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In this video Jimmy breaks down the 3 Common VA mistakes that he sees serving Veterans and Active Duty Military on a daily basis with all of their VA Home Financing needs.

6 Diabetes Mistakes And How To Avoid Them

It takes work to manage your type 2 diabetes. That includes the little things you do every day, such as what you eat and how active you are. Start by avoiding these common mistakes. Your medical team is essential. But you're not in the doctor's office every day. “You are your own doctor 99.9% of the time,” says Andrew Ahmann, MD. He's director of the Harold Schnitzer Diabetes Health Center at Oregon Health & Science University. You’re the one in charge, so it’s up to you to watch your diet, exercise, and take your medication on schedule. You can make better decisions about how to track and manage your diabetes by understanding how the disease works. Sign up for a class or a support group on managing diabetes. “Not enough patients seek them out, and not enough doctors send their patients to them," Ahmann says. "Not only do these resources offer essential information, but they also bring together people who have the same challenges, giving them a place to meet and talk with each other." It's a big step to shift your eating and exercise habits. You need to give it time to see results and for it to feel permanent. “Most people expect something dramatic is going to happen ri Continue reading >>

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  1. Kezia

    What's the lowest blood sugar level you've had?

    Hi everyone
    I was just wondering, what the lowest reading was that you've ever had?
    Personally, about a month ago, I got a reading of 1.5 (US 27) - yikes!!
    I never want to go that low again, not because it was a very bad experience, but because it was just shocking and obviously dangerous and unhealthy. Needless to say, I didn't do it on purpose.
    If you want to know how it happened - I was meeting my boyfriend/partner (whatever you want to call him!) on my lunch break at work to go to lunch at a local cafe, I was planning on injecting there in the toilets, but they had none... so I remembered the diabetic nurse say that I can inject straight after, so I thought that I will just inject once I get back to work after lunch. So, I discreetly tested my blood sugar in the cafe and it was 5.7 (102.6 US). Once I got back to work about 15 minutes after eating my lunch, I injected 6 units as I normally do. I had my normal break in the afternoon and then walked to the bus station to meet my boyfriend and then go home. Once I started walking from work, I knew my blood sugar was low - I can always tell much more easily when I'm doing something physical. I ate a couple of Glucotabs and then thought I better test to see just how low I was.. that's when I got the 1.5 reading. I was like "oh my gosh..." and showed my boyfriend, he was great about it and ran to the nearest food shop to get me a chocolate bar, while I crunched up a few more Glucotabs - I wanted to get something good out of the low - chocolate tastes nicer than Glucotabs do!!
    So anyway, I think that it happened because I injected too late after eating my lunch. I had a jacket potato with tuna and salad by the way, so I know it was roughly the same amount of carbs as my usual lunches would be, so that isn't a factor.
    Opinions anyone? And remember to tell me your lowest though this isn't a competition obviously - I'm well aware that they are very dangerous and I hate going low.

  2. joy of diabetes

    I am embarassed to say that I have had a reading of 22 while still moving around and standing upright successfully. No telling what the numbers were at the times that I have passed out in my lifetime.
    I aim for better control in my lifetime and continually strive to do better.......

  3. Nixo

    My lowest was 1.6,this weekend actually.I woke up about 7am.Yes it is frightening.

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High blood sugars can be very dangerous for diabetics. Let me tell you a little story about the highest blood sugar level I've ever had, the stupidity which caused it and what Hyperglycemia symptoms feel like. What is your highest Blood Glucose reading? and what did you do to cause it? Let me know in the comments down below. Please remember to subscribe to my channel so you don't miss the next video and leave a thumbs up and comment down below. All uploads are my intellectual property. You do not have permission to re-use any part of them without my written consent. Music by: Arman Cekin https://soundcloud.com/armancekin/hol...

