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Blood Sugar 155 Fasting

* What Is A Normal Blood Sugar?

* What Is A Normal Blood Sugar?

Normal blood sugars after a high carbohydrate breakfast eaten at 7:30 AM. The blue line is the average for the group. The brown lines show the range within which most readings fell (2 standard deviations). Bottom lines show Insulin and C-peptide levels at the same time. Click HERE if you don't see the graph. Graph is a screen shot from Dr. Christiansen's presentation cited below. The term "blood sugar" refers to the concentration of glucose, a simple, sugar, that is found in a set volume of blood. In the U.S. it is measured in milligrams per deciliter, abbreviated as mg/dl. In most of the rest of the world it is measured in millimoles per liter, abbreviated as mmol/L. The concentration of glucose in our blood changes continually throughout the day. It can even vary significantly from minute to minute. When you eat, it can rise dramatically. When you exercise it will often drop. The blood sugar measures that doctors are most interested in is the A1c, discussed below. When you are given a routine blood test doctors usually order a fasting glucose test. The most informative blood sugar reading is the post-meal blood sugar measured one and two hours after eating. Doctors rarely test this important blood sugar measurement as it is time consuming and hence expensive. Rarely doctors will order a Oral Glucose Tolerance Test, which tests your response to a huge dose of pure glucose, which hits your blood stream within minutes and produces results quite different from the blood sugars you will experience after each meal. Below you will find the normal readings for these various tests. Normal Fasting Blood Sugar Fasting blood sugar is usually measured first thing in the morning before you have eaten any food. A truly normal fasting blood sugar (which is also the blood sugar a norm Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

Blood Sugar Level Chart And Information

A - A + Main Document Quote: "A number of medical studies have shown a dramatic relationship between elevated blood sugar levels and insulin resistance in people who are not very active on a daily or regular basis." A doctor might order a test of the sugar level in a person's blood if there is a concern that they may have diabetes, or have a sugar level that is either too low or too high. The test, which is also called a check of blood sugar, blood glucose, fasting blood sugar, fasting plasma glucose, or fasting blood glucose, indicates how much glucose is present is present in a person's blood. When a person eats carbohydrates, such as pasta, bread or fruit, their body converts the carbohydrates to sugar - also referred to as glucose. Glucose travels through the blood to supply energy to the cells, to include muscle and brain cells, as well as to organs. Blood sugar levels usually fluctuate depending upon what a person eats and how long it has been since they last ate. However; consistent or extremely low levels of glucose in a person's blood might cause symptoms such as: Anxiety Sweating Dizziness Confusion Nervousness Warning signs of dangerously high levels of blood sugar include sleepiness or confusion, dry mouth, extreme thirst, high fever, hallucinations, loss of vision, or skin that is warm and dry. A blood sugar test requires a finger prick or needle stick. A doctor might order a, 'fasting,' blood glucose test. What this means is a person will not be able to drink or eat for 8-10 hours before the test, or the doctor may order the test for a random time or right after the person eats. If a woman is pregnant, her doctor might order a, 'glucose-tolerance test,' which involves drinking glucose solution and having blood drawn a specified amount of time later. The re Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Test

