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Blood Sugar 69 After Eating

Can You Have Low Blood Sugar With Type 2 Diabetes?

Can You Have Low Blood Sugar With Type 2 Diabetes?

back to Overview Know-how Type 2 A tag-team approach on low blood sugar with type 2 diabetes. Markus recently wrote an article on our German language blog talking about low blood sugar with type 2 diabetes. The question (“can I have low blood sugar with type 2 diabetes?”) is very common, and it’s easy to see why it’s of concern. So I’ve helped Markus bring his German post to life here in English. I hope it helps! Here’s Markus: Low blood sugar In 2014, results from the DAWN2 study were announced. It was the largest study of its kind (15,000 participants) on the “fears & needs of people with diabetes and their families.” One result stood out: The gravest fears are related to low blood sugars, especially at night. Up to 69% of the participants share this fear! So! Can you have low blood sugar with type 2 diabetes? Yes! Of course! But let’s think about who exactly is at risk – and why. It’s common to think: Type 1 diabetes = at risk for lows Type 2 diabetes = not at risk for lows But that isn’t correct at all, so we should wipe it from our mind. So… what do I need to know? Maybe it’s more accurate to say that people with type 2 diabetes who take certain types of medication are more at risk for lows. We’re getting closer! But to get to the truth, we should take a look at someone without diabetes. Is it possible for them to have lows, too? Theoretically yes, especially if doing long-lasting physical activities without proper food intake. Additionally, extreme stress and binge drinking are also common causes of low blood sugar for people without diabetes. However, it’s pretty rare because as soon as BG’s drop below 80 mg/dl (4.4 mmol/L), the natural counterregulatory system kicks in, raising blood sugar back to normal levels. I’ve never exp Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Blood Sugar Readings

Diabetes: Blood Sugar Readings

www.CardioSmart.org What is a blood sugar reading? A blood sugar reading shows how much sugar, or glucose, is in your blood. A test of your blood sugar may be done to: • Check for diabetes. • See how well diabetes treatment is working. • Check for diabetes that occurs during pregnancy (gestational diabetes). • Check for low or high blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia). What are normal blood sugar readings? There are several types of blood sugar tests. Normal results can vary from lab to lab. Talk with your doctor about what any abnormal results might mean, and about any symptoms and other health problems you have. Normal values for adults who do NOT have prediabetes or diabetes Less than or equal to 100 When you have not eaten (fasting blood sugar): Less than 140 if you are age 50 or younger; less than 150 if you are age 50 to 60; less than 160 if you are age 60 and older 2 hours after eating (postprandial): Levels vary depending on when and how much you ate at your last meal. In general: 80 to 120 beforemeals or when waking up; 100 to 140 at bedtime. Random (casual): Target values for nonpregnant adults who have prediabetes or diabetes 80 to 130When you have not eaten (fasting blood sugar): Less than 1802 hours after eating (postprandial): What causes abnormal blood sugar? High blood sugar can be caused by: • Diabetes or prediabetes. • Certain medicines, such as corticosteroids. Low blood sugar can be caused by: • Certain medicines, especially those used to treat diabetes. • Liver disease, such as cirrhosis. Rarely, high or low blood sugar can be caused by other medical problems that affect hormone levels. Prediabetes and diabetes Blood sugar helps fuel your body. Normally, your blood sugar rises slightly af Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

