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Blood Sugar Out Of Control

10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugars In Diabetics

10 Foods That Lower Blood Sugars In Diabetics

While a low carb diet appears to be useful on the whole, there are also many foods shown to help. Either by lowering blood sugars and/or improving insulin sensitivity. This articles looks at 10 of the best foods and supplements for lowering blood sugars, based on current research. Just know they should never be used in place of your diabetes medication, but rather alongside. 1. Resistant Starch Lowers Sugars After Meals Starches are long chains of glucose (sugar) found in oats, grains, bananas, potatoes and various other foods. Some varieties pass through digestion unchanged and are not absorbed as sugar into the blood. These are known as resistant starch. Many studies show resistant starch can greatly improve insulin sensitivity. That is, how well the body can move sugar out of the blood and into cells for energy. This is why it’s so useful for lowering blood sugar levels after meals (1, 2). The effect is so great that having resistant starch at lunch will reduce blood sugar spikes at dinner, known as the “second meal effect” (3). Problem is many foods high in resistant starch, such as potatoes, are also high in digestible carbs that can spike blood sugar. Therefore resistant starch in supplement form – without the extra carbs – is recommended. Summary: Supplemental resistant starch is a fantastic option for those struggling to control sugars or have hit a plateau. 2. Ceylon Cinnamon Several cinnamon compounds appear to prevent the absorption of sugar into the bloodstream, minimising blood sugar spikes. It may also dramatically improve insulin sensitivity (4, 5). In a recent clinical trial, 25 poorly-controlled type 2 diabetics received either 1 gram per day of cinnamon or placebo (dummy supplement) for 12 weeks. Fasting blood sugar levels in the cinnamon gro Continue reading >>

Understanding Diabetes

Understanding Diabetes

This information describes diabetes, the complications related to the disease, and how you can prevent these complications. Blood Sugar Control Diabetes is a disease where the blood sugar runs too high, usually due to not enough insulin. It can cause terrible long-term complications if it is not treated properly. The most common serious complications are blindness ("retinopathy"), kidney failure requiring dependence on a dialysis machine to stay alive ("nephropathy"), and foot and leg amputations. The good news is that these complications can almost always be prevented if you keep your blood sugar near the normal range. The best way to keep blood sugar low is to eat a healthy diet and do regular exercise. Just 20 minutes of walking 4 or 5 times a week can do wonders for lowering blood sugar. Eating a healthy diet is also very important. Do your best to limit the number of calories you eat each day. Put smaller portions of food on your plate and eat more slowly so that your body has a chance to let you know when it's had enough to eat. It is also very important to limit saturated fats in your diet. Read food labels carefully to see which foods are high in saturated fats. Particular foods to cut down on are: whole milk and 2% milk, cheese, ice cream, fast foods, butter, bacon, sausage, beef, chicken with the skin on (skinless chicken is fine), doughnuts, cookies, chocolate, and nuts. Often, diet and exercise alone are not enough to control blood sugar. In this case, medicine is needed to bring the blood sugar down further. Often pills are enough, but sometimes insulin injections are needed. If medicines to lower blood sugar are started, it is still very important to keep doing regular exercise and eating a healthy diet. Keeping Track of Blood Sugar Checking blood sugar wi Continue reading >>

Tracking Your Blood Sugar Levels

Tracking Your Blood Sugar Levels

Consistently testing and tracking the blood sugar levels that you and your doctor have agreed on can tell you how well your type 2 diabetes plan is working. Your doctor will work with you to determine the target levels that are best suited for you. What Do My Blood Sugars Tell Me? Checking your blood sugar levels is important, but keeping track of them in a written logbook or software will help you spot trends of blood sugar levels that are too high or too low. If you see a trend like this, be sure to discuss it with your doctor. Keep in mind that if you have recently started a new type 2 diabetes therapy, it may take some time to see the results. Be sure to discuss with your doctor how long it should take before you see an improvement in your blood sugar levels. If your doctor recommends blood sugar guidelines for you, he or she may ask you to check your blood sugar levels every day. Self-monitoring measures blood sugar levels at the time of the test, so it's important that your doctor also tests your A1C to see how well your blood sugar is being managed over time The A1C test measures your average blood sugar level over the previous 2 to 3 months, and results are given as a percentage, called your A1C level. The higher your A1C level, the more sugar you have in your blood. If your A1C level is too high, you may need to change your diabetes treatment plan References: 1. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK); US Department of Health and Human Services. Monitor your diabetes. Published February 2014. Accessed November 9, 2016. 2. American Diabetes Association (ADA). Checking your blood glucose. Last reviewed March 3, 2015. Last edited August 4, 2016. Accessed November 9, 2016. 3. Meetoo DD, Ochieng B, Wong L, Fatani T. Self-monitoring o Continue reading >>