Blood Sugar Test

Health » Disease & Conditions » Diagnostic Tests » Normal level of sugar in blood before your meal is between 70 and 110 mg/dl. After food, level will rise in between 100 to 140. The increased level of blood sugar above 140 mg/dl is considered to be the symptoms of diabetics. Low level of sugar, below 70 is also dangerous. It may cause fainting. The two main tests used to measure diabetes are (a) Fasting Plasma Glucose Test, the direct measurement of glucose levels in the blood after an 8 hour (overnight) fast, and (b) Oral Glucose Tolerance Test, measurement of the body's ability to appropriately handle the excess sugar presented after drinking a high glucose drink Fasting Plasma Glucose test is positive when the value of elevated blood sugar level is above 140 mg/dl after an overnight fast. If the value is above 140 mg/dl on at least two occasions, it means that a person has diabetes. Normal people have fasting sugar levels that generally run between 70-110 mg/dl. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) measures plasma glucose at timed intervals over a 3-hour period. The person being tested starts the test in a fasting state (having no food or drink except water for at least 10 hours but not greater than 16 hours). An initial blood sugar is drawn and then the person is given a drink with high amount of sugar in it (75 grams of glucose or 100 grams for pregnant women). The person then has their blood tested again 30 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours and 3 hour intervals after drinking the high glucose drink. If the plasma glucose level is 200 mg/dl or more in the blood sample taken 2 hours after drinking high glucose shows that the test is positive. Gestational diabetes is also diagnosed through OGTT. Glucose levels are normally lower during pregnancy, so the basic values for Continue reading >>

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

Ultimate Guide To The A1c Test: Everything You Need To Know

The A1C is a blood test that gives us an estimated average of what your blood sugar has been over the past 2-3 months. The A1c goes by several different names, such aswa Hemoglobin A1C, HbA1C, Hb1C, A1C, glycated hemoglobin, glycohemoglobin and estimated glucose average. What is Hemoglobin? Hemoglobin is a protein in your blood cells that carries oxygen. When sugar is in the blood, and it hangs around for a while, it starts to attach to the red blood cells. The A1C test is a measurement of how many red blood cells have sugar attached. So, if your A1C result is 7%, that means that 7% of your red blood cells have sugar attached to them. What are the Symptoms of a High A1C Test Level? Sometimes there are NO symptoms! That is probably one of the scariest things about diabetes, your sugar can be high for a while and you may not even know it. When your blood sugar goes high and stays high for longer periods of time you may notice the following: tired, low energy, particularly after meals feel very thirsty you may be peeing more than normal, waking a lot in the middle of the night to go dry, itchy skin unexplained weight loss crave sugar, hungrier than normal blurred vision, may feel like you need new glasses tingling in feet or hands cuts or sores take a long time to heal or don’t heal well at all frequent infections (urinary tract, yeast infections, etc.) When your blood sugar is high, this means the energy that you are giving your body isn’t getting into the cells. Think about a car that has a gas leak. You put gas in, but if the gas can’t get to the engine, the car will not go. When you eat, some of the food is broken down into sugar and goes into your bloodstream. If your body can’t get the sugar to the cells, then your body can’t “go.” Some of the sugar tha Continue reading >>

Elevated Fasting Blood Glucose Is Predictive Of Poor Outcome In Non-diabetic Stroke Patients: A Sub-group Analysis Of Smart

Elevated Fasting Blood Glucose Is Predictive Of Poor Outcome In Non-diabetic Stroke Patients: A Sub-group Analysis Of Smart

Abstract Although increasing evidence suggests that hyperglycemia following acute stroke adversely affects clinical outcome, whether the association between glycaemia and functional outcome varies between stroke patients with\without pre-diagnosed diabetes remains controversial. We aimed to investigate the relationship between the fasting blood glucose (FBG) and the 6-month functional outcome in a subgroup of SMART cohort and further to assess whether this association varied based on the status of pre-diagnosed diabetes. Data of 2862 patients with acute ischemic stroke (629 with pre-diagnosed diabetics) enrolled from SMART cohort were analyzed. Functional outcome at 6-month post-stroke was measured by modified Rankin Scale (mRS) and categorized as favorable (mRS:0–2) or poor (mRS:3–5). Binary logistic regression model, adjusting for age, gender, educational level, history of hypertension and stroke, baseline NIHSS and treatment group, was used in the whole cohort to evaluate the association between admission FBG and functional outcome. Stratified logistic regression analyses were further performed based on the presence/absence of pre-diabetes history. In the whole cohort, multivariable logistical regression showed that poor functional outcome was associated with elevated FBG (OR1.21 (95%CI 1.07–1.37), p = 0.002), older age (OR1.64 (95% CI1.38–1.94), p<0.001), higher NIHSS (OR2.90 (95%CI 2.52–3.33), p<0.001) and hypertension (OR1.42 (95%CI 1.13–1.98), p = 0.04). Stratified logistical regression analysis showed that the association between FBG and functional outcome remained significant only in patients without pre-diagnosed diabetes (OR1.26 (95%CI 1.03–1.55), p = 0.023), but not in those with premorbid diagnosis of diabetes (p = 0.885). The present results Continue reading >>