A - A + Main Document Quote: "A number of medical studies have shown a dramatic relationship between elevated blood sugar levels and insulin resistance in people who are not very active on a daily or regular basis." A doctor might order a test of the sugar level in a person's blood if there is a concern that they may have diabetes, or have a sugar level that is either too low or too high. The test, which is also called a check of blood sugar, blood glucose, fasting blood sugar, fasting plasma glucose, or fasting blood glucose, indicates how much glucose is present is present in a person's blood. When a person eats carbohydrates, such as pasta, bread or fruit, their body converts the carbohydrates to sugar - also referred to as glucose. Glucose travels through the blood to supply energy to the cells, to include muscle and brain cells, as well as to organs. Blood sugar levels usually fluctuate depending upon what a person eats and how long it has been since they last ate. However; consistent or extremely low levels of glucose in a person's blood might cause symptoms such as: Anxiety Sweating Dizziness Confusion Nervousness Warning signs of dangerously high levels of blood sugar include sleepiness or confusion, dry mouth, extreme thirst, high fever, hallucinations, loss of vision, or skin that is warm and dry. A blood sugar test requires a finger prick or needle stick. A doctor might order a, 'fasting,' blood glucose test. What this means is a person will not be able to drink or eat for 8-10 hours before the test, or the doctor may order the test for a random time or right after the person eats. If a woman is pregnant, her doctor might order a, 'glucose-tolerance test,' which involves drinking glucose solution and having blood drawn a specified amount of time later. The re Continue reading >>

Discussion: Blood Sugar Levels And Type 2 Diabetes

Discussion: Blood Sugar Levels And Type 2 Diabetes

When it comes to blood sugar levels, the numbers always seem to confuse people. So we're here today to cover a whole range of reader questions that have come in. If you have questions of your own, join the discussion – please feel free to leave your comments at the bottom. Healthy blood sugar goal ranges Healthy blood sugar control values will depend on several factors, the most important being when you check it. Blood glucose levels will rise after eating meals regardless of whether a person has diabetes–however, someone with good control will be able to bring it down to a stable level after 2 hours. The diagnostic values below are for non pregnant adults with type 2 diabetes. Ranges are different for children, those with type I diabetes and pregnant women. FASTING AFTER MEALS 2 HOURS HbA1c Normal 70-99 mg/dL (4-6 mmol/L)* <140 mg/dL (<7.8 mmol/L)** <5.7% Pre-Diabetes 100-125 mg/dL (6.1-6.9 mmol/L) 140-179 mg/dL 5.7-6.4% Diabetes >126 mg/dL (>7 mmol/L) >180 mg/dL 6.5% and higher *Note that different agencies establish different standards. Some range 70-100 mg/dL, some 70-110 mg/dL, some 70-130 mg/dL **Some agencies recommend <180 mg/dL post-meal especially in the elderly and those who have had diabetes for a very long time What should your goals be? That is between you and your healthcare team because it does depend on various factors. But overall your goal is to gain good control of your diabetes, which means maintaining normal levels or getting as close to normal levels as possible (refer to the normal numbers above). We’ve answered some specific questions regarding blood sugar over here, so be sure to check those out as well. Some specific comments and questions we’ve received regarding blood sugar levels include: 1. My post meal is hovering around 140-160, Continue reading >>

When Your Blood Sugar Is Too High Or Too Low

When Your Blood Sugar Is Too High Or Too Low

Sometimes, no matter how hard you try to keep your blood sugar in the range your doctor has advised, it can be too high or too low. Blood sugar that is too high or too low can make you very sick. Here's how to handle these emergencies. What You Need to Know about High Blood Sugar If your blood sugar stays over 240, it is too high. High blood sugar usually comes on slowly. It happens when you don't have enough insulin in your body. High blood sugar can happen if you miss taking your diabetes medicine, eat too much, or don't get enough exercise. Sometimes, medicines you take for other problems may cause high blood sugar. Be sure to tell your doctor about other medicines you take. This chart shows the ranges of blood sugar. Having an infection or being sick or under stress can also make your blood sugar too high. That is why it is very important to test your blood and keep taking your medicine (insulin or diabetes pills) when you have an infection or are sick. Your blood sugar may be too high if you are very thirsty and tired, have blurry vision, are losing weight fast, and have to go to the bathroom often. Very high blood sugar may make you feel sick to your stomach, faint, or throw up. It can cause you to lose too much fluid from your body. Testing your blood sugar often, especially when you are sick, will warn you that your blood sugar may be rising too high. If your blood sugar stays over 300 when you check it two times in a row, call your doctor. You may need a change in your insulin shots or diabetes pills, or a change in your meal plan. *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not performed, may result in hypoglycemia. Please see important risk and sa Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar

Low Blood Sugar

Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas. Insulin is needed to move glucose into cells where it is stored or used for energy. Without enough insulin, glucose builds up in the blood instead of going into the cells. This leads to symptoms of diabetes. Low blood sugar occurs due to any of the following: Your body's sugar (glucose) is used up too quickly Glucose production by the body is too low or it is released into the bloodstream too slowly Too much insulin is in the bloodstream Low blood sugar is common in people with diabetes who are taking insulin or certain other medicines to control their diabetes. However, many other diabetes medicines do not cause low blood sugar. Exercise can also lead to low blood sugar in people taking insulin to treat their diabetes. Babies born to mothers with diabetes may have severe drops in blood sugar right after birth. In people who do not have diabetes, low blood sugar may be caused by: Drinking alcohol Insulinoma, which is a rare tumor in the pancreas that produces too much insulin Lack of a hormone, such as cortisol, growth hormone, or thyroid hormone Severe heart, kidney, or liver failure Infection that affects the whole body (sepsis) Some types of weight-loss surgery (usually 5 or more years after the surgery) Medicines not used to treat diabetes (certain antibiotics or heart drugs) Continue reading >>

What Causes Low Sugar After Eating?

What Causes Low Sugar After Eating?

So today I got my first low sugar reading. I had eaten pretty regularly all day. I ate breakfast then lunch at about 1230 maybe then dinner at 6. No snacks. Id spent the day stressed and walking a lot due to having to get my phone repaired. I felt SO tired after the drive there. Like I could sleep in my car tired. Checked my sugar-83. Fast forward to dinner I eat meatloaf which i assume was binded with bread crumbs, mashed cauliflower and spinach, little bit of gravy from a restaurant. Delicious! Naturally after eating a foreign meal I test at 1 hr and 2. On the drive home I feel very strange, blurred vision, trouble concentrating. 1 hr pp I was 69! Very weird. I ate 1/4 of a candy bar and basically felt find almost instantly. I was 94 45 mins after eating the candy. What causes lows? I didn't eat anything wrong and my sugar was normal during the day. I'm always in the 80s when randomly checking. I take metformin only. Thanks for reading! D.D. Family Getting much harder to control So today I got my first low sugar reading. I had eaten pretty regularly all day. I ate breakfast then lunch at about 1230 maybe then dinner at 6. No snacks. Id spent the day stressed and walking a lot due to having to get my phone repaired. I felt SO tired after the drive there. Like I could sleep in my car tired. Checked my sugar-83. Fast forward to dinner I eat meatloaf which i assume was binded with bread crumbs, mashed cauliflower and spinach, little bit of gravy from a restaurant. Delicious! Naturally after eating a foreign meal I test at 1 hr and 2. On the drive home I feel very strange, blurred vision, trouble concentrating. 1 hr pp I was 69! Very weird. I ate 1/4 of a candy bar and basically felt find almost instantly. I was 94 45 mins after eating the candy. What causes lows? I didn' Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar In Non-diabetics

Low Blood Sugar In Non-diabetics

Blood sugar levels that drop too low can be just as dangerous as high blood sugar levels. This is especially a concern for diabetics, but nondiabetics can develop symptoms and health problems as well. To avoid complications it is important to be familiar with the warning signs of low blood sugar and what the common triggers are. If caught early, raising blood sugar levels with food can help avoid a life-threatening situation. Video of the Day Low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, is diagnosed when blood sugar or blood glucose levels drop below normal. Glucose is the primary source of fuel for the body and without enough of it, symptoms and health problems can occur. After a meal the food is broken down into glucose and either used immediately for energy or it is stored for use later on. According to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse, when blood glucose levels drop too low, the pancreas signals the liver to release the stored glucose into the bloodstream, until levels return to normal. If not enough glucose is available, symptoms can occur. For those without diabetes, normal fasting blood glucose levels should be between 70 to 99 mg/dL and between 70 to 140 mg/dL after eating a meal. Without enough glucose the body will not be able to function normally. Early warning signs of low blood sugar include hunger, fatigue, sweating, headaches, shakiness, dizziness, weakness, confusion, difficulty coordinating movement, anxiety, problems with vision, upset stomach and trouble speaking, Medline Plus states. If left untreated, hypoglycemia can cause fainting, a loss of consciousness, irregular heartbeats, tremors, seizures and coma. In severe cases it can be fatal. In those without diabetes, low blood sugar levels are usually caused by skipping meals or heavy alcohol con Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Four Hours After Eating

