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Blood Sugar And Thyroid

Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism

This is the medical term for an underactive thyroid gland. One of the many things the thyroid gland is responsible for is to regulate metabolism. When not enough thyroid hormone is secreted, the metabolism slows[1]; secreting too much results in hyperthyroidism and a too-rapid metabolism. The thyroid gland is actually controlled by another gland, the pituitary gland. It signals the thyroid to produce its hormone and is responsible for the amount of thyroid hormone in the blood. Symptoms of hypothyroid are dry skin and coat, often a loss of hair at the rear portion of the body, sluggishness and weight gain even if the animal has his/her meals reduced, skin that is cold to the touch. The animal may also deliberately seek out warm places to lie. Forms of neuropathy can result from hypothyroidism[2], because it is an endocrine disease. In many hypothyroid cases, the true cause of the lack of thyroid function is never discovered--it's referred to as idiopathic hypothyroidism. The other is known as lymphocytic thyroiditis, where the body begins producing antibodies against the thyroid gland. Symptoms of hypothyroidism may not develop until 75% of the thyroid gland is destroyed; it may take 1-3 years from development of the condition to this point. Idiopathic and lymphocytic thyroiditis causes account for over 95% of hypothyroidism in dogs[3]. In less than 10% of hypothyroidism cases, the problem is not with the thyroid gland itself, but with the pituitary gland in the brain. The pituitary gland produces a thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH)[4]; without this hormone to signal the thyroid gland to produce its thyroid hormone, the thyroid gland remains inactive[5]. Lack of iodine in the pet's diet can result in insufficient production of thyroid hormones with the result being a ty Continue reading >>

Ignoring Your Sugar Cravings May Be Dangerous To Your Thyroid

Ignoring Your Sugar Cravings May Be Dangerous To Your Thyroid

Have you ever been really thirsty? Maybe you’ve spent the day outside in the hot summer sun. Or, maybe you’ve been drenched in sweat after physical activity. Nobody questions a sign of thirst as a potentially harmful craving or addiction. Thirst is simply a sign from your body that you need more water. And because water is considered “healthy”, you never think twice about it. It’s just a natural response to a physiological need. Well, the truth is that sugar cravings are no different. However, when it comes to sugar and other foods that are often looked upon negatively, it’s easy to blame the food, even when it’s entirely unwarranted. Cravings are simply signs that your body is missing something, even if it’s something you might not believe to be “healthy”. Ever wonder why women crave certain foods like salt, sugar, and/or chocolate pre-menstrually and during pregnancy? Or, how about why diabetics oftentimes crave sugar even though their blood sugar is elevated? I’ll show you why in just a second. What Your Sugar Cravings Really Mean for Your Hypothyroidism There are all kinds of illogical theories out there regarding sugar cravings. Some people have been led to believe that their brains are somehow just wired the wrong way. Some have been led to believe that they just lack the willpower to fight their cravings. Some have even been led to believe (even more illogically) that sugar cravings are the result of other factors beyond their control, such as Candida. (Note: Want to know what really causes Candida? Check out this article on “Why Candida-Diets Kill Your Thyroid (and Make Your Candida Worse)”.) The reality is this… Sugar cravings are common with hypothyroidism because hypothyroidism sufferers are very prone to hypoglycemia and insulin r Continue reading >>

