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Blood Sugar And Thyroid

Thyroid, Antibiotics, And Blood Sugar – The Mystery Unravels

Thyroid, Antibiotics, And Blood Sugar – The Mystery Unravels

The past 3 months have been very enlightening. Dr Catanzaro, and our new integrative pediatrician are both helping me understand what we have truly been confused about the past 2 years. So how should I sum all this up? Because honestly, the news has blown my mind. Thyroid and blood sugar. Those are the terms that are overwhelming me right now. When Dr. Catanzaro brought this to my attention back in October, that he wasn’t happy with Anthony’s TSH levels via some blood tests, and that Anthony’s genetic panel (23&Me) showed a likely hood for thyroid issues, I was like, WOW! I hadn’t thought about Anthony’s thyroid being a factor in 5 years. Since an endocrinologist I saw, told me I didn’t really have to worry about it. Well I didn’t……. and I should of. Dr. Catanzaro put Anthony on a selenium supplement, and when his night sweats he’s always had, stopped almost immediately, and that his OCD was much improved. I knew we were on to something. After that I started thinking, googling, and researching. Dr. Catanzaro told me how thyroid, and blood sugar can be connected. Then I started thinking about how Anthony was diagnosed with PANDAS years ago. I thought about how antibiotics are the treatment of choice for PANDAS. I then started thinking how Anthony always did AMAZING on antibiotics, especially penicillin. I started googling “thyroid and antibiotics”. I found many articles about how antibiotics are a treatment for autoimmune thyroiditis. So basically, the two conditions, PANDAS, and Thyroiditis, have many similar components and symptoms that overlap. I also thought about how back in July, when we had Anthony’s adenoids taken out. I thought about how the doctor said they were very large and swollen. I googled once again, and found this VERY interest Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Imbalances And Hashimoto’s

Blood Sugar Imbalances And Hashimoto’s

One Thing People with Hashimoto’s Can Do Right Away to Feel Better People often ask me if there was one thing that people with Hashimoto’s could do right away to feel better and that is balancing your blood sugar!! Balancing blood sugar levels should be one of the priorities for anyone who is hoping to overcome autoimmune thyroiditis and adrenal fatigue. Balancing my blood sugar made a big difference for me, helping with my anxiety levels and reducing my thyroid antibodies. Before I balanced my blood sugar, I would get “hangry” (hungry +angry) multiple times per day as the high carbohydrate foods I was eating were making me have huge blood sugar swings. What I didn’t know, is that these swings were also weakening my adrenals and causing a spike in my thyroid antibodies. Blood sugar imbalances have been described as adding “fuel to the fire” in autoimmune thyroid disease by many practitioners who focus on reversing Hashimoto’s. I wasn’t aware that I had blood sugar issues when I was first diagnosed (despite being a self-admitted sugar addict…). I was thin, so, therefore, I thought that it meant that I was healthy. I recently had this conversation with an overweight family member who thought he was in the clear to eat sugar because he did not have diabetes. But you see, diabetes takes many years to develop, and impaired carbohydrate tolerance, insulin resistance, blood sugar swings, and hypoglycemia may be seen for many years before. Researchers in Poland have found that up to 50% of patients with Hashimoto’s have an impaired tolerance to carbohydrates. This means that after consuming carbohydrate-rich foods, their blood sugar goes up too high, too quickly. This leads to a rapid, sometimes excessive release of insulin. These insulin surges can cause Continue reading >>

