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Blood Sugar 155 Fasting

The Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

The Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), also referred to as the glucose tolerance test, measures the body’s ability to metabolize glucose, or clear it out of the bloodstream. The test can be used to diagnose diabetes, gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or prediabetes (a condition characterized by higher-than-normal blood sugar levels that can lead to type 2 diabetes). According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the OGTT it is better able to diagnose high blood glucose after a glucose challenge than the fasting blood glucose test. A doctor may recommend it if he suspects diabetes in cases where a patient’s fasting blood glucose level is normal. However, the test is more time-consuming and complicated than the fasting blood glucose test. According to the Diabetes Standards of Care, the test is also preferred in diagnosing Type 2 diabetes in adolescents and children. How Is the Test Conducted? Patients must fast for at least 8 to 12 hours before having the test. After fasting, blood is drawn to establish a fasting glucose level. Next, a patient must quickly drink a sugary (glucose-rich) beverage. Typically, the drink contains 75 grams of carbohydrates, although other amounts are possible. Blood will be drawn at various intervals to measure glucose levels, usually one hour and two hours after the beverage is consumed. What Does the Test Indicate? The test reveals how quickly glucose is metabolized from the bloodstream for use by cells as an energy source. The normal rate of glucose clearing depends on the amount of glucose ingested. After fasting, the normal blood glucose rate is 60 to 100 mg/dL (milligrams per deciliter). For 75 grams of glucose, normal blood glucose values are: 1 hour: less than 200 mg/dL 2 hours: less than 140 mg/dL. Between 1 Continue reading >>

Docmisty - Part 2

Docmisty - Part 2

So, excited to be at Day 20. Only a 10-day countdown left and then well see what happens to my blood sugar and weight once I start eating again. I havent been very good about taking any pictures, but I thought I should do some today and see the contrast to Day 1. I wish I had donesome measurements when I started, but my pants are definitely looser. Here you go: I have six kids, one of which is a nursing 18-month-old and we homeschool. So, to separate extra tiredness caused by juicing from the general exhaustion that allows me to fall asleep in any given position within 5 minutes is a little tricky. I do, however, have a handy dandy Fitbit I got last Christmas and it tracks my sleep for me. I put it all together in a chart and it looks like I do sleep more during a juice fast . . . or at least I take more naps. In the last 19 days of juicing, I have taken a nap on 10 of the days. Score!! And Ive slept as little as 6.3 hours a night and as much as a whoppin 10.4 hours, with a total average sleep, including naps, of 8.0 hours. Wow! It takes a juice fast to get me to sleep the recommended daily amount. Who knew? In general, though I would say I feel slightly more tired and a bit weaker while working out enough to notice, but not enough to really impact me. Pretty nice that I can go about my daily business without the juice fastknocking me flat on my back. Ok, so when I decided to start this 30-day juice fast, I had no idea that it would be smack dab in the middle of the Season of the Potlucks. To give you a little background, I come from a family of nine where things were a bit tight growing up. Together with a mom who tried to make sure weate healthy, treats and desserts were arare and exciting occurrence. They also necessitated a scale accurate to the nano-ounce, a scien Continue reading >>

What Is A Good Blood Glucose Reading For A Non-diabetic?

What Is A Good Blood Glucose Reading For A Non-diabetic?

