diabetestalk.net

Blood Sugar 250

Proven Tips & Strategies To Bring High Blood Sugar Down (quickly)

Proven Tips & Strategies To Bring High Blood Sugar Down (quickly)

Untreated, high blood sugar can cause many problems and future complications. Recognizing signs of high blood sugar levels and knowing how to lower them can help you prevent these complications and increase the quality and length of your life. Topics covered (click to jump to specific section) High blood sugar level symptoms and signs Symptoms of high blood sugar include: Increased thirst Tired all the time Irritability Increased hunger Urinating a lot Dry mouth Blurred vision Severe high blood sugar can lead to nausea and fruity smelling breath The signs and symptoms for high blood sugar are the same for both type 1 and type 2. Signs usually show up quicker in those who have type 1 because of the nature of their diabetes. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease that causes the body to stop making insulin altogether. Type 2 is caused by lifestyle factors when the body eventually stops responding to insulin, which causes the sugar to increase slowly. People with type 2 can live longer without any symptoms creeping because their body is still making enough insulin to help control it a little bit. What causes the blood sugar levels go to high? Our bodies need sugar to make energy for the cells. Without it, we cannot do basic functions. When we eat foods with glucose, insulin pairs with it to allow it to enter into the cell wall. If the insulin is not there, then the glucose molecule can’t get through the wall and cannot be used. The extra glucose hangs out in the bloodstream which is literally high blood sugar. The lack of insulin can be caused by two different things. First, you can have decreased insulin resistance which means that your insulin doesn’t react the way that it is supposed to. It doesn’t partner with glucose to be used as fuel. Secondly, you can have no insuli Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 250 Mg/dl (13.87mmol/l) - Is That Good Or Bad?

Blood Sugar 250 Mg/dl (13.87mmol/l) - Is That Good Or Bad?

We help you interpret your blood sugar values. You have tested your blood sugar and the result was 250 mg/dl. Let's have a look at the blood sugar gauge: 1 3 Foods to Remove from - The Fridge Forever Cut a bit of belly bloat each day, by avoiding these 3 foods nucific.com 2 No Charge Glucose Meter Compact Design to Track Your Glucose On-the-Go. Get It At No Charge. OneTouch A lot of factors do have influence on the ideal blood sugar level. While your blood sugar might be too low or too hight for a normal blood sugar, factors like exercising or eating do have impact on the ideal blood sugar level Do you want a more detailed report? Please select accordingly: My blood sugar was tested... How to flush belly bloat Is This Why Your Stomach Has Digestive Problems? nucific.com General information about Very High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia / Dangerous) Hyperglycemia, which is more commonly known as high blood sugar, occurs when the body is incapable of shuttling glucose out of the bloodstream so it can be transferred to cells for use as energy. In most cases, this condition is only a problem for diabetic individuals because these people suffer from dysfunction of insulin, the hormone used by the body for regulating blood sugar levels. Symptoms of Hyperglycemia Symptoms of hyperglycemia usually take several weeks to develop and can involve: Dry mouth and an unusual degree of thirst, which prompts the person to drink more water than normal. This condition is called polydipsia. Polyuria, which refers to an increased frequency of urination, particularly during nighttime. Polyphagia, which is an increase in both appetite and food consumption. Irritability Fatigue More serious symptoms, which are generally caused by prolonged periods of high blood sugar causing damage to body tissues Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Must Read Articles Related To High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

A A A High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) (cont.) If hyperglycemia persists for at least two or three days, or if ketones appear in the urine, call a doctor. Generally, people with diabetes should test their blood sugar levels at least four times a day: before meals and at bedtime (or following the schedule advised by the prescribed individual diabetes care plan). The urine should be checked for ketones any time the blood sugar level is over 250 mg/dL. When blood sugar stays high despite following a diabetic diet and plan of care, call the nurse, diabetes health educator, or physician for adjustments in the diet. If blood sugars are high because of illness, check for ketones and contact a health professional. Vomiting Confusion Sleepiness Shortness of breath Dehydration Blood sugar levels that stay above 160 mg/dL for longer than a week Glucose readings higher than 300 mg/dL The presence of ketones in the urine Ketoacidosis or diabetic coma is a medical emergency. Call 911 for emergency transport to a hospital or similar emergency center. Please ask your health care professional about the following: How to recognize high blood sugar levels How to treat a high blood sugar level when it occurs in you, a family member, or coworkers How to prevent the blood sugar level from becoming too high How to contact the medical staff during an emergency What emergency supplies to carry to treat high blood sugar Additional educational materials regarding high blood sugar Check blood sugar levels with a blood glucose meter. If blood sugar level is higher than normal, but there are no symptoms, continue routine care such as: Take all diabetes medications on schedule. Eat regular meals. Drink sugar-free and caffeine-free liquids. Take a blood sugar reading every four hours (write it down) u Continue reading >>

How Do I Correct My Blood Sugar Level With An Insulin Dose For Diabetes?