Control Blood Sugar, Cholesterol & Blood Pressure With Coriander Seeds

Control Blood Sugar, Cholesterol & Blood Pressure With Coriander Seeds

You know those green leaves packed with flavor (and nutrients!) that you commonly consume in guacamole? That’s cilantro. Coriander is a seed spice that’s been cultivated since ancient times and comes from the same plant that gives us beneficial cilantro leaves. Don’t be alarmed if this doesn’t ring a bell. These seeds might not be as well-known unless perhaps you’re a lover of curries and masalas, which include coriander as an integral ingredient. Coriander is an annual herb also known as cilantro or Chinese parsley. When the leaves are used in their fresh form, we commonly refer to this herb as cilantro. The dried seeds are what we know as coriander, and they’ve been used as a culinary spice and food-poisoning preventative agent for ages. As a spice, it’s either sold whole or ground with a flavor similar to a blend of lemon, sage and caraway. Sounds interesting, right? These seeds not only offer a unique and intriguing flavor profile, but their consumption has also been shown to blood flow and heart health as well as to calm serious digestive problems like IBS. That’s because coriander contains a multitude of bioactives that lead to a wide array of pharmacological activities, including its ability to act as an antimicrobial, anti-epileptic, antidepressant, antimutagenic, anti-inflammatory and anxiety inhibitor. It’s also been shown to help lower cholesterol, blood pressure and blood sugar naturally! (1) Read on to see just how amazing this worldly spice truly is. 8 Health Benefits of Coriander Seeds 1. Lower Blood Sugar Coriander seeds and essential oil both have blood sugar-lowering effects on the human body. The effect is actually so therapeutic and likely that people who suffer from low blood sugar or take blood sugar-lowering medicine are warned t Continue reading >>

The Full Article Title:

The Full Article Title:

BACKGROUND Hypothyroidism causes many metabolic abnormalities as well as multiple clinical symptoms. Some studies suggest that blood sugar may be affected in hypothyroidism and levels may increase. Indeed, it has been noted that patients with diabetes who also have hypothyroidism may have higher levels of Hemoglobin A1C (HBA1C). This test is done to diagnose and monitor control of blood sugar by patients with diabetes. An elevated HBA1C usually indicates worse control of diabetes. This study was done to look at the effect of thyroid hormone treatment on HBA1c levels in patients with hypothyroidism. This study was also done to look at the effect thyroid hormone treatment has on the diagnoses of pre diabetes and the control of diabetes after treatment. Anantarapu S et al Effects of thyroid hormone replacement on glycated he n non-diabetic subjects with overt hypothyroidism. Arch Endocrinol Metab. September 25 2015 [Epub ahead of print]. This study was done at a large hospital in India. Patients who were newly diagnosed with hypothyroidism were studied. They were at least 20 years old. Blood tests were done before starting the thyroid hormone and 3 months after the tests showed normal thyroid hormone levels. An HBA1C test and an oral glucose tolerance test were done on all patients. The results showed a significant drop in the HBA1c levels for patients diagnosed as having pre diabetes (HBA1C between 5.7 to 6.5 %) and diabetes (HBA1C above 6.5%) after starting thyroid hormone therapy. There was no change in the number of patients with elevated fasting glucose levels or impaired glucose tolerance after treatment with thyroid hormone. The body weight did not change to a great extent. This study suggests that hypothyroidism may be falsely increasing the levels of the HBA1C tes Continue reading >>

A Doctor’s Diagnosis: Prediabetes

A Doctor’s Diagnosis: Prediabetes

Jane is one of my patients and her story is similar to millions in the United States. She’s a 47-year-old mom who has been coming to me for the past 10 years. Jane is somewhat overweight and has been struggling with one diet or another since I have known her. In the first few years, she was exercising regularly and aggressively. At times, Jane lost a few pounds, which she usually regained with the all too frequent relaxation of her diet. She attributed her weight gain to a hormone imbalance. At age 42, I diagnosed Jane as being hypothyroid, a condition resulting from low thyroid hormone production, causing low metabolism. I treated her with a replacement dose of thyroid hormone. While Jane felt better, her weight did not change. To lose the extra weight, she not only needed to exercise but also reduce the amount of calories she consumed. “Do you know how hard that is?” Jane asked. “As a mom, I’m always on the go. It’s difficult to find the time to exercise.” “I completely understand,” I said. “But regular exercise is a necessity if we’re going to protect you from developing diabetes, heart disease or both.” I did not see Jane for two or three years, until she came to see me about six months ago. As usual, she was pleasant, but remained overweight and had gained about five pounds. Jane told me that she had been unable to find the time to exercise because she was actively preparing her daughter for college. Knowing that Jane had a family history of diabetes and heart disease, I stressed the importance of exercise. “I am still a young woman,” she said. “I should not have to worry about heart disease, at least not yet.” Jane is a registered nurse and knows a lot about different medical conditions, so I felt comfortable speaking with her frank Continue reading >>

Do You Have Hashimoto’s Hypothyroidism And Low Blood Pressure?