Diabetics should monitor their blood glucose levels closely, but non-diabetics also should be aware of the thresholds that may indicate hyperglycemia, hypoglycemia and diabetes. Types Blood glucose levels are measured by simple blood tests, either after fasting and/or as part of an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). According to the American Diabetes Association, the normal fasting blood glucose target is 70 to 100 mg/dL. After a meal, the target can be as high as 180. Readings between 100 and 126 (after fasting) could indicate a pre-diabetic condition. Function A blood glucose test measures the amount of glucose in the blood and is helpful in diagnosing diabetes, as well as hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia. The OGTT is a fasting glucose screening, followed by several blood tests over a period of several hours. The patient drinks a glucose solution that tests the system. Readings under 140 during the OGTT are considered normal. Readings between 140 and 200 may indicate impaired glucose tolerance, or pre-diabetes. A reading greater than 200 may indicate diabetes. Considerations When taking a glucose tolerance test, fasting is considered to be an eight- to 10-hour period without food or drink. Significance A blood glucose screening is helpful in diagnosing diabetes, but it is also used when hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia is suspected. Symptoms of hyperglycemia include fatigue, increased thirst and urination, blurred vision and infections that are slow to heal. Warning signs of hypoglycemia may include anxiety, confusion, sweating, hunger and blurred vision. Other Tests Pregnant women are typically screened for gestational diabetes with a basic glucose tolerance test. A level of less than 140 is considered normal, while a reading of 140 or greater is abnormal and may require Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Below chart displays possible blood sugar levels (in fasting state). Units are expressed in mg/dL and mmol/L respectively. Additional topics: What is diabetes? How do you know if you have diabetes? How to test for diabetes? Why is it important to measure your blood sugar levels frequently? Diet for people with diabetes You can also download or print this chart by clicking here. Reference: American Diabetes Association, Additional topics: What is diabetes? How do you know if you have diabetes? How to test for diabetes? What is normal blood sugar level? Why is it important to measure your blood sugar levels frequently? Diet for people with diabetes Continue reading >>

Normal Blood Glucose Level

Normal Blood Glucose Level

What is the normal blood-glucose level? Healthy glucose level is the BS number generally noted among the young non-diabetic people. What is the normal blood-glucose level? The BS numbers recommended by the popular institutions or organizations for healthy, pre-diabetes and diabetes are generally slightly in a high side. These institutions do so base on an older study, which predicted those who have diagnosed as pre-diabetes has progressed to diabetes early due to mental strain. Thus, they push the numbers slightly to a higher range to stop diabetes progression. However, many health professionals think their patients are intelligent, smarter, and brave enough. Therefore, the patients are strong to take challenge and considering it as an alarm in preventing diabetes. Perfect normal blood-glucose levels noted among most young healthy persons (non-diabetic adults) are: Fasting blood-glucose level: 70–90 mg/dl (3.89–5.00 mmol/l) One hour after a meal: 90–125 mg/dl (5.00–6.94 mmol/l) Two hours after a meal: 90–110 mg/dl (5.00–6.11 mmol/l) Five hours after a meal: 70–90 mg/dl (3.89–5.00 mmol/l) If your blood-glucose levels are more than the above-said range, then you are at increased risk towards diabetes. Thus, require taking necessary steps to prevent diabetes; otherwise, diabetes may develop within next few years or decades. You are not only risked towards diabetes; additionally, even undiagnosed as diabetes for years, your body develops diabetes complications, read on to know why. Nerve damage begins even during impaired glucose tolerance: The spectrum of neuropathy is in diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance Neurology January 14, 2003 vol. 60 no: 1 108-111. The neuropathy associated with IGT is milder than the neuropathy associated with diabetes. Small n Continue reading >>

