diabetestalk.net

Blood Sugar Level 31

Share on facebook

Blood Sugar 31 Mg/dl - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

General information about Low Blood Sugar (Hypoglycemia) Low blood sugar, clinical name hypoglycemia, is a condition in which blood sugar levels in the body fall too low. Generally, a blood sugar level between 80 and 110 milligrams per deciliter is considered to be in normal range. When this level falls below 80, individuals may develop symptoms of low blood sugar. This condition often occurs in people with diabetes, when they try to control high glucose levels and the level falls too low. However, low blood sugar can occur from other causes, such as going for long periods without eating, from certain medications and from specific medical conditions. The disturbance in normal blood sugar levels can cause a variety of symptoms, which may be different in each individual. Common symptoms include: Individuals who have been diagnosed with diabetes learn to monitor their blood sugar levels closely. When blood sugar drops below normal levels, they learn to recognize the signs, such as dizziness or nausea. Diabetics often have a glucometer to determine if low blood sugar is the cause. Test strips can also determine if blood sugar levels have dropped too low. They can then take measures to Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. micksmixxx

    Hi gill70346,
    Your blood sugar (glucose) level of 30.4 mmol/l (millimoles per litre) will not prove immediately dangerous, ma'am. It's when blood sugar levels are higher than the 'normal' range for extended periods of time that the damage starts to occur. You ARE likely to experience some of the symptoms that go along with having higher than 'normal' blood sugars, such as peeing as though it were going out of fashion, and drinking a lot to replace the fluids that you're peeing out. (The damage that I speak of is what leads to the development of diabetic complications as the body's organs, blood vessels, and nerves can all be damaged by higher than 'normal' blood sugar levels.)
    Infections DO raise blood sugar levels ... particularly in diabetic patients, and so does the taking of certain types of steroids ... prednisone being one of the culprits ... which is PROBABLY why your doctor wanted you to test whilst you were taking them.
    Personally, I am perturbed that type 2 diabetics are being told to not test their blood sugar levels. To me, this is a false economy. The chances are that people who do check would be more likely to know that they need to do something to lower their blood sugar levels, whereas those advised not to check will not know that they need to do something.
    I've signed petition after petition to try and get this Government to reverse this decision as I firmly believe that they're doing many diabetic patients a disservice.
    There's pressure on doctors to advise type 2 diabetics that they don't need to check their blood sugar levels ... or, at least, not as frequently. NICE (National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence) is a watchdog that advises the Government on how they can 'save' money by not prescribing certain items ... blood glucose test strips being just one of them. The truth of the matter is, if a diabetic needs to be admitted to hospital for treatment, the cost is astronomical in comparison, costing hundreds of pounds per day/night.
    Has your doctor advised you to check in, say a week's time, or to go to his surgery to be checked? To me, that would make more sense, as he could then keep an eye on what's happening.
    Because type 2 diabetes is a progressive condition, which means that your medication(s) MAY well need to be increased in dose(s) or with other medication(s) added to what you already take, to keep your blood sugar levels under reasonable control, your doctor is likely to need to check at some time anyway.
    Metformin works in a slightly different way to other types of oral medications that your doctor MAY prescribe at some point, but it is usually one of the first type of oral medications that doctors tend to prescribe for newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics. (I won't go into detail about how they all work as it's confusing enough as it stands, and I'm quite sure that this was ONE of the reasons that your doctor advised you to not to check regularly. After all, what would you do when you do test and find that your blood sugar levels are higher than they should be?)
    I'm presuming that your doctor has prescribed both antibiotic and antiviral medications to treat your current infections, ma'am. Hopefully, when these are taken care of your blood sugar levels should fall back down to a 'near normal' level.
    I wish you well and hope that you soon see some improvement.
    Be well, gill70346.
    Lots of Love and Light.
    Mick
    x x x x
    x x x
    P.S. Please don't be offended or alarmed at the "x's". It's simply a logo, of sorts, that I've used for some 30-odd years now.
    Report this ❤ 0 Reply to micksmixxx

  2. gill70346

    Thank you that was really helpful. To answer your questios
    1. My doctor will speak to me on the 9th January and in themeantime I have to check my blood sugars before and after a meal for the next 8 days.
    2. The doctor has given me antibiotics but not antivirals. I just have to wait but in the meantime cannot take cough sweets or cough syrup because they all have so much sugar in
    3. The doctor has added gliclazide to my daily dosage (I take 9 different tablets each day with a warning that if it causes blood sugar to go too low I have to get in touch immediately.
    4. As for taking blood sugars, I guess I would treat it like I do my blood pressure. I take it monthly . and so long as it Is within limits specified by my GP I do nothing. It is just as well I do do that because when I tested it in September it had gone up to more than 210/140 and I was immediately admitted to hospital, it is now relatively normal.
    again thanks for your message -it was very reassuring.
    Report this ❤ 0 Reply to gill70346

