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Blood Sugar 500 What To Do

Is Diabetes With Blood Sugar Level 500 Dangerous At 32 Years Age?

Is Diabetes With Blood Sugar Level 500 Dangerous At 32 Years Age?

Updated May 7, 2018 Author has 2.8k answers and 673.2k answer views It is not dangerous at all. It does reach level in most of the cases. Blood goes up when there is not enough energy in the body for vital organs. It is called metabolic syndrome. Things that happen when there is not enough energy for vital organs - Fluid builds up in the body. Causing kidney and other issues. High blood sugar starts inflammation causing the nerves to carry lesser amount of glucose and insulin to the cells. It is not due to insensitivity of cells to insulin. It is due to process of inflammation that supply of insulin to cells is cut off. So cutting down carbs is worst idea. Eliminating carbs will cause spikes of blood glucose further cutting down the metabolic rate. There will be periods of low glucose. That will immediately impact your metabolic rate which is the cause of diabetes. One needs to regulate sugar intake. Instead of medicine, take sugar at regular intervals. 2 gram of sugar every 1-2 hours. And your sugar will come down. Heavy exercise will cause further lowering of the metabolic rate after some time. If you have enough stamina. You do not feel tired. You have not gained weight recently. It is perfect. Start hydration dehydration and walk and rest routines and you should expect the blood sugar to come down within 23 months on permanent basis. Chronic mineral imbalance in blood leads to low metabolic rate resulting in aging and age related diseases like blood sugar, blood pressure and heart disease etc. To correct mineral imbalance do hydration dehydration cycles and to increase resting metabolic rate do walking and rest routines as detailed on my blog. Read my blog for more details and / Or watch my you tube videos at - rajinder bhalla ******To increase Resting Metabolic Ra Continue reading >>

The Scary Experience Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

The Scary Experience Of Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Today, we’re excited to share with you another guest blog from Katie Janowiak, who works for the Medtronic Foundation, our company’s philanthropic arm. When she first told me her story about food poisoning and Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), I knew others could benefit from hearing it as well. Thanks Katie for your openness and allowing us to share your scary story so that the LOOP community can learn from it. Throughout this past year, I’ve had the honor of sharing with you, the amazing LOOP community, my personal journey and the often humorous sequence of events that is my life with T1. Humor is, after all, the best (and cheapest) therapy. Allow me to pause today to share with you the down and dirty of what it feels like to have something that is not the slightest bit humorous: diabetic ketoacidosis.You are hot. You are freezing. You are confused. You are blacked out but coherent. You go to talk but words fail you. Time flies and goes in slow motion simultaneously. You will likely smell and look like death. In my instance, this was brought on by the combination of excessive vomiting and dehydration caused by food poisoning and the diabetic ketoacidosis that followed after my body had gone through so much. In hindsight, I was lucky, my husband knew that I had food poisoning because I began vomiting after our meal. But I had never prepped him on diabetic ketoacidosis and the symptoms (because DKA was for those other diabetics.) Upon finding me in our living room with a bowl of blood and bile by my side (no, I am not exaggerating), he got me into the car and took me to emergency care. It was 5:30 p.m. – and I thought it was 11:00 a.m. The series of events that led up to my stay in the ICU began innocently enough. It was a warm summer night and my husband and I walke Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar When It's Really High