Diabetic Emergency—how Homeopathy Brought Extremely High Blood Sugar Down

Diabetic Emergency—how Homeopathy Brought Extremely High Blood Sugar Down

DIABETIC EMERGENCY—EXTREMELY HIGH BLOOD SUGAR HOW HOMEOPATHY BROUGHT IT DOWN High blood glucose (sugar) is the hallmark of diabetes. When it goes very, very high the patient can go into coma. It is a medical emergency. I once had a patient with extremely high blood glucose and, at the time, neither he nor I knew it. I treated him for something else and not only did that complaint go away his extremely high blood glucose also dropped. It happened this way. On June, 30, 1997, a 36 year old man came in complaining of nausea, headache, vague dizziness, flank pain and stomach pain. It could have been a virus—and probably was. As I was taking his case, he said, “You know, there’s diabetes in my family and I was wondering if I could have it?” He was drinking a lot—six to seven liters of water a day for the past few weeks—and diabetics often have great thirst. But, since he was also not especially hungry, and diabetics often are, I thought it not probable. But, just to be sure, I drew blood and sent it off to the lab. He had a smorgasbord of symptoms: Dry mouth despite drinking so much water. Cramping in the calves. Nausea in the morning, worse after eating. Flank pain. Right-sided head and neck pains. Feeling over-heated. Pains in the stomach and liver which felt, “Like a bubble, like it will burst.” Tongue coated white. Some dizziness on rising from sitting. I examined him. Blood pressure was normal at 124/82. Heart rate a bit fast at 104/minute. The area over the stomach was tender to the pressure of my hand as was the liver area. The abdomen was mildly distended. My working diagnosis: a virus affecting the gastrointestinal tract primarily. Though he was uncomfortable, he was in no acute distress that I could discern. Striking, was the large volume of water Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Remedies

High Blood Sugar Remedies

Maintain Blood Sugar Levels and Control Diabetes High blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, is a common effect of diabetes and is caused by the body's inability to absorb glucose into cell tissue from the bloodstream. Normally when glucose levels are too high your pancreas releases insulin to allow your cells to absorb the sugar; but in diabetic patients insulin no longer affects the body properly, allowing blood glucose levels to spike dangerously high and cause damage to your organs, including the possibility of diabetic neuropathy. Symptoms of high blood sugar develop slowly, but the longer the levels remain elevated the greater the risk. Signs of hyperglycemia are increased thirst, frequent urination, blurred vision, fatigue, headache, and as the condition progresses: vomiting, dry mouth, weakness, abdominal pain, shortness of breath, and coma. How to Lower Blood Sugar Naturally On this page you can find a number of herbal remedies and natural treatments to lower high blood sugar level, as submitted to us by our Earth Clinic readers around the world. Our most popular cure for high blood sugar is apple cider vinegar - which slows the digestion of carbohydrates into simple sugars - with other readers suggesting cinnamon, avocado, turmeric, and a raw food diet. Let us know what remedies you try from Earth Clinic for blood sugars; and if you know of a treatments that we do not have listed yet, please do not hesitate to share it with us. Posted by Sheila (Wicks, Arkansas) on 06/18/2008 Hi, I'm a diabetic, overweight, Had a hysterectomy, and do NOT do hormone replacement, have suffered from yeast infections on my skin, not in my vagina, ever since I had the Hysterectomy, i am 40 years old, I have been in so much pain, I was ready to go, throw myself overboard if I could find a b Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels During

Blood Sugar Levels During

Pregnancy By Susan M. Callahan, Associate Editor and Featured Columnist Related Links: What Causes Spotting During Pregnancy-Top 10 RemediesNormal Fasting Blood SugarIdeal Breakfast for DiabeticsFoods That Lower Blood SugarBeat the Lows-Ideal Breakfasts for HypoglycemiaExercises That Lower Blood SugarIdeal Dinner for DiabeticsDirectory of Sugar Content in FoodsIdeal Diet for Preeclampsia and High Blood Pressure During PregnancyHigh Blood Pressure During Your Pregnancy?-10 Natural RemediesTired During Pregnancy?-Causes and Cures Ideal Breakfast for Heart Health Why Americans Read In Bathrooms-The Hidden Epidemic of Constipation Bowels -3 Keys to Normal Bowels Break Through Your Diet Plateau How Many Calories Do I Burn Fiber Rich Foods Quinoa-The New Superfood? Fish Oil Benefits-Let Me Count the Ways My Heart Attack-personal stories from survivors Fat-It's Alive! Foods That Reduce Your Blood Pressure Waist Size Matters Six Pack Abs Step by Step Americans Are Dangerously Sleep Deprived Uncontrolled blood sugar levels are dangerous to both your health and the health of your unborn baby. The risk is especially high in the first trimester, when your baby is developing rapidly. During this stage, abnormally high blood sugar levels increase the risk of miscarriage and birth defects. According to a 2009 study of 23,000 women from 9 countries led by Northwestern University and funded by the National Institutes of Health, sugar levels high enough to qualify as diabetic occurs in 5% of all pregnancies. Even slightly higher than normal blood sugar levels puts the mother at significantly higher risk for Ceasarean delivery, for preeclampsia, a potentially fatal disease, and for shoulder dystocia, a condition in which the baby's shoulder becomes in the mothers body, preventing natural Continue reading >>

Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning?

