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Blood Sugar 89

Blood Sugar Too High? Blood Sugar Too Low?

Blood Sugar Too High? Blood Sugar Too Low?

If you have diabetes, your blood sugar doesn't call your cell phone and say, "My readings are too high right now." Instead, blood sugar rises slowly and gradually, causing complications that may damage your organs -- heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, feet, and even skin are at risk. Sometimes you wonder, "Is my blood sugar too high? Too low?" because "normal" levels are so important. "Diabetes is not a 'one-size-fits-all' condition, and neither are blood sugar readings. Different targets are established for different populations," says Amber Taylor, M.D., director of the Diabetes Center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland. Targets may vary depending on a person's age, whether they have type 1 or type 2 diabetes and for how long, what medications they're taking, whether they have complications, and, if the patient is a female, whether she is pregnant. "Patients on insulin may need to test more frequently than someone on oral agents," says Taylor. "Those with type 1 diabetes always require insulin, but many with type 2 diabetes also need it." Target Blood Sugar Levels If you have diabetes, these are target "control" blood glucose levels, using a rating of milligrams to deciliter, or mg/dl: Blood sugar levels before meals (preprandial): 70 to 130 mg/dL Blood sugar levels one to two hours after the start of a meal (postprandial): less than 180 mg/dL Blood sugar levels indicating hypoglycemia or low blood glucose: 70 or below mg/dL Types of Blood Sugar Tests Blood glucose testing can screen, diagnose, and monitor. Glucose is measured either after fasting for eight to ten hours, at a random time, following a meal (postprandial), or as part of an oral glucose challenge or tolerance test. You can compare your levels to these results for specific tests, based on clinical Continue reading >>

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar Level?

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar Level?

The aim of diabetes treatment is to bring blood sugar (“glucose”) as close to normal as possible. What is a normal blood sugar level? And how can you achieve normal blood sugar? First, what is the difference between “sugar” and “glucose”? Sugar is the general name for sweet carbohydrates that dissolve in water. “Carbohydrate” means a food made only of carbon, oxygen, and hydrogen. There are various different kinds of sugars. The one our body uses most is called “glucose.” Other sugars we eat, like fructose from fruit or lactose from milk, are converted into glucose in our bodies. Then we can use them for energy. Our bodies also break down starches, which are sugars stuck together, into glucose. When people talk about “blood sugar,” they mean “blood glucose.” The two terms mean the same thing. In the U.S., blood sugar is normally measured in milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood (mg/dl). A milligram is very little, about 0.00018 of a teaspoon. A deciliter is about 3 1/3 ounces. In Canada and the United Kingdom, blood sugar is reported in millimoles/liter (mmol/L). You can convert Canadian or British glucose levels to American numbers if you multiply them by 18. This is useful to know if you’re reading comments or studies from England or Canada. If someone reports that their fasting blood glucose was 7, you can multiply that by 18 and get their U.S. glucose level of 126 mg/dl. What are normal glucose numbers? They vary throughout the day. (Click here for a blood sugar chart.) For someone without diabetes, a fasting blood sugar on awakening should be under 100 mg/dl. Before-meal normal sugars are 70–99 mg/dl. “Postprandial” sugars taken two hours after meals should be less than 140 mg/dl. Those are the normal numbers for someone w Continue reading >>