How To Lower Your Blood Sugar When It's Really High

​This article is written for type 2 diabetics who need help coming down from a very high blood sugar during a single, isolated high blood sugar event. If you want to try an stabilize your baseline, consider signing up for my Baseline Blood Sugar Challenge course. ​THIS ARTICLE IS NOT A SUBSTITUTE FOR REAL MEDICAL ADVICE. If you're a type 2 diabetic and your blood sugar is high right now (greater than 300mg/dL for at least 6 hours), the first thing you should do is call your doctor. So, if you haven't called anyone for help yet, please stop reading this article and call your doctor. If your doctor is able to help, then you need not read on. Also, if you are having symptoms of Diabetic Ketoacidosis, stop reading this article and go to the hospital immediately. Diabetic Ketoacidosis can kill you if left untreated. But. If you're in a situation where your blood sugar has been high for an extended period of time, you could perhaps consider taking the following steps to solve your blood sugar problem. Disclaimer: This is friendly, non-medical advice from a random diabetic person you don't even know, which is a very (very) poor substitute for real, actual medical advice. Use at your own risk. First, you should try and lower your blood sugar without injectable insulin by completing the following steps: 1. Check your blood sugar. Write down the time and your blood sugar level. 2. Drink water (this doesn't actually lower blood sugar, but it helps flush sugar and ketones from your body, if you have them). Continue drinking water, but please don't make yourself sick. 3. Move. As in, walk. Walk around the block or walk in place or haul your ass up and down the stairs for 30-60 minutes. Walking helps your cells become less insulin resistant, which is what you need right now. Do N Continue reading >>

Urine Tests For Diabetes: Glucose Levels And Ketones

Urine Tests For Diabetes: Glucose Levels And Ketones

What Are Urine Tests for Diabetes? Diabetes is a condition that is characterized by high blood sugar levels. This is due to the body’s inability to make any or enough insulin, use insulin effectively, or both. Insulin is a hormone that helps the cells of your body absorb blood sugar to make energy. Insulin is produced by the pancreas after you eat food. There are two major classifications of diabetes: Type 1 diabetes occurs when the body’s immune system attacks and destroys insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. This type is usually diagnosed in childhood and develops quickly. Symptoms include quick weight loss, excessive thirst, excessive urination, and fatigue. Type 1 makes up just 5 percent of diabetes cases in the United States. Type 2 diabetes is when cells aren’t able to use insulin effectively anymore. This is called insulin resistance. If the cells can’t take in and store glucose, the glucose remains in the blood. Eventually the pancreas is unable to produce enough insulin to keep blood sugar levels within normal ranges, and diabetes develops. This type of diabetes develops gradually and is associated with being overweight and having a sedentary lifestyle. Diabetes causes blood glucose (blood sugar) to rise to abnormally high levels. In type 1 diabetes, the body may also begin to burn fat for energy because the cells aren’t getting the glucose they need. When this happens, the body produces chemicals called ketones. When ketones build up in the blood, they make the blood more acidic. A buildup of ketones can poison the body and result in coma or even death. Urine tests aren’t ever used to diagnose diabetes, but they may be used to monitor a person’s levels of urine ketones and urine glucose and sometimes to make sure their diabetes is being manag Continue reading >>

10 Simple Strategies For Blood Sugar Control

10 Simple Strategies For Blood Sugar Control

Looking for ways to rein in your blood sugar? Prevent your levels from going too low or too high with these tips. Thinkstock Maintaining good blood sugar control might take dedication and time, but making it a priority can help you avoid or delay serious complications of type 2 diabetes. “Managing type 2 diabetes is a long war, not a battle won within a month or two,” says Sethu K. Reddy, MD, MBA, chief of the adult diabetes section at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston, Massachusetts. Blood Sugar: When It’s Too Low or Too High The hormone insulin takes sugar (glucose) from food and uses it for energy. With type 2 diabetes, you don’t have enough insulin or your body isn’t effective at using insulin, and excess sugar continues to circulate in your bloodstream. A target blood sugar range for most people with type 2 diabetes is 80 to 130 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl) before a meal and less than 180 mg/dl one to two hours after starting a meal, according to the American Diabetes Association. A reading of 160 mg/dl or higher is typically considered high blood sugar (hyperglycemia). Over time, blood sugar in the range of 160 to 250 mg/dl can affect every organ in your body, Dr. Reddy says. It's associated with heart disease, eye disease, kidney disease, neuropathy, stroke, and vascular disease. If blood sugar goes as high as 500 mg/dl, you may experience symptoms such as thirst, the urge to urinate more often, weight loss, low energy, and drowsiness, he says. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) occurs when levels fall to less than 70 mg/dl. This is a risk when you take insulin or other diabetes medications, have gone too long without a meal, have been active, or have been drinking alcohol. If your blood sugar goes too low, you’ll probably feel shaky and sweaty and you Continue reading >>

