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Blood Sugar Level 240 After Eating

Blood Sugar 240 Mg/dl (13.32mmol/l) After Eating - Is That Good Or Bad?

Blood Sugar 240 Mg/dl (13.32mmol/l) After Eating - Is That Good Or Bad?

We help you interpret your blood sugar values. You have tested your blood sugar after eating and the result was 240 mg/dl. Let's have a look at the blood sugar gauge: Your result is: Very High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia / Dangerous) To improve your blood sugar after eating you need to lower your blood glucose level by 100mg/dl. Your blood sugar level (up to 2 hours) after eating should always be below 140mg/dl but not fall below 80mg/dl. 3 Foods to Throw Out Cut a bit of belly bloat each day, by avoiding these 3 foods nucific.com It is normal for blood sugar levels to rise immediately after a meal. The increased glucose is a product of the carbohydrates in the food that was just consumed. The higher blood glucose triggers the pancreas to produce more insulin. This release of insulin usually takes place within about 10 minutes of eating. The insulin removes the glucose from the blood and stores it for the body to use as energy. In a healthy individual, blood glucose levels should return to a normal level within about two hours after finishing the meal. In diabetics, the blood sugar level often remain elevated for a longer period because of the body’s inability to produce or utilize insulin properly.An elevated two-hour postprandial (after a meal) blood sugar may indicate diabetes or prediabetes. As a general rule, a normal two- hour postprandial blood sugar is as follows: • Age 50 and under: Less than 140 mg/dl • Age 50 – 60: Less than 150 mg/dl • Over age 60: Less than 160 mg/dl A doctor may recommend different postprandial blood sugar levels based on an individual’s particular circumstances and health history. Several factors may cause a person’s postprandial blood sugar to remain elevated. • Smoking after the meal: Studies show that smoking raises bloo Continue reading >>

Take Care Of Yourself When Sick Or Under Stress

Take Care Of Yourself When Sick Or Under Stress

When we're stressed, our bodies need extra energy to help us cope and recover. This is true whether bodies are under stress from illness or injury or are dealing with the effects of emotional stress, both good and bad. To meet the demand for more energy, the body responds by releasing into the bloodstream sugar that's been stored in the liver, causing blood sugar levels to rise. In someone without diabetes, the pancreas responds to the rise in blood sugar by releasing enough insulin into the bloodstream to help convert the sugar into energy. This brings blood sugar levels back down to normal. In someone with diabetes, the extra demand usually means needing to take more diabetes medicine (insulin or pills.) To make sure your body is getting enough medicine to help keep your blood sugar levels close to normal, you'll need to test more often when you are: Sick Recovering from surgery Fighting an infection Feeling upset Under more stress than usual Traveling Type 1 Diabetes In people with type 1 diabetes, blood sugar levels rise in response to stress, but the body doesn't have enough insulin to turn the sugar into energy. Instead, the body burns stored fat to meet energy needs. When fat is burned for energy, it creates waste products called ketones. As fat is broken down, ketones start to build up in the bloodstream. High levels of ketones in the blood can lead to a serious condition known as diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which can cause a person to lose consciousness and go into a diabetic coma. Type 2 Diabetes In people with type 2 diabetes, the body usually has enough insulin available to turn sugar into energy, so it doesn't need to burn fat. However, stress hormones can cause blood sugar levels to rise to very high and even dangerous levels. People with type 2 diabetes Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pregnancy: Twice As Important