Thyroid, Antibiotics, And Blood Sugar – The Mystery Unravels

Thyroid, Antibiotics, And Blood Sugar – The Mystery Unravels

The past 3 months have been very enlightening. Dr Catanzaro, and our new integrative pediatrician are both helping me understand what we have truly been confused about the past 2 years. So how should I sum all this up? Because honestly, the news has blown my mind. Thyroid and blood sugar. Those are the terms that are overwhelming me right now. When Dr. Catanzaro brought this to my attention back in October, that he wasn’t happy with Anthony’s TSH levels via some blood tests, and that Anthony’s genetic panel (23&Me) showed a likely hood for thyroid issues, I was like, WOW! I hadn’t thought about Anthony’s thyroid being a factor in 5 years. Since an endocrinologist I saw, told me I didn’t really have to worry about it. Well I didn’t……. and I should of. Dr. Catanzaro put Anthony on a selenium supplement, and when his night sweats he’s always had, stopped almost immediately, and that his OCD was much improved. I knew we were on to something. After that I started thinking, googling, and researching. Dr. Catanzaro told me how thyroid, and blood sugar can be connected. Then I started thinking about how Anthony was diagnosed with PANDAS years ago. I thought about how antibiotics are the treatment of choice for PANDAS. I then started thinking how Anthony always did AMAZING on antibiotics, especially penicillin. I started googling “thyroid and antibiotics”. I found many articles about how antibiotics are a treatment for autoimmune thyroiditis. So basically, the two conditions, PANDAS, and Thyroiditis, have many similar components and symptoms that overlap. I also thought about how back in July, when we had Anthony’s adenoids taken out. I thought about how the doctor said they were very large and swollen. I googled once again, and found this VERY interest Continue reading >>

Thyroid, Blood Sugar, And Metabolic Syndrome

Thyroid, Blood Sugar, And Metabolic Syndrome

This article is part of a special report on Thyroid Disorders. To see the other articles in this series, click here. According to the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists, 27 million Americans suffer from thyroid dysfunction – half of whom go undiagnosed. Subclinical hypothyroidism, a condition in which TSH is elevated but free T4 is normal, may affect an additional 24 million Americans. Taken together, more than 50 million Americans are affected by some form of thyroid disorder. Metabolic syndrome (MetS), also affects 50 million Americans, and insulin resistance, one of the components of metabolic syndrome, affects up to 105 million Americans. That’s 35% of the population. Metabolic syndrome has become so common that it’s predicted to eventually bankrupt our healthcare system. Both metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance are risk factors for heart disease and diabetes, two of the leading causes of death in the developed world. With such a high prevalence of both thyroid dysfunction and metabolic syndrome, you might suspect there’s a connection between the two. And you’d be right. Studies show an increased frequency of thyroid disorders in diabetics, and a higher prevalence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in people with thyroid disorders. That’s because healthy thyroid function depends on keeping your blood sugar in a normal range, and keeping your blood sugar in a normal range depends on healthy thyroid function. How high blood sugar affects the thyroid Metabolic syndrome is defined as a group of metabolic risk factors appearing together, including: abdominal obesity; high cholesterol and triglycerides; high blood pressure; insulin resistance; tendency to form blood clots; and, inflammation. Metabolic syndrome is caused by chronic hyperglyc Continue reading >>

Reactive Hypoglycemia: The Reason For Weight Gain And Thyroid Problems?

Reactive Hypoglycemia: The Reason For Weight Gain And Thyroid Problems?

Reactive Hypoglycemia: The Reason for Weight Gain and Thyroid Problems? I was recently diagnosed with Reactive Hypoglycemia where my blood sugar drops below fasting level after eating because my body makes too much insulin (I do not have diabetes). I have exercised my entire adult life, I eat healthy, and I just turned 40. Why is this happening? My Endocrinologist does not know; everything I’ve read about it provides no explanation. My thyroid is fine (for now); I do not have a tumor; cholesterol levels are fine; I’m not at all overweight (as seen in the picture). I have been monitoring my blood sugar for the last couple of weeks and it drops to fasting levels or below within an hour after eating; symptoms include headaches after eating, lightheaded, fatigued, overall muscle weakness, and sometimes nausea (even after eating a very balanced meal with chicken, asparagus, brown rice). I read that chronic hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) causes stress on the body; it goes into “fight or flight” mode and increases cortisol levels. Cortisol then signals to the liver to increase glucose in the blood. The last few times I’ve been to the doctor, my blood pressure has been unusually high as well. Over time, apparently, this can affect the thyroid. Postprandial Syndrome (PS) is something very similar to Reactive Hypoglycemia (RH); so similar, in fact, it is often used interchangeably in research. However, my symptoms sound more like PS because RH symptoms are caused by blood sugars dropping below 70 mg/dl about 3–4 hours after eating; PS symptoms occur 1–2 hours after eating and blood sugar does not necessarily drop that low (mine usually drops anywhere between 70–91 mg/dl and my fasting level is about 90 mg/dl). It is very frustrating to eat a healthy meal, thinking Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar & Insulin Resistance Correlate With High T3