When You Need To Go To The Emergency Room With High Blood Sugars

When You Need To Go To The Emergency Room With High Blood Sugars

My uncle, like all his family, was a bit of a cheapskate. He hated to spend money unless it was absolutely necessary. He was thin and active, having only recently given up a career as a singer and dancer performing weekly on a nationally televised variety show. So when he felt unwell one weekend night, he turned down his wife's suggestion that she drive him to the emergency room and told her he'd wait til Monday when he could see his family doctor. Why waste all that money on an ER visit that was probably unnecessary? As it turned out, he didn't need to see his doctor on Monday. He died that night. He was a few years younger than I am now and the fatal heart attack he experienced was the first symptom he had of our family's odd form of inherited diabetes. But this is why, even though I've inherited the family "cheap" gene, if there's any possibility something dangerous is going on, I head for the ER. Usually it is a waste of money. I was in a small car accident a few weeks ago that left me with nerve pain running up and down my arms and legs. I sat for four hours at our local ER, saw the doctor for five minutes, and was sent home. The diagnosis, whiplash. The treatment, wait and see if it gets worse. The bill? Over $900. I went to the ER because I'd called my family doctor's office and they told me to. Whiplash usually resolves on its own, but occasionally it can cause swelling in your neck that can kill you. I'm not equipped to judge what kind I had, and unlike my uncle, I wasn't about to gamble. So with this in mind, you can understand my reaction when a stranger contacted me recently, after reading my web page, and told me that his blood sugar, which had been normal until very recently, was testing in the 500s on his meter except when his meter wasn't able to give hi Continue reading >>

What Are The Dangers Of A Sugar Count Over 500?

What Are The Dangers Of A Sugar Count Over 500?

Blood sugar control is a critical aspect of diabetes management. People without diabetes typically have fasting blood sugar readings below 100 milligrams per deciliter. If you are diabetic, your doctor sets an individualized blood sugar goal that you aim for with the help of an individualized treatment regimen. A reading higher than your target indicates your blood sugar is not under control, and having a reading over 500 is a medical emergency. Your body needs glucose to function properly, but it's unhealthy for high levels to circulate in your bloodstream. The hormone insulin regulates blood sugar by allowing glucose to get into your cells. Typically, blood sugar is considered high when it's 160 milligrams per deciliter or above your glucose target, notes the Joslin Diabetes Center. Your doctor may need to adjust your treatment plan if your glucose remains above 180 milligrams per deciliter for three consecutive days. If glucose stays elevated for a long time, it can affect your eyes, kidneys and heart. Ketoacidosis A dangerously high blood sugar level increases your risk for diabetes-related ketoacidosis. When glucose circulates in your bloodstream and can't get into your cells, your cells don't get the energy they need. To compensate, your body begins to burn fat for fuel, producing acids called ketones. These acids build up in your bloodstream and can poison your body when levels get too high. This happens when your body doesn't have enough insulin and is more common with Type 1 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association recommends checking your urine for ketones when your glucose is higher than 240 milligrams per deciliter. Hyperosmolar Syndrome Your kidneys typically excrete extra glucose to help compensate for high blood sugar levels, but when glucose is extrem Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugars (ketoacidosis)

High Blood Sugars (ketoacidosis)

