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Blood Sugar Out Of Control

Blood Sugar Control: Does Cutting Out White Foods Really Help?

Blood Sugar Control: Does Cutting Out White Foods Really Help?

Q: I have cut out all “white” foods from my diet, but my blood sugar levels are still running high after meals. What else can I do at mealtimes to improve my readings? A: Although “white” foods can contain excess sugar and refined carbohydrates that spike blood sugar levels, these are not the only foods that impact blood sugar. In addition, not all “white foods” are going to significantly raise your levels either. First, let's take a look at what actually impacts blood sugar. Any carbohydrate-based food will break down into glucose, or sugar, and enter your bloodstream. Depending on the type of carbohydrate contained in the food, this will either happen rapidly or slowly over time. Although “white foods” like table sugar will elevate blood sugar levels quickly, there are plenty of non-white foods that will do this as well. The key to managing healthy blood sugar levels: Eat mostly complex carbohydrates instead of simple carbohydrates — but make sure not to consume excess amounts of any kind of carbohydrate at any one time. A simple carbohydrate is one that converts into sugar rapidly. In addition to table sugar, these include white flour pasta, white bread, and white rice. Then there are non-white simple refined carbohydrates such as wheat bread (that is not 100% whole grain), honey, fruit drinks, sugary desserts and snacks, such as milk chocolate and pie, condiments such as jelly, ketchup, barbeque sauce, and even many granola bars. Consuming any refined carbohydrate, regardless of its color, will result in a rise in blood sugar levels. To prevent this, you want to choose complex, or whole grain carbohydrates, instead. These are carbohydrate-rich foods that are still in their whole, unprocessed form. Think whole fruits, 100% whole grain bread, brown r Continue reading >>

12 Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Out Of Whack

12 Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Out Of Whack

Blood sugar, or glucose, is one of the best things Mother Nature ever provided us with. It’s one component of your body chemistry that helps you feel alive and happy. When glucose is at the right level, you’re likely to experience a great attitude, a strong immune system, low stress, and a good night’s sleep as well. But when blood sugar gets too high, then “crashes,” or falls very low, the effects can be devastating to bodily processes. For this reason, the body strives to maintain blood sugar levels within a narrow range through the coordinated efforts of several glands and their hormones. Understanding Blood Sugar Control After you eat a meal, the sugars in each of the foods you eat raises the level of sugar in your blood. The body responds by secreting insulin — a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin lowers blood sugar levels by increasing the rate at which glucose is taken up by cells throughout the body. If you go too long without eating, or eat the wrong (read: “junk”) foods, or if your hormones are out of balance, your blood sugar will fall too low. When this happens, your adrenal glands will release adrenalin and cortisol in order to remedy the situation. At this point, you should eat food that will slowly and gradually raise your blood sugar levels again. Most of the time, eating three square meals a day keeps your blood sugar in balance. But when this process gets out of whack, you can find yourself on the blood sugar roller coaster, with no one at the brake switch. How do you know if you’re holding a ticket to this invisible junk food ride? 12 Signs Your Blood Sugar Is Out Of Control 1. Your waist is larger than your hips. 2. You find it difficult to lose weight. 3. You crave sweets. 4. You feel infinitely better after you eat. 5. You Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia) In Diabetes

High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia) In Diabetes

What is high blood sugar? High blood sugar means that the level of sugar in your blood is higher than recommended for you. If you don’t keep your blood sugar at a normal, healthy level most of the time, you will increase your risk of heart and blood vessel disease, stroke, kidney problems, and loss of vision. The medical term for high blood sugar is hyperglycemia. Blood sugar is also called blood glucose. What is the cause? Blood sugar that stays high is the main problem of diabetes. Your body breaks down some of the foods you eat into sugar. Normally the hormone insulin moves this sugar into your cells, where your body uses it for energy. In diabetes the insulin is not moving the sugar into the cells, so it builds up in the bloodstream and starts to cause problems. Sometimes you may have high blood sugar even though you are taking diabetes medicine. This can happen for many reasons but it always means that your diabetes is not in good control. Some reasons why your sugar might go too high are: Skipping your diabetes medicine Not taking the right amount of diabetes medicine Taking certain medicines that increase your blood sugar or make your blood sugar medicines work less well Taking in too many calories by eating large portions of food, choosing too many high-calorie foods, or drinking too many high-sugar beverages Eating too many carbohydrates, such as foods made mainly with sugar, white flour (in bread, biscuits, pancakes, for example), white potatoes, or white rice Not getting enough physical activity (exercise lowers your blood sugar) Having increased emotional or physical stress Being sick, including colds, flu, an infected tooth, or a urinary tract infection, especially if you have a fever If you are using insulin, having a problem with your insulin (for examp Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Control Your Blood Sugar