Do You Have Hashimoto’s Hypothyroidism And Low Blood Pressure?

We all hear about the risks associated with high blood pressure, but having low blood pressure can also pose health risks. When you have low blood pressure your blood, which carries oxygen and nutrients, is not being sufficiently pushed into the tissues throughout your body, including the brain. This means your brain and other organs are not getting enough oxygen to work as well as they could. A blood pressure of 120/80 is considered healthy and if the upper or lower number deviates by 10 your blood pressure is in an abnormal range. People with poorly managed Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism may also have problems with blood flow and oxygenation, which compounds the effects of low blood pressure. Low blood pressure associated with adrenal fatigue Low blood pressure is typically associated with poor adrenal function. The adrenal glands, which sit atop the kidneys, produce stress hormones and play an important role in regulating blood pressure. Many people today have fatigued adrenal glands thanks to chronic stress, poor diets, low blood sugar, chronic infections, digestive problems, inflammation, or other issues. Chronic stress from any or all of these factors may wear out the adrenal glands, causing adrenal fatigue. As a result, your body has a harder time maintaining health and balance through life's ups and downs. Symptoms of adrenal fatigue may include constant tiredness, hypoglycemia (low blood sugar), and low blood pressure. It’s not uncommon for people with Hashimoto’s hypothyroidism to also suffer from some form of adrenal imbalance, including adrenal fatigue. Feeling faint when you stand up A common type of low blood pressure is a orthostatic hypotension, a drop in blood pressure when you go from sitting to standing that causes lightheadedness. For the person wi Continue reading >>

Hyperthyroidism And Diabetes

Hyperthyroidism And Diabetes

Hyperthyroidism can make blood glucose control difficult, so proper diagnosis and treatment are important. People with type 1 diabetes are at a high risk for hyperthyroidism, a condition caused by the overproduction of thyroid hormones. This excess of hormones speeds up the metabolism, the rate at which the body uses energy. Hyperthyroidism is usually associated with poor blood glucose control and a need for additional insulin. A increased metabolism “clears” insulin from the system at a faster rate, and an increased production and absorption of glucose can raise blood sugars. All of this can lead to insulin resistance – where cells are unable to respond to insulin in order to use glucose for energy. In extreme cases, this can lead to dangerously high blood sugars and diabetic ketoacidosis. Hyperthyroidism can also aggravate diabetic heart conditions. It can cause a rapid heart rate as well as arrhythmia (an irregular heartbeat). People with type 1 diabetes are particularly vulnerable to developing hyperthyroidism because thyroid disorders often result from problems with the immune system. The most common cause of hyperthyroidism in people under 40 is Graves’ disease, an autoimmune disorder. People with type 2 diabetes can also be affected by hyperthyroidism. However, people with type 2 are more likely to have hypothyroidism, a condition where the body produces too little thyroid hormones and the metabolism is slowed. What is Hyperthyroidism? The source of the problem is the thyroid, a butterfly-shaped gland located in the front of the neck below the larynx or voice box. The thyroid consists of two lobes, one located on either side of the windpipe. The job of the gland is to store hormones and release them into the bloodstream, where they circulate throughout th Continue reading >>

The Link Between Sugar And Thyroid Health. A Dietitian Explains

The Link Between Sugar And Thyroid Health. A Dietitian Explains

Your thyroid (the butterfly-shaped gland in your neck that regulates metabolism) is very sensitive to change. Thyroid hormones can be thrown out by stress, infections, lack of sleep, and, oh yeah, diet. As a dietitian and nutritionist, I consult with a lot of women with thyroid issues. But whether they have autoimmune thyroid disease or suboptimal thyroid function (hypothyroidism) from lifestyle stressors, I always tell them one thing: lower your sugar intake. Sugar mucks with your gut bacteria. Sugar feeds the “bad” bacteria in your intestine (gut), which perpetuates their numbers. This often comes at the expense of “good”, or beneficial, bacteria. But what does this have to do with the thyroid, you say? Well, close close to 20 per cent of T3 (active thyroid hormone) production happens in your gut. The presence of bad bacteria decreases production and causes the release of endotoxins (chemicals released by bad bacteria), which lead to leaky gut. Leaky gut has been linked to thyroid dysfunction and numerous autoimmune conditions. Sugar screws with blood glucose. A high-sugar diet causes frequent insulin spikes. Over time, your body becomes resistant to these spikes, leaving more glucose in your bloodstream, as opposed to in your cells where it can be used for energy. This is known as insulin resistance. Chronically high blood sugar and the associated insulin spikes are linked to increased thyroid gland destruction in people with autoimmune thyroid conditions. Sugar causes inflammation. The negative effect of sugar on glucose levels can create inflammation, too. The inflammation leads to a suppression of the hypothalamic pituitary axis (HPA Axis), which is a SUPER important chain of structures that control your response to stress, immune function and thyroid horm Continue reading >>

