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Blood Sugar Over 500 What To Do

Controlling Blood Sugar In Diabetes: How Low Should You Go?

Controlling Blood Sugar In Diabetes: How Low Should You Go?

Diabetes is an ancient disease, but the first effective drug therapy was not available until 1922, when insulin revolutionized the management of the disorder. Insulin is administered by injection, but treatment took another great leap forward in 1956, when the first oral diabetic drug was introduced. Since then, dozens of new medications have been developed, but scientists are still learning how best to use them. And new studies are prompting doctors to re-examine a fundamental therapeutic question: what level of blood sugar is best? Normal metabolism To understand diabetes, you should first understand how your body handles glucose, the sugar that fuels your metabolism. After you eat, your digestive tract breaks down carbohydrates into simple sugars that are small enough to be absorbed into your bloodstream. Glucose is far and away the most important of these sugars, and it's an indispensable source of energy for your body's cells. But to provide that energy, it must travel from your blood into your cells. Insulin is the hormone that unlocks the door to your cells. When your blood glucose levels rise after a meal, the beta cells of your pancreas spring into action, pouring insulin into your blood. If you produce enough insulin and your cells respond normally, your blood sugar level drops as glucose enters the cells, where it is burned for energy or stored for future use in your liver as glycogen. Insulin also helps your body turn amino acids into proteins and fatty acids into body fat. The net effect is to allow your body to turn food into energy and to store excess energy to keep your engine running if fuel becomes scarce in the future. A diabetes primer Diabetes is a single name for a group of disorders. All forms of the disease develop when the pancreas is unable to Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugars (ketoacidosis)

High Blood Sugars (ketoacidosis)

Fri, 11/19/2010 - 14:41 -- Richard Morris Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome Severe high blood sugars, ketosis (the presence of ketones prior to acidification of the blood), and ketoacidosis (DKA) are serious and potentially life-threatening medical problems which can occur in diabetes. High blood sugars become life-threatening in Type 1 or long-term Type 2 diabetes only when that person does not receive enough insulin from injections or an insulin pump. This can be caused by skipping insulin or not receiving enough insulin when large amounts are required due to an infection or other major stress. Ketoacidosis surprisingly occurs almost as often in Type 2 diabetes as it does in Type 1. However, people with Type 2 diabetes also encounter another dangerous condition called hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome, which is roughly translated as thick blood due to very high blood sugars. Here, coma and death can occur simply because the blood sugar is so high. The blood will have ketones at higher levels but does not become acidotic. HHS usually occurs with blood sugar readings above 700 mg/dl (40 mmol) as the brain and other functions begin to shut down. When insulin levels are low, the body cannot use glucose present at high levels in the blood. The body then starts burning excessive amounts of fat which causes the blood to become acidic as excess ketone byproducts are produced. Even though the blood pH which measures acidity only drops from its normal level of 7.4 down to 7.1 or 7.0, this small drop is enough to inactivate enzymes that depend on a precise acid-base balance to operate. High blood sugars and ketoacidosis can be triggered by: In Type 1 diabetes, ketoacidosis often occurs under the duress of an infection, and is also frequently present when a Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar: Complications That Can Happen

High Blood Sugar: Complications That Can Happen

Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Nonketotic Syndrome (HHNS) If your blood sugar is too high for too long, it can cause serious health problems. Its something to be careful of whether you have diabetes or not. How high is too high?Your doctor will tell you what your target range should be, and what to do if your levels arent in that range. If you have diabetes, you'll need to check your blood sugar, also called glucose, to know if its too high, too low, or meets your goal. The problems that high blood sugar can cause happen over time. The sooner you get your levels back in line, the better. These are symptoms of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). Your body burns glucose for energy. When your cells dont get enough of it, they burn fat. That produces chemicals called ketones. When these build up, your blood becomes more acid-like. This can be life-threatening if its not treated. Hyperosmolar Hyperglycemic Nonketotic Syndrome (HHNS) This mostly affects elderly people. As glucose builds up in your blood, your body tries to get rid of it through your urine. At first, you pee a lot. Over time, you pee less, but when you do, its very dark. This condition can lead to dehydration, coma, or even death. Get medical help right away if you have any of these warning signs: You can avoid many of these problems by keeping your blood sugar under control. Follow your doctors advice about diet and exercise, take your medicine, keep up with your doctor visits, and check your levels often. WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Arefa Cassoobhoy, MD, MPH on December 19, 2017 Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma Recovery: What You Need To Know