Diabetes And Pregnancy: Twice As Important

Pregnancy is a wondrous and exciting time. It’s a time of change, both physically and emotionally. With the proper attention and prenatal medical care, most women with diabetes can enjoy their pregnancies and welcome a healthy baby into their lives. Why Tight Blood Sugar Control Is Critically Important Blood sugar control is important from the first week of pregnancy all the way until delivery. Organogenesis takes place in the first trimester. Uncontrolled blood sugar during the early weeks of pregnancy increases the risk of miscarriage, and birth defects. (Women don’t develop gestational diabetes until later in pregnancy, which means they don’t share these early pregnancy risks.) Later in the pregnancy, uncontrolled blood sugar levels can cause fetal macrosomia, which may lead to shoulder dystocia, fractures, and the need for Cesarean section deliveries. Very high blood sugar levels can increase the risk of stillbirth. Maternal hyperglycemia can stimulate fetal hyperinsulinemia, and lead to neonatal hypoglycemia when the glucose supply (umbilical cord) is cut. Because of all these increased risks, home deliveries are not typically recommended for women with any form of diabetes. As many as two thirds of all women with diabetes have unplanned pregnancies and most women don’t realize that they’re pregnant until six or more weeks into the pregnancy. That’s why it’s critically important for women who have diabetes to use contraception and achieve tight blood sugar control prior to conception. Many health-care providers suggest at least three to six months of stable blood sugar control prior to attempting to conceive. Hemoglobin A1c should be within 1 percentage point above the lab normal, which means striving for a HbA1c of less than 7 percent. Women using or Continue reading >>

My Blood Count Before Meals 140 And After Meals Shoots Up To 240, How Can I Control Sugar With Less Medicine

My Blood Count Before Meals 140 And After Meals Shoots Up To 240, How Can I Control Sugar With Less Medicine

Keep carbohydrate intake between 10 and 14 portions per day (1 portion = 10g carbohydrate), ideally 3 meals x 4 carb portions. uk.sitestat.com/diabetes/we... Eat low GI carbs glycemicindex.com/ Make up the balance of your meals with natural, additive-free, unprocessed protein and fat foods I am of similar case. I am on medication of Glyciphage 500mg-3 a day and Diaband 80mg-2 a day. Besides my diet is, morning Idli/dosa-3Nos. for lunch 2 chapathis, one handful rice and some vegetables, evening one cup of baked cerals and for night 3 wheat dosas. Please suggest me any change to bring my sugar level to normal/ below normal. * Adopt diabetic diet. * Eat less food, more times in a day. * Do not consume food after 6:00 pm. * Exercise (brisk walking) daily for 30 minutes. * Check your post-prandial blood sugar (2 hours after taking food) daily and avoid foods that cause elevated blood sugar levels. * Undergo HbA1c test. HbA1c is a lab test that shows the average level of blood sugar (glucose) over the previous 3 months. It shows how well you are controlling your diabetes. An HbA1c of 5.6% or less is normal. The following are the results when the HbA1c is being used to diagnose diabetes:-- * Normal: Less than 5.7% * Pre-diabetes: 5.7% to 6.4% * Diabetes: 6.5% or higher If you have diabetes, you and your doctor or nurse will discuss the correct range for you. For many people the goal is to keep your level at or below 6.5 - 7%. * Purchase any book on diabetes mellitus and study it well. * Take anti-diabetic medication and prevent heart attack, stroke or kidney failure. Sources:-- Continue reading >>

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

What A High Blood Sugar Feels Like.

The American Diabetes Association cites the following symptoms as indicative of high blood sugar: High blood glucose [Editor’s note: Duh] High levels of sugar in the urine Frequent urination Increased thirst And if high blood sugar goes untreated? “Hyperglycemia can be a serious problem if you don’t treat it, so it’s important to treat as soon as you detect it. If you fail to treat hyperglycemia, a condition called ketoacidosis (diabetic coma) could occur. Ketoacidosis develops when your body doesn’t have enough insulin. Without insulin, your body can’t use glucose for fuel, so your body breaks down fats to use for energy. When your body breaks down fats, waste products called ketones are produced. Your body cannot tolerate large amounts of ketones and will try to get rid of them through the urine. Unfortunately, the body cannot release all the ketones and they build up in your blood, which can lead to ketoacidosis.” – ADA website But what does a high blood sugar feel like? Because when you see someone who is working through an elevated blood sugar, they may not look terribly out of sorts. But what is happening inside of them is real, and plays out in a myriad of ways for every person with diabetes. I’ve tried to write about it several times, but each high is different, and affects me in different ways: “It’s a thick feeling in the base of your brain, like someone’s cracked open your head and replaced your gray matter with sticky jam. I find myself zoning out and staring at things, and my eyeballs feel dry and like they’re tethered to my head by frayed ropes instead of optic nerves. Everything is slow and heavy and whipped with heavy cream.” – Oh, High! “There’s something about a high blood sugar that makes my body feel weighted down, l Continue reading >>

