diabetestalk.net

Blood Sugar Meters And Strips

Guidelines For Buying And Using Diabetes Supplies

Guidelines For Buying And Using Diabetes Supplies

Diabetes is a lifelong condition. Because it is, you can have major health problems if you don't keep blood glucose under control. That's why fully understanding how to buy and properly use diabetes testing supplies as well as diabetes medications is so important. Learning to regularly test your blood glucose level with a glucose monitor and to take diabetes medications when you are supposed to will make living with the condition much easier. With a little practice, you can self-manage diabetes just as you manage other aspects of your life. When you do, your quality of life and ability to be active and do the things you want to do will greatly improve. Home blood sugar (glucose) testing is an essential part of controlling your blood sugar and self-managing diabetes. Your diabetes educator can guide you in terms of how often to check your blood glucose and how to do it properly. Make sure the diabetes educator watches you use the glucose meter several times. That way, you can be sure you're doing it correctly. At a minimum, you'll be checking your blood sugar every morning before you eat. It's also advisable to check it before lunch and dinner and at bedtime. Your doctor may also ask that you test your blood one hour after eating. Blood glucose levels checked with blood taken from the fingertips will show important changes faster than glucose levels checked with blood taken from other sites on the body. The usual way to check blood sugar levels is by: Pricking the fingertip with a lancing tool -- a small, sharp needle Putting the blood drop on a test strip Placing the test strip into a glucose meter Reading the blood glucose level displayed on the meter If you take insulin, you might change the dose, depending on the reading. Checking blood glucose frequently allows you Continue reading >>

All-in-one Meters: Now You See Them... Or Not

All-in-one Meters: Now You See Them... Or Not

The idea of an all-in-one glucose meter that eliminates the need to carry around a bunch of separate D-supplies is so appealing! But in many respects it's like the mirage of water on the desert horizon that we can never reach. Many companies have promised glucose meters with built-in lancets and test strips to make D-management all the easier for us PWDs (people with diabetes), but so far they've all been vaporware. Recently, one of these all-inclusive device developers caught our eye in that it was named by MedCity News as a top company investors should be watching in the near future: Pepex Biomedical in St. Louis, MN, which is creating a line of glucose monitoring products that it believes will "change the game" for diabetes devices. The company's not a new kid on the block; Pepex has been around since 2009 and for four years has been working on its all-inclusive meter platform called Trio. Different than traditional meters that use a strip to measure blood from a lancet-pricked fingertip, the Trio actually won't draw any blood but will instead test the blood at the tissue source, the company says. The meter itself will be about the size of an iPhone, and you'll be able to snap on a slim, side-loaded disposable cartridge that houses a supply of plastic molded glucose test "chips" that consolidate a lancet and glucose checking technology in one piece. Meter Magic This is all based on Pepex's proprietary Conductive Composite Monofilaments (CCM) for detecting blood glucose levels -- electrochemical biosensors inside the cartridge that are composed of single strands of fiber about the diameter of a human hair. While the company markets the cartridges as being able to hold "a week's worth of chips," there is no clear number at this time on how many that might entail. Once Continue reading >>

Why Do Test Strips Cost So Much?

Why Do Test Strips Cost So Much?

Have you looked at test strip prices and thought, “These should be made of gold?” Well, they are made of gold, along with other costly chemicals. But some cost 16 cents apiece; others cost $1 to $2. Why this range? What price is right? Spurred by some comments from DSM reader John C, I decided to research test strips, and they’re amazing. In fact, I will need two columns to explore them and the issues involved in their best use. To understand how test strips work, you would need to know quantum mechanics and electrochemistry (whatever that is), and I don’t. Here’s the part I could understand: Modern strips work by measuring the electrical energy in glucose in the blood. According to an article by Erika Gebel, PhD, in Diabetes Forecast, “Electrochemical test strips, the world standard today, employ enzymes…that convert glucose into an electrical current. That electricity…is read out by the meter as a glucose concentration.” It’s much faster than the old way, which was based on reading a color change, and requires much less blood. Apparently, working with enzymes is hard. “You want hydration around the enzyme to keep it active, but not too much because that will lead to degradation,” says Selly Saini, the worldwide director of strip products for Johnson & Johnson. “That’s a fine balance.” Because they use enzymes, strips are delicate. According to Dr. Gebel, exposure to humidity or temperature extremes can damage the enzymes, reducing accuracy. But “strip makers have partly tamed enzymes and increased their life span by incorporating chemicals that stabilize them.” So the colored patch at the end of the strip includes absorbents to soak up blood and enzymes to turn it into electricity and stabilizers to protect the enzymes. Then the elect Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meter & Insurance Coverage