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

In the next two articles we’re going to discuss the concept of “normal” blood sugar. I say concept and put normal in quotation marks because what passes for normal in mainstream medicine turns out to be anything but normal if optimal health and function are what you’re interested in. Here’s the thing. We’ve confused normal with common. Just because something is common, doesn’t mean it’s normal. It’s now becoming common for kids to be overweight and diabetic because they eat nothing but refined flour, high-fructose corn syrup and industrial seed oils. Yet I don’t think anyone (even the ADA) would argue that being fat and metabolically deranged is even remotely close to normal for kids. Or adults, for that matter. In the same way, the guidelines the so-called authorities like the ADA have set for normal blood sugar may be common, but they’re certainly not normal. Unless you think it’s normal for people to develop diabetic complications like neuropathy, retinopathy and cardiovascular disease as they age, and spend the last several years of their lives in hospitals or assisted living facilities. Common, but not normal. In this article I’m going to introduce the three markers we use to measure blood sugar, and tell you what the conventional model thinks is normal for those markers. In the next article, I’m going to show you what the research says is normal for healthy people. And I’m also going to show you that so-called normal blood sugar, as dictated by the ADA, can double your risk of heart disease and lead to all kinds of complications down the road. The 3 ways blood sugar is measured Fasting blood glucose This is still the most common marker used in clinical settings, and is often the only one that gets tested. The fasting blood glucose Continue reading >>

High-normal Fasting Blood Sugar Above 87 Mg/dl Could Signal Diabetes Risk

High-normal Fasting Blood Sugar Above 87 Mg/dl Could Signal Diabetes Risk

Men and women with fasting plasma glucose levels in the high-normal range of 87 to 99 mg/dL should be counseled with regard to weight and lifestyle, and assessing their lipid profiles. Young men with fasting plasma glucose levels in the high-normal range appear to be at increased risk for type 2 diabetes, especially if they are on the heavy side and have high serum triglyceride levels. That’s the finding of researchers who studied more than 13,000 apparently healthy young men in the Israeli defense forces. The investigators found that so-called "normal" test values may actually predict type 2 diabetes. "Higher fasting plasma glucose levels within the normoglycemic range constitute an independent risk factor for type 2 diabetes among young men, and such levels may help, along with body-mass index and triglyceride levels, to identify apparently healthy men at increased risk for diabetes," wrote Amir Tirosh, M.D., Ph.D., from the Israeli Defense Forces Medical Corps and colleagues at various Israeli institutions. According to the American Diabetes Association, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels below 100 mg/dL (5.55 mmol/L) are considered to be normal, whereas levels between 100 mg/dL and 109 mg/dL signal impairment. But readings at the upper end of the normal limit – just below the 100 mg/dL threshold – might signal risk for future diabetes, and could serve as a risk marker. To see how things stood with glucose among young Israeli adults, they drew on data from the Metabolic, Lifestyle and Nutrition Assessment in Young Adults study, which tracks all Israeli service personnel older than 25. Participants fill out a detailed demographic, nutrition, lifestyle and medical questionnaire, and have blood samples drawn after a 14-hour fast. The study included data on 13,163 Continue reading >>

Why Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

Why Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

Hi, I just found this site and would like to participate. I will give my numbers, etc. First, my last A1c was 6.1, the doc said it was Pre-diabetes in January of 2014, OK, I get it that part, but what confuses me is that at home, on my glucometer, all my fastings were “Normal” however, back then, I had not checked after meals, so maybe they were the culprits. Now, I am checking all the time and driving myself crazy. In the morning sometimes fasting is 95 and other times 85, it varies day to day. Usually, after a low carb meal, it drops to the 80’s the first hour and lower the second. On some days, when I am naughty and eat wrong, my b/s sugar is still low, and on other days, I can eat the same thing, and it goes sky high, again, not consistent. Normally, however, since February, my fbs is 90, 1 hour after, 120, 2nd hour, back to 90, but, that changes as well. In February, of 2014, on the 5th, it was horrible. I think I had eaten Lasagne, well, before, my sugars did not change much, but that night, WHAM-O I started at 80 before the meal, I forgot to take it at the one and two hour mark, but did at the 3 hour mark, it was 175, then at four hours, down to 160, then at 5 hours, back to 175. I went to bed, because by that time, it was 2 AM, but when I woke up at 8:00 and took it, it was back to 89!!!! This horrible ordeal has only happened once, but, I have gone up to 178 since, but come down to normal in 2 hours. I don’t know if I was extra stressed that day or what, I am under tons of it, my marriage is not good, my dear dad died 2 years ago and my very best friend died 7 months ago, I live in a strange country, I am from America, but moved to New Zealand last year, and I am soooo unhappy. Anyway, what does confuse me is why the daily differences, even though I may Continue reading >>

Is An 89 Blood Sugar Level Too High For 14 Hours Of Fasting, And Running For 20 Minutes?