Blood Glucose Four Hours After Eating

Cells throughout your body work around the clock, even when you’re sleeping. Clearly, they need a steady supply of energy to keep going. To function, they rely on glucose, a simple type of carbohydrate. Glucose enters your bloodstream until the hormone insulin comes around to help cells use or store the circulating glucose. Your blood sugar may go up a bit after eating, but if it’s still high four hours after your meal, or if it drops too low, something is awry in your body. Video of the Day Normally your blood sugar should remain between 70 and 130 milligrams per deciliter, according to the American Diabetes Association. This range is for any random time throughout the day, before or after meals. After a long fast, such as after a night’s sleep, it’s normal for your glucose to be on the lower end of that spectrum -- 70 to 100 milligrams per deciliter. Four Hours After Eating If you’re generally healthy or are properly managing your diabetes, your blood glucose should fall between 90 and 130 milligrams per deciliter four hours after eating. If you're not diabetic, your sugar could even go as high as 140 milligrams per deciliter after meals. Of course, if you are a diabetic, your blood glucose could rise even higher -- 180 milligrams per deciliter or above, even several hours after eating. It’s not typical for your glucose to remain elevated four hours after eating. By then, insulin should have done its job and made sure that all of that extra glucose was used up. So if your blood sugar is still high hours after eating, it could be a sign that you have diabetes. Or if you have already been diagnosed, the dosage of your insulin or other diabetes medication might be off. Elevated glucose can also stem from an infected pancreas, an overactive thyroid and certain Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Diabetes Mellitus (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar) In Diabetes Mellitus (beyond The Basics)

LOW BLOOD SUGAR OVERVIEW Hypoglycemia, also known as low blood sugar, occurs when levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood are too low. Hypoglycemia is common in people with diabetes who take insulin and some (but not all) oral diabetes medications. WHY DO I GET LOW BLOOD SUGAR? Low blood sugar happens when a person with diabetes does one or more of the following: Takes too much insulin (or an oral diabetes medication that causes your body to secrete insulin) Does not eat enough food Exercises vigorously without eating a snack or decreasing the dose of insulin beforehand Waits too long between meals Drinks excessive alcohol, although even moderate alcohol use can increase the risk of hypoglycemia in people with type 1 diabetes LOW BLOOD SUGAR SYMPTOMS The symptoms of low blood sugar vary from person to person, and can change over time. During the early stages low blood sugar, you may: Sweat Tremble Feel hungry Feel anxious If untreated, your symptoms can become more severe, and can include: Difficulty walking Weakness Difficulty seeing clearly Bizarre behavior or personality changes Confusion Unconsciousness or seizure When possible, you should confirm that you have low blood sugar by measuring your blood sugar level (see "Patient education: Self-monitoring of blood glucose in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)"). Low blood sugar is generally defined as a blood sugar of 60 mg/dL (3.3 mmol/L) or less. Some people with diabetes develop symptoms of low blood sugar at slightly higher levels. If your blood sugar levels are high for long periods of time, you may have symptoms and feel poorly when your blood sugar is closer to 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L). Getting your blood sugar under better control can help to lower the blood sugar level when you begin to feel symptoms. Hypoglyc Continue reading >>