Fri, 11/19/2010 - 14:41 -- Richard Morris Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome Severe high blood sugars, ketosis (the presence of ketones prior to acidification of the blood), and ketoacidosis (DKA) are serious and potentially life-threatening medical problems which can occur in diabetes. High blood sugars become life-threatening in Type 1 or long-term Type 2 diabetes only when that person does not receive enough insulin from injections or an insulin pump. This can be caused by skipping insulin or not receiving enough insulin when large amounts are required due to an infection or other major stress. Ketoacidosis surprisingly occurs almost as often in Type 2 diabetes as it does in Type 1. However, people with Type 2 diabetes also encounter another dangerous condition called hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome, which is roughly translated as thick blood due to very high blood sugars. Here, coma and death can occur simply because the blood sugar is so high. The blood will have ketones at higher levels but does not become acidotic. HHS usually occurs with blood sugar readings above 700 mg/dl (40 mmol) as the brain and other functions begin to shut down. When insulin levels are low, the body cannot use glucose present at high levels in the blood. The body then starts burning excessive amounts of fat which causes the blood to become acidic as excess ketone byproducts are produced. Even though the blood pH which measures acidity only drops from its normal level of 7.4 down to 7.1 or 7.0, this small drop is enough to inactivate enzymes that depend on a precise acid-base balance to operate. High blood sugars and ketoacidosis can be triggered by: In Type 1 diabetes, ketoacidosis often occurs under the duress of an infection, and is also frequently present when a Continue reading >>

6 Things To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too High

6 Things To Do If Your Blood Sugar Is Too High

Grapefruit also has a low glycemic index (GI), around 25, which means it doesn't raise blood sugar as quickly or as much as high-GI foods like white bagel (72) or even a banana (48) or watermelon (72). (The highest GI score is 100.) A 2006 study published in the Journal of Medicinal Food, found that people who ate grapefruit (juice or half a fruit) before a meal had a lower spike in insulin two hours later than those taking a placebo, and fresh grapefruit was associated with less insulin resistance. All 91 patients in the 12-week study were obese, but they did not necessarily have type 2 diabetes. While the results are promising in those without diabetes, blood-sugar reactions to food can vary widely, so if you have been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, test your blood sugar after eating grapefruit to make sure it can be part of your healthy eating plan. Getty Images Blood sugar is a tricky little beast. Yes, you can get a high reading if you throw caution to the wind and eat several slices of cake at a wedding. The problem is that you can also have a high blood sugar reading if you follow every rule in the type 2 diabetes handbook. That's because it's not just food that affects blood sugar. You could have a cold coming on, or stress may have temporarily boosted your blood sugar. The reading could be wrong, and you need to repeat it. Or it could mean that your medicine is no longer working, and it's time to try a new one. The point is, it's the pattern that matters, not a single reading. Whatever you do, don't feel bad or guilty if you have a high blood sugar reading. A 2004 study found that blood sugar monitoring often amplifies feelings of being a "success" or "failure" at diabetes, and when readings are consistently high, it can trigger feelings of anxiety or self-bla Continue reading >>

Know About Risks Of Blood Sugars Over 500

Know About Risks Of Blood Sugars Over 500

Blood Sugar Levels Over 500: Risks and Prevention written by: Ravneet Kaur edited by: Diana Cooper updated: 2/28/2011 Blood sugar levels over 500 mg/dl is a medical emergency that can have serious medical implications, even causing death. Learn more about the prevention and treatment of high blood sugar levels, known as hyperglycemia. Having blood sugar at optimal levels is important for health and survival, for glucose is the bodys main energy source. In a healthy human body, when blood sugar rises after a meal, the pancreas releases insulin to help the cells use the glucose for energy. In a diabetic, either the pancreas does not secrete insulin or the body is unable to utilize it effectively, causing blood sugar to build up in the bloodstream to levels that are higher than normal, a condition called hyperglycemia. If left untreated, blood sugar levels can rise dangerously high,and blood sugar levels over 500 mg/dl can be life-threatening. If blood glucose levels are brought under control, it can lead to serious health complications and even cause birth defects in case of pregnant women. Blood sugar levels over 500 mg/dl can lead to: Damage to the retina, the leading cause of blindness in diabetics. Damage to the nerves, particularly in the legs and feet. In most of the diabetic cases, diabetic neuropathy leads to foot and leg amputations. Damage to the kidneys. This state, known as diabetic nephropathy, is the leading cause of kidney failure. Atherosclerosis, the hardening of the arteries that leads to reduced blood flow to vital organs, such as heart and brain. This can have severe complications in the form of a heart attack or stroke. A heart attack can occur if the blood flow to the coronary arteries decreases and a stroke can be the result of reduced blood flow t Continue reading >>