A1c Tip: Look At Your Blood Sugar After You Eat

A1c Tip: Look At Your Blood Sugar After You Eat

Frustrated with your latest A1C test results? Your blood sugar levels within the 1-3 hours after you eat are just as important as your blood sugar right before you eat, especially when it comes to your A1C. For example, if your blood sugar is regularly rising to 240 mg/dL (13 mmol) after a meal, that means that you could be spending 2-3 hours after every meal with your blood sugar in that range…which adds up to at least 9 hours of the day! That’s a good chunk of the day spent with high blood sugars, and possibly the source of your A1C results. What can you do to prevent that blood sugar spike after a meal? Here are 5 tips: 1. Take your insulin or oral medication sooner before you eat. Today’s fast-acting insulin’s are designed to reach your bloodstream and start working within 10 to 30 minutes. That means that if you eat your meal and then take your insulin, you’re giving the carbohydrates in that food 10 to 30 minutes to start spiking your blood sugar, easily enough time to work its way up to 200 mg/dL (11 mmol) or higher by the time the insulin really gets going. 2. Talk to your doctor about a medication like Symlin. Symlin is an injectable medication designed to replace the hormone “amylin.” Amylin is a hormone in the human body that works to prevent food from digesting as quickly and it helps prevent high blood sugars after eating. People with type 1 diabetes make zero amylin and people with type 2 diabetes make some, but often not enough. While you can certainly live a healthy life with diabetes without Symlin (or amylin), it can be very helpful for those with insulin resistance or difficulty with high blood sugar after meals. 3. Fine-tune your insulin doses for meals. If you’re taking insulin with your meals, it’s vital that you test your insulin Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Four Hours After Eating

Blood Glucose Four Hours After Eating

Cells throughout your body work around the clock, even when you’re sleeping. Clearly, they need a steady supply of energy to keep going. To function, they rely on glucose, a simple type of carbohydrate. Glucose enters your bloodstream until the hormone insulin comes around to help cells use or store the circulating glucose. Your blood sugar may go up a bit after eating, but if it’s still high four hours after your meal, or if it drops too low, something is awry in your body. Video of the Day Normally your blood sugar should remain between 70 and 130 milligrams per deciliter, according to the American Diabetes Association. This range is for any random time throughout the day, before or after meals. After a long fast, such as after a night’s sleep, it’s normal for your glucose to be on the lower end of that spectrum -- 70 to 100 milligrams per deciliter. Four Hours After Eating If you’re generally healthy or are properly managing your diabetes, your blood glucose should fall between 90 and 130 milligrams per deciliter four hours after eating. If you're not diabetic, your sugar could even go as high as 140 milligrams per deciliter after meals. Of course, if you are a diabetic, your blood glucose could rise even higher -- 180 milligrams per deciliter or above, even several hours after eating. It’s not typical for your glucose to remain elevated four hours after eating. By then, insulin should have done its job and made sure that all of that extra glucose was used up. So if your blood sugar is still high hours after eating, it could be a sign that you have diabetes. Or if you have already been diagnosed, the dosage of your insulin or other diabetes medication might be off. Elevated glucose can also stem from an infected pancreas, an overactive thyroid and certain Continue reading >>

Proven Tips & Strategies To Bring High Blood Sugar Down (quickly)

Proven Tips & Strategies To Bring High Blood Sugar Down (quickly)