Blood Glucose Meter & Insurance Coverage

Different plans cover varying amounts of the meter/ strips; there are exceptions to the list below. Many plans cover strips through prescription plans so be sure to verify prescription plan coverage. Sometime it’s more cost effective through DME (durable medical equipment) so individual should check his/ her coverage. Also, some meter companies offer discount cards so it may be more cost effective to use the copay card instead of the recommendations below. Abbott/Freestyle is now available with automatic lower copays for all commercial plans at participating pharmacies (CVS, Rite Aid, Walmart, Walgreens, Giant, Costco, Wegman’s). Recommended meters by each company: Abbott - Freestyle Freedom, Freestyle Lite, Freestyle Insulinx, or Precision x-tra Accu-chek - Guide, Nano, Aviva or Compact Plus Bayer - Contour, Contour Next, Contour USB, or Breeze 2 One Touch - Verio, Ultra, Ultra 2, Ultra Smart, Ultra Mini Continue reading >>

The Best Glucometers Of 2018

The Best Glucometers Of 2018

Our Process We spent over 80 hours researching the best 30 glucometers on the market. We considered the specifications, features, user reviews, medical studies, availability and cost. After eliminating models that used old technology, like coding, or were too difficult to find in stores, we purchased the best 12 blood glucose meters so we could perform hands-on evaluations of each device. Before diving into our recommendations for the best glucometers, it’s important to note that Top Ten Reviews is not a substitute for your primary care physician. Our recommendations are made based on common scenarios, hands-on experience, market cost evaluations and a comparison of important features, but they’re not a replacement for advice from your doctor. We are not medical experts. $19.99 The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect gets its name from its main feature – Bluetooth that connects it to a mobile app on your smartphone. This provides excellent data management of your readings so you can spot patterns and better treat your diabetes. In addition, the device's interface is one of the easiest to navigate. It has multiple buttons so you can get to the features you need quickly, and the display is high-contrast with big numbers. Another reason why the Aviva Connect is the best glucometer is the availability of its test strips – they are everywhere. We couldn't find a pharmacy or online store that didn't stock them. Of course, the one significant downside to the test strips is their cost. At $1.39 per strip in a pack of 100 and $1.52 per strip in a pack of 50, they’re more expensive than most test strips on the market. Best Glucometer for Value & Availability $13.95 The CONTOUR NEXT is our pick for the best glucometer if your primary concerns are overall value and the availability o Continue reading >>

Glucose Meter

Glucose Meter

Four generations of blood glucose meter, c. 1993–2005. Sample sizes vary from 30 to 0.3 μl. Test times vary from 5 seconds to 2 minutes (modern meters typically provide results in 5 seconds). A glucose meter is a medical device for determining the approximate concentration of glucose in the blood. It can also be a strip of glucose paper dipped into a substance and measured to the glucose chart. It is a key element of home blood glucose monitoring (HBGM) by people with diabetes mellitus or hypoglycemia. A small drop of blood, obtained by pricking the skin with a lancet, is placed on a disposable test strip that the meter reads and uses to calculate the blood glucose level. The meter then displays the level in units of mg/dl or mmol/l. Since approximately 1980, a primary goal of the management of type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes mellitus has been achieving closer-to-normal levels of glucose in the blood for as much of the time as possible, guided by HBGM several times a day. The benefits include a reduction in the occurrence rate and severity of long-term complications from hyperglycemia as well as a reduction in the short-term, potentially life-threatening complications of hypoglycemia. History[edit] Leland Clark presented his first paper about the oxygen electrode, later named the Clark electrode, on 15 April 1956, at a meeting of the American Society for Artificial Organs during the annual meetings of the Federated Societies for Experimental Biology.[1][2] In 1962, Clark and Ann Lyons from the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital developed the first glucose enzyme electrode. This biosensor was based on a thin layer of glucose oxidase (GOx) on an oxygen electrode. Thus, the readout was the amount of oxygen consumed by GOx during the enzymatic reaction with the substra Continue reading >>