8 Ways To Control Your Blood Sugar

That means at least 20 to 30 minutes every day. It takes only a few days of missed workouts and poor eating to worsen a person’s insulin resistance, says Barry Braun, Ph.D., an associate professor of kinesiology at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. To make sure you stick with it, choose the exercise that you enjoy the most. Related: TRY THE 21-DAY METASHRED—an All-New At-Home Fitness Program From Men’s Health. One Guy Lost 25 Pounds In 6 Months! Photo: Rubberball Productions Studies show it can improve insulin sensitivity. This means your body needs less of the hormone insulin to keep your blood-sugar levels in check. “The cheap supermarket stuff works just as well as expensive supplement versions,” says Jonny Bowden, Ph.D., C.N.S., author of The Most Effective Natural Cures on Earth. Photo: Mitch Mandel ...take alpha lipoic acid. “This supplement is unexcelled as a blood-sugar nutrient and is a prescription item in Europe,” says Bowden. He recommends taking 300 milligrams twice a day. Puritan’s Pride Alpha Lipoic Acid is reasonably priced and passed purity tests at consumerlab.com. Photo: Mitch Mandel University of Massachusetts scientists recently discovered that exercising improved insulin sensitivity by 40 percent when a 500-calorie deficit was created, but produced no improvement when the burned energy was immediately replaced with mostly carbohydrates. Photo: Rodale Images, Rodale Inc. It’ll allow you to find out how specific meals, foods, and beverages affect your blood sugar. One option is the TrueTrack Smart System brand (cvs.com). Simply prick your finger 2 hours after a meal. The number shouldn’t be above 139 mg/dl, and it shouldn’t be below 100 or your fasting number—whichever is lower, says Keith W. Berkowitz, M.D. If you f Continue reading >>

Us Diabetics Have Worsening Blood Sugar Control

Us Diabetics Have Worsening Blood Sugar Control

The number of U.S. diabetics with healthy blood sugar levels has declined in recent years, a study suggests. Researchers analyzed data on 1.6 million adults with diabetes from 2006 to 2013. During this period, the proportion with HbA1c below 7 percent declined from 56 percent to 54 percent, and the share with HbA1c at or above 9 percent rose from 10 percent to 12 percent. "Clearly, there is a sizeable proportion of patients with poor glycemic control - and many of them are young," said lead study author Kasia Lipska of Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut. "We need to do better for them." The researchers examined data on prescriptions and blood sugar test results to see how changes in medication utilization might relate to shifts in the proportion of diabetics with healthy blood sugar. Use of thiazolidinediones plummeted from 2006 to 2013 when one drug in this class (rosiglitazone) was linked to an increased risk of heart attack, stroke and congestive heart failure. Thiazolidinedione prescriptions accounted for less than 6 percent of the market share for diabetes drugs by the end of the study period, down from 29 percent at the start. Prescriptions also fell for sulfonylureas. These medicines accounted for 31 percent of prescriptions at the end of the study, down from 39 percent. Meanwhile, DPP-4 inhibitors, introduced around the start of the study period, accounted for 15 percent of prescriptions by 2013. (These drugs include sitagliptin, saxagliptin and vildagliptin, for example.) Prescriptions for metformin rose from 48 percent to 54 percent over the course of the study. The study didn't explore why shifts in drug utilization or changes in glycemic control occurred, but it's possible at least some patients were using less effective medicines by the end of the st Continue reading >>