Here you'll find info about why blood sugar is high in the morning, along with tips and resources to lower those numbers! A while back I had a client sending me her blood sugar charts every few days and on those charts she always made some notes if she had questions. Every time she sent them through, I noticed she had 3 big question marks (???) against her morning blood sugar results. And on another morning when her morning blood sugar levels were high at 160 mg/dl (or 8.9 mmol/l). She had written: I don't understand. 97 mg/dl (or 5.5mmol/l) last night when I went to sleep. I didn't eat anything because I didn't feel well. Humm… I was also over in one of the online diabetes groups I'm involved in today and this message popped up. I'm struggling with my morning BS number. When I went to bed around 11PM my BS was 107. I'm waking up with my BS between 120 – 135. I did put two pieces of string cheese next to my bed and when I woke up around 3am, I ate one. Since I was told to eat protein at night. When I woke up 3 hours later my BS was 130. I didn't want to eat anything large since it's so close to 140 (my goal is to keep it below 140). So I had 1 piece of toast (sugar free wheat bread) and just a tiny bit of peanut butter. I checked it an hour later and it was 161! What am I doing wrong? Do these morning situations sound familiar to you? Are you constantly questioning: Why is blood sugar high in the morning? I mean, logically we'd think that it should be at it's lowest in the morning right? Well don't panic, there is a reason for it, so let's explore why morning blood sugar is often higher. And at the end, I'll also point you toward some resources to help you lower those levels. Why Is Blood Sugar High In The Morning? Although it would seem logical that your body would Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose — Know Your Number!

Blood Glucose — Know Your Number!

When it comes to blood sugar, the closer you can keep it to the normal range of 80 to 89 mg/dL the better. For years I have been warning that blood sugars even in the 90 to 100 range show that you are becoming insulin resistant and on your way to diabetes. A recent study done on 47,000 Kaiser Permanente patients validated this observation. The study, published in the American Journal of Medicine found that blood sugar, blood glucose (BG) levels in the 95-99 range more than doubled a person’s risk of becoming diabetic. In fact, for every point over 85 mg/dL the risk of becoming diabetic increased 6%, even when they controlled for other factors.1 Accordingly, the study noted that there was more incidence of cardiovascular disease and hypertension in those with higher BG. Why is this research so important? It flies in the face of currently accepted medical guidelines that for years have used 100 as the magic number for diagnosing “pre-diabetes.” At LMI, I’ve been seeing red flags for years when patients come in with BG levels even in the 90’s, because these levels are often accompanied by being somewhat overweight or over fat, having a thick waist, or the spare tire of dangerous belly fat. These are signs that the body can no longer efficiently process the sugars that come from complex carbohydrates in whole grains, starchy vegetables, fruits, and simple sugars. In other words, they are signs of insulin resistance. Insulin is the “key” that unlocks the door to each cell in the body, letting glucose into the cell to be processed for energy. If the insulin key is faulty, the glucose remains in circulation, raising triglycerides, lowering HDL, and usually ending up at the waistline. Anytime you see your doctor for a routine physical, fasting blood glucose is tes Continue reading >>