Is An 89 Blood Sugar Level Too High For 14 Hours Of Fasting, And Running For 20 Minutes?

Fasting blood sugar level is determined after about 10-12 hrs of overnight fast, therefore, your fasting blood sugar level is almost normal. Anyways, by single data nothing can be concluded. It is better to repeat the fasting and postprandial blood sugar levels and if you find abnormal values then consult a physician or endocrinologist. It is good to run20 minutes daily and this will help in controlling blood sugar level. Normal blood sugar levels Fasting blood sugar level: 70-110 mg/dl Postprandial blood sugar level: 80- 140 mg/dl Blood sugar levels in prediabetics (impaired glucose tolerance) Fasting blood sugar level: 110-125 mg/dl Postprandial blood sugar level: 140-200 mg/dl Blood sugar levels in diabetics Fasting blood sugar level: 126 mg/dl or more Postprandial blood sugar level: 200 mg/dl or more Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 89 Mg/dl Fasting - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 89 Mg/dl Fasting - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Your fasting blood sugar level should always be below 100mg/dl but not fall below 80mg/dl. Blood sugar testing measures how much glucose is in the bloodstream. No matter what is eaten, from a small snack to a large meal, blood glucose values rise in response to any carbohydrates that are digested. In a healthy person, the pancreas reacts to the higher blood glucose by releasing insulin, a hormone that converts blood sugar into usable energy. In addition to carbohydrates, other body processes also raise blood sugar levels.When a person fasts, which is defined medically as not eating or drinking anything aside from water for at least eight hours, the release of glucagon is triggered in the body. Glucagon instructs the liver to metabolize reserve supplies of glycogen, which are then circulated into the bloodstream as sugars. Accordingly, the amount of plasma glucose goes up. This is how the body creates energy even while fasting. In sum, when diabetes is not present the body responds to all blood sugars by manufacturing insulin in proportion with the glucose level. When it comes to fasting blood sugars, insulin lowers and stabilizes the levels so that they remain in a normal, healthy range. Yet when any form of diabetes is present, either pre-diabetes, Type 1 diabetes or Type 2 diabetes, the whole physiological process doesnt work correctly, and blood sugars are often considerably higher than normal. The fasting blood sugar test (FBS) is commonly used to detect the existence of diabetes. In order to prepare for a fasting blood sugar test, one must refrain from eating or drinking from eight to twelve hours before the test, depending upon the doctors instructions. It is conducted in the same manner as any laboratory blood test. The health professional will wrap an elastic b Continue reading >>

A Question About Healthy Blood Glucose Levels For Diabetes - Straight Dope Message Board

A Question About Healthy Blood Glucose Levels For Diabetes - Straight Dope Message Board

Straight Dope Message Board > Main > General Questions > a question about healthy blood glucose levels for diabetes a question about healthy blood glucose levels for diabetes I've just recently had bloodwork done, including a series of tests to check on my lungs, liver, etc after having difficulty breathing a few weeks ago. Without getting into too much detail about those tests (I'm okay, at least for now), I just looked at my blood glucose levels and see my fasting blood sugar is at 89 mg/dL, which is within the healthy range. Nevertheless, this number for some reason worries me because it is too close to the "prediabetes" range (at least by my estimation). I didn't have a chance to ask my doctor in detail about this reading because of the more urgent medical issues at the time. But now that I've finally been able to consider it more fully, I've looked up some info online and it seems that the American Diabetes Association considers 90 to 100 mg/dL as "high normal." This really scares the hell out of me now. I don't really understand the basis of the range and if one healthy number is better than another or if they are all created equal. In other words, is it more ideal to be at 82 mg/dL than at 89? If so, is there a way to decrease my reading to a more comfortable level? Sorry if I put this in the wrong forum. I considered Mundane Pointless Stuff . . . but came here since it's actually a question. I'm a doctor who takes care of diabetics. I'm delighted to see my patients with a number like 89. Sometimes that can even be too low, depending on what med they're on and when it's taken, as it could indicate a risk for hypoglycemia coming on, under certain conditions. What blood sugar levels are acceptable? Depends who you ask. The ADA recommends 2 hour post-prandial (afte Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose — Know Your Number!