Diabetic Coma Recovery: What You Need To Know

In people with diabetes, a diabetic coma occurs when severe levels of either high or low uncontrolled blood sugar are not corrected. If treated quickly, a person will make a rapid recovery from a diabetic coma. However, diabetic coma can be fatal or result in brain damage. It is important for people with diabetes to control their blood sugars and know what to do when their blood sugar levels are not within their target range. The severe symptoms of uncontrolled blood sugar that can come before a diabetic coma include vomiting, difficulty breathing, confusion, weakness, and dizziness. Recovery from diabetic coma If a diabetic coma is not treated within a couple of hours of it developing, it can cause irreversible brain damage. If no treatment is received, a diabetic coma will be fatal. In addition, having blood sugar levels that continue to be too low or too high can be bad for long-term health. This remains true even if they do not develop into diabetic coma. Recognizing the early signs of low or high blood sugar levels and regular monitoring can help people with diabetes keep their blood sugar levels within the healthy range. Doing so will also reduce the risk of associated complications and diabetic coma. What is diabetes? Diabetes is a long-term condition in which the body is unable to control the level of a sugar called glucose in the blood. Diabetes is caused by either a lack of insulin, the body's inability to use insulin correctly, or both. In people who don't have diabetes, insulin usually ensures that excess glucose is removed from the bloodstream. It does this by stimulating cells to absorb the glucose they need for energy from the blood. Insulin also causes any remaining glucose to be stored in the liver as a substance called glycogen. The production of insul Continue reading >>

Are You Suffering From Untreated Hyperglycemia?

Are You Suffering From Untreated Hyperglycemia?

Are you a patient, health care provider, or someone else interested in hearing more about our services or are you interested in receiving our monthly newsletter? Send us your email and a message, and we'll get back to you within 24 hours! Thank you! Your submission has been received! Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form Are You Suffering from Untreated Hyperglycemia? Untreated hyperglycemia leads to serious complications. Signs are hard to identify, but self-monitoring and early treatment lowers these risks and improves quality of life. Hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar, affects people who have diabetes. Since the symptoms are difficult to feel and easily go unnoticed, the condition often goes untreated. Prolonged hyperglycemia is the main cause of almost all the complications associated with diabetes but good blood sugar control can prevent them. The more you know about high blood sugar, the more likely you are to recognize it, treat it, and hopefully take steps to prevent it. Hyperglycemia is a fancy way to say high blood sugar. People without diabetes usually maintain a fasting blood sugar of less than 100 mg/dl. The goal for managing diabetes is to achieve glucose values as close to this as possible, but the recommended range is 80-130 mg/dl. There is no specific value used to define hyperglycemia in all individuals. In general, a glucose level above 160-180 mg/dl is considered hyperglycemia. The best way to define it, though, is by talking with your medical team. Hyperglycemia is really defined as any blood sugar that is above the upper limit of your individualized range. Fasting hyperglycemia is a blood sugar that is higher than the desirable level after 8 hours without food or drink. Postprandial hyperglycemia is when the blood sugar is higher t Continue reading >>

When You Need To Go To The Emergency Room With High Blood Sugars

When You Need To Go To The Emergency Room With High Blood Sugars

My uncle, like all his family, was a bit of a cheapskate. He hated to spend money unless it was absolutely necessary. He was thin and active, having only recently given up a career as a singer and dancer performing weekly on a nationally televised variety show. So when he felt unwell one weekend night, he turned down his wife's suggestion that she drive him to the emergency room and told her he'd wait til Monday when he could see his family doctor. Why waste all that money on an ER visit that was probably unnecessary? As it turned out, he didn't need to see his doctor on Monday. He died that night. He was a few years younger than I am now and the fatal heart attack he experienced was the first symptom he had of our family's odd form of inherited diabetes. But this is why, even though I've inherited the family "cheap" gene, if there's any possibility something dangerous is going on, I head for the ER. Usually it is a waste of money. I was in a small car accident a few weeks ago that left me with nerve pain running up and down my arms and legs. I sat for four hours at our local ER, saw the doctor for five minutes, and was sent home. The diagnosis, whiplash. The treatment, wait and see if it gets worse. The bill? Over $900. I went to the ER because I'd called my family doctor's office and they told me to. Whiplash usually resolves on its own, but occasionally it can cause swelling in your neck that can kill you. I'm not equipped to judge what kind I had, and unlike my uncle, I wasn't about to gamble. So with this in mind, you can understand my reaction when a stranger contacted me recently, after reading my web page, and told me that his blood sugar, which had been normal until very recently, was testing in the 500s on his meter except when his meter wasn't able to give hi Continue reading >>