Your Complete Guide To Blood Sugar Levels

Your Complete Guide To Blood Sugar Levels

“The food you eat can be either the safest and most powerful form of medicine or the slowest form of poison.” (Ann Wigmore) We exist in an era where we rely more on junk, inorganic, sugary, processed foodstuffs. This unwholesome diet is wreaking havoc on our well-being. Keeping a log of our blood sugar levels should be a mandatory component of our regimen. This article will highlight the ranges of blood glucose levels on different occasions. However, before proceeding ahead, I will like you to have an understanding of some important terms as follows: Random blood glucose (RBG): This is a casual blood sugar test taken in a non-fasting state at any time during the day. Fasting blood glucose (FBG): This is the test, measured first at the cockcrow after an overnight fasting of at least 8-12 hours. Postprandial Blood Glucose: Postprandial blood glucose indicates the level of glucose in your blood after meals; this could be 1 hour after meals, 2 hours after meals and so on so forth. Pre-Diabetes (Impaired Glucose Tolerance): This signifies that the person is not yet in the diabetic range, but has crossed the normal glucose range (i.e. hyperglycemic now). The pre-diabetic has an enhanced risk of insulin resistance and an increased propensity to develop full-blown diabetes. Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT/GCT or Glucose Challenge Test): Oral means via mouth, glucose tolerance test implies testing your blood glucose levels after giving you a glucose solution to drink. The test is performed in the morning, usually after an overnight fasting of approximately 8-12 hours (no calorie intake, can drink water). A baseline blood sample is then withdrawn at zero time. The person then receives a glucose solution to slurp, (this could be a 50-gram (g), 75-g, or a 100-g glucose soluti Continue reading >>

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

In the next two articles we’re going to discuss the concept of “normal” blood sugar. I say concept and put normal in quotation marks because what passes for normal in mainstream medicine turns out to be anything but normal if optimal health and function are what you’re interested in. Here’s the thing. We’ve confused normal with common. Just because something is common, doesn’t mean it’s normal. It’s now becoming common for kids to be overweight and diabetic because they eat nothing but refined flour, high-fructose corn syrup and industrial seed oils. Yet I don’t think anyone (even the ADA) would argue that being fat and metabolically deranged is even remotely close to normal for kids. Or adults, for that matter. In the same way, the guidelines the so-called authorities like the ADA have set for normal blood sugar may be common, but they’re certainly not normal. Unless you think it’s normal for people to develop diabetic complications like neuropathy, retinopathy and cardiovascular disease as they age, and spend the last several years of their lives in hospitals or assisted living facilities. Common, but not normal. In this article I’m going to introduce the three markers we use to measure blood sugar, and tell you what the conventional model thinks is normal for those markers. In the next article, I’m going to show you what the research says is normal for healthy people. And I’m also going to show you that so-called normal blood sugar, as dictated by the ADA, can double your risk of heart disease and lead to all kinds of complications down the road. The 3 ways blood sugar is measured Fasting blood glucose This is still the most common marker used in clinical settings, and is often the only one that gets tested. The fasting blood glucose Continue reading >>

Overview Of Diabetes

Overview Of Diabetes

Diagnosis The biochemical hallmark of diabetes is elevated blood glucose. Therefore, diagnosis of diabetes is made by estimation of glucose concentrations in the blood. When the fasting plasma glucose is ≥ 126 mg/dl or random blood glucose ≥ 200 mg/dl on more than one occasion.1 Fasting Plasma Glucose: Elevated fasting plasma glucose is always regarded to have a high degree of specificity for the diagnosis of diabetes. It is more consistent and reproducible than postprandial plasma glucose because there are more variable in the latter, such as timing and carbohydrate load. FPG may be easier to control with medications than PPG. An overnight fasting for 8 – 12 hours is considered desirable. The ADA and WHO have recommended FPG value of ≥ 126 mg/dl as the diagnostic value for diabetes and the value of 110 – 125 mg/dl have been termed as impaired fasting glucose which is a prediabetic stage.1 Postprandial Blood Glucose: The word postprandial means after a meal and hence it refers to plasma glucose concentration after food intake. The optimal time to measure postprandial glucose concentrations is 2 hr after the start of a meal. An elevated PPG concentration is one of the earliest abnormalities of type 2 diabetes, and represents an independent risk for cardiovascular disease. Postprandial changes precipitate atherosclerosis before FPG concentrations are affected. The recommended PPG goal of treatment is a value of <160mg/dl. Oral Glucose Tolerance Test It is recommended for diagnosis/exclusion for diabetes. The Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) is done in the morning after 8-10hrs of overnight fast (water may be taken). A fasting blood sample should be taken before giving glucose load. The person then drinks 75gm of glucose in 250-300 ml of water (the glucose load Continue reading >>