  3. micksmixxx

    Dear gill70346,
    Thank you, ma'am, for coming back with the information that you provide.
    Hopefully, your doctor will have advised you to check your blood sugar level 2 hours after eating, otherwise you COULD get a false high reading. (It can take roughly 2 hours for our body to break down foods and release the glucose into our bloodstream, so testing earlier MIGHT catch it whilst your sugar level is still rising if you test earlier.)
    I'm glad your doctor has prescribed antibiotics, ma'am. It's likely to take a few days to 'kick in' before these start to have any real effect. As for not treating the virus, you doctor MAY believe that your body will be able to fight it off by itself.
    There ARE actually sugar-free cough medicines available.
    Dependent on the type of cough that you have, Covonia Chesty is one such cough medicine, for chesty coughs, obviously, that has a sugar-free variant.
    I can't remember, but I believe that they MAY do a sugar-free Simple Linctus, too. Ask your chemist/pharmacist about sugar-free cough medicines and sugar-free lozenges.
    Gliclazide works in a totally different way to Metformin, ma'am. This type of oral medication is called a sulfonylurea, which works by stimulating your pancreas to produce more insulin, whereas Metformin works by inhibiting your liver from producing glucose (sugar); inhibits absorption of glucose during the digestive process; and MAY help by lessening insulin resistance, which is where your body's cells don't utilise the insulin that your pancreas already produces efficiently.
    As you might imagine, if you're producing more insulin, which is used to 'transport' glucose (sugar) from your bloodstream into your body's cells, where it is used to create energy, and you're also taking another medication to prevent absorption of glucose and/or production of glucose by the liver, this CAN cause SOME people to experience a hypo (low blood sugar level), hence the reason your doctor explained that you should contact him immediately if this happens to you. Low blood sugar levels are more immediately dangerous than high ones, and need immediate treatment, which would include taking some fast-acting carbohydrates, such as regular, sweetened soda/pop, regular, sweetened orange juice, glucose tablets, glucose powder mixed in water or milk.
    I apologise to you, gill70346, but I didn't make it very clear what I meant when I said "what would you do when you do test and find that your blood sugar levels are higher than they should be?" What I really meant was that there would be very little you could do to lower blood sugar levels by taking just Metformin. It wouldn't work quickly enough for you to notice any real difference. It's different for those with type 1 diabetes as they could inject a 'correction bolus' of insulin, which would lower blood sugar levels more quickly ... assuming, of course, that it was a fast-acting or short-acting insulin that they injected, as these would lower blood sugar levels within a few hours.
    Thank goodness you were admitted to hospital when your blood pressure was so high. I've no wish to alarm you, but blood pressure that's that high puts you at incredible risk for a stroke or heart attack. I'm truly glad that your blood pressure is now more near a 'normal' level.
    Apologies to you for the length of my responses, ma'am, but I try to include information that I feel is relevant to things that you mention. Hopefully, I'm not 'going overboard' with too much information, and I certainly hope that I'm not frightening you when I mention some of the things that can go wrong.
    Be well, gill70346. I hope you soon make a full recovery.
    Lots of Love and Light.
    Mick
    x x x x
    x x x
    P.S. I really ought to mention that I am NOT a medically qualified practitioner so do check anything that I tell you with your own doctor.
    Report this ❤ 0 Reply to micksmixxx

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close
Share on facebook

What To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too Low

What to Do if Your Blood Sugar Is Too Low What to Do if Your Blood Sugar Is Too Low You'll need to test your blood sugar if you think you have hypoglycemia.(ARTIGA PHOTO/CORBIS)Although type 2 diabetes is characterized by blood sugar that is too high, some people take insulin and others medications (such as sulfonylureas) that can occasionally drive blood sugar too low. When blood sugar is too lowgenerally less than 70 mg/dLit's called hypoglycemia, and it can become a medical emergency. (The normal range for fasting blood sugar is 70 to 99 mg/dL, though it varies somewhat with age, and is lower during pregnancy and in children.) Hypoglycemia is more likely to occur when you start taking a new medication (it can take practice to match your food intake to your insulin dose, for example) or if you exercise more than usual. As blood sugar drops to low levels, you may feel: This can occur within 10 to 15 minutes, and in extreme cases you can even lose consciousness and experience seizures if you don't consume some glucose (though hypoglycemia is usually mild in people with type 2 diabetes, and readily fixed by drinking juice or eating other sugar-containing items, such as glucose tabl Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. Kezia

    What's the lowest blood sugar level you've had?