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

Top 10 Popular Blood Glucose Meters Put To The Test

With countless blood glucose meters on the market, how do you know which one to choose? Do you choose the most expensive one; it must work the best if it costs the most, right? Or are you a techie looking for a Bluetooth meter that syncs to your smartphone? Perhaps, you’re concerned with the cost and you’re looking for the most affordable meter. Top 10 Glucose Meters We’ve taken the time to test the ten most popular blood glucose meters. Take a look to find the meter that’s the best fit for you. Winner and our favorite meter is One Touch Ultra 2. OneTouch Ultra 2 Accu-Chek Aviva Connect Walmart ReliON Confirm OneTouch Verio Abbott FreeStyle Lite Walgreens True2Go Contour Next EZ Livongo Health In Touch Meter Nova Max Plus Sanofi iBGStar Our Pick After a careful review of the top glucose meters on the market, our #1 recommendation is the One Touch Ultra 2. It’s simply one of the best in terms of functionality and price. Click here to learn more. (Helpful Tip: Although you can get one from your local pharmacy, you’ll find it cheaper on Amazon. Click here to get yours.) Accu-Chek Aviva Connect The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect gets its name from the Bluetooth connection that syncs to the user’s smartphone. The Connect utilizes an app to keep track of both short-term and long-term readings on a person’s smartphone. The user can also view their trends via bar graphs and maps on the app. The Accu-Chek Aviva Connect will cost you $29.99 and $1.75 for a single test strip. One con to this meter is that the test strips are one of the highest priced strips on the market. However, they are readily available in almost all drug stores and pharmacies. Accu-Chek also offers a supplemental program called Preferred Savings which can reduce most test-strip co-pays to $15-$45. Ot Continue reading >>

8 Things To Consider When Choosing A Blood Glucose Monitor

8 Things To Consider When Choosing A Blood Glucose Monitor

Test strips are sold separately from glucose monitors and can be pricey.(KRISTEN AFONSO/PRISCILLA DE CASTRO)Blood glucose monitors are devicesabout the size of a cell phone or smallerthat are used to monitor your blood sugar at home. Although they can be mistaken for the latest fancy digital device, these gadgets come with lancets, which are used to poke the finger, and test strips, which is where you place the drop of blood before inserting it into the monitor to get a blood-sugar reading. They range in price from $20 to $70, but are often given away for free by various health-care providers. Companies can afford to give the monitors away for free because they make their money from the glucose strips, which can be pricey$1 or more per strip. If you check your blood sugar as often as you should, you can easily spend more than $100 a month. The vast majority of your cost will come from glucose strips. So when choosing your device, you should pay attention to the cost of the strips, even if the monitor is free. Glucose Meters"This may save your life" Watch videoMore about blood sugar monitoring You may need to select a specific blood glucose monitor because that's what your insurance plan covers. Edith Sciamanna, 79, of Binghamton, N.Y. has the Accu-Chek Advantage for just that reason. "I'm quite satisfied with it," she says. However, if you do have the luxury of choice, there are differences between models that can help you decide (in addition to the cost of the strips). Consider that some systems: Are multisite: This means you can prick yourself not only on the finger but also on the upper arm, forearm, thigh, calf, or fleshy part of the hand. Require smaller samples of blood: The lancet doesn't poke the skin as deeply. Give results in as little as five seconds: This fe Continue reading >>

Best Cheap Blood Glucose Meters

Best Cheap Blood Glucose Meters

Cheap blood glucose meters are still accurate and consistent It may be tempting to judge a blood glucose meter solely by its initial cost. But given that someone testing their glucose levels four times a day can blow through more than 100 test strips in a month, a glucose meter's true cost is best measured by how much you spend on test strips over time. In fact, some major manufacturers give away their meters for free because they recoup their losses on sales of test strips. Still, the meters with the lowest yearly operating cost also tend to cost very little themselves. Take our best-reviewed cheap glucose meter, the Bayer Contour Next (Est. $15). It's one of the few truly inexpensive meters that not only makes it into clinical trials but also excels: In a study published in 2014 in the Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, researchers found that the Bayer Contour Next outperformed a professional glucose monitor designed for point-of-care testing. This small, inexpensive glucose meter also receives Excellent scores for accuracy from a leading consumer research organization, alongside Very Good scores for repeatability and convenience. User reviews on the Bayer Contour Next tend to be very short and to the point; at this price, users just want a blood glucose meter that does its job. But they also love not having to code the meter when they open a new vial of test strips, being able to collect blood from almost any angle, and having the option to add more blood to the test strip if there wasn't enough the first time. The Bayer Contour Next requires a 0.6 microliter blood sample and allows you to use your palm as an alternate testing site. Other popular features -- and unusual finds on a glucose meter in this price range -- include the ability to add notes to store Continue reading >>