Correcting Morning Blood Sugar Highs — Know The Causes Of These Spikes And Ways To Treat Them

Correcting Morning Blood Sugar Highs — Know The Causes Of These Spikes And Ways To Treat Them

Today’s Dietitian Vol. 14 No. 11 P. 18 Jill is frustrated. Her type 1 diabetes seems out of control, and she comes to your office at her wits’ end. She says she’s doing everything right: counting carbs, taking her insulin as prescribed, monitoring her blood glucose levels four times per day. A look at Jill’s testing logs and most recent blood work confirms there’s a problem. She has a hemoglobin A1c of 9.2, and her blood glucose levels are all over the map. Her numbers generally are fine before she goes to bed but incredibly high in the morning. Recently, her physician increased her nighttime basal insulin dose to counteract the morning highs, but things seem worse now than ever. Her breakfast bolus doesn’t seem to be effective, and her high blood glucose levels persist into the afternoon. “Fluctuating blood sugars can be very frustrating,” says Eileen M. Sturner, RD, LDN, CDE, BC-ADM. “RDs can play an important role in helping patients get to the bottom of problems such as morning highs. Working with patients to gather the appropriate data and facilitating the sharing of those data with the healthcare provider that’s managing their diabetes can have life-changing results.” Hyperglycemia In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas can no longer provide either the steady drip of basal insulin that keeps blood sugar levels stable between meals or the bolus release of insulin that directs the uptake of glucose after eating. Patients must take basal insulin to keep their fasting blood sugar levels steady and bolus insulin to match their carbohydrate intake and correct highs. The primary cause of hyperglycemia in type 1 diabetes is carbohydrate intake that isn’t matched with bolus insulin dosing. Perhaps Jill is underreporting her carbohydrate intake, administer Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

A A A High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Whenever the glucose (sugar) level in one's blood rises high temporarily, this condition is known as hyperglycemia. The opposite condition, low blood sugar, is called hypoglycemia. Glucose comes from most foods, and the body uses other chemicals to create glucose in the liver and muscles. The blood carries glucose (blood sugar) to all the cells in the body. To carry glucose into the cells as an energy supply, cells need help from insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, an organ near the stomach. The pancreas releases insulin into the blood, based upon the blood sugar level. Insulin helps move glucose from digested food into cells. Sometimes, the body stops making insulin (as in type 1 diabetes), or the insulin does not work properly (as in type 2 diabetes). In diabetic patients, glucose does not enter the cells sufficiently, thus staying in the blood and creating high blood sugar levels. Blood sugar levels can be measured in seconds by using a blood glucose meter, also known as a glucometer. A tiny drop of blood from the finger or forearm is placed on a test strip and inserted into the glucometer. The blood sugar (or glucose) level is displayed digitally within seconds. Blood glucose levels vary widely throughout the day and night in people with diabetes. Ideally, blood glucose levels range from 90 to 130 mg/dL before meals, and below 180 mg/dL within 1 to 2 hours after a meal. Adolescents and adults with diabetes strive to keep their blood sugar levels within a controlled range, usually 80-150 mg/dL before meals. Doctors and diabetes health educators guide each patient to determine their optimal range of blood glucose control. When blood sugar levels remain high for several hours, dehydration and more serious complicat Continue reading >>

12 Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Out Of Whack

12 Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Out Of Whack

Blood sugar, or glucose, is one of the best things Mother Nature ever provided us with. It's one component of your body chemistry that helps you feel alive and happy. When glucose is at the right level, you're likely to experience a great attitude, a strong immune system, low stress, and a good night's sleep as well. But when blood sugar gets too high, then "crashes," or falls very low, the effects can be devastating to bodily processes. For this reason, the body strives to maintain blood sugar levels within a narrow range through the coordinated efforts of several glands and their hormones. Understanding Blood Sugar Control After you eat a meal, the sugars in each of the foods you eat raises the level of sugar in your blood. The body responds by secreting insulin — a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin lowers blood sugar levels by increasing the rate at which glucose is taken up by cells throughout the body. If you go too long without eating, or eat the wrong (read: "junk") foods, or if your hormones are out of balance, your blood sugar will fall too low. When this happens, your adrenal glands will release adrenalin and cortisol in order to remedy the situation. At this point, you should eat food that will slowly and gradually raise your blood sugar levels again. Most of the time, eating three square meals a day keeps your blood sugar in balance. But when this process gets out of whack, you can find yourself on the blood sugar roller coaster, with no one at the brake switch. How do you know if you're holding a ticket to this invisible junk food ride? 12 Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Out Of Control 1. Your waist is larger than your hips. 2. You find it difficult to lose weight. 3. You crave sweets. 4. You feel infinitely better after you eat. 5. You get irritable if Continue reading >>