    Hi everyone
    I was just wondering, what the lowest reading was that you've ever had?
    Personally, about a month ago, I got a reading of 1.5 (US 27) - yikes!!
    I never want to go that low again, not because it was a very bad experience, but because it was just shocking and obviously dangerous and unhealthy. Needless to say, I didn't do it on purpose.
    If you want to know how it happened - I was meeting my boyfriend/partner (whatever you want to call him!) on my lunch break at work to go to lunch at a local cafe, I was planning on injecting there in the toilets, but they had none... so I remembered the diabetic nurse say that I can inject straight after, so I thought that I will just inject once I get back to work after lunch. So, I discreetly tested my blood sugar in the cafe and it was 5.7 (102.6 US). Once I got back to work about 15 minutes after eating my lunch, I injected 6 units as I normally do. I had my normal break in the afternoon and then walked to the bus station to meet my boyfriend and then go home. Once I started walking from work, I knew my blood sugar was low - I can always tell much more easily when I'm doing something physical. I ate a couple of Glucotabs and then thought I better test to see just how low I was.. that's when I got the 1.5 reading. I was like "oh my gosh..." and showed my boyfriend, he was great about it and ran to the nearest food shop to get me a chocolate bar, while I crunched up a few more Glucotabs - I wanted to get something good out of the low - chocolate tastes nicer than Glucotabs do!!
    So anyway, I think that it happened because I injected too late after eating my lunch. I had a jacket potato with tuna and salad by the way, so I know it was roughly the same amount of carbs as my usual lunches would be, so that isn't a factor.
    Opinions anyone? And remember to tell me your lowest though this isn't a competition obviously - I'm well aware that they are very dangerous and I hate going low.

  2. joy of diabetes

    I am embarassed to say that I have had a reading of 22 while still moving around and standing upright successfully. No telling what the numbers were at the times that I have passed out in my lifetime.
    I aim for better control in my lifetime and continually strive to do better.......

  3. Nixo

    My lowest was 1.6,this weekend actually.I woke up about 7am.Yes it is frightening.

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close
Share on facebook

Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In People Without Diabetes

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is most common in people who have diabetes. If you have already been diagnosed with diabetes and need more information about low blood sugar, see the topics: You may have briefly felt the effects of low blood sugar when you've gotten really hungry or exercised hard without eating enough. This happens to nearly everyone from time to time. It's easy to correct and usually nothing to worry about. But low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, can also be an ongoing problem. It occurs when the level of sugar in your blood drops too low to give your body energy. What causes hypoglycemia in people who don't have diabetes? Ongoing problems with low blood sugar can be caused by: Symptoms can be different depending on how low your blood sugar level drops. Mild hypoglycemia can make you feel hungry or like you want to vomit. You could also feel jittery or nervous. Your heart may beat fast. You may sweat. Or your skin might turn cold and clammy. Moderate hypoglycemia often makes people feel short-tempered, nervous, afraid, or confused. Your vision may blur. You could also feel unsteady or have trouble walking. Severe hypoglycemia can cause you to pass out. You could Continue reading >>