Hashimoto’s: Blood Sugar Blues

Hashimoto’s: Blood Sugar Blues

The human body is a wonderfully complex playground where hormones, immune cells, neurotransmitters, red and white blood cells, bacteria, and more all frolic. With Hashimoto’s that playground gets invaded by a hurricane of inflammation and this disrupts many of the systems that produce these things. In today’s post, we focus on how blood sugar problems can impact the thyroid and how Hashimoto’s and hypothyroidism can also make blood sugar problems worse. It’s a two way street, people. The Poor, Dear Pancreas The endocrine gland that is responsible for helping maintain blood sugar balance is the pancreas. The poor, dear, much beleaguered pancreas. What does the pancreas do? Quite a lot actually, we really should be nicer to it. It does endocrine stuff and non-endocrine or exocrine stuff. Blood Sugar Balance and Absorption On the endocrine side it produces insulin, glucagon and somatostatin. Insulin and glucagon are involved in blood sugar metabolism and somatostatin is involved in intestinal absorption. The exocrine functions include secreting digestive enzymes into the small intestines. These breakdown proteins, fats and carbs in the diet. Studies have found pancreatic function was significantly reduced in patients with hypothyroidism. And, in many people today, the pancreas is under siege. Sugar Junkies Americans are addicted to sugar. In some measure, it’s their own doing. In other ways, it is the food industry and public health officials who decided that fat was evil when it was discovered that cholesterol was linked to heart disease in the 1980s. The National Academy of Science made sweeping recommendations at that time to get rid of dietary fat. Bye, Bye Fat – Hello Sugar So fat was taken out of many processed, fast foods and in an effort to make it tast Continue reading >>

Is Your Thyroid Killing You? Diabetes

Is Your Thyroid Killing You? Diabetes

Dana, your blood sugar and cholesterol are very high. Do you have a family history of diabetes and heart disease? Several months later… Dana, your blood sugar and cholesterol are high again. You should start a cholesterol-lowering statin drug and diabetes medication. Let’s wait until your next lab test to decide. 347 million people worldwide have diabetes. The World Health Organization warns that its escalating rates around the world will result in the doubling of diabetes deaths between 2005 and 2030.[1. World Health Organization. World Diabetes Day 2012] Thyroid Disease and Diabetes The frequency of thyroid dysfunction in diabetic patients is higher than that of the general population. The Journal of Thyroid Research published an article in 2011 reviewing the scientific research worldwide on thyroid disorders and diabetes mellitus.[2. Hage, M., Zantout, M.S., Azar, S.T. Review Article: Thyroid Disorders and Diabetes Mellitus. Journal of Thyroid Research Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 439463, 7 pages] Perros et al. demonstrated an overall prevalence of 13.4% of thyroid diseases in diabetics with the highest prevalence in type 1 female diabetics (31.4%). A prevalence of 12.3% was reported among Greek diabetic patients and 16% of Saudi patients with type 2 diabetes were found to have thyroid dysfunction. In Jordan, a study reported that thyroid dysfunction was present in 12.5% of type 2 diabetic patients. Thyroid disorders remain the most frequent autoimmune disorders associated with type 1 diabetes. Positive TPO antibodies have been reported in as high as 38% of diabetic individuals. Ghawil et al. documented that 23.4% of type 1 diabetic Libyan subjects had positive TPO antibodies and 7% had positive TG antibodies. According to the World Health Organization, 50% of Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia & Hypothyroidism