Blood Glucose — Know Your Number!

When it comes to blood sugar, the closer you can keep it to the normal range of 80 to 89 mg/dL the better. For years I have been warning that blood sugars even in the 90 to 100 range show that you are becoming insulin resistant and on your way to diabetes. A recent study done on 47,000 Kaiser Permanente patients validated this observation. The study, published in the American Journal of Medicine found that blood sugar, blood glucose (BG) levels in the 95-99 range more than doubled a person’s risk of becoming diabetic. In fact, for every point over 85 mg/dL the risk of becoming diabetic increased 6%, even when they controlled for other factors.1 Accordingly, the study noted that there was more incidence of cardiovascular disease and hypertension in those with higher BG. Why is this research so important? It flies in the face of currently accepted medical guidelines that for years have used 100 as the magic number for diagnosing “pre-diabetes.” At LMI, I’ve been seeing red flags for years when patients come in with BG levels even in the 90’s, because these levels are often accompanied by being somewhat overweight or over fat, having a thick waist, or the spare tire of dangerous belly fat. These are signs that the body can no longer efficiently process the sugars that come from complex carbohydrates in whole grains, starchy vegetables, fruits, and simple sugars. In other words, they are signs of insulin resistance. Insulin is the “key” that unlocks the door to each cell in the body, letting glucose into the cell to be processed for energy. If the insulin key is faulty, the glucose remains in circulation, raising triglycerides, lowering HDL, and usually ending up at the waistline. Anytime you see your doctor for a routine physical, fasting blood glucose is tes Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About Your Blood Sugar Results

What You Need To Know About Your Blood Sugar Results

Normal ranges of medical tests provide the boundaries that define where health ends and disease begins. Or do they? A growing body of evidence suggests that results in the normal range can provide a false sense of security. When it comes to blood sugar levels, recent research has demonstrated significant pathology occurring in the high normal range. Normal lab values clearly are essential for defining and diagnosing a variety of familiar illnesses such as hypertension (blood pressure greater than 140/90), obesity (body mass index greater than 30), and diabetes (fasting blood sugar, FBS, greater than 126mg/dL). And yet, you don’t go from healthy, with a FBS of 90mg/dL last year, to diabetic, with a FBS of 127mg/dL at this year’s checkup. A growing appreciation of the progression of chronic diseases has created the “pre-patient” category. So for instance, the pre-diabetic has a FBS of 100-125mg/dL, and the pre-hypertensive has a blood pressure of 120-139/80-89. This midway station in the journey to patienthood reflects new understanding of the earlier stages of these diseases. While this can potentially make everyone pre-something, a scenario that doesn’t lend itself to a peaceful mind, it should give us a jump on preventing progression to full-blown disease. And that’s a good thing. Unfortunately, in the typical rushed doctor visit, lab values don’t get the attention they need. All too often, the harried physician scans the “abnormal” test result column. If the column is blank, you’re good to go, see you next year. Such technique picks up abnormal results but misses trends. And it is the slow trends in many lab values that indicate trouble is brewing. By the time you have an abnormal lab value, you’re already a ways down the road. We must go from a Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Range