Share on facebook

Popular Questions

  1. micksmixxx

    Hi gill70346,
    Your blood sugar (glucose) level of 30.4 mmol/l (millimoles per litre) will not prove immediately dangerous, ma'am. It's when blood sugar levels are higher than the 'normal' range for extended periods of time that the damage starts to occur. You ARE likely to experience some of the symptoms that go along with having higher than 'normal' blood sugars, such as peeing as though it were going out of fashion, and drinking a lot to replace the fluids that you're peeing out. (The damage that I speak of is what leads to the development of diabetic complications as the body's organs, blood vessels, and nerves can all be damaged by higher than 'normal' blood sugar levels.)
    Infections DO raise blood sugar levels ... particularly in diabetic patients, and so does the taking of certain types of steroids ... prednisone being one of the culprits ... which is PROBABLY why your doctor wanted you to test whilst you were taking them.
    Personally, I am perturbed that type 2 diabetics are being told to not test their blood sugar levels. To me, this is a false economy. The chances are that people who do check would be more likely to know that they need to do something to lower their blood sugar levels, whereas those advised not to check will not know that they need to do something.
    I've signed petition after petition to try and get this Government to reverse this decision as I firmly believe that they're doing many diabetic patients a disservice.
    There's pressure on doctors to advise type 2 diabetics that they don't need to check their blood sugar levels ... or, at least, not as frequently. NICE (National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence) is a watchdog that advises the Government on how they can 'save' money by not prescribing certain items ... blood glucose test strips being just one of them. The truth of the matter is, if a diabetic needs to be admitted to hospital for treatment, the cost is astronomical in comparison, costing hundreds of pounds per day/night.
    Has your doctor advised you to check in, say a week's time, or to go to his surgery to be checked? To me, that would make more sense, as he could then keep an eye on what's happening.
    Because type 2 diabetes is a progressive condition, which means that your medication(s) MAY well need to be increased in dose(s) or with other medication(s) added to what you already take, to keep your blood sugar levels under reasonable control, your doctor is likely to need to check at some time anyway.
    Metformin works in a slightly different way to other types of oral medications that your doctor MAY prescribe at some point, but it is usually one of the first type of oral medications that doctors tend to prescribe for newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics. (I won't go into detail about how they all work as it's confusing enough as it stands, and I'm quite sure that this was ONE of the reasons that your doctor advised you to not to check regularly. After all, what would you do when you do test and find that your blood sugar levels are higher than they should be?)
    I'm presuming that your doctor has prescribed both antibiotic and antiviral medications to treat your current infections, ma'am. Hopefully, when these are taken care of your blood sugar levels should fall back down to a 'near normal' level.
    I wish you well and hope that you soon see some improvement.
    Be well, gill70346.
    Lots of Love and Light.
    Mick
    x x x x
    x x x
    P.S. Please don't be offended or alarmed at the "x's". It's simply a logo, of sorts, that I've used for some 30-odd years now.
    Report this ❤ 0 Reply to micksmixxx

  2. gill70346

    Thank you that was really helpful. To answer your questios
    1. My doctor will speak to me on the 9th January and in themeantime I have to check my blood sugars before and after a meal for the next 8 days.
    2. The doctor has given me antibiotics but not antivirals. I just have to wait but in the meantime cannot take cough sweets or cough syrup because they all have so much sugar in
    3. The doctor has added gliclazide to my daily dosage (I take 9 different tablets each day with a warning that if it causes blood sugar to go too low I have to get in touch immediately.
    4. As for taking blood sugars, I guess I would treat it like I do my blood pressure. I take it monthly . and so long as it Is within limits specified by my GP I do nothing. It is just as well I do do that because when I tested it in September it had gone up to more than 210/140 and I was immediately admitted to hospital, it is now relatively normal.
    again thanks for your message -it was very reassuring.
    Report this ❤ 0 Reply to gill70346

  3. micksmixxx

    Dear gill70346,
    Thank you, ma'am, for coming back with the information that you provide.
    Hopefully, your doctor will have advised you to check your blood sugar level 2 hours after eating, otherwise you COULD get a false high reading. (It can take roughly 2 hours for our body to break down foods and release the glucose into our bloodstream, so testing earlier MIGHT catch it whilst your sugar level is still rising if you test earlier.)
    I'm glad your doctor has prescribed antibiotics, ma'am. It's likely to take a few days to 'kick in' before these start to have any real effect. As for not treating the virus, you doctor MAY believe that your body will be able to fight it off by itself.
    There ARE actually sugar-free cough medicines available.
    Dependent on the type of cough that you have, Covonia Chesty is one such cough medicine, for chesty coughs, obviously, that has a sugar-free variant.
    I can't remember, but I believe that they MAY do a sugar-free Simple Linctus, too. Ask your chemist/pharmacist about sugar-free cough medicines and sugar-free lozenges.
    Gliclazide works in a totally different way to Metformin, ma'am. This type of oral medication is called a sulfonylurea, which works by stimulating your pancreas to produce more insulin, whereas Metformin works by inhibiting your liver from producing glucose (sugar); inhibits absorption of glucose during the digestive process; and MAY help by lessening insulin resistance, which is where your body's cells don't utilise the insulin that your pancreas already produces efficiently.
    As you might imagine, if you're producing more insulin, which is used to 'transport' glucose (sugar) from your bloodstream into your body's cells, where it is used to create energy, and you're also taking another medication to prevent absorption of glucose and/or production of glucose by the liver, this CAN cause SOME people to experience a hypo (low blood sugar level), hence the reason your doctor explained that you should contact him immediately if this happens to you. Low blood sugar levels are more immediately dangerous than high ones, and need immediate treatment, which would include taking some fast-acting carbohydrates, such as regular, sweetened soda/pop, regular, sweetened orange juice, glucose tablets, glucose powder mixed in water or milk.
    I apologise to you, gill70346, but I didn't make it very clear what I meant when I said "what would you do when you do test and find that your blood sugar levels are higher than they should be?" What I really meant was that there would be very little you could do to lower blood sugar levels by taking just Metformin. It wouldn't work quickly enough for you to notice any real difference. It's different for those with type 1 diabetes as they could inject a 'correction bolus' of insulin, which would lower blood sugar levels more quickly ... assuming, of course, that it was a fast-acting or short-acting insulin that they injected, as these would lower blood sugar levels within a few hours.
    Thank goodness you were admitted to hospital when your blood pressure was so high. I've no wish to alarm you, but blood pressure that's that high puts you at incredible risk for a stroke or heart attack. I'm truly glad that your blood pressure is now more near a 'normal' level.
    Apologies to you for the length of my responses, ma'am, but I try to include information that I feel is relevant to things that you mention. Hopefully, I'm not 'going overboard' with too much information, and I certainly hope that I'm not frightening you when I mention some of the things that can go wrong.
    Be well, gill70346. I hope you soon make a full recovery.
    Lots of Love and Light.
    Mick
    x x x x
    x x x
    P.S. I really ought to mention that I am NOT a medically qualified practitioner so do check anything that I tell you with your own doctor.
    Report this ❤ 0 Reply to micksmixxx