6 Ways To Control Your Blood Sugar

6 Ways To Control Your Blood Sugar

When you have diabetes, you’re endlessly told to watch your blood sugar levels. Swings in blood sugar levels not only make you feel lousy, but also can do real damage. Diabetes decreases the body’s production of insulin, the hormone that regulates blood sugar. Without enough insulin, sugar builds up. That build-up damages nerves and blood vessels. It increases your risk for heart disease and stroke. Ignored, it can also lead to kidney failure and blindness. Conversely, low sugar levels lead to other damage, which leads to dizziness, weakness and a lack of coordination. Boiled down, doctors will suggest two things to fight those swings and unhealthy sugar elevated levels: Eat healthy and exercise. But it can be a lot more complex than that. In a world where schedules are rushed, hurried meals are an afterthought and workouts get postponed because of a thousand other things going on in our lives, “eat healthy and exercise” may seem a lot easier said than done. Here are a few tips from the experts to make maintaining healthy blood sugar levels a breeze: Plan, plan, plan. Anticipating your week’s menu before going to the grocery store will make following a healthy diet easier, say experts. Also, plan for the unplannable. You’re going to miss a meal every now and then. It happens. Carry healthy snacks, like a few granola bars or even emergency glucose tablets, that can prevent your blood sugar level from dropping too low. Shop strategically. Most supermarkets have similar layouts: most of the healthier options can be found around the store’s perimeter. Fresh produce, dairy, fresh (and organic) meats and fish are usually along the outer walls. Try to stick to the perimeter, with only occasional trips to the inner areas, advise nutritionists with the American Dia Continue reading >>

A Beginner’s Guide To Paleo And Blood Sugar

A Beginner’s Guide To Paleo And Blood Sugar

Confused about blood sugar? Here’s a quick and basic overview of what it is, what kinds of diet and lifestyle factors can affect it, and what that means from the perspective of a Paleo diet and lifestyle framework. What Is Blood Sugar? The “sugar” in “blood sugar” isn’t the same thing as table sugar. Biologically, “sugars” are simple carbohydrates, the building blocks of all the carbohydrates in everything you eat (including table sugar, but also including other foods that contain carbohydrates, like potatoes). One type of simple carbohydrate or “sugar” is glucose, which is the “sugar” measured when somebody measures your “blood sugar.” A more accurate name for it is “blood glucose,” which is what you’ll see in most studies. So having high blood sugar doesn’t mean that you ate a lot of table sugar and the sugar is now in your bloodstream; it means you ate a lot of carbohydrates (from any source) and the sugar (glucose) is now in your bloodstream. Any digestible carbohydrate can raise blood sugar, although some raise it higher and faster than others. Problems with Blood Sugar Regulation In healthy people, blood sugar is automatically regulated. You eat some carbs and your blood sugar rises, but insulin appears to the rescue and lowers blood sugar levels by storing the glucose for you to use later between meals (that’s an incredibly simplified explanation, and the reality is very complicated, but if you want more on insulin, you can read about it here). That’s how it works in healthy people. But problems with blood sugar regulation are incredibly widespread. In fact, some of them are so common we’ve almost stopped seeing them as problems – like the mood and energy rollercoaster that leaves you trying to drag yourself out of a mi Continue reading >>