Morning Highs? How To Lower Morning Blood Sugar

Morning Highs? How To Lower Morning Blood Sugar

As Type 2 Diabetes Develops During the years when type 2 diabetes slowly develops (which may be up to 10 years through developing metabolic syndrome and continuing on to prediabetes), hormonal control of blood glucose breaks down. To understand how your body responds, it's important to understand the essential hormones involved in blood glucose control. Four hormones are involved in blood glucose control: Insulin, made in the beta cells of the pancreas, helps the body use glucose from food by enabling glucose to move into the body's cells for energy. People with type 2 diabetes have slowly dwindling insulin reserves. Amylin, secreted from the beta cells, slows the release of glucose into the bloodstream after eating by slowing stomach-emptying and increasing the feeling of fullness. People with type 1 and type 2 diabetes are amylin-deficient. Incretins, hormones secreted from the intestines that include glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), enhance the body's release of insulin after eating. This in turn slows stomach-emptying, promotes fullness, delays the release of glucose into the bloodstream, and prevents the pancreas from releasing glucagon, putting less glucose into the blood. Glucagon, made in the alpha cells of the pancreas, breaks down glucose stored in the liver and muscles and releases it to provide energy when glucose from food isn't available Out-of-Control Blood Sugar During Sleep For people in the early years of type 2 diabetes, the hormones that control blood sugar can particularly go awry. Here's what happens during sleep to a person with type 2 diabetes: "Overnight, the liver and muscles get the message from excess glucagon to ramp up the glucose supply because the person is sleeping, not eating," says Marty Irons, R.Ph., CDE. "There is not enough GLP-1, i Continue reading >>

7 Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Out Of Control

7 Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Out Of Control

Thinkstock A Silent Danger When you have type 2 diabetes, your main goal should be controlling your blood sugar. Without adequate blood sugar control, your risk for serious health complications — stroke, heart disease, nerve damage, blindness, and more — skyrockets. But here’s the tricky part: You might not even know your blood sugar levels are out of control. “Not everyone will have the same symptoms, and some individuals have no symptoms at all,” says Lori Zanini, RD, CDE, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Because proper blood sugar maintenance is vital to your overall health with type 2 diabetes, you need to take action if you think your levels may be out of control. “Since symptoms of uncontrolled diabetes may not appear until prolonged hyperglycemia has been present, it’s important for individuals with diabetes to monitor their glucose and adjust their medication based on the results,” explains Mary Ann Emanuele, MD, an endocrinologist, professor, and medical director of Inpatient Diabetes at Loyola University Medical Center in Mayfield, Illinois. Here are signs of uncontrolled blood sugar to look for: Continue reading >>

How To Improve Your Child's Behavior With Blood Sugar Control

How To Improve Your Child's Behavior With Blood Sugar Control

Are you struggling with behavioral issues in your child? Have you ever wondered if blood sugar control is affecting them? So often I see a parent come in with a child who needs behavior modification – and the schools of course want something to be done about it. I get it! Schools are over populated, with not nearly enough teachers to students. Their job has become a large mix of behavior management and teaching. What I don’t get, is the lack of awareness of how much this behavior modification can be influenced by dietary choices. When I talk with parents, they describe to me how different their child acts when they consume sugar-laden foods such as cake, cookies, candy, ice cream or cupcakes. But what about when your child is eating low levels of sugar in the diet constantly? A diet filled with bagels, sandwiches, hot pockets, chicken nuggets, packaged foods, white potatoes, processed condiments such as ketchup and not to mention sugary drinks like soda and fruit juice, all have your child constantly wound up at a level right below the extreme hyperactivity you may witness after a piece of cake. Sometimes it isn’t as drastic of a change in their behavior to see them “off the wall” after consumption of these foods. However you may notice that your child doesn’t always listen even after multiple tries, or is quick to get frustrated or angry, lacks the ability to sit still like other children, or just struggles with remembering tasks. Rather than just being offered medication solutions or behavioral training alone, kids (and more importantly) their parents should also be given the knowledge and know how of what to do with a child’s diet. After all – you are what you eat. So, if you child mostly consumes processed carbohydrates in the form of breads, pastas, Continue reading >>