Why Is My Blood Glucose So High In The Morning?

Why Is My Blood Glucose So High In The Morning?

I am puzzled by my blood sugar pattern. I am not on any medications. My morning fasting blood sugar is always the highest of the day—between 120 and 140 mg/dl. The rest of the day it is in the normal range. Why does this occur? Continue reading >>

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar And How To Get It Back On Track

What Is A Normal Blood Sugar And How To Get It Back On Track

My Family History of Diabetes Diabetes has been in my family for generations. My grandmother was a diabetic, my father is diabetic, and during my pregnancy I almost developed prenatal diabetes. Given my family history and my own personal experience, I've learned a lot about this condition over the years. It turns out that there are many things we can do to control our blood sugar though the foods we eat. Normal Blood Glucose Levels What are normal blood glucose levels? Before meals: 80-90 mg/dL After meals: Up to 120 mg/dL Keep in mind that the blood glucose level before a meal for a non-diabetic and a prediabetic person may be very similar. As you can see in the graph below, how your blood sugar fluctuates after eating a meal can be more telling than your pre-meal glucose levels. However, if your pre-meal glucose level is over 100 mg/dL, you should see a doctor. A fasting glucose level of 126 mg/dL is considered diabetic. In this article, you will learn about the progression of Type 2 diabetes and how you can reverse it. Understanding the Diagnosis If you are reading this, you probably have been told by your doctor that you have, or someone you care about has, diabetes or prediabetes. You may be surprised, shocked, or even scared. You wonder how and why this is happening. Basically, diabetes means that the level of glucose in your blood (or blood sugar) is too high. Everyone has glucose in his or her blood. We need it to provide energy for all the cells in our body. Having diabetes means you have more than you need, way above normal blood sugar levels. The diagnosis of diabetes is somewhat arbitrary and keeps changing over time. Some time ago, your fasting glucose levels had to be 140 mg/dL or higher to be considered diabetic. Today the official number is 126 mg/dL, an Continue reading >>

What Is The Right Amount Of Sugar In Your Blood On An Empty Stomach?

What Is The Right Amount Of Sugar In Your Blood On An Empty Stomach?

Blood sugar tested on an empty stomach, also called fasting blood glucose, can help determine whether you are healthy or have a medical condition like Type 2 diabetes. Different medical conditions can cause your fasting blood sugar to be higher or lower than normal, and certain medications can also affect your blood sugar levels. A fasting blood glucose score of 100 to 125 milligrams per deciliter often means you have a condition called pre-diabetes, and if your blood sugar level is above 126 milligrams per deciliter it usually means you have diabetes, according to MedlinePlus. However, other conditions can also cause high fasting blood sugar, including pancreatic inflammation or cancer, an overactive thyroid gland or rare conditions like Cushing syndrome or acromegaly, which causes tumors. Medications, including corticosteroids, oral contraceptives, beta blockers and certain types of antidepressants can also increase your blood sugar levels. Some signs of high blood sugar levels including increased thirst and frequent urination. Too Low Should your test results show a fasting blood sugar level under 70 milligrams per deciliter, you may an underactive thyroid or a pituitary problem called hypopituitarism. Diabetics may get this type of result if they've taken too much diabetes medication or insulin. Medications like MAOIs, acetaminophen, anabolic steroids and gemfibrozil can also lower your blood sugar levels. Low blood sugar levels can cause symptoms including fatigue, confusion, fast heartbeat, lightheadedness, shakiness and irritability. Just Right The correct amount of sugar in your blood on an empty stomach is between 70 milligrams per deciliter and 100 milligrams per deciliter, although for diabetics fasting blood sugar results of up to 130 milligrams per decilite Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Remedies