High Blood Sugars (ketoacidosis)

Fri, 11/19/2010 - 14:41 -- Richard Morris Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome Severe high blood sugars, ketosis (the presence of ketones prior to acidification of the blood), and ketoacidosis (DKA) are serious and potentially life-threatening medical problems which can occur in diabetes. High blood sugars become life-threatening in Type 1 or long-term Type 2 diabetes only when that person does not receive enough insulin from injections or an insulin pump. This can be caused by skipping insulin or not receiving enough insulin when large amounts are required due to an infection or other major stress. Ketoacidosis surprisingly occurs almost as often in Type 2 diabetes as it does in Type 1. However, people with Type 2 diabetes also encounter another dangerous condition called hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome, which is roughly translated as thick blood due to very high blood sugars. Here, coma and death can occur simply because the blood sugar is so high. The blood will have ketones at higher levels but does not become acidotic. HHS usually occurs with blood sugar readings above 700 mg/dl (40 mmol) as the brain and other functions begin to shut down. When insulin le Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. micksmixxx

    Hi gill70346,
    Your blood sugar (glucose) level of 30.4 mmol/l (millimoles per litre) will not prove immediately dangerous, ma'am. It's when blood sugar levels are higher than the 'normal' range for extended periods of time that the damage starts to occur. You ARE likely to experience some of the symptoms that go along with having higher than 'normal' blood sugars, such as peeing as though it were going out of fashion, and drinking a lot to replace the fluids that you're peeing out. (The damage that I speak of is what leads to the development of diabetic complications as the body's organs, blood vessels, and nerves can all be damaged by higher than 'normal' blood sugar levels.)
    Infections DO raise blood sugar levels ... particularly in diabetic patients, and so does the taking of certain types of steroids ... prednisone being one of the culprits ... which is PROBABLY why your doctor wanted you to test whilst you were taking them.
    Personally, I am perturbed that type 2 diabetics are being told to not test their blood sugar levels. To me, this is a false economy. The chances are that people who do check would be more likely to know that they need to do something to lower their blood sugar levels, whereas those advised not to check will not know that they need to do something.
    I've signed petition after petition to try and get this Government to reverse this decision as I firmly believe that they're doing many diabetic patients a disservice.
    There's pressure on doctors to advise type 2 diabetics that they don't need to check their blood sugar levels ... or, at least, not as frequently. NICE (National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence) is a watchdog that advises the Government on how they can 'save' money by not prescribing certain items ... blood glucose test strips being just one of them. The truth of the matter is, if a diabetic needs to be admitted to hospital for treatment, the cost is astronomical in comparison, costing hundreds of pounds per day/night.
    Has your doctor advised you to check in, say a week's time, or to go to his surgery to be checked? To me, that would make more sense, as he could then keep an eye on what's happening.
    Because type 2 diabetes is a progressive condition, which means that your medication(s) MAY well need to be increased in dose(s) or with other medication(s) added to what you already take, to keep your blood sugar levels under reasonable control, your doctor is likely to need to check at some time anyway.
    Metformin works in a slightly different way to other types of oral medications that your doctor MAY prescribe at some point, but it is usually one of the first type of oral medications that doctors tend to prescribe for newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics. (I won't go into detail about how they all work as it's confusing enough as it stands, and I'm quite sure that this was ONE of the reasons that your doctor advised you to not to check regularly. After all, what would you do when you do test and find that your blood sugar levels are higher than they should be?)
    I'm presuming that your doctor has prescribed both antibiotic and antiviral medications to treat your current infections, ma'am. Hopefully, when these are taken care of your blood sugar levels should fall back down to a 'near normal' level.
    I wish you well and hope that you soon see some improvement.
    Be well, gill70346.
    Lots of Love and Light.
    Mick
    x x x x
    x x x
    P.S. Please don't be offended or alarmed at the "x's". It's simply a logo, of sorts, that I've used for some 30-odd years now.
    Report this ❤ 0 Reply to micksmixxx

  2. gill70346

    Thank you that was really helpful. To answer your questios
    1. My doctor will speak to me on the 9th January and in themeantime I have to check my blood sugars before and after a meal for the next 8 days.
    2. The doctor has given me antibiotics but not antivirals. I just have to wait but in the meantime cannot take cough sweets or cough syrup because they all have so much sugar in
    3. The doctor has added gliclazide to my daily dosage (I take 9 different tablets each day with a warning that if it causes blood sugar to go too low I have to get in touch immediately.
    4. As for taking blood sugars, I guess I would treat it like I do my blood pressure. I take it monthly . and so long as it Is within limits specified by my GP I do nothing. It is just as well I do do that because when I tested it in September it had gone up to more than 210/140 and I was immediately admitted to hospital, it is now relatively normal.
    again thanks for your message -it was very reassuring.
    Report this ❤ 0 Reply to gill70346