How Do I Correct My Blood Sugar Level With An Insulin Dose For Diabetes?

Extra insulin taken because of a high blood sugar level before a meal is called correction insulin. Just as you need to establish an insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio, you should try to figure out your individual correction factor, the approximate fall in blood glucose level that you expect from a unit of insulin. Obviously, no one can ever know that number exactly because it will vary somewhat from one situation to another. But with a little trial and error, you can usually figure out that 1 unit of insulin will lower your blood sugar by about 25 points, by 30 points, or by whatever you determine to be your number. You'll have to go through some trial-and-error testing, keeping careful records, just as you did with the insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio for food. For most people, it's reasonable to start with the assumption that 1 unit of insulin will lower the glucose by 50 points and then set a target for the upper-limit premeal number you'll accept. For example, you might decide to correct for any glucose number over 120 before meals and assume at the beginning that 1 unit of insulin will drop you by 50 points. If your premeal blood sugar level is between 121 and 170, or up to 50 points above the 120 mark, you'd take 1 extra unit of insulin; if it is between 171 and 220, or between 51 and 100 points above the 120 mark, you'd take 2 extra units; if it is between 221 and 270, or between 101 and 150 points above the 120 mark, you'd take 3 extra units, and so on. If your correction insulin isn't lowering your sugar as much as it should or is lowering it too much, you'll have to adjust your correction factor up or down. You'll have to try 1 unit for every 30 points of glucose above your target or 1 unit for 25 points until you can reliably reach the proper range. You may have to Continue reading >>

Pp Blood Sugar 250. Fasting 150

Pp Blood Sugar 250. Fasting 150

Name- T T Parwani Age - 70 Weight- 78 kg Height- 5Ft 7inch Diabetic type 2 since 15 years. Previous medicine Glycomet GP1 at the time of breakfast only. Ok a Since last 3 months in addition to above medicine I take Tenegliptin 20mg +metformin 500mg at the time of dinner also asper advice of local physician. Before this my hba1c was 8.2 I go for 30 minutes morning wall daily since 10 years. 10 days back test results were as below. Sugar fbs- 100 ppbs- 250 Random bs- 155 HbA1c - 7.2 Creatinine Serum- 0.72 mg/do Since last 10 days i have changed medicine as below Voglibose .2mg+metformin 500mg in morning & same dose at dinner time. On the contrary Fbs has increased to 150 & ppbs has remained same at 250. Urine routine, Colour- pale yellow Appearance - clear Albumin,sugar,ketone,bile. Pigment- Absent Occult blood - Negative Microscopic examination RBC- absent Pus cells - 2-3/hpf Yeast cells - present ( trace ) Epithelial cells - 2-3/hpf Casts,crystals, mucus threads Continue reading >>

When To Test Blood Sugar In Type 2

When To Test Blood Sugar In Type 2

One of the topics that comes up a lot in the email I get from visitors to my What They Don't Tell You About Diabetes web site is the question of when is the best time to test your blood sugar. A lot of doctors still tell people with Type 2 to test first thing in the morning and before meals. That was what I was told at diagnosis in 1998. People who test using this schedule may tell you their blood sugar is usually 120 mg/dl, which sounds pretty good, except that since this is a fasting number it usually hides the information that the person's blood sugar maybe going to 250 mg/dl or higher after every meal. Research has shown that for people with Type 2 diabetes--especially those who have been diagnosed recently and still retain some beta cell function--it is the high spikes after meals that contribute most heavily to raising the A1c and causing complications. If you only test your fasting blood sugar, you will not know anything about how high your blood sugar is spiking after meals, so you won't know which foods are toxic to you because they cause dangerous spikes. If you are like most people with Type 2 your access to the very expensive blood sugar testing strips is limited. You may have to pay for strips yourself or your insurance may pay for a single box each month. That means that you need to use each strip as efficiently as possible. Here are some strategies that you can use to get the information out of your blood tests that will let you drop your A1c back into the healthy zone. Keep a written log that matches what you eat with the test result you get. Even though your meter may keep a list of your readings, these readings are meaningless unless you know what food you ate that resulted in each particular reading. If you write down what portion size of which food y Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 250 Mg/dl (13.87mmol/l) After Eating - Is That Good Or Bad?