High Blood Sugar Remedies

Maintain Blood Sugar Levels and Control Diabetes High blood sugar, or hyperglycemia, is a common effect of diabetes and is caused by the body's inability to absorb glucose into cell tissue from the bloodstream. Normally when glucose levels are too high your pancreas releases insulin to allow your cells to absorb the sugar; but in diabetic patients insulin no longer affects the body properly, allowing blood glucose levels to spike dangerously high and cause damage to your organs, including the possibility of diabetic neuropathy. Symptoms of high blood sugar develop slowly, but the longer the levels remain elevated the greater the risk. Signs of hyperglycemia are increased thirst, frequent urination, blurred vision, fatigue, headache, and as the condition progresses: vomiting, dry mouth, weakness, abdominal pain, shortness of breath, and coma. How to Lower Blood Sugar Naturally On this page you can find a number of herbal remedies and natural treatments to lower high blood sugar level, as submitted to us by our Earth Clinic readers around the world. Our most popular cure for high blood sugar is apple cider vinegar - which slows the digestion of carbohydrates into simple sugars - with other readers suggesting cinnamon, avocado, turmeric, and a raw food diet. Let us know what remedies you try from Earth Clinic for blood sugars; and if you know of a treatments that we do not have listed yet, please do not hesitate to share it with us. Posted by Sheila (Wicks, Arkansas) on 06/18/2008 Hi, I'm a diabetic, overweight, Had a hysterectomy, and do NOT do hormone replacement, have suffered from yeast infections on my skin, not in my vagina, ever since I had the Hysterectomy, i am 40 years old, I have been in so much pain, I was ready to go, throw myself overboard if I could find a b Continue reading >>

Optimal Blood Sugar Levels

Optimal Blood Sugar Levels

According to the latest medical research, optimal blood sugar levels should be significantly lower than the so-called “normal” range, “shifting the entire population glycaemia curve to the left.” (Editorial, BMJ 2001; 322:5-6). It is essential for us as Ayurvedic practitioners to be abreast of these current understandings, so that we can apply the correct chikitsa to prevent serious illnesses in our clients. In an important article in The Lancet, (2006 Nov 11; 368(9548):1651-9) the authors note that “Cardiovascular mortality risk increases continuously with blood glucose, from concentrations well below conventional thresholds used to define diabetes.” They further note that, “Higher-than-optimum blood glucose is a leading cause of cardiovascular mortality in most world regions.” In fact, high blood sugar is linked, worldwide, to 3,160,000 deaths each year. Traditionally, the ADA has held fasting blood glucose of less than 100mg/dL as “normal”. Yet the Lancet study showed that risk started to increase at 4.9mmol, or 88.2mg/dL; a number that would pass as very normal on a blood sugar test. An Israeli study published in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2005 followed healthy, non-diabetic Israeli soldiers for an average of over five years. Co-author Dr. Iris Shai noted that, “What we found was that men with fasting blood glucose levels at the high end of normal – between 95 to 99 mg/dl – had about three times the risk of developing type 2 diabetes as men with blood sugar levels under 81 mg/dl.” Furthermore, “If you combine those high end levels with other factors like obesity or high triglycerides, the risk is even higher.” I have found it helpful to look at blood glucose levels in three segments, explaining carefully to clients where t Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus - Part 4 - Glucose Tolerance Test, (g T T), Oral Glucose Tolerance Test, (ogtt)

Diabetes Mellitus - Part 4 - Glucose Tolerance Test, (g T T), Oral Glucose Tolerance Test, (ogtt)