What Type 2s Can Do When Blood Sugar Soars

What Type 2s Can Do When Blood Sugar Soars

The emergency condition most type 2s dread is hypoglycemia, where plummeting blood sugar levels can bring on a dangerous semi-conscious state, and even coma or death. However, hyperglycemia, high-blood sugar levels consistently above 240 mg/dL, can be just as dangerous. Left untreated, at its most extreme high-blood sugar, can induce ketoacidosis, the build-up of toxic-acid ketones in the blood and urine. It can also bring on nausea, weakness, fruity-smelling breath, shortness of breath, and, as with hypoglycemia, coma. However, once they’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, most type 2s have taken steps to prevent or lessen the most dangerous effects of high-blood sugar levels. Their concern shifts to dealing with unexpected, sometimes alarming spikes in blood sugar levels. The symptoms of those spikes are the classic ones we associate with the onset of diabetes—unquenchable thirst, excessive urination, fatigue, weight loss, and headaches. When you do spike, what can you do right away to bring blood sugar levels down? Immediate Steps You Can Take: 1. Insulin—If you are on an insulin regimen; a bolus injection should drive numbers down fairly rapidly. 2. If you are not on insulin or don’t use fast-acting insulin, taking a brisk walk or bike ride works for most people to start bringing their numbers down. 3. Stay hydrated. Hyperglycemic bodies want to shed excess sugar, leading to frequent urination and dehydration. You need to drink water steadily until your numbers drop. 4. Curb your carb intake. It does not matter how complex the carbs in your diet are, your body still converts them to glucose at some point. Slacking off on carb consumption is a trackable maneuver that lets you better understand how to control your numbers. Preventative Steps: These are extensions Continue reading >>

3 Easy Tips To Lower Blood Sugar Fast

3 Easy Tips To Lower Blood Sugar Fast

Jeanette Terry was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when she was 11 years old, and she has since lived with diabetes through difficult life transitions, including the teenage years, college, and having children. She addresses the day-to-day struggles of living with diabetes—going beyond medical advice—to improve overall adherence and management. Extremely high blood sugar levels can be dangerous, and they can cause lasting health complications. Remember: if you ever have blood sugar readings that remain high for more than 24 hours without coming down (and after an effort has been made to lower them), you need to be addressed by a doctor. That being said, we've all had those days when we get a random high blood sugar reading and we are not sure what caused it…or we forget to give insulin, or we eat a delicious dessert without realizing how much sugar is actually in it. For whatever reason, those out of the ordinary high blood sugar readings happen and need to be treated. No need to rush to the doctor for every high blood sugar reading though. There are some simple steps you can take to lower blood sugar fast. Watch for signs of high blood sugar You know the feeling: extreme thirst, sluggishness, nausea, blurred vision, a downright sick feeling. And your family or friends may tell you that extreme irritability is a major sign you need to check your blood sugar to see if it is high. The best thing to do is to catch it before it gets really high, or it will be harder to bring down quickly, causing havoc on your blood sugar readings for days. If you do not take insulin as a part of your treatment plan, these tips will show you how to lower your blood sugar fast. If you take insulin, you will first want to give the appropriate amount of insulin to correct the blood sugar. Continue reading >>