About Blood Glucose Over 500

About Blood Glucose Over 500

Glucose is a type of sugar that is found in the bloodstream. Blood glucose is the main energy source of the body. Having a healthy blood glucose or blood sugar level is important to optimal health and survival. As glucose in the blood begins to rise, typically after a meal, the pancreas releases insulin to help the cells of the body use the glucose for fuel and energy. If someone is a diabetic, and his pancreas secretes little to no insulin into the bloodstream, the blood sugar levels begin to rise. If not treated properly with an insulin injection, the levels can quickly rise over 500mg. Any blood glucose level over 500mg is considered a medical emergency. Video of the Day Most people who have had a blood glucose level over 500mg are considered diabetic. According to the American Diabetes Association, over 23.6 million people have diabetes. Diabetes is a serious disease that causes unstable blood sugar levels. There are three main types of diabetes; Type 1, Type 2 and gestational diabetes. Type I generally occurs when a patient is young and is sometimes referred to as juvenile diabetes. Type 2 is a condition in which the body does not produce enough insulin to bring blood sugars down, the patient becomes dependent on insulin injections. Gestational diabetes occurs when a woman becomes pregnant. If blood sugar levels are not brought down or treated, it can lead to serious conditions and birth defects that can harm both mother and child. When a blood glucose level gets over 500mg, one of the first things a doctor will do is determine what is causing the high blood sugar level. Generally, the cause is uncontrolled diabetes. As someone continues to eat foods that may be high in sugar or high in carbohydrate, his blood sugar levels begin to rise over normal levels. If his b Continue reading >>

What Do You Do When Your Blood Sugar Gets Over 500

What Do You Do When Your Blood Sugar Gets Over 500

What do you do when your blood sugar gets over 500 The rescue squad was just here. I was scared and then got panicy when my blood sugar was over 500. I know what to do when it reaches 45 at 4am and I get up and eat a banana and go back to bed. But, what does one do when it is too high?????? Sure hope you are on some pretty strong meds, and insulin if you are having numbers hitting 500. Contact your medical team and discuss your options for control. Exercise (moderate to start with) and reduced carbohydrate intake will help you. Since you have been T2 since 1993, I would think you have heard of this before. My question is how did it get that high? Are you ill, have an infection, do you take steroids, what are you eating? What do I do when I go that high - I drink ice water, test every hour and take small doses of insulin until it starts to come down. You did not say if you went to the hospital - what did the rescue squad do for you and did your number come down? Inject more insulin ? Or rush to emergency ? Not sure mine has never gone much above 250. Hi, I am T1 and have never gone above 24 mmol/L (around 450 mg/dl). I should imagine that if you do not have access to insulin you will need some medical attention ASAP. You definitely don't want to have your BGL at that level for very long, that is for sure. Good luck & let us know where you are at. How high do you normally go and what meds or insulins are you on? If you routinely go high you need to discuss this with your doctor. It sounds like you need a better bg management plan. How is your diet? How many carbs are you eating per meal? Many Type 2's are insulin resistant and if we eat the wrong foods, our cells seem to be resistant to the insulin we produce or inject. The others gave some great info now for me here is Continue reading >>

The Scary Experience Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

The Scary Experience Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Today, we’re excited to share with you another guest blog from Katie Janowiak, who works for the Medtronic Foundation, our company’s philanthropic arm. When she first told me her story about food poisoning and Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), I knew others could benefit from hearing it as well. Thanks Katie for your openness and allowing us to share your scary story so that the LOOP community can learn from it. Throughout this past year, I’ve had the honor of sharing with you, the amazing LOOP community, my personal journey and the often humorous sequence of events that is my life with T1. Humor is, after all, the best (and cheapest) therapy. Allow me to pause today to share with you the down and dirty of what it feels like to have something that is not the slightest bit humorous: diabetic ketoacidosis.You are hot. You are freezing. You are confused. You are blacked out but coherent. You go to talk but words fail you. Time flies and goes in slow motion simultaneously. You will likely smell and look like death. In my instance, this was brought on by the combination of excessive vomiting and dehydration caused by food poisoning and the diabetic ketoacidosis that followed after my body had gone through so much. In hindsight, I was lucky, my husband knew that I had food poisoning because I began vomiting after our meal. But I had never prepped him on diabetic ketoacidosis and the symptoms (because DKA was for those other diabetics.) Upon finding me in our living room with a bowl of blood and bile by my side (no, I am not exaggerating), he got me into the car and took me to emergency care. It was 5:30 p.m. – and I thought it was 11:00 a.m. The series of events that led up to my stay in the ICU began innocently enough. It was a warm summer night and my husband and I walke Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma

Print Overview A diabetic coma is a life-threatening diabetes complication that causes unconsciousness. If you have diabetes, dangerously high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) or dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can lead to a diabetic coma. If you lapse into a diabetic coma, you're alive — but you can't awaken or respond purposefully to sights, sounds or other types of stimulation. Left untreated, a diabetic coma can be fatal. The prospect of a diabetic coma is scary, but fortunately you can take steps to help prevent it. Start by following your diabetes treatment plan. Symptoms Before developing a diabetic coma, you'll usually experience signs and symptoms of high blood sugar or low blood sugar. High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) If your blood sugar level is too high, you may experience: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Stomach pain Fruity breath odor A very dry mouth A rapid heartbeat Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Signs and symptoms of a low blood sugar level may include: Shakiness or nervousness Anxiety Fatigue Weakness Sweating Hunger Nausea Dizziness or light-headedness Difficulty speaking Confusion Some people, especially those who've had diabetes for a long time, develop a condition known as hypoglycemia unawareness and won't have the warning signs that signal a drop in blood sugar. If you experience any symptoms of high or low blood sugar, test your blood sugar and follow your diabetes treatment plan based on the test results. If you don't start to feel better quickly, or you start to feel worse, call for emergency help. When to see a doctor A diabetic coma is a medical emergency. If you feel extreme high or low blood sugar signs or symptoms and think you might pass out, call 911 or your local emergency nu Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes

Hyperglycemia And Hypoglycemia In Type 2 Diabetes

Hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetes Created: May 29, 2007; Last Update: January 11, 2018; Next update: 2021. If someone has diabetes that isnt treated properly, they have too much sugar in their blood (hyperglycemia). Too little sugar in the bloodstream (hypoglycemia) is usually a side effect of treatment with blood-sugar-lowering medication. Diabetes is a metabolic disease with far-reaching health effects. In type 2 diabetes, not enough insulin is released into the bloodstream, or the insulin cant be used properly. In type 1 diabetes, the body only produces very little insulin, or none at all. We need insulin to live. Without it, sugar (glucose) builds up in the blood because it cant be taken out and used by the body. Very high blood sugar, known as hyperglycemia, leads to a number of symptoms. If blood sugar levels are too low, it is called hypoglycemia. When is blood sugar considered to be too high or too low? Slight fluctuations in blood sugar levels are completely normal, and also happen every day in people who dont have diabetes, in response to the food they eat. Between around 60 and 140 milligrams of sugar per deciliter of blood (mg/dL) is considered to be healthy. This is equivalent to a blood sugar concentration of between 3.3 and 7.8 mmol/L. Millimole per liter (mmol/L) is the international unit for measuring blood sugar. It indicates the amount of a certain substance per liter. If type 1 diabetes is left untreated, peoples blood sugar levels can get very high, even exceeding 27.8 mmol/L (500 mg/dL). Such high levels tend to be uncommon in type 2 diabetes, though. Blood sugar concentrations below 3.3 mmol/L (60 mg/dL) are considered to be too low. As you can see in the illustration below, there are no clear-cut borders between the normal range Continue reading >>

10 Simple Strategies For Blood Sugar Control

10 Simple Strategies For Blood Sugar Control

Looking for ways to rein in your blood sugar? Prevent your levels from going too low or too high with these tips. Thinkstock Maintaining good blood sugar control might take dedication and time, but making it a priority can help you avoid or delay serious complications of type 2 diabetes. “Managing type 2 diabetes is a long war, not a battle won within a month or two,” says Sethu K. Reddy, MD, MBA, chief of the adult diabetes section at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, Massachusetts. Blood Sugar: When It’s Too Low or Too High The hormone insulin takes sugar (glucose) from food and uses it for energy. With type 2 diabetes, you don’t have enough insulin or your body isn’t effective at using insulin, and excess sugar continues to circulate in your bloodstream. A target blood sugar range for most people with type 2 diabetes is 80 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl) before a meal and less than 180 mg/dl one to two hours after starting a meal, according to the American Diabetes Association. A reading of 160 mg/dl or higher is typically considered high blood sugar (hyperglycemia). Over time, blood sugar in the range of 160 to 250 mg/dl can affect every organ in your body, Dr. Reddy says. It's associated with heart disease, eye disease, kidney disease, neuropathy, stroke, and vascular disease. If blood sugar goes as high as 500 mg/dl, you may experience symptoms such as thirst, the urge to urinate more often, weight loss, low energy, and drowsiness, he says. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) occurs when levels fall to less than 70 mg/dl. This is a risk when you take insulin or other diabetes medications, have gone too long without a meal, have been active, or have been drinking alcohol. If your blood sugar goes too low, you’ll probably feel shaky and sweaty and you Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Review your blood sugar logs to look for patterns of BG over 140-150 mg/dL. A very high BG is anything over 300 mg/dL. One very high blood sugar number, as long as you feel okay, is not an immediate cause of concern. 2 or more very high blood sugar numbers means you need to start figuring out why your number is so high. Test for ketones when you have more than two very high blood sugar numbers in a row. In general, any level over 140-150 mg/dL is a high level. You do not necessarily need to do anything about this level beyond watching to make sure that a pattern of levels at or above this range doesnt develop. If you notice that your BG levels are rising, you can call the diabetes clinic for some help in making changes to fix these levels. At some point everyone with diabetes will have a very high blood sugar level. We define very high as any level over 300 mg/dL. One very high blood sugar level is not a cause for panic. Rather, it should serve as an alarm signaling the need for additional blood glucose monitoring and depending upon how you treat your diabetes; it may also mean that you need to take some extra insulin. Very high blood sugar levels mean that the body does not have enough insulin around to use sugar as energy. Even though the level of sugar in the blood stream is very high, the body cells may be sending out the alarm that they are starving. In this case, the body will switch to burning fat as an energy source. This is a problem because excess burning creates byproducts such as ketones and acids. After several hours the blood can become too acidic for the body organs to work right. This leads to a life-threatening diabetes emergency called Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA). Full-blown DKA must be treated in a hospital, often in the Intensive Care Unit. It is im Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia) In Diabetes