High Blood Sugar & Insulin Resistance Correlate With High T3

High blood sugar, insulin resistance, or high fasting blood glucose may all be caused by high T3 levels. Many on the T3-only protocol or high doses of desiccated thyroid notice their blood sugar levels rising and wonder why. It’s because thyroid levels, either too high or too low, have a direct impact on blood glucose. Hypothyroidism may cause high blood sugar & insulin resistance A1C levels of hypothyroid patients are generally higher than normal, and in one study, replacement with thyroid hormone brought the A1C down, but it did not lower fasting blood glucose. [1] A1C is a measure of average blood glucose levels over several months. This study shows that the hypothyroid condition will cause an overall higher average blood glucose than normal. Insulin resistance appears when thyroid levels are too low or too high. [2] Correcting the hypothyroid state is beneficial, but replacement with too much thyroid hormone may result in continued insulin resistance. A low T3/T4 ratio was found in pre-diabetics who had both high insulin levels and insulin resistance. These subjects had lower T3 levels and higher T4 levels than normal, glucose-tolerant subjects. This study confirms that a certain level of T3 is essential for normal glucose metabolism.[3] SHBG (Sex Hormone Binding Globulin) is secreted by the liver and is positively correlated with thyroid levels—it rises when hyperthyroid and falls when hypothyroid. Low levels therefore suggest a hypothyroid condition. Low SHBG is also a biomarker of insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and a risk factor for developing high blood sugar and type 2 diabetes, especially in women. [5] High T3 & High T4 may cause high blood sugar and insulin resistance Blood sugar problems may be caused by high thyroid levels. The following are so Continue reading >>

The Thyroid Adrenal Pancreas Axis

The Thyroid Adrenal Pancreas Axis

he thyroid-adrenal-pancreas axis is one of the most important connections in understanding and healing your thyroid. In addition to gastrointestinal and blood sugar disorders, adrenal gland dysfunction is one of the most commonly seen imbalance in today’s society. Adrenal gland imbalances are also one of the major factors that cause thyroid hormone imbalance. Stress from work, relationships, electronics, poor diet choices such as consumption of refined carbohydrates and trans fats, infections, and environmental toxins all contribute to adrenal disorders. Let’s discuss the thyroid-adrenal-pancreas axis in detail so you can understand this complex connection The Adrenal Glands The adrenal glands are about the size of a walnut and lie on top of the kidneys. The outer adrenal cortex comprises eighty percent of the gland and produces many hormones including cortisol and DHEA from cholesterol. Ninety percent of the cholesterol in the body is made by the liver and only ten percent comes from the diet. Cholesterol converts into the hormone pregnenolone in the adrenal cortex which then converts to cortisol, the stress hormone, or DHEA, the sex hormone source, immune enhancer and anabolic. Cortisol is our “fight or flight” stress hormone. Cortisol slows down digestion, suppresses immune function and raises blood sugar as a survival mechanism when we are under stress. The problem arises when this becomes chronic and over time, elevated cortisol will tear down your body. Cortisol is secreted on a circadian rhythm with highest production in the morning that slowly tapers off as the day progresses. Sleep is when our bodies repair and rejuvenate but high cortisol during sleep will prevent this from happening. Hormones Secreted by the Adrenal Glands DHEA DHEA (dehydroepiandrost Continue reading >>