Blood Sugar Range

Glucose, a form of sugar, is the body's main fuel. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, occurs when blood levels of glucose drop too low to fuel the body's activity. Carbohydrates (sugars and starches) are the body's main dietary sources of glucose. During digestion, the glucose is absorbed into the blood stream (hence the term "blood sugar"), which carries it to every cell in the body. Unused glucose is stored in the liver as glycogen. Hypoglycemia can occur as a complication of diabetes, as a condition in itself, or in association with other disorders. Blood Sugar Range The normal range for blood sugar is about 60 mg/dL (milligrams of glucose per deciliter of blood) to 120 mg/dL, depending on when a person last ate. In the fasting state, blood sugar can occasionally fall below 60 mg/dL and even to below 50 mg/dL and not indicate a serious abnormality or disease. This can be seen in healthy women, particularly after prolonged fasting. Blood sugar levels below 45 mg/dL are almost always associated with a serious abnormality. How Does the Body Control Glucose? The amount of glucose in the blood is controlled mainly by the hormones insulin and glucagon. Too much or too little of these hormones can cause blood sugar levels to fall too low (hypoglycemia) or rise too high (hyperglycemia). Other hormones that influence blood sugar levels are cortisol, growth hormone, and catecholamines (epinephrine and norepinephrine). The pancreas, a gland in the upper abdomen, produces insulin and glucagon. The pancreas is dotted with hormone-producing tissue called the islets of Langerhans, which contain alpha and beta cells. When blood sugar rises after a meal, the beta cells release insulin. The insulin helps glucose enter body cells, lowering blood levels of glucose to the normal range. Wh Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 89 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 89 Mg/dl After Eating - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Your blood glucose level is 89 mg/dl after eating? (or 4.94mmol/l) Blood sugar 89 mg/dl (4.94mmol/l) after eating - is that good or bad? We help you interpret your blood sugar values. You have tested your blood sugar after eating and the result was 89 mg/dl. Let's have a look at the blood sugar gauge: Your blood sugar level (up to 2 hours) after eating should always be below 140mg/dl but not fall below 80mg/dl. It is normal for blood sugar levels to rise immediately after a meal. The increased glucose is a product of the carbohydrates in the food that was just consumed. The higher blood glucose triggers the pancreas to produce more insulin. This release of insulin usually takes place within about 10 minutes of eating. The insulin removes the glucose from the blood and stores it for the body to use as energy. In a healthy individual, blood glucose levels should return to a normal level within about two hours after finishing the meal. In diabetics, the blood sugar level often remain elevated for a longer period because of the bodys inability to produce or utilize insulin properly.An elevated two-hour postprandial (after a meal) blood sugar may indicate diabetes or prediabetes. As a general rule, a normal two- hour postprandial blood sugar is as follows: A doctor may recommend different postprandial blood sugar levels based on an individuals particular circumstances and health history. Several factors may cause a persons postprandial blood sugar to remain elevated. Smoking after the meal: Studies show that smoking raises blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. Extreme stress: Stress produces the bodys fight-or-flight response triggering the release of stress hormones such as cortisol. These hormones cause the body to release the glucose it has previously stored for en Continue reading >>

Normal Blood Sugar Range After Meals

Normal Blood Sugar Range After Meals

Monitoring is the only way to tell if your blood sugar is consistently staying with in range. Even non-diabetics should check their blood sugar every once in awhile to catch the potential development of the disease early. For non-diabetics, checking post-meal blood sugars is a good way to keep an eye on the potential developing disease. For diabetics, keeping an eye on after meal blood sugars is critical for to make sure the correct amount of insulin is being administered with meals. Video of the Day Blood sugar describes the molecule glucose that circulates in the blood. Glucose is the energy source that we get from the food you eat, specifically carbohydrates, and required by the body’s tissues to perform all of its basic functions. Insulin is a hormone secreted by the pancreas that allows cells to take in glucose from the blood to use as energy. The tissue cells do not take in all of the sugar in the blood though; there is a specific amount that bodies like to keep in the bloodstream, according to the Blood Sugar Diabetic website. How Food Affects Blood Sugar When you eat, digestion breaks down food into smaller molecules to be absorbed into your tissues. Even before you take your first bite, your pancreas produces insulin in preparation for increased blood sugar and therefore energy absorption into cells. Carbohydrates are the main source for glucose, but protein can increase blood sugar, as well. But not all carbohydrates are created equal. Simple carbohydrates such as white bread, fruit, milk, and candy raise blood sugar more quickly than complex carbohydrates such as whole grains, vegetables, and beans. A non diabetic’s blood sugar level should be between 70 and 140 mg/dL one to two hours after a meal, according to the American Diabetes Association. If it is Continue reading >>