Natural Methods For Controlling Blood Sugar

Natural Methods For Controlling Blood Sugar

Drug-free Key to Managing Diabetes Ten years ago, my brother was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. His doctor sent him home with a prescription for metformin and a DVD to inform him about lifestyle changes he could make to lower his blood sugar. Twice daily, my brother began taking the prescribed metformin. But he also chose to watch the DVD. He took his diabetes seriously and decided to follow the dietary instructions provided in the DVD. He also religiously checked his blood sugar every day. After three months, he had lost 30 pounds and reduced his metformin to once daily, because his blood sugar was dropping too low. Meanwhile, he continued following the dietary plan on the DVD. After six months, my brother went back to the doctor for a checkup. His doctor declared his diabetes reversed and took him off metformin altogether. For the past ten years, his blood sugar levels have tested normal due to the changes he made in his lifestyle and continues to follow. Happily, he doesn’t have to worry about all the terrible complications associated with diabetes and he isn’t strapped with an ever-increasing monthly drug bill. He also doesn’t have to deal with some of the nasty side-effects of taking diabetes medications. Here are 10 ways to control your blood sugar naturally! 1.Reduce your carb intake. If you do nothing else, do this! Carbohydrates are what drive blood sugar up. Your body turns carbs into sugar. This is not some fad diet, but real science! The link between carb intake and blood sugar has been established for a long time.[1]Our Diabetes Solution Kit takes the guesswork out of carb-counting and shows you exactly how much to eat through a three-phase plan. By reducing your carbs as a way of life, you’re not just lowering your blood sugar to pass an A1c test, Continue reading >>

8 Sneaky Things That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

8 Sneaky Things That Raise Your Blood Sugar Levels

Skipping breakfast iStock/Thinkstock Overweight women who didn’t eat breakfast had higher insulin and blood sugar levels after they ate lunch a few hours later than they did on another day when they ate breakfast, a 2013 study found. Another study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition found that men who regularly skipped breakfast had a 21 percent higher chance of developing diabetes than those who didn’t. A morning meal—especially one that is rich in protein and healthy fat—seems to stabilize blood sugar levels throughout the day. Your breakfast is not one of the many foods that raise blood sugar. Here are some other things that happen to your body when you skip breakfast. Artificial sweeteners iStock/Thinkstock They have to be better for your blood sugar than, well, sugar, right? An interesting new Israeli study suggests that artificial sweeteners can still take a negative toll and are one of the foods that raise blood sugar. When researchers gave mice artificial sweeteners, they had higher blood sugar levels than mice who drank plain water—or even water with sugar! The researchers were able to bring the animals’ blood sugar levels down by treating them with antibiotics, which indicates that these fake sweeteners may alter gut bacteria, which in turn seems to affect how the body processes glucose. In a follow-up study of 400 people, the research team found that long-term users of artificial sweeteners were more likely to have higher fasting blood sugar levels, reported HealthDay. While study authors are by no means saying that sugary beverages are healthier, these findings do suggest that people who drink artificially sweetened beverages should do so in moderation as part of a healthy diet. Here's what else happens when you cut artificial sweetener Continue reading >>

10 Blood Sugar–lowering Foods

10 Blood Sugar–lowering Foods

Adapted from The Carb Sensitivity Program It is no exaggeration—balancing your blood sugar could be a matter of life or death. Chronic high blood sugar levels are toxic to your body, destroying organs and blood vessels and paving the way to a heart attack, type 2 diabetes, stroke, dialysis, nerve damage, erectile dysfunction, or even blindness. The good news? Out-of-control sugar levels can be reigned in and regulated with the right foods. Here are most potent blood sugar-lowering foods so you know how to lower blood sugar levels naturally. Blood Sugar Benefit: A groundbreaking study published in the Journal of Nutrition in 2010 found a daily dose of the bioactive ingredients from blueberries increases sensitivity to insulin and may reduce the risk of developing diabetes in at-risk individuals. That's important because too many carbs produces too much insulin, which could lead to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Adding blueberries to daily smoothies for six weeks also improves insulin sensitivity, so feel free to eat healthy doses of the superfood fruit, too. Added Perk: Low in naturally occurring sugars, blueberries are also packed with antioxidants that fight damage from free radicals, accelerated aging, and diseases like cancer and Alzheimer's. Blood Sugar Benefit: Don't let the fat content of avocados fool you—they're still good for you! Avocados are full of monounsaturated fat, the kind that helps slow the release of sugars into the bloodstream, prompting less insulin release, and can even help to lower your cholesterol. Added Perk: Avocados contain beta-sitosterol, a compound that could help quell inflammation after an intense workout. Just limit yourself to one-quarter of an avocado at a time to avoid calorie overload. Or, try avocado oil drizzled on a Continue reading >>