How’s Your Blood Sugar? 15 Signs That You Have Insulin Resistance

How’s Your Blood Sugar? 15 Signs That You Have Insulin Resistance

by Dr. Will Cole A staggering 50 percent of us are now either prediabetic or have full-blown type 2 diabetes. No, that is not a typo; one out of two of us have some serious blood sugar problems, making a condition that was once a rarity completely commonplace. Much of the blood sugar problems we see today are due to one thing: insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone that directs blood sugar into cells to create energy in the form of ATP, but when you become resistant to its effects, your cell receptor sites are blunted and you’re left with a backup of insulin and blood sugar, which is no bueno. If this condition goes on for too long without intervention, you could get diabetes, which is one of the leading causes of heart attacks and strokes! Know the signs of blood sugar imbalance If more than one of these is true for you, I suggest getting your blood sugar levels checked stat. You crave sweets or breads and pastries….a lot! Eating sweets doesn’t relieve your sugar cravings and even increases them. You become irritable and “hangry” if you miss a meal. You find yourself needing caffeine to get through the day. You become lightheaded if you miss a meal. Eating makes you exhausted and in need of a nap. It’s difficult for you to lose weight. You feel weak, shaky, or jittery pretty frequently. You have to pee a lot. You get agitated, easily upset, or nervous, out of proportion to the reason for these feelings. Your memory is not what it used to be. Your vision is blurry. Your waist measurement is equal to or larger than your hip measurements. You have an atypically low sex drive. You’re always thirsty. Natural ways to improve blood sugar balance You don’t have to settle for a future of diabetes. Intervene now with these tips for restoring a healthy blood sug Continue reading >>

Low Thyroid Function And Type 2 Diabetes

Low Thyroid Function And Type 2 Diabetes

Study finds hypothyroidism tied to type 2 diabetes. Having too little thyroid hormone in the blood–even in the low-normal range–raises the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, especially in people with prediabetes, a new study in nearly 8,500 people finds. Adults in the lowest third of thyroid function levels had a 1.4 time higher risk of progressing from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes than those in the highest third of thyroid function, according to a study presented at the Endocrine Society annual meeting. Dutch researchers used a cohort of adults without diabetes at baseline, ages 45 and older, and found those with higher thyroid-stimulating hormone had a 1.2-fold increased risk of developing diabetes. Patients diagnosed with prediabetes have a 40% greater likelihood of developing diabetes if they are also diagnosed with hypothyroidism. Layal Chaker, MD, of Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam, Netherlands, in his presentation, added that, “Low thyroid function is associated with higher risk of developing diabetes, but also the progression from prediabetes to diabetes and this is even within the normal range of thyroid function, “Low thyroid function as represented by higher TSH [thyroid-stimulating hormone] is with a 1.2-fold increased risk of diabetes and a 1.4-fold increased risk for progression from prediabetes.” She added that, over a lifetime, 70% to 75% of people diagnosed with prediabetes will progress to diabetes. Dr. Chaker presented the results at ENDO 2016. Thyroid hormone is important for metabolism, and thus important in controlling weight and cholesterol metabolism. Therefore, Dr Chaker and her team hypothesized that thyroid hormone could also be important in the development of type 2 diabetes. To test their hypothesis, the research team evalua Continue reading >>

Thyroid Disorders & Type 1 Diabetes: Diabetes Forecast

Thyroid Disorders & Type 1 Diabetes: Diabetes Forecast

A few years ago I felt extremely sluggish and I kept thinking it was blood sugar symptoms. When I talked to my endocrinologist about this, she checked my thyroid levels and “hypothyroid” was added as a new diagnosis on my chronic illness list. It wasn’t a surprise because it runs in my family and I know my immune system is more susceptible because of type 1 diabetes. But since my diagnosis, I have learned that there are a lot of people who live with both diabetes and thyroid issues. There are some interesting connections that you might not know about. Here’s an excerpt from the January edition of Diabetes Forecast article “Thyroid Disorders and Type 1 Diabetes” written by Allison Tsai. “Common things occur commonly” is an old medical school adage used to remind future doctors that two common diseases will frequently overlap but aren’t necessarily related. The link between type 2 diabetes and thyroid disease is a perfect example of this, says Peter Arvan, MD, PhD, professor of internal medicine and chief of the Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology, and Diabetes at the University of Michigan. In the United States, nearly 28 million people have type 2 diabetes and 20 million have some form of thyroid disease. This means that people with type 2 diabetes frequently have thyroid disease as well. But type 2 does not increase your risk for thyroid disease. People with type 1 are even more likely to have thyroid problems, even though type 1 doesn’t directly cause thyroid disease. According to the American Diabetes Assocation’s 2016 Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes, autoimmune thyroid disease occurs in 17 to 30 percent of people with type 1. The Regulator The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland in the neck that produces two hormones, triiodothyronine, Continue reading >>