6 Ways To Control Your Blood Sugar Levels To Prevent Diabetes And Cancer

6 Ways To Control Your Blood Sugar Levels To Prevent Diabetes And Cancer

Sure, having out-of-whack blood sugar raises your risk of diabetes. But did you know it can also raise your risk of cancer 24 percent by fueling the growth of abnormal cells? The great news: This is one risk factor that’s easy to control by... Steady your sugar with raw vegetables Eating two cups of antioxidant-rich veggies daily is study-proven to cut your risk of blood-sugar woes 31 percent — or more. Make meeting that goal easy by keeping a dish of ready-to- eat carrot, celery, cucumber and red pepper sticks — plus cherry tomatoes and raw string beans — front and center in your refrigerator. People who tried this trick doubled their intake of those healthy sugar-steadying foods. “When you see something over and over again, it reprograms your brain so you start wanting that food,” explains Tom Kersting, Ph.D., author of Losing Weight When Diets Fail. MUST-SEE: Here’s How to Drop 11 Pounds Fast by Drinking Iced Tea Melting fat with rice and beans Sneaking ½ cup of brown rice and the same amount of beans into your daily diet could more than double your fat loss, plus cut your chance of developing a risky sugar problem 23 percent or more, say researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Beans are chock-full of appetite-suppressing protein, and rice is packed with sugar-stabilizing fiber and B vitamins. Stock up on olive oil Most Greeks consume 26 liters of extra-virgin olive oil yearly — plus as much wine! And while you’d think lacing your meals with oil and alcohol would be a recipe for blood-sugar disaster, the opposite is true: Sipping 5 oz. of wine while dining reduces a heavy meal’s sugar surge 37 percent by stalling the digestive tract’s absorption of carbs. And downing 2 Tbs. of olive oil daily helps muscle cells soak up (a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Management

Diabetes Management

The term diabetes includes several different metabolic disorders that all, if left untreated, result in abnormally high concentration of a sugar called glucose in the blood. Diabetes mellitus type 1 results when the pancreas no longer produces significant amounts of the hormone insulin, usually owing to the autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing beta cells of the pancreas. Diabetes mellitus type 2, in contrast, is now thought to result from autoimmune attacks on the pancreas and/or insulin resistance. The pancreas of a person with type 2 diabetes may be producing normal or even abnormally large amounts of insulin. Other forms of diabetes mellitus, such as the various forms of maturity onset diabetes of the young, may represent some combination of insufficient insulin production and insulin resistance. Some degree of insulin resistance may also be present in a person with type 1 diabetes. The main goal of diabetes management is, as far as possible, to restore carbohydrate metabolism to a normal state. To achieve this goal, individuals with an absolute deficiency of insulin require insulin replacement therapy, which is given through injections or an insulin pump. Insulin resistance, in contrast, can be corrected by dietary modifications and exercise. Other goals of diabetes management are to prevent or treat the many complications that can result from the disease itself and from its treatment. Overview[edit] Goals[edit] The treatment goals are related to effective control of blood glucose, blood pressure and lipids, to minimize the risk of long-term consequences associated with diabetes. They are suggested in clinical practice guidelines released by various national and international diabetes agencies. The targets are: HbA1c of 6%[1] to 7.0%[2] Preprandial blood Continue reading >>

15 Ways High Blood Sugar Affects Your Body

15 Ways High Blood Sugar Affects Your Body

High blood sugar symptoms Glucose, or sugar, is the fuel that powers cells throughout the body. Blood levels of this energy source ebb and flow naturally, depending what you eat (and how much), as well as when you eat it. But when something goes wrong—and cells aren't absorbing the glucose—the resulting high blood sugar damages nerves, blood vessels, and organs, setting the stage for dangerous complications. Normal blood-sugar readings typically fall between 60 mg/dl and 140 mg/dl. A blood test called a hemoglobin A1c measures average blood sugar levels over the previous three months. A normal reading is below 5.7% for people without diabetes. An excess of glucose in the bloodstream, or hyperglycemia, is a sign of diabetes. People with type 1 diabetes don’t make insulin, the hormone needed to ferry sugar from the bloodstream into cells. Type 2 diabetes means your body doesn’t use insulin properly and you can end up with too much or too little insulin. Either way, without proper treatment, toxic amounts of sugar can build up in the bloodstream, wreaking havoc head to toe. That’s why it’s so important to get your blood sugar levels in check. “If you keep glucose levels near normal, you reduce the risk of diabetes complications,” says Robert Ratner, MD, chief scientific and medical officer of the American Diabetes Association. Here’s a rundown of the major complications and symptoms of high blood sugar. No symptoms at all Often, high blood sugar causes no (obvious) symptoms at all, at least at first. About 29 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, but one in four has no idea. Another 86 million have higher-than-normal blood sugar levels, but not high enough to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. That's why it’s a good idea to get your blood sugar test Continue reading >>