Untreated, high blood sugar can cause many problems and future complications. Recognizing signs of high blood sugar levels and knowing how to lower them can help you prevent these complications and increase the quality and length of your life. Topics covered (click to jump to specific section) High blood sugar level symptoms and signs Symptoms of high blood sugar include: Increased thirst Tired all the time Irritability Increased hunger Urinating a lot Dry mouth Blurred vision Severe high blood sugar can lead to nausea and fruity smelling breath The signs and symptoms for high blood sugar are the same for both type 1 and type 2. Signs usually show up quicker in those who have type 1 because of the nature of their diabetes. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease that causes the body to stop making insulin altogether. Type 2 is caused by lifestyle factors when the body eventually stops responding to insulin, which causes the sugar to increase slowly. People with type 2 can live longer without any symptoms creeping because their body is still making enough insulin to help control it a little bit. What causes the blood sugar levels go to high? Our bodies need sugar to make energy for the cells. Without it, we cannot do basic functions. When we eat foods with glucose, insulin pairs with it to allow it to enter into the cell wall. If the insulin is not there, then the glucose molecule can’t get through the wall and cannot be used. The extra glucose hangs out in the bloodstream which is literally high blood sugar. The lack of insulin can be caused by two different things. First, you can have decreased insulin resistance which means that your insulin doesn’t react the way that it is supposed to. It doesn’t partner with glucose to be used as fuel. Secondly, you can have no insuli Continue reading >>

Expected Blood Glucose After A High-carb Meal

Expected Blood Glucose After A High-carb Meal

Blood glucose levels normally rise after a high-carbohydrate meal and drop back to normal levels within a few hours. But if your glucose levels rise higher than normal and recover more slowly, you might have diabetes. Your doctor can administer tests that measure your blood glucose levels immediately before you consume a high-carbohydrate meal and for several hours afterward. If you already have diabetes, your doctor might want you to check your blood glucose levels after meals, to make sure you're keeping your glucose within the expected range. Normal Levels After Eating Healthy, non-diabetic people normally have blood glucose levels of less than 120 milligrams per deciliter two hours after a normal meal, rarely exceeding 140 mg/dL, according to the American Diabetes Association. Levels return to normal within two to three hours. When you undergo a glucose tolerance test, you consume a high-carbohydrate drink or snack containing 75 grams of carbohydrate. At one hour, your test falls into the normal, non-diabetic range if your blood glucose remains below 200 mg/dL. Two hours after your meal, blood glucose should remain below 140 mg/dL. A level of over 200 mg/dL at two hours post-prandial -- which means after a meal -- indicates diabetes. Levels between 140 and 200 mg/dL indicate pre-diabetes, a condition with a strong risk of developing diabetes in the future. Expected Results in Diabetics Diabetics experience larger spikes in blood glucose that take longer to return to baseline. For diabetics, blood glucose an hour after eating should remain below 180 mg/dL or no more than 80 mg/dL over your pre-meal levels. The highest spikes in blood glucose levels often occur after breakfast. If you experience hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose levels before a meal, you might experi Continue reading >>

I Have Type Ii Diabetes.now My Blood Sugar In Fasting Is 160 And After 2 Hrs It Is 240. Inside I Feel Shaking Heart Beat Raising What To Do

I Have Type Ii Diabetes.now My Blood Sugar In Fasting Is 160 And After 2 Hrs It Is 240. Inside I Feel Shaking Heart Beat Raising What To Do

Your sugar levels are indeed high but you should not worry too much about it because you can bring it down to normal levels.I hope you have already consulted a good diabetologist. As a long term diabetic I am offering some general suggestions which you may consider. Diabetes is a metabolic disorder which is a result of the pancreatic gland in our body either produces little or no insulin or the body has developed resistance to insulin. In both cases,the body cells do not receive the glucose needed for production of energy because insulin is essential for glucose to enter the cells. This results in the blood sugar levels to increase beyond acceptable levels,though your body cells are starved for glucose. This condition is very bad for our well being and over long term may result in severe complications. Controlling blood sugar levels is a tough job but it is not impossible if you realize that every thing is in your own hands. This is so,because though you may get good advise from doctors and dieticians,it is ultimately Y O U that will have to take all the necessary steps to successfully control diabetes.I am giving certain general suggestions based on my personal experience which you may consider and adopt based on your personal choice. Diet plays a very important role in managing diabetes. You should reduce intake of foods that are rich in carbohydrates like sweets, rice,wheat,other grains ,potato,beet and other root vegetables rich in starch. You should eat more of vegetables,sprouts,greens and salads that give you lot of fiber,vitamins and minerals. Each meal you take should be smaller but you may have 5 or 6 meals instead 3 meals a day. Exercise is very important to control diabetes. Daily brisk walking or jogging for at least 40 to 60 minutes is ideal. Such exercise Continue reading >>