Thyroid And Blood Sugar Relationship

Thyroid And Blood Sugar Relationship

Both controlled by the endocrine system, the thyroid gland and your blood sugar levels (controlled by the pancreas) go hand in hand. As such, a problem with one can lead to a problem with the other. If you are suffering from a thyroid problem – or diabetes – then read on to learn more about the relationship between your thyroid and your blood sugar – and how it can affect your health in the long run. The Endocrine System The endocrine system is a group of cells and glands that produce hormones, molecules that regulate the activities of various organs and tissues in the body. Included in this system is the thyroid gland, pituitary gland, adrenal gland, pancreas, testicles, and ovaries. However, only those that will be discussed in detail are the glands relevant to this topic. The Thyroid Gland Located at the front of your neck, the thyroid gland is proof that great things come in small packages. Shaped like a butterfly, this gland controls many vital functions in the body, such as your respiration, heart rate, body temperature, and digestion. If your thyroid is inactive, it is not able to make the hormones that the body needs. This condition is called hypothyroidism. Symptoms include weight gain, cold intolerance, lower heart rate, fatigue, and muscle pain, to name a few. On the other hand, if your thyroid is too active, it will produce more hormones than the body requires. This condition, called hyperthyroidism, is characterized by heat intolerance, sleeping problems, mood swings, weight loss, and faster heart rate, among many others. Pancreas Located behind the stomach’s lower part is the pancreas, a gland responsible for making digestive enzymes as well as insulin, a hormone which regulates the body’s blood sugar levels. Insulin is produced in the islets of Continue reading >>

Is Your Thyroid Killing You? Diabetes

Is Your Thyroid Killing You? Diabetes

Dana, your blood sugar and cholesterol are very high. Do you have a family history of diabetes and heart disease? Several months later… Dana, your blood sugar and cholesterol are high again. You should start a cholesterol-lowering statin drug and diabetes medication. Let’s wait until your next lab test to decide. 347 million people worldwide have diabetes. The World Health Organization warns that its escalating rates around the world will result in the doubling of diabetes deaths between 2005 and 2030.[1. World Health Organization. World Diabetes Day 2012] Thyroid Disease and Diabetes The frequency of thyroid dysfunction in diabetic patients is higher than that of the general population. The Journal of Thyroid Research published an article in 2011 reviewing the scientific research worldwide on thyroid disorders and diabetes mellitus.[2. Hage, M., Zantout, M.S., Azar, S.T. Review Article: Thyroid Disorders and Diabetes Mellitus. Journal of Thyroid Research Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 439463, 7 pages] Perros et al. demonstrated an overall prevalence of 13.4% of thyroid diseases in diabetics with the highest prevalence in type 1 female diabetics (31.4%). A prevalence of 12.3% was reported among Greek diabetic patients and 16% of Saudi patients with type 2 diabetes were found to have thyroid dysfunction. In Jordan, a study reported that thyroid dysfunction was present in 12.5% of type 2 diabetic patients. Thyroid disorders remain the most frequent autoimmune disorders associated with type 1 diabetes. Positive TPO antibodies have been reported in as high as 38% of diabetic individuals. Ghawil et al. documented that 23.4% of type 1 diabetic Libyan subjects had positive TPO antibodies and 7% had positive TG antibodies. According to the World Health Organization, 50% of Continue reading >>

Thyroid Health – Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar And Hypoglycemia