How To Maintain Normal Blood Sugar

How To Maintain Normal Blood Sugar

If you are one of the millions of people who has prediabetes, diabetes, metabolic syndrome or any other form of “insulin resistance,” maintaining normal blood sugar levels can be challenging. Over the past several decades, these chronic disorders have swept through the U.S. and many other nations, reaching epidemic proportions and causing serious, but often preventable, side effects like nerve damage, fatigue, loss of vision, arterial damage and weight gain. Elevated blood sugar levels maintained for an extended period of time can push someone who is “prediabetic” into having full-blown diabetes (which now affects about one in every three adults in the U.S.). (1) Even for people who aren’t necessarily at a high risk for developing diabetes or heart complications, poorly managed blood sugar can lead to common complications, including fatigue, weight gain and sugar cravings. In extreme cases, elevated blood sugar can even contribute to strokes, amputations, coma and death in people with a history of insulin resistance. Blood sugar is raised by glucose, which is the sugar we get from eating many different types of foods that contain carbohydrates. Although we usually think of normal blood sugar as being strictly reliant upon how many carbohydrates and added sugar someone eats, other factors also play a role. For example, stress can elevate cortisol levels, which interferes with how insulin is used, and the timing of meals can also affect how the body manages blood sugar. (2) What can you do to help avoid dangerous blood sugar swings and lower diabetes symptoms? As you’ll learn, normal blood sugar levels are sustained through a combination of eating a balanced, low-processed diet, getting regular exercise and managing the body’s most important hormones in othe Continue reading >>

Intensive Insulin Therapy: Tight Blood Sugar Control

Intensive Insulin Therapy: Tight Blood Sugar Control

Intensive insulin therapy can help prevent long-term diabetes complications. Consider the benefits — and understand the commitment. If you have type 1 diabetes — and in some cases if you have type 2 diabetes — intensive insulin therapy may be the key to long-term health. This aggressive therapy isn't easy, but the benefits are real. Find out how intensive insulin therapy can help you achieve desired blood sugar control and what intensive insulin therapy requires of you. Then you and your health care team can decide if intensive insulin therapy is the best approach for you. What is intensive insulin therapy? Intensive insulin therapy is an aggressive treatment approach designed to control your blood sugar levels. Intensive insulin therapy requires close monitoring of blood sugar levels and multiple doses of insulin. Fortunately, research is ongoing into new methods of blood sugar monitoring and insulin delivery that may make it easier and reduce the risk of intensive insulin therapy. One such method is a closed-loop insulin delivery system that combines continuous blood sugar monitoring with insulin pump delivery. If you choose to try intensive insulin therapy, you'll work with your doctor to set various goals based on your age, overall health and other individual factors. Ideally, this could mean: Blood sugar level before meals: 70 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 3.9 to 7.2 millimoles per liter (mmol/L) Blood sugar level two hours after meals: less than 180 mg/dL (10 mmol/L) Hemoglobin A1C (glycated hemoglobin, an indicator of your blood sugar control for the past few months): less than 7 percent What are the benefits of intensive insulin therapy? Intensive insulin therapy can prevent or slow the progression of long-term diabetes complications. Several Continue reading >>

Proven Tips & Strategies To Bring High Blood Sugar Down (quickly)

Proven Tips & Strategies To Bring High Blood Sugar Down (quickly)