  3. micksmixxx

    Dear gill70346,
    Thank you, ma'am, for coming back with the information that you provide.
    Hopefully, your doctor will have advised you to check your blood sugar level 2 hours after eating, otherwise you COULD get a false high reading. (It can take roughly 2 hours for our body to break down foods and release the glucose into our bloodstream, so testing earlier MIGHT catch it whilst your sugar level is still rising if you test earlier.)
    I'm glad your doctor has prescribed antibiotics, ma'am. It's likely to take a few days to 'kick in' before these start to have any real effect. As for not treating the virus, you doctor MAY believe that your body will be able to fight it off by itself.
    There ARE actually sugar-free cough medicines available.
    Dependent on the type of cough that you have, Covonia Chesty is one such cough medicine, for chesty coughs, obviously, that has a sugar-free variant.
    I can't remember, but I believe that they MAY do a sugar-free Simple Linctus, too. Ask your chemist/pharmacist about sugar-free cough medicines and sugar-free lozenges.
    Gliclazide works in a totally different way to Metformin, ma'am. This type of oral medication is called a sulfonylurea, which works by stimulating your pancreas to produce more insulin, whereas Metformin works by inhibiting your liver from producing glucose (sugar); inhibits absorption of glucose during the digestive process; and MAY help by lessening insulin resistance, which is where your body's cells don't utilise the insulin that your pancreas already produces efficiently.
    As you might imagine, if you're producing more insulin, which is used to 'transport' glucose (sugar) from your bloodstream into your body's cells, where it is used to create energy, and you're also taking another medication to prevent absorption of glucose and/or production of glucose by the liver, this CAN cause SOME people to experience a hypo (low blood sugar level), hence the reason your doctor explained that you should contact him immediately if this happens to you. Low blood sugar levels are more immediately dangerous than high ones, and need immediate treatment, which would include taking some fast-acting carbohydrates, such as regular, sweetened soda/pop, regular, sweetened orange juice, glucose tablets, glucose powder mixed in water or milk.
    I apologise to you, gill70346, but I didn't make it very clear what I meant when I said "what would you do when you do test and find that your blood sugar levels are higher than they should be?" What I really meant was that there would be very little you could do to lower blood sugar levels by taking just Metformin. It wouldn't work quickly enough for you to notice any real difference. It's different for those with type 1 diabetes as they could inject a 'correction bolus' of insulin, which would lower blood sugar levels more quickly ... assuming, of course, that it was a fast-acting or short-acting insulin that they injected, as these would lower blood sugar levels within a few hours.
    Thank goodness you were admitted to hospital when your blood pressure was so high. I've no wish to alarm you, but blood pressure that's that high puts you at incredible risk for a stroke or heart attack. I'm truly glad that your blood pressure is now more near a 'normal' level.
    Apologies to you for the length of my responses, ma'am, but I try to include information that I feel is relevant to things that you mention. Hopefully, I'm not 'going overboard' with too much information, and I certainly hope that I'm not frightening you when I mention some of the things that can go wrong.
    Be well, gill70346. I hope you soon make a full recovery.
    Lots of Love and Light.
    Mick
    x x x x
    x x x
    P.S. I really ought to mention that I am NOT a medically qualified practitioner so do check anything that I tell you with your own doctor.
    Report this ❤ 0 Reply to micksmixxx

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Low Blood Sugar ka ilaj in Urdu- Low Blood Sugar ka Desi ilaj- Low Blood Sugar Treatment in Urdu Hindi Urdu Plus channel is about all general health related issues in Urdu. Urdu Totkay. Health News in Urdu. health tips. beauty tips & ghareloo totkay. Islamic Knowledge in Urdu.Cooking Recipes in Urdu. We also provide the information about vegetable benefits in urdu, Daily News. Dilchasp News. Urdu Plus provide general information about your health for more information and treatments please contact your doctor. plz hamary GOOGLE PLUS page ko bi zaroor follow karain : https://plus.google.com/+UrduPlus plz hamary facebook profile ko bhi follow karain : https://www.facebook.com/saqibyousaf2014 plz hamary facebook page ko bi like karain : https://www.facebook.com/UrduPluss plz hamary facebook group ko bi join karain : https://www.facebook.com/groups/UrduP... plz hamary Twitter page ko bhi follow karain : https://twitter.com/saqibyousaf2626 plz watch my all youtube videos: https://www.facebook.com/UrduPluss/ap... plz hamary incomeon profile ko bhi follow karain : https://www.incomeon.com/saqibyousaf3... On This URDU PLUS Channel You Will Find Everything Related To Celebrities. Everyday Videos are Uploaded So You Can Enjoy On Our URDU PLUS Channel All The Information and Photos are Collected From Google Using Advanced Search Option. Please Note : All The Information Provided in The Videos May Not Be Accurate. All The Music is Which is Used in Our Videos is Provided By NoCopyrightsSounds and Youtube Library. Don't Forget to subscribe My URDU PLUS Channel and Sharing To Your Friends & Family Thank You. براہ مہربانی میرے چینل کو سبسکرائب کریں تا کہ آپ کو ہماری ویڈیوز ملتی رہیں۔ God Is Great, Saqib Yousaf (Life Is Alone786 - Life Is Alone)