Hypoglycemia & Hypothyroidism

At some point everyone has experienced Hypoglycemia, also known as low blood sugar. You may not know the term but you probably know the feeling. You wait too long to eat or eat high carb foods (say a bagel for breakfast), then within a few hours it feels like you hit a wall. You might feel these symptoms: Energy comes crashing down Weak and Shaky Irritable or Cranky Hot (like a hot flash) or sweaty Fuzzy head, trouble thinking clearly Become ravenously hungry Read more about Hypoglycemia symptoms After eating a ridiculous amount of food, or having something really sugary your energy starts to recover slowly. It takes a while to rebound from the weak, lifeless state, and muster enough energy to get off the couch. For over twenty years I experienced this kind of high-low energy cycle with Hypoglycemia. At one point, before getting treated for Hypothyroidism and Adrenal Fatigue, I asked a doctor about Hypoglycemia. He simply dismissed it and said: “No, nothing can be done about it. Just drink orange juice when it happens.” The problem was, I experienced Hypoglycemia about every two hours, that’s a lot of O.J.! I’m no doctor, but one would think having energy crashes every two hours means something else is not right. Also worth noting, in the middle of a working-out I would often get Hypoglycemia. For me this meant with any kind of physical exertion I would get really week, start shaking and nearly collapse with exhaustion. This was totally frustrating because I wanted to exercise, and the doctors told me to “lose weight I just needed to exercise more.” But when the Hypoglycemia wall hit that was it, workout over. At that point orange juice just isn’t going to help. So the looming question was why was I getting Hypoglycemia and could it be prevented? When I fi Continue reading >>

Diabetes-thyroid Alert: Is There A Connection?

Diabetes-thyroid Alert: Is There A Connection?

Undiagnosed disorders can cause one to experience severe health problems and debilitating symptoms. Two stealthy conditions that can cause serious damage if not properly looked for are diabetes and thyroid dysfunction. However, being difficult to diagnose is not the only thing these two conditions have in common. There are various mutually impactful effects that thyroid malfunction and diabetes share between each other. Because of this, it is not surprising that many studies have found that prevalence of thyroid conditions among diabetics is notably higher than that of the general populace. Different study populations have shown percentages ranging from roughly 5% to about 30% with an overall prevalence of 13.4%. This is a significant rate of thyroid dysfunction among diabetics that should not be taken lightly. Furthermore, because both thyroid conditions and diabetes interact with the endocrine system, mutual damage can occur that promotes both conditions. Understanding the influence of each condition on the other is an important means of acquiring quality treatment. Diabetes Breakdown There are two primary forms of diabetes, type 1 and type 2. Thyroid conditions are more commonly associated with type 1 diabetes. However, it is important to recognize that those with type 2 are still at increased risk of developing a thyroid condition when compared to the general population. Type 1 diabetes is classified as an autoimmune condition. Diseases in this category cause the body to turn on itself and attack its own systems. In the case of diabetes, the immune system attacks the pancreas, which severely reduces production of insulin. When this is further exaggerated by a thyroid condition, which can also inhibit insulin production by slowing one’s metabolism, proper blood glu Continue reading >>

The Hypoglycemic Side Of Hypothyroidism

The Hypoglycemic Side Of Hypothyroidism

Hypoglycemia is a not so infrequent condition encountered in endocrine practice. Considered an inevitable (though modifiable) part of diabetes therapy, hypoglycemia occurs fairly often, in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, in patients on oral hypoglycemic agents and insulin, and in indoor as well as outdoor settings.[1] As the prevalence of diabetes rises, and as we try to control glycemia more aggressively, using the multiple permutations and combinations of antidiabetic drugs available to us, the incidence of hypoglycemia is certain to rise. Apart from this, hypoglycemia is sometimes spontaneous, and may occur without relation to antidiabetic therapy. Hypoglycemia is basically a mismatch between insulin (whether exogenous or endogenous) and glycemic levels (whether produced by meals or parenteral nutrition). The excessive insulin levels may be due to excessive dosage, increased bioavailability, or enhanced insulin sensitivity. The inappropriate increase in insulin levels leads to a fall in blood glucose levels, which in turn stimulates a series of physiological protective mechanisms. These include a release of glucagon, adrenaline, cortisol, and growth hormone; among others.[1] These physiological responses are linked with symptoms, which can be classified as adrenergic or autonomic, neuroglycopenic, and general (usually glucagon-induced). Hypoglycemia prevention now occupies center stage in diabetes praxis, as focus moves from a purely efficacy oriented approach to one which aims for safety and tolerability, along with glycemic control. This shift has occurred in parallel with our understanding of the multiple deleterious effects of hypoglycemia on various organ systems; including the heart, brain, and retina.[2] Hypothyroidism is one of the most common endocrinopathi Continue reading >>