High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia) In Diabetes

What is high blood sugar? High blood sugar means that the level of sugar in your blood is higher than recommended for you. If you don’t keep your blood sugar at a normal, healthy level most of the time, you will increase your risk of heart and blood vessel disease, stroke, kidney problems, and loss of vision. The medical term for high blood sugar is hyperglycemia. Blood sugar is also called blood glucose. What is the cause? Blood sugar that stays high is the main problem of diabetes. Your body breaks down some of the foods you eat into sugar. Normally the hormone insulin moves this sugar into your cells, where your body uses it for energy. In diabetes the insulin is not moving the sugar into the cells, so it builds up in the bloodstream and starts to cause problems. Sometimes you may have high blood sugar even though you are taking diabetes medicine. This can happen for many reasons but it always means that your diabetes is not in good control. Some reasons why your sugar might go too high are: Skipping your diabetes medicine Not taking the right amount of diabetes medicine Taking certain medicines that increase your blood sugar or make your blood sugar medicines work less well Taking in too many calories by eating large portions of food, choosing too many high-calorie foods, or drinking too many high-sugar beverages Eating too many carbohydrates, such as foods made mainly with sugar, white flour (in bread, biscuits, pancakes, for example), white potatoes, or white rice Not getting enough physical activity (exercise lowers your blood sugar) Having increased emotional or physical stress Being sick, including colds, flu, an infected tooth, or a urinary tract infection, especially if you have a fever If you are using insulin, having a problem with your insulin (for examp Continue reading >>

Complications - Mylife Diabetescare International

Complications - Mylife Diabetescare International

Fluctuating blood glucose levels in the form of mild hypoglycaemic episodes and slightly elevated blood glucose values are constant companions during insulin therapy . However, in order to prevent hypoglycaemic emergencies in a timely manner, it is important to be aware of your symptoms and treatment options. Preventing hypoglycaemia (low blood glucose) is the greatest challenge to achieving the most physiologically normal blood glucose levels possible (like those of non-diabetics). It must be borne in mind here that a hypoglycaemic emergency can develop very quickly, within just a few minutes. If there is more insulin in the blood than is necessary in order to regulate the blood glucose value, then the blood glucose level will drop. A hypoglycaemic episode is considered an emergency starting at a value of 50 mg/dL (2.8 mmol/L). Initial signs usually appear in advance, including At the first sign of a hypoglycaemic episode and/or if blood glucose levels drop below 65 mg/dL (3.6 mmol/L) a rapid response is vital in order to prevent blood glucose levels from dropping even further. Always remember to remain calm and eat something first before you measure your blood glucose. Immediately consume some form of fast-acting sugar (20 g carbohydrates), such as glucose (available in tablet, liquid or chewable tablet form). Alternatively, consume a sweetened drink, such as orange juice or cola (100 mL = approx. 10 g carbohydrates). Measure your blood glucose level and then measure it again in 15 minutes. Then consume some long-acting carbohydrates, such as whole grain bread, bananas or yogurt to ensure that your blood glucose level does not drop again. Suspend all athletic activity and do not operate an automobile until your blood glucose levels have returned to normal. When your Continue reading >>

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