About Blood Glucose Over 500

About Blood Glucose Over 500

Glucose is a type of sugar that is found in the bloodstream. Blood glucose is the main energy source of the body. Having a healthy blood glucose or blood sugar level is important to optimal health and survival. As glucose in the blood begins to rise, typically after a meal, the pancreas releases insulin to help the cells of the body use the glucose for fuel and energy. If someone is a diabetic, and his pancreas secretes little to no insulin into the bloodstream, the blood sugar levels begin to rise. If not treated properly with an insulin injection, the levels can quickly rise over 500mg. Any blood glucose level over 500mg is considered a medical emergency. Video of the Day Most people who have had a blood glucose level over 500mg are considered diabetic. According to the American Diabetes Association, over 23.6 million people have diabetes. Diabetes is a serious disease that causes unstable blood sugar levels. There are three main types of diabetes; Type 1, Type 2 and gestational diabetes. Type I generally occurs when a patient is young and is sometimes referred to as juvenile diabetes. Type 2 is a condition in which the body does not produce enough insulin to bring blood sugars down, the patient becomes dependent on insulin injections. Gestational diabetes occurs when a woman becomes pregnant. If blood sugar levels are not brought down or treated, it can lead to serious conditions and birth defects that can harm both mother and child. When a blood glucose level gets over 500mg, one of the first things a doctor will do is determine what is causing the high blood sugar level. Generally, the cause is uncontrolled diabetes. As someone continues to eat foods that may be high in sugar or high in carbohydrate, his blood sugar levels begin to rise over normal levels. If his b Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma

Print Overview A diabetic coma is a life-threatening diabetes complication that causes unconsciousness. If you have diabetes, dangerously high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) or dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can lead to a diabetic coma. If you lapse into a diabetic coma, you're alive — but you can't awaken or respond purposefully to sights, sounds or other types of stimulation. Left untreated, a diabetic coma can be fatal. The prospect of a diabetic coma is scary, but fortunately you can take steps to help prevent it. Start by following your diabetes treatment plan. Symptoms Before developing a diabetic coma, you'll usually experience signs and symptoms of high blood sugar or low blood sugar. High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) If your blood sugar level is too high, you may experience: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Stomach pain Fruity breath odor A very dry mouth A rapid heartbeat Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Signs and symptoms of a low blood sugar level may include: Shakiness or nervousness Anxiety Fatigue Weakness Sweating Hunger Nausea Dizziness or light-headedness Difficulty speaking Confusion Some people, especially those who've had diabetes for a long time, develop a condition known as hypoglycemia unawareness and won't have the warning signs that signal a drop in blood sugar. If you experience any symptoms of high or low blood sugar, test your blood sugar and follow your diabetes treatment plan based on the test results. If you don't start to feel better quickly, or you start to feel worse, call for emergency help. When to see a doctor A diabetic coma is a medical emergency. If you feel extreme high or low blood sugar signs or symptoms and think you might pass out, call 911 or your local emergency nu Continue reading >>

Is It Safe To Take Metformin 500mg & Linagliptin With A Blood Sugar Of 125(fasting) & 180 (post Eating)?

Is It Safe To Take Metformin 500mg & Linagliptin With A Blood Sugar Of 125(fasting) & 180 (post Eating)?

High blood sugar levels, when left out of control over time, can lead to a number of health issues including heart disease, vision problems, kidney disease, and nerve damage. Blood sugar control is certainly an important issue but so is medication safety when treating high blood sugar levels. The readings of 125 mg/dL fasting and 180 mg/dL after eating fall into the range of pre-diabetic and are generally addressed with lifestyle changes. Since I am not sure if you are already taking medications to manage your diabetes nor do I know what your A1C is, I can not definitely say if you should be taking both metformin and linagliptin. However, I can say metformin and linagliptin can be given together. However, this will depend on your blood sugar levels and your A1C. *The A1C provides a 3-month average of the blood sugar level and is often used by doctors for diagnosis and treatment decisions. In other words, depending on your A1C, your doctor may have added linagliptin to your treatment regimen to manage your blood sugars. One of the risks of largest concern with medications that treat high blood sugar is the risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). The risk of low blood sugar is low with metformin and linagliptin when given together. The risk for low blood sugar is higher when you take certain medications to treat diabetes such as insulin or a sulfonylurea. The American Diabetes Association considers a patient to have diabetes when they have more than one reading of a fasting blood sugar level of 126 mg/dL or more, a level of 200 mg/dL or more after eating, or an A1C of 6.5% or more. If you concerned about your medications, speak with your doctor about your treatment. Continue reading >>

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