Controlling The Dawn Phenomenon

Controlling The Dawn Phenomenon

One of our most stubborn challenges is to control the dawn phenomenon. That’s when our fasting blood glucose readings in the morning are higher than when we went to bed. The dawn phenomenon is a normal physiological process where certain hormones in our body work to raise blood glucose levels before we wake up, as we wrote in The New Glucose Revolution: What Makes My Blood Glucose Go Up…And Down? Professor Jennie Brand-Miller of the University of Sydney, Kaye Foster-Powell, and I co-authored that book (Marlowe & Co., first edition 2003, second American edition 2006). These so-called counter-regulatory hormones, including glucagon, epinephrine, growth hormone, and cortisol, work against the action of insulin. They stimulate glucose release from the liver and inhibit glucose utilization throughout the body. The result is an increase in blood glucose levels, ensuring a supply of fuel in anticipation of the wakening body’s needs. If you take insulin injections, it could be that the effect of insulin you took is waning. Your blood glucose will rise if you didn’t take enough to keep your insulin level up through the night. The dawn phenomenon varies from person to person and can even vary from time to time in each of us. That much was clear when our book came out. But how to control it was a different story. A couple of years ago here I wrote about several efforts for “Taming the Dawn Phenomenon.” People have tried everything from eating a green apple at bedtime to high-maize grain to uncooked cornstarch. None of these remedies that I have been able to try ever worked for me. I always thought that the most promising remedy was one that a correspondent named Renee suggested – vinegar capsules. “I am still using vinegar tablets (usually 8) each night and have us Continue reading >>

Should I Be Worried If My Blood Sugar Levels Is 156 Mg/dl An Hour After Lunch?

Should I Be Worried If My Blood Sugar Levels Is 156 Mg/dl An Hour After Lunch?

A High Sugar Level After a Meal: It's normal for your blood sugar level to rise after you eat, especially if you eat a meal high in refined sugar. But if your blood sugar rises more than most people's, you might have diabetes or pre-diabetes, a condition that indicates a strong risk for developing diabetes in the future. If you already have diabetes, you doctor will recommend keeping your blood sugar within a prescribed range. A glucose tolerance test, done one to three hours after you eat a high-carbohydrate meal, can check your blood sugar levels. Significance: When you eat carbohydrates, your body breaks down the sugars they contain into glucose. Your body can't absorb most sugars without breaking them down first. Simple sugars such as refined sugar break down very quickly; you absorb them rapidly into your bloodstream, which raises your blood sugar. In healthy people, the levels don't rise very high and they drop back to normal quickly. If you have diabetes, your levels after a meal will rise higher and stay high longer than levels in other people. Normal Levels: If your doctor suspects that you have abnormal glucose levels, he might suggest doing a glucose tolerance test. You are given around 75 grams of carbohydrate after fasting for 12 hours. At one- to three-hour intervals, your doctor draws blood and analyzes your glucose levels. A normal fasting glucose is 60 to 100 milligrams per deciliter; your levels should rise no higher than 200 mg/dl one hour after eating and no more than 140 mg/dl two hours after finishing the snack. Most healthy people without diabetes have two-hour readings below 120 mg/dl. Pre-Diabetes: A fasting blood sugar of between 100 and 130 mg/dl indicates impaired glucose metabolism. This means that you don't process glucose normally, which p Continue reading >>

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