Is 89 Low For Blood Sugar? ?

Is 89 Low For Blood Sugar? ?

Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: No. 89 mg/dL is well within the realms of a non-diabetic person. A 'normal' blood sugar level should be between 70 and 126 mg/dL though towards each end of these readings a doctor may wish to carry out further testing. Towards the lower end may indicate possible hypoglycemia, and towards the higher end may indicate diabetes ... or pre-diabetes if the reading is between 111 and 125 mg/dL. Source(s): My Diabetes Gone Completely : I had the same problem with my last pregnancy. It was so bad that I had to move back home with my parents for the remainder of my pregnancy. The doctor said it was because when a diabetic is pregnant, your body goes in overdrive and your blood sugar tends to drop more. I was advised to eat six small meals a day and snacks on time. I also had to get up during the night to check my blood sugar and eat a snack. It was very tiresome but well worth it. I do agree with matador89 that you need to get facts instead of just taking what people say on here. I myself would advise you to log your blood sugars, the time, how much medicine you take along with your food intake and take it to your next dr appointment to discuss it with your dr. Good luck and congratulations and I hope I helped you some. I'm a 45 year old woman and was recently diagnosed as being a borderline diabetic. My doctor prescribed some medication, but before filling it I decided to do some research on the internet which led me to the methods. After reading this ebook and applying the methods, my scepticism turned to 100% belief. I noticed that my energy levels increased significantly and I felt more rested in the morning, my symptoms started going away. I am very happy to tell you that I have been feeling better than I have felt i Continue reading >>

What To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too Low

What To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too Low

You'll need to test your blood sugar if you think you have hypoglycemia.(ARTIGA PHOTO/CORBIS)Although type 2 diabetes is characterized by blood sugar that is too high, some people take insulin and others medications (such as sulfonylureas) that can occasionally drive blood sugar too low. When blood sugar is too lowgenerally less than 70 mg/dLit's called hypoglycemia, and it can become a medical emergency. (The normal range for fasting blood sugar is 70 to 99 mg/dL, though it varies somewhat with age, and is lower during pregnancy and in children.) You can lose consciousness Hypoglycemia is more likely to occur when you start taking a new medication (it can take practice to match your food intake to your insulin dose, for example) or if you exercise more than usual. As blood sugar drops to low levels, you may feel: Shaky Irritable Sweaty This can occur within 10 to 15 minutes, and in extreme cases you can even lose consciousness and experience seizures if you don't consume some glucose (though hypoglycemia is usually mild in people with type 2 diabetes, and readily fixed by drinking juice or eating other sugar-containing items, such as glucose tablets or four to six pieces of hard candy). Hypoglycemia"My blood sugar was really plummeting" Watch videoMore about blood sugar monitoring You'll need to test your blood sugar to confirm that you're having hypoglycemiasome people become irritable if blood sugar is too high, so it's not always obvious. If you drink sugar-containing juice, or some other form of carbohydrate, it should bring blood sugar back into the normal range. You can also purchase glucose pills or gels in the pharmacy that can get blood sugar back on track. “You should always have a glucose source in the car,” says Yvonne Thigpen, RD, diabetes program coor Continue reading >>

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