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

In the next two articles we’re going to discuss the concept of “normal” blood sugar. I say concept and put normal in quotation marks because what passes for normal in mainstream medicine turns out to be anything but normal if optimal health and function are what you’re interested in. Here’s the thing. We’ve confused normal with common. Just because something is common, doesn’t mean it’s normal. It’s now becoming common for kids to be overweight and diabetic because they eat nothing but refined flour, high-fructose corn syrup and industrial seed oils. Yet I don’t think anyone (even the ADA) would argue that being fat and metabolically deranged is even remotely close to normal for kids. Or adults, for that matter. In the same way, the guidelines the so-called authorities like the ADA have set for normal blood sugar may be common, but they’re certainly not normal. Unless you think it’s normal for people to develop diabetic complications like neuropathy, retinopathy and cardiovascular disease as they age, and spend the last several years of their lives in hospitals or assisted living facilities. Common, but not normal. In this article I’m going to introduce the three markers we use to measure blood sugar, and tell you what the conventional model thinks is normal for those markers. In the next article, I’m going to show you what the research says is normal for healthy people. And I’m also going to show you that so-called normal blood sugar, as dictated by the ADA, can double your risk of heart disease and lead to all kinds of complications down the road. The 3 ways blood sugar is measured Fasting blood glucose This is still the most common marker used in clinical settings, and is often the only one that gets tested. The fasting blood glucose Continue reading >>

Reactive Hypoglycemia - Hypos After Eating

Reactive Hypoglycemia - Hypos After Eating

Tweet Reactive hypoglycemia is the general term for having a hypo after eating, which is when blood glucose levels become dangerously low following a meal. Also known as postprandial hypoglycemia, drops in blood sugar are usually recurrent and occur within four hours after eating. Reactive hypoglycemia can occur in both people with and without diabetes, and is thought to be more common in overweight individuals or those who have had gastric bypass surgery. What are the causes of reactive hypoglycemia? Scientists believe reactive hypoglycemia to be the result of too much insulin being produced and released by the pancreas following a large carbohydrate-based meal. This excess insulin production and secretion continues after the glucose derived from the meal has been digested, causing the amount of glucose in the bloodstream to fall to a lower-than-normal level. What causes this increase in pancreatic activity is unclear. One possible explanation is that in rare cases, a benign (non-cancerous) tumour in the pancreas may cause an overproduction of insulin, or too much glucose may be used up by the tumour itself. Another is that reactive hypoglycemia is caused by deficiencies in glucagon secretion. In the U.S. the National Institutes of Health (NIH) states that "the causes of most cases of reactive hypoglycemia are still open to debate". Signs and symptoms of reactive hypoglycemia Symptoms of reactive hypoglycemia can include: Anxiety Blurred vision Confusion Fatigue Headaches Heart palpitations Increased hunger Irritability Light-headedness Sleeping problems Sweating Weakness When talking about the signs of reactive hypoglycemia, it's important to note that many of these symptoms can be experienced without actually having low blood sugar. In fact, it is rare for such sympt Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar

Low Blood Sugar

South Eastern Florida Regional Diabetes Program Diabetes Education Service 1450 Northwest 10th Avenue, Miami FL, 33136 Phone: 305â€243â€3696  Fax:305â€243â€5791 © 2009 H ypoglycemia or a ‘hypo’ means having a blood sugar level below 70mg/dL and usually only occurs in people who take certain tablets or injectable medication to treat  their diabetes. Hypoglycemia is usually avoidable, however, it is important that if you do experience a low blood sugar level, you know how to recognize and importantly treat the situation. Prevention of low blood sugar levels is the primary goal.   What are the Symptoms of Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia The “Rule of 15†Blood sugar less than 70mg/dl 15 grams quick acting carbs (Glucose tablets, juice, regular soda, or candy) Recheck blood sugar in 15 minutes Repeat 15 grams of quick acting carbs until blood sugar is above 70 mg/dl There are two stages of symptoms or signs associated with low blood sugars:  These first stage symptoms are our safety symptoms that warn us of low blood sugar levels. It is important to listen and respond to these symptoms. They usually occur with blood sugar levels between 55 – 70mg/dl. If you have had elevated blood sugar levels above 200mg/dl for a period of time, you may feel low at normal blood sugar levels of 80 – 100mg/dL.   These second sta Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level 45-69 Mg/dl After Eating - All About Reactive Hypoglycemia