Blood Sugar 250 Mg/dl (13.87mmol/l) After Eating - Is That Good Or Bad?

It is normal for blood sugar levels to rise immediately after a meal. The increased glucose is a product of the carbohydrates in the food that was just consumed. The higher blood glucose triggers the pancreas to produce more insulin. This release of insulin usually takes place within about 10 minutes of eating. The insulin removes the glucose from the blood and stores it for the body to use as energy. In a healthy individual, blood glucose levels should return to a normal level within about two hours after finishing the meal. In diabetics, the blood sugar level often remain elevated for a longer period because of the body’s inability to produce or utilize insulin properly.An elevated two-hour postprandial (after a meal) blood sugar may indicate diabetes or prediabetes. As a general rule, a normal two- hour postprandial blood sugar is as follows: • Age 50 and under: Less than 140 mg/dl • Age 50 – 60: Less than 150 mg/dl • Over age 60: Less than 160 mg/dl A doctor may recommend different postprandial blood sugar levels based on an individual’s particular circumstances and health history. Several factors may cause a person’s postprandial blood sugar to remain elevated. • Smoking after the meal: Studies show that smoking raises blood sugar levels in people with diabetes. • Extreme stress: Stress produces the body’s fight-or-flight response triggering the release of stress hormones such as cortisol. These hormones cause the body to release the glucose it has previously stored for energy. • Eating or drinking after the meal and before testing the blood sugar: Continuing to eat will keep blood sugars closer to their immediate post-meal levels. Studies show that 15 to 20 minutes of moderate exercise, such as walking, shortly after a meal may improve glucos Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Symptoms

High Blood Sugar Symptoms

If you’ve had diabetes for any length of time at all, you’ve probably seen lists of the signs and symptoms of high blood glucose dozens of times. Doctors and diabetes educators hand them out. Hundreds of websites reprint them. Most diabetes books list them. You likely know some of the items on the list by heart: thirst, frequent urination, blurry vision, slow healing of cuts, and more. But have you ever stopped to wonder why these symptoms occur? How does high blood glucose cause frequent urination, make your vision go blurry, or cause all of those other things to happen? Here are some answers to explain what’s going on in your body when you have high blood glucose. Setting the stage for high blood glucose High blood glucose (called hyperglycemia by medical professionals) is the defining characteristic of all types of diabetes. It happens when the body can no longer maintain a normal blood glucose level, either because the pancreas is no longer making enough insulin, or because the body’s cells have become so resistant to insulin that the pancreas cannot keep up, and glucose is accumulating in the bloodstream rather than being moved into the cells. What is high blood sugar? Blood glucose is commonly considered too high if it is higher than 130 mg/dl before a meal or higher than 180 mg/dl two hours after the first bite of a meal. However, most of the signs and symptoms of high blood glucose don’t appear until the blood glucose level is higher than 250 mg/dl. Some of the symptoms have a rapid onset, while others require a long period of high blood glucose to set in. It’s important to note that individuals differ in their sensitivity to the effects of high blood glucose: Some people feel symptoms more quickly or more strongly than others. But each sign or sympt Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Type 2 Diabetes: High Blood Sugar (hyperglycemia)

Diabetes management: High blood sugar and its symptoms What is high blood sugar? High blood sugar, technically known as hyperglycemia, can occur when blood glucose stays too high -- typically over 180 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) -- for too long. High blood sugar is an indication that the body doesn't have enough insulin. It can happen if someone with diabetes skips doses of diabetes medications, eats too much, or doesn't get enough exercise. Sometimes the medications taken for other ailments cause high blood sugar. In addition, an infection, illness, injury, surgery, or stress can also make blood glucose soar to harmful heights. What are the symptoms of high blood sugar? Excessive thirst Fatigue Increased urination Blurry vision Nausea More frequent infections Slow-healing cuts and sores Unexplained weight loss Diabetes management: Treating and preventing high blood sugar How to treat high blood sugar Make sure that the person you're caring for drinks plenty of water to avoid dehydration and the potential for high blood sugar to spiral out of control. If blood glucose is above 250 mg/dL, a person with diabetes should test his urine for ketones, acids that can build up in his body and cause potentially life-threatening problems. Ketone test strips are available over the counter at pharmacies. If blood glucose readings are routinely above target range, the person in your care may consider taking pills or injecting insulin. If he already does, he may need to have the dose increased. Discuss these concerns with his main diabetes care provider. How to prevent high blood sugar Help the person figure out what foods tend to trigger a high blood sugar reaction so he can avoid them or compensate by adjusting his medications or becoming more active. Check the size of his port Continue reading >>