Strike The Spike Ii

Strike The Spike Ii

Dealing With High Blood Sugar After Meals Eleven years ago, I wrote an article for Diabetes Self-Management about the management of high blood sugar after meals. It was called “Strike the Spike” and no article I’ve ever written has led to greater reader response. To this day, I still receive calls, letters, and e-mails thanking me for offering practical answers to this perplexing challenge. I’ve even been asked to speak on the topic at some major conferences. So when presented with the opportunity to readdress the issue, I jumped at the chance. A lot has changed in the past eleven years: we know more than ever about the harmful effects of after-meal blood sugar spikes, but we also have a number of potent new tools and techniques for preventing them. Now that I know how important this topic is to so many people, I’ll do my absolute best to bring you up to date. What’s a spike? After-meal, or “postprandial,” spikes are temporary high blood glucose levels that occur soon after eating. It is normal for the level of glucose in the blood to rise a small amount after eating, even in people who do not have diabetes. However, if the rise is too high, it can affect your quality of life today and contribute to serious health problems down the road. The reason blood glucose tends to spike after eating in many people with diabetes is a simple matter of timing. In a person who doesn’t have diabetes, eating foods containing carbohydrate causes two important reactions in the pancreas: the immediate release of insulin into the bloodstream, and the release of a hormone called amylin. The insulin starts working almost immediately (to move glucose out of the bloodstream and into cells) and finishes its job in a matter of minutes. The amylin keeps food from reaching the sm Continue reading >>

Understanding Your Blood Glucose Readings

Understanding Your Blood Glucose Readings

Testing your blood sugar at home—also called self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG)—is the single best tool you have to manage your type 1 or type 2 diabetes on a daily basis. Why? Testing helps you: 1. Catch and treat any dangerous blood sugar highs or lows. 2. Understand how your blood sugar rises in reaction to certain foods. 3. Recognize how exercise changes your blood sugar levels. 4. Determine if your diabetes medications are working. 5. Calculate your insulin dose for meals (if you have been prescribed a rapid-acting insulin). By using the information from regular blood sugar testing, you can make sure your efforts to eat right, exercise, and take your medications are paying off. And studies show that keeping your blood sugar under control is the best way to reduce your risk of long-term diabetes complications like kidney damage and heart and eye disease. What is a healthy blood sugar level? Everyone has unique blood sugar targets based on their individual medical history, age, and lifestyle needs. However, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends the following general goals for non-pregnant adults: Fasting (before meals; upon waking): 70–130 mg/dL (3.9–7.2 mmol/L) Postprandial (one to two hours after the start of a meal): no greater than 180 mg/dL (10.0 mmol/L) Remember, these are only guidelines. Talk to your doctor or diabetes educator about the blood sugar targets that are right for you. They can also advise you on how often you should be testing. What is a blood sugar emergency? Extremely high or low blood sugars can be dangerous to people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Insulin treatments and certain oral diabetes medications can trigger blood sugar lows, or hypoglycemia. Everyone has a different lower threshold for feeling the effects of Continue reading >>

About Dangerous Levels Of Blood Sugar

About Dangerous Levels Of Blood Sugar

Diabetes, characterized by fasting glucose (blood sugar) levels above 120, generally requires oral medication or insulin injections to control glucose levels. Changes in diet and exercise assist the body in maintaining appropriate levels of blood sugar throughout the day. However, even with proper treatment and good control of glucose, people with diabetes run the risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) or hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). Types Hypoglycemia occurs when blood sugar levels drop below 70, and may occur as a result of skipping a meal, forgetting to eat a snack or simply failing to consume enough carbohydrates to maintain an adequate level of glucose. Strenuous exercise or illness may bring on hypoglycemia. Medications used to treat diabetes sometimes cause a drop in blood sugar in the middle of the night. Hyperglycemia occurs when glucose levels of 200 to 240 or more, depending on the target range for the individual. Generally, a sudden spike in glucose after meals begins to come down within an hour or two after eating, but when glucose levels fail to drop, or continue to climb, hyperglycemia causes concern. Eating too large a meal or a meal containing large amounts of carbohydrates, lack of exercise or stress and illness contribute to high blood glucose levels. Features Symptoms of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) include pale skin, jitters or shakiness, the feeling of extreme hunger, headache, dizziness, changes in behavior or mood, difficulty paying attention or confusion or tingling around the mouth. Symptoms of hyperglycemia include excessive thirst and increased urination. Blood glucose readings above 200 indicate that hyperglycemia requires treatment. At levels of 240 or more, the risk of diabetic coma (ketoacidosis) exists. Effects Ketoacidosis develo Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

A - A + Main Document Quote: "A number of medical studies have shown a dramatic relationship between elevated blood sugar levels and insulin resistance in people who are not very active on a daily or regular basis." A doctor might order a test of the sugar level in a person's blood if there is a concern that they may have diabetes, or have a sugar level that is either too low or too high. The test, which is also called a check of blood sugar, blood glucose, fasting blood sugar, fasting plasma glucose, or fasting blood glucose, indicates how much glucose is present is present in a person's blood. When a person eats carbohydrates, such as pasta, bread or fruit, their body converts the carbohydrates to sugar - also referred to as glucose. Glucose travels through the blood to supply energy to the cells, to include muscle and brain cells, as well as to organs. Blood sugar levels usually fluctuate depending upon what a person eats and how long it has been since they last ate. However; consistent or extremely low levels of glucose in a person's blood might cause symptoms such as: Anxiety Sweating Dizziness Confusion Nervousness Warning signs of dangerously high levels of blood sugar include sleepiness or confusion, dry mouth, extreme thirst, high fever, hallucinations, loss of vision, or skin that is warm and dry. A blood sugar test requires a finger prick or needle stick. A doctor might order a, 'fasting,' blood glucose test. What this means is a person will not be able to drink or eat for 8-10 hours before the test, or the doctor may order the test for a random time or right after the person eats. If a woman is pregnant, her doctor might order a, 'glucose-tolerance test,' which involves drinking glucose solution and having blood drawn a specified amount of time later. The re Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Too High? Blood Sugar Too Low?

Blood Sugar Too High? Blood Sugar Too Low?

If you have diabetes, your blood sugar doesn't call your cell phone and say, "My readings are too high right now." Instead, blood sugar rises slowly and gradually, causing complications that may damage your organs -- heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, feet, and even skin are at risk. Sometimes you wonder, "Is my blood sugar too high? Too low?" because "normal" levels are so important. "Diabetes is not a 'one-size-fits-all' condition, and neither are blood sugar readings. Different targets are established for different populations," says Amber Taylor, M.D., director of the Diabetes Center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland. Targets may vary depending on a person's age, whether they have type 1 or type 2 diabetes and for how long, what medications they're taking, whether they have complications, and, if the patient is a female, whether she is pregnant. "Patients on insulin may need to test more frequently than someone on oral agents," says Taylor. "Those with type 1 diabetes always require insulin, but many with type 2 diabetes also need it." Target Blood Sugar Levels If you have diabetes, these are target "control" blood glucose levels, using a rating of milligrams to deciliter, or mg/dl: Blood sugar levels before meals (preprandial): 70 to 130 mg/dL Blood sugar levels one to two hours after the start of a meal (postprandial): less than 180 mg/dL Blood sugar levels indicating hypoglycemia or low blood glucose: 70 or below mg/dL Types of Blood Sugar Tests Blood glucose testing can screen, diagnose, and monitor. Glucose is measured either after fasting for eight to ten hours, at a random time, following a meal (postprandial), or as part of an oral glucose challenge or tolerance test. You can compare your levels to these results for specific tests, based on clinical Continue reading >>

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