8 Stumbling Blocks To Steady Blood Glucose Control

8 Stumbling Blocks To Steady Blood Glucose Control

A person with diabetes may be asked to monitor their blood glucose levels or watch their "sugars." Getting their blood glucose numbers in control becomes a part of their daily life and oftentimes a point of stress and worry. That's because the swings from low to high or high to low can take a toll on the body. Low glucose levels (called hypoglycemia) need to be treated immediately. And over time, elevated blood glucose levels may lead to complications. On the flip side, good glucose control can mean better energy and fewer complications. The blood sugar spike after a meal is normal, as long as it goes back down to a healthy level (about 2 hours after eating). But there are times when blood glucose levels go out of whack. What can cause erratic blood glucose control? Your eating habits: Post-meal spikes in blood glucose are to be expected, and some foods have more impact on the levels than others. Timing of meals and snacks can also make a difference in the way that the body handles glucose. So can an unexpected serving of carbohydrates or eating too little throughout the day. Your workout routines: A burst of activity can send blood glucose levels plummeting during and after exercise. Despite that side effect, exercise is a huge part of diabetes management. And as with nutrition, physical activity should be a consistent part of the routine. Shifting length, timing, and intensity of exercise can be the cause of fluctuating blood sugar levels. Certain high intensity exercises may also raise blood sugar levels temporarily due to the body releasing certain stress hormones such as cortisol and adrenaline. Your reactions to stress: Stress sends hormones coursing through the body that can increase the blood glucose levels. Your daily schedule: What one does from dawn to dusk h Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar In Dogs

High Blood Sugar In Dogs

Hyperglycemia in Dogs A dog with abnormally high levels of glucose in the blood is said to have hyperglycemia. A simple carbohydrate sugar that circulates in the blood, glucose is a major source of energy for the body, of which normal levels range between 75-120mg. Insulin, a hormone that is produced and released by the pancreas into the bloodstream when glucose levels rise, plays a key role in maintaining normal sugar levels. Low levels or absolute deficiency of insulin results in abnormally high blood sugar levels. Some of the causes for hyperglycemia may be pancreatitis, and the resulting inability to produce insulin; normally occurring hormones, especially in female dogs; diet; and infections of the body (such as teeth, or urinary tract). Middle aged and older dogs are more at risk for developing hyperglycemia, and it is more common in female dogs than in males. Any breed can be affected, but some smaller breeds appear to be more disposed, including beagles, cairn terriers, dachshunds, miniature poodles and schnauzers. Symptoms and Types Clinical symptoms may vary depending on the underlying disease/condition. Your dog may not be showing any serious symptoms, especially those if the increased sugar is thought to be temporary, hormonal, or stress induced hyperglycemia. Some of the more common symptoms include: Depression Weight loss Excessive hunger Dehydration Bloodshot eyes (due to inflamed blood vessels) Liver enlargement Nerve damage in legs Severe depression (in cases of very high blood sugar levels) Non-healing wounds;infection is increased as the excess sugar feeds fungal and bacterial invaders Tissue damage (due to oxidizing [burning] effect of the excess sugar in the tissue) Causes Other than high stress situations, harmful drug interactions (such as with he Continue reading >>

Which Supplements Can Help Lower Or Control My Blood Sugar?

Which Supplements Can Help Lower Or Control My Blood Sugar?

Question: Answer: Many different supplements may help lower or control blood sugar in people with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes who experience hyperglycemia (when blood glucose rises higher than normal). These supplements are discussed below. More details about each, including dosage, drug interactions, potential side effects, and ConsumerLab.com's reviews of products on the market, can be found by clicking on the links. Due to the seriousness of hyperglycemia, it is important to consult with your physician regarding use of these supplements. Cinnamon supplements may modestly improve blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes whose blood sugar is not well controlled with medication. In addition, one small study found that a branded cinnamon extract reduced fasting blood sugar by an average of about 10 mg/dL in prediabetic men and women with metabolic syndrome. Keep in mind, however, that only certain varieties of cinnamon have been shown to have this effect, and long-term safety studies have not been conducted. Curcumin (from turmeric) may improve blood sugar levels, according to preliminary studies, and one study found curcumin to dramatically lower the chances of prediabetes in middle-aged, slightly overweight men and women with somewhat higher than normal blood sugar levels. Alpha lipoic acid may improve insulin sensitivity and blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes, although it may only slightly reduce levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Chromium picolinate may help some people with type 2 diabetes decrease fasting blood glucose levels as well as levels of insulin and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). However, be aware that high doses may worsen insulin sensitivity in healthy people who are not obese or diabetic. Having adequate blood levels of vi Continue reading >>

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