Thyroid Health – Symptoms Of Low Blood Sugar And Hypoglycemia

When your blood sugar is low, do you just want to sleep? Maybe a better question is, “When is it okay to have low blood sugar?” The answer is, ” Never.” Especially “never” when you have Hashimoto’s Disease or hypothyroidism as it exacerbates your brain health, adrenal and other hormonal systems. And, hypoglycemia tends to be one of the many linked-in conditions to thyroid dysfunction. MY STORY – MIGHT BE YOURS STORY TOO 1) CHILDHOOD I’ve had low blood sugar problems since I was a child. I remember fainting in church often in my early teens. Why? I was raised Catholic. “Back then” we couldn’t eat before church in order to have communion, in fact, it was a “sin!” Who needed more fear of going to hell! So, by the time we went to church and came home and fixed lunch (no fast food back then), I was several quarts low on blood sugar for sure. 2) My 20’s In my early 20’s I totaled out my car on the interstate. Luckily I was not hurt. After going back to get my car I realized that where I “remember” last driving and where it actually was was 15 miles further. I’d had a black out. I had a black out due to low blood sugar. A glucose tolerance test a few days later by a Chiropractor proved it. He told me to go on a no sugar, high complex carbohydrate and protein diet. I did. It helped. (Thank goodness for Chiropractors who almost all and always study whole body and nutrition). 3) My Late 20’s When I was 28 and 29 I worked two summer’s at Girl Scout Camps. The second year I directed a day camp, I made sure that all my counselors carried peanut butter (this was before peanut allergies took over) with them to spoon feed our little campers who would, an hour or two after breakfast or lunch, get dizzy, start falling over or sobbing for no reaso Continue reading >>

Thyroid Disorders And Diabetes

Thyroid Disorders And Diabetes

Thyroid disorders are very common in the general U.S. population, affecting up to 27 million Americans, although half that number remains undiagnosed. It is second only to diabetes as the most common condition to affect the endocrine system — a group of glands that secrete hormones that help regulate growth, reproduction, and nutrient use by cells. As a result, it is common for an individual to be affected by both thyroid disease and diabetes. Since the thyroid gland plays a central role in the regulation of metabolism, abnormal thyroid function can have a major impact on the control of diabetes. In addition, untreated thyroid disorder can increase the risk of certain diabetic complications and can aggravate many diabetes symptoms. Luckily, abnormal thyroid function can easily be diagnosed by simple blood tests, and effective treatment is available. For all of these reasons, periodic screening for thyroid disorder should be considered in all people with diabetes. What is the thyroid? The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland located in the neck, just below the Adam’s apple and above the collarbone. It produces two hormones, thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), which enter the bloodstream and affect the metabolism of the heart, liver, muscles, and other organs. The thyroid gland operates as part of a feedback mechanism involving the hypothalamus, an area of the brain, and the pituitary gland, which is located within the brain. First, the hypothalamus sends a signal to the pituitary through a hormone called TRH (thyrotropin-releasing hormone). When the pituitary gland receives this signal, it releases TSH (thyroid-stimulating hormone) to the thyroid gland. Upon receiving TSH, the thyroid responds by producing and releasing the two thyroid hormones (T3 and T4). The Continue reading >>

Carbohydrates And Blood Sugar

Carbohydrates And Blood Sugar

Carbohydrates (or carbs), proteins, and fats are the main nutrients in food that give your body energy. Sugars and starchy foods are examples of carbs. Carbs can raise blood sugar levels more than other nutrients. That’s why it’s important to be aware of the amount of carbs you eat. Natural sugars found in foods like milk and fruits are called simple carbohydrates. Simple carbohydrates may also be added to certain foods when they are made, like heavy syrup that is added to canned fruit. Simple carbohydrates, which are broken down faster than complex carbohydrates, will begin to raise blood sugar levels very soon after you eat them. Complex carbohydrates, like starches, take longer to break down in the body. As a result, complex carbohydrates take longer to impact blood sugar, causing the amount of sugar in the blood to rise more slowly. Fiber is the third type of carbohydrate. It is the part of plant foods, like vegetables, fruits, nuts, beans, and whole grains, that cannot be digested. Fiber helps prevent constipation. It also helps you feel full after eating and may lower cholesterol levels. Starches—bread, cereal, crackers, grains, rice, pasta Starchy vegetables—potatoes, corn, peas, beans All fruits and fruit juices Milk and yogurt Sugary foods—candy, regular soda, jelly Sweets—cakes, cookies, pies, ice cream Food groups that don’t normally have carbohydrates are proteins and fats. Because carbohydrates raise blood sugar more than other types of foods, you may wonder why you should eat them at all. You need to eat foods with carbohydrates because they provide your body with energy, along with many vitamins and minerals. Sweets are okay once in a while, but remember that sweets usually have a lot of carbohydrates, calories, and fat, with very little nut Continue reading >>

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