What To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too Low

What to Do if Your Blood Sugar Is Too Low What to Do if Your Blood Sugar Is Too Low You'll need to test your blood sugar if you think you have hypoglycemia.(ARTIGA PHOTO/CORBIS)Although type 2 diabetes is characterized by blood sugar that is too high, some people take insulin and others medications (such as sulfonylureas) that can occasionally drive blood sugar too low. When blood sugar is too lowgenerally less than 70 mg/dLit's called hypoglycemia, and it can become a medical emergency. (The normal range for fasting blood sugar is 70 to 99 mg/dL, though it varies somewhat with age, and is lower during pregnancy and in children.) Hypoglycemia is more likely to occur when you start taking a new medication (it can take practice to match your food intake to your insulin dose, for example) or if you exercise more than usual. As blood sugar drops to low levels, you may feel: This can occur within 10 to 15 minutes, and in extreme cases you can even lose consciousness and experience seizures if you don't consume some glucose (though hypoglycemia is usually mild in people with type 2 diabetes, and readily fixed by drinking juice or eating other sugar-containing items, such as glucose tabl Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. micksmixxx

    Hi gill70346,
    Your blood sugar (glucose) level of 30.4 mmol/l (millimoles per litre) will not prove immediately dangerous, ma'am. It's when blood sugar levels are higher than the 'normal' range for extended periods of time that the damage starts to occur. You ARE likely to experience some of the symptoms that go along with having higher than 'normal' blood sugars, such as peeing as though it were going out of fashion, and drinking a lot to replace the fluids that you're peeing out. (The damage that I speak of is what leads to the development of diabetic complications as the body's organs, blood vessels, and nerves can all be damaged by higher than 'normal' blood sugar levels.)
    Infections DO raise blood sugar levels ... particularly in diabetic patients, and so does the taking of certain types of steroids ... prednisone being one of the culprits ... which is PROBABLY why your doctor wanted you to test whilst you were taking them.
    Personally, I am perturbed that type 2 diabetics are being told to not test their blood sugar levels. To me, this is a false economy. The chances are that people who do check would be more likely to know that they need to do something to lower their blood sugar levels, whereas those advised not to check will not know that they need to do something.
    I've signed petition after petition to try and get this Government to reverse this decision as I firmly believe that they're doing many diabetic patients a disservice.
    There's pressure on doctors to advise type 2 diabetics that they don't need to check their blood sugar levels ... or, at least, not as frequently. NICE (National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence) is a watchdog that advises the Government on how they can 'save' money by not prescribing certain items ... blood glucose test strips being just one of them. The truth of the matter is, if a diabetic needs to be admitted to hospital for treatment, the cost is astronomical in comparison, costing hundreds of pounds per day/night.
    Has your doctor advised you to check in, say a week's time, or to go to his surgery to be checked? To me, that would make more sense, as he could then keep an eye on what's happening.
    Because type 2 diabetes is a progressive condition, which means that your medication(s) MAY well need to be increased in dose(s) or with other medication(s) added to what you already take, to keep your blood sugar levels under reasonable control, your doctor is likely to need to check at some time anyway.
    Metformin works in a slightly different way to other types of oral medications that your doctor MAY prescribe at some point, but it is usually one of the first type of oral medications that doctors tend to prescribe for newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics. (I won't go into detail about how they all work as it's confusing enough as it stands, and I'm quite sure that this was ONE of the reasons that your doctor advised you to not to check regularly. After all, what would you do when you do test and find that your blood sugar levels are higher than they should be?)
    I'm presuming that your doctor has prescribed both antibiotic and antiviral medications to treat your current infections, ma'am. Hopefully, when these are taken care of your blood sugar levels should fall back down to a 'near normal' level.
    I wish you well and hope that you soon see some improvement.
    Be well, gill70346.
    Lots of Love and Light.
    Mick
    x x x x
    x x x
    P.S. Please don't be offended or alarmed at the "x's". It's simply a logo, of sorts, that I've used for some 30-odd years now.
    Report this ❤ 0 Reply to micksmixxx