Unstable Blood Sugar And Thyroid Disease – How To Break The Vicious Cycle.

Unstable Blood Sugar And Thyroid Disease – How To Break The Vicious Cycle.

Miriam thought this talk yesterday by Ritamarie Loscalzo was so good that she has made notes from it for us. It describes the connections between unstable blood sugar and thyroid disease and how to break the vicious cycle. Thanks Miriam. ______________ Video interview with Dr Ritamarie Loscalzo Breaking the vicious Cycle of Blood Sugar Imbalances and Thyroid Dysfunction Jump Start Your Energy.com – If blood sugar is too low, the thyroid is sluggish. The thyroid doesnt have any fuel so everything slows down. High blood sugar causes inflammation and that causes inflammation in the thyroid as well. Therefore it cant function well and there is low production of thyroid hormone. TSH creates damage to the cells that are supposed to be picking up the thyroid hormones. Therefore high TSH makes insulin resistance worse. When blood sugar goes too low even genes are affected. The production of these genes is necessary to maintain healthy blood sugar. Factors that contribute to insulin resistance 1. Poor sleep 2. Lack of movement Trained muscles are more sensitive to insulin. Effective exercise is Burst Training short bursts of activity, 30-60 seconds of all-out exercise. This raises the level of growth hormone for 1 hours after that. It decreases levels of insulin dramatically. 4-8 burst per day help create a healthy hormone balance. Its like sprinting as opposed to running a marathon. Dr Ritamarie has a stair stepper under her desk and uses it in her office. You could also do squats at your desk for 30-60 seconds, until your legs burn and youre panting. 3. Stress Stress increases cortisol, then the liver produces blood sugar (gluconeogenesis), which in turn provokes the production of insulin. Cortisol prefers to break down lean tissue or protein (muscle) rather than fat. So whe Continue reading >>

Thyroid Health – Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar And Hypoglycemia

Thyroid Health – Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar And Hypoglycemia

When your blood sugar is low, do you just want to sleep? Maybe a better question is, “When is it okay to have low blood sugar?” The answer is, ” Never.” Especially “never” when you have Hashimoto’s Disease or hypothyroidism as it exacerbates your brain health, adrenal and other hormonal systems. And, hypoglycemia tends to be one of the many linked-in conditions to thyroid dysfunction. MY STORY – MIGHT BE YOURS STORY TOO 1) CHILDHOOD I’ve had low blood sugar problems since I was a child. I remember fainting in church often in my early teens. Why? I was raised Catholic. “Back then” we couldn’t eat before church in order to have communion, in fact, it was a “sin!” Who needed more fear of going to hell! So, by the time we went to church and came home and fixed lunch (no fast food back then), I was several quarts low on blood sugar for sure. 2) My 20’s In my early 20’s I totaled out my car on the interstate. Luckily I was not hurt. After going back to get my car I realized that where I “remember” last driving and where it actually was was 15 miles further. I’d had a black out. I had a black out due to low blood sugar. A glucose tolerance test a few days later by a Chiropractor proved it. He told me to go on a no sugar, high complex carbohydrate and protein diet. I did. It helped. (Thank goodness for Chiropractors who almost all and always study whole body and nutrition). 3) My Late 20’s When I was 28 and 29 I worked two summer’s at Girl Scout Camps. The second year I directed a day camp, I made sure that all my counselors carried peanut butter (this was before peanut allergies took over) with them to spoon feed our little campers who would, an hour or two after breakfast or lunch, get dizzy, start falling over or sobbing for no reaso Continue reading >>

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