Samples and Procedure The patient is advised to come to the laboratory in fasting state, where after taking fasting blood sample, the patient is given 75 grams of glucose. It is better to give in 7-up where it will be well tolerated. Collect fasting blood and then collect blood samples at 30, 60, 90, 120 minutes. Multiple samples are taken at half hour interval along with urine sample. In pregnant lady collect blood at 60, 120 and 180 min after glucose. some time the sample is taken at 1, 2, 3, and up to 4 hours. Purpose of the test It is used to diagnose Diabetes mellitus. It is also used to evaluate hypoglycemia. Patient with family H/o diabetes. patients with obesity (heavy). Patients with H/O recurrent infection. Patients with H/O delayed wound healing. Ladies with H/O stillbirths or delivering obese babies. Patient with H/O random glycosuria, or hyperglycemia during pregnancy or after myocardial infarction, surgery or stress. Pathophysiology The following diagram gives the summary of the interaction of Carbohydrates, fats, and proteins. Important facts Its use also discouraged for the fasting hypoglycemia. In non-pregnant adult and children, the OGTT is not recommended as a screening test. For pregnant lady 50 G glucose is recommended for screening. The serum glucose level of >150 mg/dl at 1 hour, is considered for further testing. There is a rapid response to insulin to oral glucose and peak is 30 and 60 minutes. Glucose comes to normal in 3 hours. Glucose will not appear in the urine in a normal pattern. Normal NORMAL WHEN Fasting glucose = < 110 mg/dl. Random glucose = < 140 mg/dl. Child fasting = <130 mg/dl. at 120 min = < 140 mg/dl. Impaired glucose tolerance in children: Fasting = <140 mg/dl. 120 min = >140 mg/dl. Adult non-pregnant. Fasting = 79 to 105 mg/dl Continue reading >>

Glucose Monitoring During Pregnancy

Glucose Monitoring During Pregnancy

Go to: Is There Evidence That Glucose Monitoring Improves Outcomes in Women With Gestational Diabetes? With the advent of home reflectance monitors in the late 1970s and early 1980s, self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) was demonstrated to be possible, and perhaps beneficial, in women with gestational diabetes [1, 2]. By 2004, SMBG was widely practiced, with more than 90% of obstetrician/gynecologists recommending that their patients with gestational diabetes check fasting blood glucose (FBG). However, only 61% of obstetrician/gynecologists were recommending 2-hour postprandial tests [3]. This lack of uniformity in the approach to glucose monitoring can be attributed to several factors. Specifically, there has been uncertainty about the frequency and utility of daily testing; the necessity of SMBG in all women with diabetes during pregnancy; the timing of self-monitoring measurements and whether preprandial or postprandial testing was superior; and the ideal thresholds for implementing changes in therapy [4]. With respect to the uncertain benefits of SMBG in women with diet-treated gestational diabetes, we recently published our findings regarding the utility of SMBG at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center [5]. Between January 1991 and December 1997, women with diet-treated gestational diabetes had routine glycemic monitoring at weekly prenatal visits [5]. After January 1998, the standard practice was to issue home glucose meters with instructions to check blood glucose levels four times per day. A total of 675 women who underwent weekly monitoring were compared with 315 women who performed SMBG four times per day. We found that SMBG was associated with a number of maternal and fetal benefits. In particular, there were significantly fewer overgrown inf Continue reading >>

The Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

The Oral Glucose Tolerance Test

The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), also referred to as the glucose tolerance test, measures the body’s ability to metabolize glucose, or clear it out of the bloodstream. The test can be used to diagnose diabetes, gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or prediabetes (a condition characterized by higher-than-normal blood sugar levels that can lead to type 2 diabetes). According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the OGTT it is better able to diagnose high blood glucose after a glucose challenge than the fasting blood glucose test. A doctor may recommend it if he suspects diabetes in cases where a patient’s fasting blood glucose level is normal. However, the test is more time-consuming and complicated than the fasting blood glucose test. According to the Diabetes Standards of Care, the test is also preferred in diagnosing Type 2 diabetes in adolescents and children. How Is the Test Conducted? Patients must fast for at least 8 to 12 hours before having the test. After fasting, blood is drawn to establish a fasting glucose level. Next, a patient must quickly drink a sugary (glucose-rich) beverage. Typically, the drink contains 75 grams of carbohydrates, although other amounts are possible. Blood will be drawn at various intervals to measure glucose levels, usually one hour and two hours after the beverage is consumed. What Does the Test Indicate? The test reveals how quickly glucose is metabolized from the bloodstream for use by cells as an energy source. The normal rate of glucose clearing depends on the amount of glucose ingested. After fasting, the normal blood glucose rate is 60 to 100 mg/dL (milligrams per deciliter). For 75 grams of glucose, normal blood glucose values are: 1 hour: less than 200 mg/dL 2 hours: less than 140 mg/dL. Between 1 Continue reading >>

Diagnosis Of Diabetes

Diagnosis Of Diabetes

Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are above normal. People with diabetes have problems converting food to energy. After a meal, food is broken down into a sugar called glucose, which is carried by the blood to cells throughout the body. Cells use insulin, a hormone made in the pancreas, to help them convert blood glucose into energy. People develop diabetes because the pancreas does not make enough insulin or because the cells in the muscles, liver, and fat do not use insulin properly, or both. As a result, the amount of glucose in the blood increases while the cells are starved of energy. Over the years, high blood glucose, also called hyperglycemia, damages nerves and blood vessels, which can lead to complications such as heart disease and stroke, kidney disease, blindness, nerve problems, gum infections, and amputation. The three main types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, formerly called juvenile diabetes, is usually first diagnosed in children, teenagers, or young adults. In this form of diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas no longer make insulin because the body's immune system has attacked and destroyed them. Type 2 diabetes, formerly called adult-onset diabetes, is the most common form. People can develop it at any age, even during childhood. This form of diabetes usually begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which muscle, liver, and fat cells do not use insulin properly. At first, the pancreas keeps up with the added demand by producing more insulin. In time, however, it loses the ability to secrete enough insulin in response to meals. Gestational diabetes develops in some women during the late stages of pregnancy. Although this form of diabetes usually goes away after the baby is born, a Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

Blood Sugar: What Causes High Blood Sugar Levels In The Morning

There are two reasons why your blood sugar levels may be high in the morning – the dawn phenomenon and the Somogyi effect. The dawn phenomenon is the end result of a combination of natural body changes that occur during the sleep cycle and can be explained as follows: Your body has little need for insulin between about midnight and about 3:00 a.m. (a time when your body is sleeping most soundly). Any insulin taken in the evening causes blood sugar levels to drop sharply during this time. Then, between 3:00 a.m. and 8:00 a.m., your body starts churning out stored glucose (sugar) to prepare for the upcoming day as well as releases hormones that reduce the body's sensitivity to insulin. All of these events happen as your bedtime insulin dose is also wearing off. These events, taken together, cause your body's blood sugar levels to rise in the morning (at "dawn"). A second cause of high blood sugar levels in the morning might be due to the Somogyi effect (named after the doctor who first wrote about it). This condition is also called "rebound hyperglycemia." Although the cascade of events and end result – high blood sugar levels in the morning – is the same as in the dawn phenomenon, the cause is more "man-made" (a result of poor diabetes management) in the Somogyi effect. There are two potential causes. In one scenario, your blood sugar may drop too low in the middle of the night and then your body releases hormones to raise the sugar levels. This could happen if you took too much insulin earlier or if you did not have enough of a bedtime snack. The other scenario is when your dose of long-acting insulin at bedtime is not enough and you wake up with a high morning blood sugar. How is it determined if the dawn phenomenon or Somogyi effect is causing the high blood sug Continue reading >>

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