  2. gill70346

    Thank you that was really helpful. To answer your questios
    1. My doctor will speak to me on the 9th January and in themeantime I have to check my blood sugars before and after a meal for the next 8 days.
    2. The doctor has given me antibiotics but not antivirals. I just have to wait but in the meantime cannot take cough sweets or cough syrup because they all have so much sugar in
    3. The doctor has added gliclazide to my daily dosage (I take 9 different tablets each day with a warning that if it causes blood sugar to go too low I have to get in touch immediately.
    4. As for taking blood sugars, I guess I would treat it like I do my blood pressure. I take it monthly . and so long as it Is within limits specified by my GP I do nothing. It is just as well I do do that because when I tested it in September it had gone up to more than 210/140 and I was immediately admitted to hospital, it is now relatively normal.
    again thanks for your message -it was very reassuring.
    Report this ❤ 0 Reply to gill70346

  3. micksmixxx

    Dear gill70346,
    Thank you, ma'am, for coming back with the information that you provide.
    Hopefully, your doctor will have advised you to check your blood sugar level 2 hours after eating, otherwise you COULD get a false high reading. (It can take roughly 2 hours for our body to break down foods and release the glucose into our bloodstream, so testing earlier MIGHT catch it whilst your sugar level is still rising if you test earlier.)
    I'm glad your doctor has prescribed antibiotics, ma'am. It's likely to take a few days to 'kick in' before these start to have any real effect. As for not treating the virus, you doctor MAY believe that your body will be able to fight it off by itself.
    There ARE actually sugar-free cough medicines available.
    Dependent on the type of cough that you have, Covonia Chesty is one such cough medicine, for chesty coughs, obviously, that has a sugar-free variant.
    I can't remember, but I believe that they MAY do a sugar-free Simple Linctus, too. Ask your chemist/pharmacist about sugar-free cough medicines and sugar-free lozenges.
    Gliclazide works in a totally different way to Metformin, ma'am. This type of oral medication is called a sulfonylurea, which works by stimulating your pancreas to produce more insulin, whereas Metformin works by inhibiting your liver from producing glucose (sugar); inhibits absorption of glucose during the digestive process; and MAY help by lessening insulin resistance, which is where your body's cells don't utilise the insulin that your pancreas already produces efficiently.
    As you might imagine, if you're producing more insulin, which is used to 'transport' glucose (sugar) from your bloodstream into your body's cells, where it is used to create energy, and you're also taking another medication to prevent absorption of glucose and/or production of glucose by the liver, this CAN cause SOME people to experience a hypo (low blood sugar level), hence the reason your doctor explained that you should contact him immediately if this happens to you. Low blood sugar levels are more immediately dangerous than high ones, and need immediate treatment, which would include taking some fast-acting carbohydrates, such as regular, sweetened soda/pop, regular, sweetened orange juice, glucose tablets, glucose powder mixed in water or milk.
    I apologise to you, gill70346, but I didn't make it very clear what I meant when I said "what would you do when you do test and find that your blood sugar levels are higher than they should be?" What I really meant was that there would be very little you could do to lower blood sugar levels by taking just Metformin. It wouldn't work quickly enough for you to notice any real difference. It's different for those with type 1 diabetes as they could inject a 'correction bolus' of insulin, which would lower blood sugar levels more quickly ... assuming, of course, that it was a fast-acting or short-acting insulin that they injected, as these would lower blood sugar levels within a few hours.
    Thank goodness you were admitted to hospital when your blood pressure was so high. I've no wish to alarm you, but blood pressure that's that high puts you at incredible risk for a stroke or heart attack. I'm truly glad that your blood pressure is now more near a 'normal' level.
    Apologies to you for the length of my responses, ma'am, but I try to include information that I feel is relevant to things that you mention. Hopefully, I'm not 'going overboard' with too much information, and I certainly hope that I'm not frightening you when I mention some of the things that can go wrong.
    Be well, gill70346. I hope you soon make a full recovery.
    Lots of Love and Light.
    Mick
    x x x x
    x x x
    P.S. I really ought to mention that I am NOT a medically qualified practitioner so do check anything that I tell you with your own doctor.
    Report this ❤ 0 Reply to micksmixxx

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