Signs Of High And Low Blood Sugar

Signs Of High And Low Blood Sugar

One of the challenges of managing diabetes is maintaining consistent blood sugar (glucose) levels. Even with diligence, some situations can cause high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, while others can bring on low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia. So it’s important to know the signs of both high and low levels, and what actions to take to bring them back within a desired range. Monitoring your blood sugar levels with a glucose meter will do a lot to help you keep those levels steady and avoid the complications that can come with diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, how often you check your blood sugar level depends on many factors, including your age, the type and severity of your diabetes, the length of time that you've had the condition, and the presence of any diabetes-related complications. About High Blood Sugar (Hyperglycemia) Common signs of high blood sugar include frequent urination, fatigue, dry or itchy skin, feeling thirsty, more frequent infections, and eating more food but not gaining as much weight as usual, says Athena Philis-Tsimikas, MD of the Scripps Whittier Diabetes Institute in San Diego, California. A blood sugar reading above 180 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) is considered above normal and can bring on these symptoms, although it’s possible to have high blood sugar without any symptoms, Dr. Philis-Tsimikas says. A reading above 300 mg/dL is considered severe. If your blood sugar is above 250 mg/dL for two days, Philis-Tsimikas advises informing your doctor and asking for specific treatment recommendations. Blood sugar levels above 300 mg/dL can cause nausea, drowsiness, blurred vision, confusion, and dizziness, especially when standing up from a sitting or lying position. Ways to treat high blood sugar include: Taking your prescribed medicati Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia

Hyperglycemia

Not to be confused with the opposite disorder, hypoglycemia. Hyperglycemia, or high blood sugar (also spelled hyperglycaemia or hyperglycæmia) is a condition in which an excessive amount of glucose circulates in the blood plasma. This is generally a blood sugar level higher than 11.1 mmol/l (200 mg/dl), but symptoms may not start to become noticeable until even higher values such as 15–20 mmol/l (~250–300 mg/dl). A subject with a consistent range between ~5.6 and ~7 mmol/l (100–126 mg/dl) (American Diabetes Association guidelines) is considered slightly hyperglycemic, while above 7 mmol/l (126 mg/dl) is generally held to have diabetes. For diabetics, glucose levels that are considered to be too hyperglycemic can vary from person to person, mainly due to the person's renal threshold of glucose and overall glucose tolerance. On average however, chronic levels above 10–12 mmol/L (180–216 mg/dL) can produce noticeable organ damage over time. Signs and symptoms[edit] The degree of hyperglycemia can change over time depending on the metabolic cause, for example, impaired glucose tolerance or fasting glucose, and it can depend on treatment.[1] Temporary hyperglycemia is often benign and asymptomatic. Blood glucose levels can rise well above normal and cause pathological and functional changes for significant periods without producing any permanent effects or symptoms. [1] During this asymptomatic period, an abnormality in carbohydrate metabolism can occur which can be tested by measuring plasma glucose. [1] However, chronic hyperglycemia at above normal levels can produce a very wide variety of serious complications over a period of years, including kidney damage, neurological damage, cardiovascular damage, damage to the retina or damage to feet and legs. Diabetic n Continue reading >>