Top 10 Best Glucose Meters From Consumer Reports 2015

Top 10 Best Glucose Meters From Consumer Reports 2015

World-wide annual sales of glucose meters and test-strip supplies tally up to well over 10 billion dollars each year, but with over 50 styles and brands to choose from, it can be hard to determine which meter is not only the best for your needs but also best in terms of accuracy, price, and ease of use. Thanks to Stacey Divone from The Girl with the Portable Pancreas, we got the inside scoop on the 2015 Consumer Reports review of today’s glucose meter technology. The first nine of these meters scored as “excellent” in accuracy and “above 80 out of 100” for their overall assessment. Here are the top 10 recommended meters: FreeStyle Lite: $20 for the meter with an annual cost of $2410 at 4 strips per day FreeStyle Freedom Lite: $20 for the meter with an annual cost of $2410 at 4 strips per day Bayer Contour Next: $20 for the meter with an annual cost of $1460 at 4 strips per day Well at Walgreens True Metrix: $22 for the meter with an annual cost of $1225 at 4 strips per day Bayer Breeze 2: $25 for the meter with an annual cost of $1900 at 4 strips per day Up & Up Blood Glucose Meter from Target: $15 for the meter with an annual cost of $525 at 4 strips per day Accu-Chek Aviva Plus: $30 for the meter with an annual cost of $2115 at 4 strips per day ReliOn Micro from Walmart: $15 for the meter with an annual cost of $525 at 4 strips per day Accu-Chek Compact Plus: $75 for the meter with an annual cost of $2030 at 4 strips per day ReliOn Ultima from Walmart: $15 for the meter with an annual cost of $525 at 4 strips per day Do you use one of these top 10 meters? What are your favorite and least favorite features? Further reading on blood sugar monitoring: Continue reading >>

Why Meters Can't Tell Us Our Blood Sugar Levels

Why Meters Can't Tell Us Our Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes advocate and author Riva Greenberg has been on a "meter accuracy kick" lately — researching the heck out of this controversial topic. Very timely considering I've been seeing loads of expensive TV ads for Accu-Chek's new Nano meter, claiming that it's "23% more accurate" (!) Riva recently published a piece at the Huffington Post on why meter accuracy is both less, and more, critical than you might think. Truth is, she tells us, meter accuracy is only one part of a much larger story. A Guest Post by Riva Greenberg After being lucky enough to receive an iBGStar meter from Sanofi the day before its launch, I ran a few comparison tests between it and the Bayer Contour USB, which I'd been using the past two years, and discovered that the iBGStar consistently gave me a reading 20-25 points higher. So I took out all my meters. There were several, (Sanofi studies show most people use 4 meters on average) and I even ordered two new free meters from FreeStyle. I checked my blood sugar several times on my collection of 7 meters (some think I was a little obsessed) and saw it was rare when two meters gave me the same number! Given that I feel like my meter is my lifeline, I wanted to find out how meters work and why different meters give different results. I talked with a number of Chief Medical Officers, MDs and Medical Safety Officers at several meter manufacturers and I'm going to tell you what I learned in layman's terms. To better understand the science behind meter and strip technology, you can google "meter accuracy" for white papers and posts that would delight even the geekiest engineer. To better know how accurate your own meter is (in percentage terms), you can "check the package insert that comes with the strips and look online at prescribing information," sa Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meter Guide

Blood Glucose Meter Guide

Tweet Keeping an accurate idea of your blood glucose levels is an integral part of successful diabetes management. Blood glucose meters allow you to do this. Choosing the right meter will depend on the products available to you, the cost of test strips (if you need to buy you our own), NHS prescription availability and the most suitable device for your individual requirements. Some blood glucose meters can also check for the presence of ketones which is useful for people with type 1 diabetes or those who are otherwise susceptible to ketoacidosis. Compare blood glucose meters The following independent blood glucose meter reviews detail the types of blood glucose meters available in the UK, who they are made by, the range of features each meter brings and how to get one. In addition, you can read user reviews or leave your own review. Your healthcare team should be able to advise you on how many times per day you need to check your blood sugar levels. Learn more about the recommended blood glucose level ranges as advised by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and the International Diabetes Federation (IDF). You can also read reviews for insulin pumps and CGMs. Discuss your options with your healthcare team and GP. If you are buying your own meter and need to buy your own test strips, make sure to compare prices of test strips and lancets as it is these supplies that are the biggest cost associated with blood glucose testing. Some people prefer to have more than one blood glucose monitor - one for home and one for the office, or one for home and one for travelling. How easy are blood glucose meters to use? This will depend on the design interface favoured by the manufacturer, but some blood glucose monitors are definitely easier to use than others. Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