  4. -> Continue reading
read more close

No more pages to load

Related Articles

  • Do Sugar Alcohols Raise Your Blood Sugar Level?

    The sugar alcohols commonly found in foods are sorbitol, mannitol, xylitol, isomalt, and hydrogenated starch hydrolysates. Sugar alcohols come from plant products such as fruits and berries. The carbohydrate in these plant products is altered through a chemical process. These sugar substitutes provide somewhat fewer calories than table sugar (sucrose), mainly because they are not well absorbed and may even have a small laxative effect. Many so-ca ...

    diabetes Feb 24, 2018
  • How Much Does 1 Gram Of Sugar Raise Your Blood Sugar Level?

    A simple sugar called glucose is one of the body's main fuels, used to provide cells with the energy they need to do their jobs. Although glucose is crucial to the body's operation, excessive levels of it in your blood can also damage tissues and organs. Many foods can cause your blood sugars to increase rapidly, causing spikes in your glucose that can create or aggravate health problems. Oddly, sugar itself isn't one of the worst offenders. The ...

    blood sugar Dec 30, 2017
  • How Much Does One Gram Of Sugar Raise Your Blood Sugar Level?

    In the latest “Really?” column, Anahad O’Connor explores why some foods labeled “sugar free” may still raise blood sugar. The culprits are sugar alcohols that are sometimes paired with artificial sweeteners. He writes: Sugar alcohols get their name from their structure, which looks like a cross between a molecule of alcohol and sugar but is technically neither. Companies have added them to more and more “sugar free” products, like c ...

    blood sugar Jan 5, 2018
  • Which Blood Test Gives A 12-week Average Blood Sugar Level?

    Directly responsible for an estimated 1.6 million deaths in 2015, diabetes is predicted by the World Health Organization to become the seventh leading cause of death in 2030. Rates of people living with the disease are also rapidly rising, more than doubling in the UK since 1996. A chronic disease characterized by a lack of blood glucose control, diabetes is associated with the development of a range of health conditions, including heart disease, ...

    blood sugar Feb 26, 2018
  • Postprandial Plasma Glucose Level Less Than The Fasting Level

    A blood glucose test measures the amount of a type of sugar, called glucose, in your blood. Glucose comes from carbohydrate foods . It is the main source of energy used by the body. Insulin is a hormone that helps your body's cells use the glucose. Insulin is produced in the pancreas and released into the blood when the amount of glucose in the blood rises. Normally, your blood glucose levels increase slightly after you eat. This increase causes ...

    insulin Apr 26, 2018
  • What Is The Difference Between Blood Sugar Level And Glucose Level

    Type 1 and type 2 diabetes share the problem of high levels of blood sugar. The inability to control blood sugar causes the symptoms and the complications of both types of diabetes. But type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes are two different diseases in many ways. According to the latest (2014) estimates from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 29.1 million people, or 9.3 percent of the U.S. population, have diabetes. Type 1 diabe ...

    insulin Dec 30, 2017

Popular Articles

More in blood sugar