Fasting Blood Sugar Of 432, Effectively Cured With Carbohydrate-restriction

Fasting Blood Sugar Of 432, Effectively Cured With Carbohydrate-restriction

I thought I was a hopeless case. I had struggled with weight loss my entire life. I can remember being on diets at 12 years old. As a teen, I starved myself (it is hard, being a teen girl!) and never dropped below 215 pounds (size 14). As an adult, I tried slim fast, vegetarianism, calorie restriction in various forms (over and over) but nothing worked. I even tried metabolism enhancing pills (Ephedra based). Again, nothing worked. It seemed hopeless. I had never been a sedentary person. As a child I was a dancer, and as a teen I was an active horseback rider. I took up weight training and running in an attempt to lose weight. Again, no luck. I learned to love running at 250 pounds, something I did not think would be possible. Then the diabetes struck. I thought I had a urinary tract infection. Yes, I had been drinking a lot of water in the previous months, but my working environment was a bad one...I was sitting in front of an air curtain all day and assumed that accounted for my thirst. I went to the doctor's office for what I assumed was to be a prescription for antibiotics to cure my urinary tract infection. I gave the nurse a urine sample, and as I did so, I noticed how sweet my urine smelled. She took one whif of that cup and whisked me into the back room for a blood test. My fasting blood sugar was 432 mg/dl. I was crushed. My mother has diabetes and so did my grandfather, so I always assumed it could be in the cards. We are also part native american, which makes the chances of diabetes even greater. But I never expected to get it at 32 years old. I was of course given pamphlets on nutrition...and whisked off to a laboratory for a battery of tests to see what damage my body had already taken. Luckily, my heart and other systems were undamaged. That was a terrifyi Continue reading >>

How Do I Quickly Bring Down My Blood Glucose?

How Do I Quickly Bring Down My Blood Glucose?

If you get a high reading when checking your blood sugar, is there a way to get the number down quickly? Continue reading >>

Can You Guess Your Blood Sugar?

Can You Guess Your Blood Sugar?

Many people with diabetes have been writing to TheDiabetesCouncil inquiring to see if it is possible to accurately guess one’s blood sugar. That is, to guess the number value exactly, or closely enough to treat it accordingly, without a glucometer. As a Certified Diabetes Educator, I would highly advise against this practice. People with diabetes should validate the symptoms that they are having with a glucometer. Although they may be able to tell by their symptoms of weakness, sweating, and heart palpitations, that they are low, it is very unlikely that they will be able to guess the number value of their blood sugar. It is true that with marked hypoglycemic symptoms, and swift progression to confusion, they may not have time to check their blood sugar with a glucometer. They may go ahead and treat with 15 grams of carbohydrates and then check their blood sugar. This may seem to be the safest route to take, rather than waiting until they are unable to help themselves because of a low, and possibly needing assistance from another person. Are you a guesser? PWDs with very high blood sugars may definitely recognize the fatigue, extreme thirst, hunger, and extra trips to the bathroom of an onset signal. In my experience, high blood sugars in the 200-250 mg/dl range are much more difficult to pick up on, as many with Type 2 diabetes may walk around for years with blood sugars around 200-250 mg/dl and not recognize the symptoms. I seriously doubt that people with diabetes can accurately guess their blood sugars. I have never met a person with diabetes who questioned whether or not they could guess what their blood sugars are exactly. Everyone I have come into contact with verifies their suspicions of low or high blood sugars with a glucometer. I recommend the following art Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels

Blood Sugar Levels

In diabetics, dangerous blood sugar levels can occur if oral drugs do not work or if the diabetes has not been diagnosed. Sometimes diabetics forget to take their oral tablets or insulin or are in a situation where they cannot or they even may be taking some medications, which adversely affect their sugar levels. At such times, their sugar levels can go very high or even low. Normal blood sugar levels read 70-100 mg per deciliter of blood. The sugar levels vary throughout the day: when you wake up in the morning your levels are low and when you eat a carbohydrate/sugar rich meal, levels can go up. If you experience the mid-morning slump, your sugar levels are probably low. The highest level is reached two hours after a meal. Hyperglycemia or high blood sugar levels in a diabetic start at 180 mg/dl. However, some people, especially those who have undiagnosed diabetes can have dangerous blood sugar levels in the range of over 250-800 mg/dl. It is not just a short time high level that is dangerous, but when high levels persist or are dangerously high, they can cause more problems and even lead to emergency situations. Dangerous levels can lead to: Coma Stroke Blindness Nerve damage Blood vessel damage Kidney disease DKA or diabetic ketoacidosis – more common in people with type 1 diabetes Hyperglycemic hyperosmolar nonketotic syndrome (HHNS) – more common in people with type 2 diabetes. For diabetics, monitoring sugar levels are of utmost importance and can prevent dangerous complications. What Causes Dangerous Blood Sugar Levels? Blood sugar levels can go high in different situations and can be caused by: Not taking enough insulin Eating too much high sugar/carbohydrate foods Missing an insulin dose Less than usual exercise Drinking alcohol Stress Illness Injury Medic Continue reading >>

More in blood sugar