Untreated, high blood sugar can cause many problems and future complications. Recognizing signs of high blood sugar levels and knowing how to lower them can help you prevent these complications and increase the quality and length of your life. Topics covered (click to jump to specific section) High blood sugar level symptoms and signs Symptoms of high blood sugar include: Increased thirst Tired all the time Irritability Increased hunger Urinating a lot Dry mouth Blurred vision Severe high blood sugar can lead to nausea and fruity smelling breath The signs and symptoms for high blood sugar are the same for both type 1 and type 2. Signs usually show up quicker in those who have type 1 because of the nature of their diabetes. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease that causes the body to stop making insulin altogether. Type 2 is caused by lifestyle factors when the body eventually stops responding to insulin, which causes the sugar to increase slowly. People with type 2 can live longer without any symptoms creeping because their body is still making enough insulin to help control it a little bit. What causes the blood sugar levels go to high? Our bodies need sugar to make energy for the cells. Without it, we cannot do basic functions. When we eat foods with glucose, insulin pairs with it to allow it to enter into the cell wall. If the insulin is not there, then the glucose molecule can’t get through the wall and cannot be used. The extra glucose hangs out in the bloodstream which is literally high blood sugar. The lack of insulin can be caused by two different things. First, you can have decreased insulin resistance which means that your insulin doesn’t react the way that it is supposed to. It doesn’t partner with glucose to be used as fuel. Secondly, you can have no insuli Continue reading >>

Which Supplements Can Help Lower Or Control My Blood Sugar?

Which Supplements Can Help Lower Or Control My Blood Sugar?

Question: Answer: Many different supplements may help lower or control blood sugar in people with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes who experience hyperglycemia (when blood glucose rises higher than normal). These supplements are discussed below. More details about each, including dosage, drug interactions, potential side effects, and ConsumerLab.com's reviews of products on the market, can be found by clicking on the links. Due to the seriousness of hyperglycemia, it is important to consult with your physician regarding use of these supplements. Cinnamon supplements may modestly improve blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes whose blood sugar is not well controlled with medication. In addition, one small study found that a branded cinnamon extract reduced fasting blood sugar by an average of about 10 mg/dL in prediabetic men and women with metabolic syndrome. Keep in mind, however, that only certain varieties of cinnamon have been shown to have this effect, and long-term safety studies have not been conducted. Curcumin (from turmeric) may improve blood sugar levels, according to preliminary studies, and one study found curcumin to dramatically lower the chances of prediabetes in middle-aged, slightly overweight men and women with somewhat higher than normal blood sugar levels. Alpha lipoic acid may improve insulin sensitivity and blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes, although it may only slightly reduce levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Chromium picolinate may help some people with type 2 diabetes decrease fasting blood glucose levels as well as levels of insulin and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). However, be aware that high doses may worsen insulin sensitivity in healthy people who are not obese or diabetic. Having adequate blood levels of vi Continue reading >>

14 Amazing Herbs That Lower Blood Sugar

14 Amazing Herbs That Lower Blood Sugar

We live in a world where prescription medicine is getting more and more expensive as well as controversial. Alternative medicine is gaining momentum and with good reason! The same is true for treatments for diabetes type 2. You have therapies that can reverse diabetes through lifestyle and diet changes, natural supplements that can help stabilize blood sugar levels, and also herbs that lower blood sugar. Not only are these alternative therapies safer, but they are also easier on your pocket, on your body and mind. Maintaining normal blood sugar levels is necessary for the body’s overall health. Erratic blood sugar levels can affect the body’s ability to function normally and even lead to complications if left unchecked. Some herbs and spices found in nature do a tremendous job of naturally lowering blood sugar levels, making them a boon for diabetics and pre-diabetics. What’s more, being nature’s multi-taskers, herbs and spices also produce overall health benefits beyond just helping balance blood sugar. We want to clarify one thing right away – not everything on our list can be classified as ‘herbs’. However, they are all from natural sources. Herbs come from the leafy and green part of the plant. Spices are parts of the plant other than the leafy bit, such as the root, stem, bulb, bark or seeds. RELATED: Decoding The Dawn Phenomenon (High Morning Blood Sugar) With that in mind, let’s take a look at some of the best herbs that lower blood sugar, along with a few spices thrown in, to give you a more comprehensive list. Please note that while we normally do not use animal studies to support any dietary supplement, several herbs like garlic and ginger are considered ‘food’ and so, are used traditionally by cultures across the world in their daily diet Continue reading >>

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