claimed reliable range in this machine is 20-400mg/dl but I have not had much of an issue up to over 600mg/dl. Of course, with dilutions, there is no limit. Caveat: you will need larger volume of blood sample and it works more reliably if you separate serum/plasma from the cells by spinning the blood. [Come to think of it, there was a portable glucometer designed by one of our faculty members over a couple of decades ago, which used a membrane with glucose oxidase and the system worked remarkably well with no practical limits (I used it up to 1200mg/dl). Eli Lilli bough the rights to produce it consumers but shelfed it because it really worked way too well and did not require any consumable supplies. The membrane lasted well over a year, the only other solution required was glucose to standardize the meter (depending on the concentration of glucose in standard, one could have a reliable reading range of their cho Continue reading >>

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