Blood Sugar Level 45-69 Mg/dl After Eating - All About Reactive Hypoglycemia

After you've consumed your meal, you got your blood sugar level 45-69 mg/dL after eating (58, 57 56, 55, 54, 53, 52, 51, 50, 49, 48, 47, 46, 45. This is called Reactive Hypoglycemia, a condition in which hypoglycemia occurs four hours after having your meal. WHY? And get to know how to avoid having such low blood sugar after eating in the future. No Charge Glucose Meter - OneTouch Verio Flex® Meter Ad Compact Design to Track Your Glucose On-the-Go. Get It At No Charge. OneTouch Learn more Blood Sugar level 45-69 mg/dL after eating - Causes of Reactive Hypoglycemia The diagnosis of Reactive Hypoglycemia is done through: - interview regarding your actual signs and symptoms - measuring your blood sugar by drawing a blood sample from the arm and send to lab for confirmation - clinical observation of symptoms that are being subsided after consuming something to eat/drink. If symptoms will disappear and blood sugar will raise up to 70 mg/dL, then Reactive Hypoglycemia is confirmed. There is no confirmed cause to Reactive hypoglycemia, and this is still an open discussion. I do not want to enter into medical research or clinical observatory statements as this will not be of any interest for you. I want to make you clear some points of those probable causes of low blood sugar level 45-59 mg/dL after eating like: - increased sensitivity to epinephrine action (in some patients) - deficiency of production/secretion of glucagon - stomach surgeries (food passing rapidly into the small intestines). - rare enzyme deficiencies (e.g. hereditary fructose intolerance determined by food intolerance testing) Blood Sugar level 45-69 mg/dL after eating - Treating Acute Episodes Acute episodes of low blood sugar level 58, 57 ,56, 55, 54, 53, 52, 51, 50, 49, 48, 47, 46, 45 mg/dL can be treated Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia Or Low Blood Glucose

Hypoglycemia Or Low Blood Glucose

Hypoglycemia means that your blood glucose is low - generally below 60 to 80 mg/dL. Symptoms occur quickly and need to be treated as soon as possible. Causes Prevention Not enough food Eat all your meals and snacks on time. More physical activity than usual Eat extra food to match your increased activity. Too much diabetes medicine Take only the dose that has been prescribed. Symptoms You may have one or more of the following symptoms: sweating shaking feeling weak or tired feeling anxious or nervous racing heart feeling hungry having a mild headache tingling sensation around lips and tongue Treating hypoglycemia You are never harming yourself if you take glucose tablets or eat a simple sugar food because you suspect you have low blood glucose. If you are injecting insulin, always carry a simple sugar food with you. These include raisins, marshmallows, glucose tablets or a juice box. Test your blood glucose as soon as you feel symptoms. If your level is low, treat with 15 grams of carbohydrate. Examples include: 1/2 cup of fruit juice (you don't need to add sugar) 1/2 cup of regular pop 1 tablespoon of honey or sugar 2 tablespoons of raisins 3 large marshmallows 1 cup of skim milk 3 to 4 glucose tablets 15 grams of glucose gel After eating one of these foods, test your blood glucose every 10 to 15 minutes. If it is still low, eat another 15 grams of carbohydrate until your symptoms are gone or your blood glucose level is above 80. Follow-up treatment after hypoglycemia After you've experienced hypoglycemia, you may need more food. If your next meal or snack is less than one hour away, eat at your normal time. If your next meal or snack is one to two hours away, eat an extra snack that contains 15 grams of carbohydrate. If your next meal or snack is more than two hours a Continue reading >>

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