What does this test do? This is a test system for use at home to measure the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood. What is glucose? Glucose is a sugar that your body uses as a source of energy. Unless you have diabetes, your body regulates the amount of glucose in your blood. People with diabetes may need special diets and medications to control blood glucose. What type of test is this? This is a quantitative test, which means that you will find out the amount of glucose present in your blood sample. Why should you take this test? You should take this test if you have diabetes and you need to monitor your blood sugar (glucose) levels. You and your doctor can use the results to: determine your daily adjustments in treatment know if you have dangerously high or low levels of glucose understand how your diet and exercise change your glucose levels The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (1993) showed that good glucose control using home monitors led to fewer disease complications. How often should you test your glucose? Follow your doctor's recommendations about how often you test your glucose. You may need to test yourself several times each day to determine adjustments in your diet or treatment. What should your glucose levels be? According to the American Diabetes Association (Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2011, Diabetes Care, January 2011, vol.34, Supplement 1, S11-S61) the blood glucose levels for an adult without diabetes are below 100 mg/dL before meals and fasting and are less than 140 mg/dL two hours after meals. People with diabetes should consult their doctor or health care provider to set appropriate blood glucose goals. You should treat your low or high blood glucose as recommended by your health care provider. How accurate is this test? The ac Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meters And Strips

Blood Glucose Meters And Strips

What They Do: Blood glucose meters (BGMs) measure a person’s blood sugar level. To use a meter, users insert a test strip, prick their fingers with a lancing device to draw blood, and then apply a small drop of blood onto a test strip. The meter then gives a blood glucose reading in mg/dl (US standard) or mmol/l (European standard). A blood sugar level of under 70 mg/dl (3.9 mmol/l) is typically considered hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). A level of over 180 mg/dl (10 mmol/l) is considered hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). Hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia are potentially dangerous situations where blood sugars are out of normal range and can be addressed using fast-acting carbohydrates (in the case of a low value) or insulin (in the case of a high value). What Supplies Do I Need? To monitor your blood sugar, these supplies are required: Test strips Lancing instrument (used to prick the finger for blood) Blood glucose meter Some meters are coupled with smartphone apps to monitor data Useful Links: TEST DRIVE: Bayer Contour USB Meter – An in-depth look at this BGM that can plug directly into a computer, next-generation update here. TEST DRIVE: Telcare, Freestyle InsuLinx, and LifesScan OneTouch Verio IQ Meters – Adam compares these three popular meters and provides his favorite aspects of each in this test drive article. TEST DRIVE: Sanofi's iBGStar Meter – A detailed analysis of the iBGStar meter, which can connect to an iPhone/iPod Touch. TEST DRIVE: The LifeScan OneTouch VerioSync Meter and OneTouch Reveal App – Adam test drives this meter, which can wirelessly send data to your favorite Apple devices. Roche's Accu-Chek Aviva Expert the First-Ever BGM with Built-in Bolus Calculator – A brief update on Roche’s new and exciting advancement for the BGM field. L Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meter: How To Choose

Blood Glucose Meter: How To Choose

Many types of blood glucose meters are available. Here's how to choose one that fits your needs and lifestyle. If you have diabetes, you'll likely need a blood glucose meter to measure and display the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood. Exercise, food, medications, stress and other factors affect your blood glucose level. Using a blood glucose meter can help you better manage your diabetes by tracking any fluctuations in your blood glucose level. Many types of blood glucose meters are available, from basic models to more-advanced meters with multiple features and options. The cost of blood glucose meters and test strips varies, as does insurance coverage. Study your options before deciding which model to buy. Choosing the right meter When selecting a blood glucose meter, it can help to know the basics of how they work. To use most blood glucose meters, you first insert a test strip into the device. Then you prick a clean fingertip with a special needle (lancet) to get a drop of blood. You carefully touch the test strip to the blood and wait for a blood glucose reading to appear on the screen. When used and stored properly, blood glucose meters are generally accurate in how they measure glucose. They differ in the type and number of features they offer. Here are several factors to consider when choosing a blood glucose meter: Insurance coverage. Check with your insurance provider for coverage details. Some insurance providers limit coverage to specific models or limit the total number of test strips allowed. Cost. Meters vary in price. Be sure to factor in the cost of test strips. Ease of use and maintenance. Some meters are easier to use than others. Are both the meter and test strips comfortable and easy to hold? Can you easily see the numbers on the screen? How e Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar