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Blood Sugar Level 226 Mg

A High Sugar Level After A Meal

A High Sugar Level After A Meal

It's normal for your blood sugar level to rise after you eat, especially if you eat a meal high in refined carbohydrates. But if your blood sugar rises more than most people's, you might have diabetes or pre-diabetes, a condition that indicates a strong risk for developing diabetes in the future. If you already have diabetes, you doctor will recommend keeping your blood sugar within a prescribed range. A glucose tolerance test, done one to three hours after you eat a high-carbohydrate meal, can check your blood sugar levels. Why Does Your Blood Sugar Rise? When you eat carbohydrates, your body breaks down the sugars they contain into glucose. Your body can't absorb most sugars without breaking them down first. Simple sugars such as refined sugar break down very quickly; you absorb them rapidly into your bloodstream, which raises your blood sugar. In healthy people, the levels don't rise very high and they drop back to normal quickly. If you have diabetes, your levels after a meal will rise higher and stay high longer than levels in other people. This occurs because your pancreas either don't release enough insulin, the hormone that helps cells absorb glucose, or because the cells don't respond properly to insulin release. Normal Levels If your doctor suspects that you have abnormal glucose levels, he might suggest doing a glucose tolerance test. You are given around 75 grams of carbohydrate after fasting for 12 hours. At one- to three-hour intervals, your doctor draws blood and analyzes your glucose levels. A normal fasting glucose is 60 to 100 milligrams per deciliter; your levels should rise no higher than 200 mg/dl one hour after eating and no more than 140 mg/dl two hours after finishing the snack. Most healthy people without diabetes have two-hour readings below 12 Continue reading >>

My Sugar Level Is 158/226.

My Sugar Level Is 158/226.

My blood sugar level is 158 and 226 on fasting and PP respectively.On doctor's advice I am taking GLIMER 2 mg one daily before breakfast. I am walking regularly in the morning 6-7 Km.I wish to take ayurvedic medicine for permanent cure.Pl suggest. My opinion is very similar to rusticguy. Keep carbohydrate intake between 10 and 14 portions per day (1 portion = 10g carbohydrate), ideally 3 meals x 4 carb portions. uk.sitestat.com/diabetes/we... Make up the balance of your meals with natural, additive-free, unprocessed protein and fat foods. Glimepiride (generic name) Glimer (brand name) is used along with diet and exercise, and sometimes with other medications, to treat type 2 diabetes (condition in which the body does not use insulin normally and, therefore, cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood). Glimepiride lowers blood sugar by causing the pancreas to produce insulin (a natural substance that is needed to break down sugar in the body) and helping the body use insulin efficiently. This medication will only help lower blood sugar in people whose bodies produce insulin naturally. * Adopt diabetic diet. Consult a dietitian and prepare a diet chart. * Check your fasting blood sugar daily and avoid the the foods that cause elevated blood sugar levels. Post-prandial blood sugar may also be checked occasionally. If you don't reduce your high blood sugar, you suffer from diabetic complications in the near future such as heat attack, stroke or kidney failure. Periodical tests to be conducted by a diabetic patient. A: HbA1c. HbA1c is a lab test that shows the average level of blood sugar (glucose) over the previous 3 months. It shows how well you are controlling your diabetes. B: Control your high Blood pressure, if any. Normal blood pressure- <120/80 mmHg. C: Control Continue reading >>

High Blood Glucose: What It Means And How To Treat It

High Blood Glucose: What It Means And How To Treat It

What is high blood glucose? People who do not have diabetes typically have fasting plasma blood glucose levels that run under 100 mg/dl. Your physician will define for you what your target blood glucose should be — identifying a blood glucose target that is as close to normal as possible that you can safely achieve given your overall medical health. In general, high blood glucose, also called 'hyperglycemia', is considered "high" when it is 160 mg/dl or above your individual blood glucose target. Be sure to ask your healthcare provider what he or she thinks is a safe target for you for blood glucose before and after meals. If your blood glucose runs high for long periods of time, this can pose significant problems for you long-term — increased risk of complications, such as eye disease, kidney disease, heart attacks and strokes and more. High blood glucose can pose health problems in the short-term as well. Your treatment plan may need adjustment if the blood glucose stays over 180 mg/dl for 3 days in a row. It is important to aim to keep your blood glucose under control, and treat hyperglycemia when it occurs. What are the symptoms of high blood glucose? Increased thirst Increased urination Dry mouth or skin Tiredness or fatigue Blurred vision More frequent infections Slow healing cuts and sores Unexplained weight loss What causes high blood glucose? Too much food Too little exercise or physical activity Skipped or not enough diabetes pills or insulin Insulin that has spoiled after being exposed to extreme heat or freezing cold Stress, illness, infection, injury or surgery A blood glucose meter that is not reading accurately What should you do for high blood glucose? Be sure to drink plenty of water. It is recommended to drink a minimum of 8 glasses each day. If yo Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level During Pregnancy, What's Normal?

Blood Sugar Level During Pregnancy, What's Normal?

The form of diabetes which develops during pregnancy is known as gestational diabetes. This condition has become predominant in the recent pastaccording to the 2009 article in American Family Physician. For instance, in the United States alone, it affects around 5% to 9% of all the pregnant women. Pregnancy aggravates the preexisting type 2 and type 1 diabetes. During pregnancy the sugar level may tend to be high sometimes, posing problems to the mother and the infant as well. However, concerning the sugar level during pregnancy, what's normal? Blood sugar control is one of the most essential factors that should be undertaken during pregnancy. When measures are taken to control blood sugar level during pregnancy, it increases chances of a successful pregnancy. The average fasting glucose for pregnant women without any diabetes condition range from 69 to 75 and from 105 to 108 immediately one hour after consuming food. If you have preexisting diabetes or you have developedgestational diabetes, the best way to handle the blood sugar level is to ensure that it remains in between the normal range, not going too low or high. According to the recommendations of the 2007, Fifth International Workshop-Conference on Gestational Diabetes, which established blood glucose goals especially for diabetic women, during the period of pregnancy, the fasting blood sugar should not exceed 96. Blood sugar should remain below 140 just one hour after eating and below 120 two hours later. Why Is It Important to Keep Normal Blood Sugar Level During Pregnancy? The most effective way to prevent complications related to diabetes is to control the amount or the level of blood sugar. This blood sugar control is very significant during pregnancy as it can: Minimize the risk of stillbirth as well as m Continue reading >>

What Type 2s Can Do When Blood Sugar Soars

What Type 2s Can Do When Blood Sugar Soars

The emergency condition most type 2s dread is hypoglycemia, where plummeting blood sugar levels can bring on a dangerous semi-conscious state, and even coma or death. However, hyperglycemia, high-blood sugar levels consistently above 240 mg/dL, can be just as dangerous. Left untreated, at its most extreme high-blood sugar, can induce ketoacidosis, the build-up of toxic-acid ketones in the blood and urine. It can also bring on nausea, weakness, fruity-smelling breath, shortness of breath, and, as with hypoglycemia, coma. However, once they’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, most type 2s have taken steps to prevent or lessen the most dangerous effects of high-blood sugar levels. Their concern shifts to dealing with unexpected, sometimes alarming spikes in blood sugar levels. The symptoms of those spikes are the classic ones we associate with the onset of diabetes—unquenchable thirst, excessive urination, fatigue, weight loss, and headaches. When you do spike, what can you do right away to bring blood sugar levels down? Immediate Steps You Can Take: 1. Insulin—If you are on an insulin regimen; a bolus injection should drive numbers down fairly rapidly. 2. If you are not on insulin or don’t use fast-acting insulin, taking a brisk walk or bike ride works for most people to start bringing their numbers down. 3. Stay hydrated. Hyperglycemic bodies want to shed excess sugar, leading to frequent urination and dehydration. You need to drink water steadily until your numbers drop. 4. Curb your carb intake. It does not matter how complex the carbs in your diet are, your body still converts them to glucose at some point. Slacking off on carb consumption is a trackable maneuver that lets you better understand how to control your numbers. Preventative Steps: These are extensions Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

At Lansing OB/GYN, we screen all pregnant women for gestational diabetes. This test is scheduled some time between the 26th and 28th week of pregnancy. The diabetes of pregnancy is called gestational diabetes and exists in 2.5-4% of all pregnancies. Gestational diabetes is an inability to metabolize carbohydrates normally. This inability results in elevated blood sugar levels. Carbohydrate intolerance manifests itself in varying degrees of severity and is usually diagnosed in the second or third trimester. During pregnancy, rising levels of placental hormones cause a resistance to insulin actions. Usually, the body will compensate by producing increased amounts of insulin. However, age, obesity, family history, and pancreatic reserve are factors which may make a woman susceptible to gestational diabetes. Testing involves a visit to the laboratory. One hour after drinking a sweet drink at the laboratory, a blood sample will be drawn and analyzed. The test is abnormal or positive if the glucose level is 135 mg./dl. or higher. Any reading below 135 mg./dl. is considered within normal limits, and the mother is at very low risk for developing gestational diabetes. A positive screen, 135 mg/dl or higher, requires further evaluation with a three-hour glucose tolerance test. The preparation for this test is more involved. A three-day, high carbohydrate preparation diet is required for the most accurate results. Then, after an overnight fast, a blood sample is drawn. The mother drinks a solution containing glucose and, after each hour for three consecutive hours, a blood sample is drawn. A diagnosis of gestational diabetes is made if at least two of the blood glucose levels are elevated over the norm. If you are diagnosed with Gestational Diabetes Mothers with gestational diabet Continue reading >>

Understanding Diabetes

Understanding Diabetes

This information describes diabetes, the complications related to the disease, and how you can prevent these complications. Blood Sugar Control Diabetes is a disease where the blood sugar runs too high, usually due to not enough insulin. It can cause terrible long-term complications if it is not treated properly. The most common serious complications are blindness ("retinopathy"), kidney failure requiring dependence on a dialysis machine to stay alive ("nephropathy"), and foot and leg amputations. The good news is that these complications can almost always be prevented if you keep your blood sugar near the normal range. The best way to keep blood sugar low is to eat a healthy diet and do regular exercise. Just 20 minutes of walking 4 or 5 times a week can do wonders for lowering blood sugar. Eating a healthy diet is also very important. Do your best to limit the number of calories you eat each day. Put smaller portions of food on your plate and eat more slowly so that your body has a chance to let you know when it's had enough to eat. It is also very important to limit saturated fats in your diet. Read food labels carefully to see which foods are high in saturated fats. Particular foods to cut down on are: whole milk and 2% milk, cheese, ice cream, fast foods, butter, bacon, sausage, beef, chicken with the skin on (skinless chicken is fine), doughnuts, cookies, chocolate, and nuts. Often, diet and exercise alone are not enough to control blood sugar. In this case, medicine is needed to bring the blood sugar down further. Often pills are enough, but sometimes insulin injections are needed. If medicines to lower blood sugar are started, it is still very important to keep doing regular exercise and eating a healthy diet. Keeping Track of Blood Sugar Checking blood sugar wi Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

A - A + Main Document Quote: "A number of medical studies have shown a dramatic relationship between elevated blood sugar levels and insulin resistance in people who are not very active on a daily or regular basis." A doctor might order a test of the sugar level in a person's blood if there is a concern that they may have diabetes, or have a sugar level that is either too low or too high. The test, which is also called a check of blood sugar, blood glucose, fasting blood sugar, fasting plasma glucose, or fasting blood glucose, indicates how much glucose is present is present in a person's blood. When a person eats carbohydrates, such as pasta, bread or fruit, their body converts the carbohydrates to sugar - also referred to as glucose. Glucose travels through the blood to supply energy to the cells, to include muscle and brain cells, as well as to organs. Blood sugar levels usually fluctuate depending upon what a person eats and how long it has been since they last ate. However; consistent or extremely low levels of glucose in a person's blood might cause symptoms such as: Anxiety Sweating Dizziness Confusion Nervousness Warning signs of dangerously high levels of blood sugar include sleepiness or confusion, dry mouth, extreme thirst, high fever, hallucinations, loss of vision, or skin that is warm and dry. A blood sugar test requires a finger prick or needle stick. A doctor might order a, 'fasting,' blood glucose test. What this means is a person will not be able to drink or eat for 8-10 hours before the test, or the doctor may order the test for a random time or right after the person eats. If a woman is pregnant, her doctor might order a, 'glucose-tolerance test,' which involves drinking glucose solution and having blood drawn a specified amount of time later. The re Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 226 Mg/dl - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 226 Mg/dl - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Nerve damage, nerve pain and numbness or tingling in the extremities (peripheral neuropathy) Individuals with diabetes are not able to convert blood sugar into energy either because on insufficient levels of insulin or because their insulin is simply not functioning correctly. This means that glucose stays in the bloodstream, resulting in high blood sugar levels. Diabetes takes two distinct forms: Type 1 and type 2. Diagnosing hyperglycemia is done by assessing symptoms and performing a simple blood glucose test. Depending on the severity of the condition and which type of diabetes the patient is diagnosed with, insulin and a variety of medication may be prescribed to help the person keep their blood sugar under control. Insulin comes in short, long and fast-acting forms, and a person suffering from type 1 diabetes is likely to be prescribed some combination of these. Individuals who are either diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or are considered at risk for the disease are recommended to make alterations to their diet, lifestyle habits and exercise routine in order to lower blood sugar and keep it under control. These changes generally help to improve blood glucose control, individuals with type 2 diabetes may require medication eventually. These can include glitazones, acarbose, glucophage or sulphonylureas. Continue reading >>

Is He A Diabetic At 12.6 ? ( 226)

Is He A Diabetic At 12.6 ? ( 226)

D.D. Family T2 dx Dec '06 Metformin SR 2000mg, Victoza 1.2mg He may just need a little time to think about it. I'm sure it came as a shock to a lot of us at first. Doesn't mean he'll be in denial forever. A1c December 06 6.3 March 06 6.2 June 07 5.7 Dec 07 5.8 June 08 5.6 Nov. 08 5.7 Jan 09 5.8 May 09 5.6 Aug 09 5.4 Feb 10 6.0 Sept 10 6.5 Feb 11 7.1 June 11 5.7 Nov 11 5.9 (41) Feb 12 6.1 (43) Aug 12 6.4 (46) Dec 12 5.8 (40.4) June 13 5.9 (41) January 14 6.1 (43) July 14 6.4 (46) Feb. 15 5.8 (40) Sept 15 6.8 (52) January 16 7.6% (60) April 16 7.0% (53) July 16 5.9% (41) Oct. 16 5.4% (36) had a friend drop by today as i was testing my BG,he wanted to test his so i changed needle and he was 11.4........i said wow you are diabetic he said no way.he told me he had just finished breakfast one hour before,he had bacon ,eggs,beans,toast ,jam,coffee no sugar. we waited another hour tested again and he was 12.6 (226) i told him when he gets home to go see his doctor,he tells me he is NOT diabetic.with those numbers i think he is. That looks pretty diabetic to me! They are far worse levels than I have ever had actually. This friend should definitely get a checkup and urgently adjust his diet. I think anything over 7.8mm requires immediate attention. A normal person is back to 4.6mm an hour or two after eating, no matter what they eat. How is it that he can have a A1c of 12.6 and have a BG of 226? My A1c was 11.3 and told my BG was 330? Am I missing something? D.D. Family Getting much harder to control How is it that he can have a A1c of 12.6 and have a BG of 226? My A1c was 11.3 and told my BG was 330? Am I missing something? The difference is either a random or fasting reading. The average of your a1c is a blood sugar average of 227. My A1c is 5.6, but I've had many numbers over Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Blood Sugar Highs And Lows

How To Avoid Blood Sugar Highs And Lows

Blood sugar control is a main goal for people living with type 2 diabetes. High blood sugar levels can lead to a variety of complications over time, including nerve damage, heart disease, and vision problems. Blood sugar levels that are too low can cause more immediate problems, such as dizziness, confusion, and potentially a loss of consciousness. Keeping blood sugar levels as close to normal as possible is key to preventing these complications and living well with type 2 diabetes. Blood Sugar Highs and Lows Glucose, or blood sugar, comes from two places — the food you eat and your liver. “Blood sugar is basically used to supply energy to the body,” explains Deborah Jane Wexler, MD, an endocrinologist in practice at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston. For instance, one of your most valued organs — your brain — runs entirely on glucose, she notes. Insulin is used to move glucose into cells to be used for energy. When you have type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t produce enough insulin or can’t effectively use the insulin it does produce. Without insulin, glucose builds up in the blood, leading to high blood sugar levels. Low blood sugar can occur when you take too much diabetes medication, skip a meal, or increase your physical activity. Monitoring your blood sugar — by making sure it doesn’t spike too high or dip too low — is an important part of managing your type 2 diabetes. And you can start by learning the signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) and steps to take to bring those levels back to normal: Hypoglycemia: If blood sugar is too low — usually below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) — you may have symptoms such as confusion, sweating, nervousness, nausea, and dizziness. You could even pass out Continue reading >>

A1c Tip: Look At Your Blood Sugar After You Eat

A1c Tip: Look At Your Blood Sugar After You Eat

Frustrated with your latest A1C test results? Your blood sugar levels within the 1-3 hours after you eat are just as important as your blood sugar right before you eat, especially when it comes to your A1C. For example, if your blood sugar is regularly rising to 240 mg/dL (13 mmol) after a meal, that means that you could be spending 2-3 hours after every meal with your blood sugar in that range…which adds up to at least 9 hours of the day! That’s a good chunk of the day spent with high blood sugars, and possibly the source of your A1C results. What can you do to prevent that blood sugar spike after a meal? Here are 5 tips: 1. Take your insulin or oral medication sooner before you eat. Today’s fast-acting insulin’s are designed to reach your bloodstream and start working within 10 to 30 minutes. That means that if you eat your meal and then take your insulin, you’re giving the carbohydrates in that food 10 to 30 minutes to start spiking your blood sugar, easily enough time to work its way up to 200 mg/dL (11 mmol) or higher by the time the insulin really gets going. 2. Talk to your doctor about a medication like Symlin. Symlin is an injectable medication designed to replace the hormone “amylin.” Amylin is a hormone in the human body that works to prevent food from digesting as quickly and it helps prevent high blood sugars after eating. People with type 1 diabetes make zero amylin and people with type 2 diabetes make some, but often not enough. While you can certainly live a healthy life with diabetes without Symlin (or amylin), it can be very helpful for those with insulin resistance or difficulty with high blood sugar after meals. 3. Fine-tune your insulin doses for meals. If you’re taking insulin with your meals, it’s vital that you test your insulin Continue reading >>

What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level

What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level

The blood sugar concentration or blood glucose level is the amount of glucose (sugar) present in the blood of a human or an animal. The body naturally tightly regulates blood glucose levels (with the help of insulin that is secreted by pancreas) as a part of metabolic homeostasis. If blood sugar levels are either increased or decreased by a greater margin than expected this might indicate a medical condition. Diabetic patients must monitor their blood sugar levels as body’s inability to properly utilize and / or produce insulin can pose a serious threat to their health. Navigation: Definition: What is blood sugar? What is diabetes? Diagnosis: Diabetes symptoms Levels and indication Normal blood sugar levels Low blood sugar levels High blood sugar levels Managing: How to lower blood sugar level? Children blood sugar levels Blood sugar levels chart Checking for BS: How to check blood sugar? Treatment: How to lower blood sugar level? Can diabetes be cured? Accessories Diabetic Socks Diabetic Shoes What is blood sugar? What does it mean when someone refers to blood sugar level in your body? Blood sugar level (or blood sugar concentration) is the amount of glucose (a source of energy) present in your blood at any given time. A normal blood glucose level for a healthy person is somewhere between 72 mg/dL (3.8 to 4 mmol/L) and 108 mg/dL (5.8 to 6 mmol/L). It, of course, depends on every individual alone. Blood sugar levels might fluctuate due to other reasons (such as exercise, stress and infection). Typically blood sugar level in humans is around 72 mg/dL (or 4 mmol/L). After a meal the blood sugar level may increase temporarily up to 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L). This is normal. A blood sugar level between 72 mg/dL (4 mmol/L) and 108 mg/dL (6 mmol/L) is considered normal for a h Continue reading >>

Discussion: Blood Sugar Levels And Type 2 Diabetes

Discussion: Blood Sugar Levels And Type 2 Diabetes

When it comes to blood sugar levels, the numbers always seem to confuse people. So we're here today to cover a whole range of reader questions that have come in. If you have questions of your own, join the discussion – please feel free to leave your comments at the bottom. Healthy blood sugar goal ranges Healthy blood sugar control values will depend on several factors, the most important being when you check it. Blood glucose levels will rise after eating meals regardless of whether a person has diabetes–however, someone with good control will be able to bring it down to a stable level after 2 hours. The diagnostic values below are for non pregnant adults with type 2 diabetes. Ranges are different for children, those with type I diabetes and pregnant women. FASTING AFTER MEALS 2 HOURS HbA1c Normal 70-99 mg/dL (4-6 mmol/L)* <140 mg/dL (<7.8 mmol/L)** <5.7% Pre-Diabetes 100-125 mg/dL (6.1-6.9 mmol/L) 140-179 mg/dL 5.7-6.4% Diabetes >126 mg/dL (>7 mmol/L) >180 mg/dL 6.5% and higher *Note that different agencies establish different standards. Some range 70-100 mg/dL, some 70-110 mg/dL, some 70-130 mg/dL **Some agencies recommend <180 mg/dL post-meal especially in the elderly and those who have had diabetes for a very long time What should your goals be? That is between you and your healthcare team because it does depend on various factors. But overall your goal is to gain good control of your diabetes, which means maintaining normal levels or getting as close to normal levels as possible (refer to the normal numbers above). We’ve answered some specific questions regarding blood sugar over here, so be sure to check those out as well. Some specific comments and questions we’ve received regarding blood sugar levels include: 1. My post meal is hovering around 140-160, Continue reading >>

What You Don’t Know About Blood Sugar

What You Don’t Know About Blood Sugar

The most cherished benefit of Foundation membership is discovering something new in every Life Extension publication. Unlike typical health journals, we inform members about what they don’t know concerning medical findings that are overlooked by conventional and alternative doctors. In our relentless review of the scientific literature, we have uncovered data that calls into question what the safe range of blood sugar really is. Current guidelines state that a person is diabetic if fasting blood glucose levels exceed 126 mg/dL on two consecutive occasions. Fasting glucose levels over 109 are flagged as potential prediabetic (glucose intolerant) states. Life Extension has long argued that optimal glucose ranges are less than 100. In a new hypothesis that shakes the pillars of conventional wisdom, it now appears that optimal fasting blood glucose levels should probably be under 86 mg/dL. This means that those with high “normal” glucose (86-109) are at an increased risk of premature death. While the medical establishment clearly understands the lethal dangers of hyperglycemia (blood sugar over 126), they have yet to recognize that even high normal glucose levels pose a serious threat to one’s health. Conventional Medicine’s Interpretation Of Fasting Glucose Blood Tests 70-109 mg/dL . . . . . . . . .Normal glucose tolerance 110-125 mg/dL. . . . . . . . .Impaired fasting glucose (prediabetes) 126+ mg/dL . . . . . . . . .Probable diabetes Life Extension’s Fasting Glucose Guidelines 70-85 mg/dL . . . . . . . . . Optimal (no glucose intolerance) 86-99 mg/dL . . . . . . . . . Borderline impaired fasting glucose 100+ mg/dL . . . . . . . . . .Probable prediabetes Why “Normal” Glucose Levels Are Dangerous To support our hypothesis that higher“normal” ranges of b Continue reading >>

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