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Essential Notes On Blood Sugar And Insulin

Essential Notes On Blood Sugar And Insulin

You have approximately 5 liters (about 21 cups) of blood traveling around in your blood vessels and heart at any given moment. In these 5 liters of blood, you need only about one teaspoon of sugar for all of your regular activities. If you regularly have more than a teaspoon of sugar floating through your blood vessels, the excess sugar can slow down your circulation, which, over time, can cause all of the problems you would expect to have if you had thick maple syrup clogging up your blood vessels. This is essentially what happens when a person becomes diabetic. In order to keep the amount of sugar floating through your blood vessels at around a teaspoon, your body releases insulin whenever you eat foods that release sugar into your bloodstream. Eating sugary foods, most sweeteners, grains, cookies, pastries, cakes, pasta, and starchy vegetables like potatoes all lead to a release of sugar into your bloodstream. Insulin works by stimulating your cells to sponge up this excess sugar out of your bloodstream. Once inside your cells, sugar is used for energy, with any excess amount being converted to fat tissue. If you regularly eat sugary foods and highly processed carbohydrates, your body will have released so much insulin that it will begin to lose its sensitivity to insulin, which means that your cells won’t receive as strong a signal to sponge up excess sugar out of your blood. This will lead to excess sugar floating around your blood vessels and all the health problems that come with this scenario. Just a few years ago, 110 - 120 mg/dL (6.1 - 6.7 mmol/L) was widely considered the upper range for a normal fasting blood sugar level. Today, a fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is considered normal, while anything within 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to Continue reading >>

This Tattoo Changes Colors As Your Blood Sugar Levels Change

This Tattoo Changes Colors As Your Blood Sugar Levels Change

Whether you’re a fan tattoos or would never consider getting one, you’ll have to admit—these are pretty cool. Scientists have developed something called a “biosensing” tattoo that could help change the lives of people living with types 1 or 2 diabetes. How could a tattoo do this, you ask? Well, by changing color along with the person’s blood sugar levels. This new tattoo is the hard work of a team of researchers from Harvard and MIT who call the project Dermal Abyss. The researchers replaced traditional tattoo ink with color-changing “biosensors” that react to variations in the interstitial fluid, which surrounds tissue cells in the human body. “It blends advances in biotechnology with traditional methods in tattoo artistry,” the team writes on their website. “Currently… diabetics need to monitor their glucose levels by piercing the skin 3 to 10 times per day. With Dermal Abyss, we imagine the future where the painful procedure is replaced with a tattoo. Thus, the user could monitor the color changes and the need of insulin.” RELATED: An Artificial Pancreas Could Be On Its Way To Help Those With Type 1 Diabetes The research focuses on four different biosensors that react to three different pieces of biochemical information that are evident in that interstitial fluid. The pH (or acidity) of the fluid changes between purple and pink, the glucose (sugar) sensor changes between blue and brown and the sodium and another pH sensor “fluoresce at a higher intensity under UV light.” Tattoos In Action Curious to see how the biosensing tattoos work? This cool video helps explain the concept. Currently For Research Only If this sounds life-changing to you, don’t get your hopes up quite yet. Right now, DermalAbyss is just a research project. “There Continue reading >>

Managing Your Blood Sugar

Managing Your Blood Sugar

Know the basic steps for managing your diabetes. Poorly managed diabetes can lead to many health problems. Know how to: Monitor your blood sugar (glucose) Find, buy, and store diabetes supplies If you take insulin, you should also know how to: Give yourself insulin Adjust your insulin doses and the foods you eat to manage your blood sugar during exercise and on sick days You should also live a healthy lifestyle. Exercise at least 30 minutes a day, 5 days a week. Do muscle strengthening exercises 2 or more days a week. Avoid sitting for more than 30 minutes at a time. Try speed walking, swimming, or dancing. Pick an activity you enjoy. Always check with your doctor before starting any new exercise plans. Follow your meal plan. Take your medicines the way your health care provider recommends. Checking your blood sugar levels often and writing down the results will tell you how well you are managing your diabetes. Talk to your doctor and diabetes educator about how often you should check your blood sugar. Not everyone with diabetes needs to check their blood sugar every day. But some people may need to check it many times a day. If you have type 1 diabetes, check your blood sugar at least 4 times a day. Usually, you will test your blood sugar before meals and at bedtime. You may also check your blood sugar: After you eat out, especially if you have eaten foods you don't normally eat If you feel sick Before and after you exercise If you have a lot of stress If you eat too much If you are taking new medicines Keep a record for yourself and your provider. This will be a big help if you are having problems managing your diabetes. It will also tell you what works and what doesn't work, to keep your blood sugar under control. Write down: The time of day Your blood sugar level Th Continue reading >>

For Diabetics, A High-fiber Diet Feeds Gut Microbes, Lowering Blood Sugar

For Diabetics, A High-fiber Diet Feeds Gut Microbes, Lowering Blood Sugar

For diabetics, a high-fiber diet feeds gut microbes, lowering blood sugar lenty of fiber: Thats long been the recommendation for a healthy diet. But why? The main rationale has been that fiber is made up of undigestible bulk that prevents people from eating unhealthy food and helps keep the digestive tract regular. But new research suggests that dietary fibers actually play a critical role in feeding the trillions of microbes that reside in our bodies, known collectively as the microbiome . And that specifically for people with type 2 diabetes, a high-fiber diet along with a favorable gut microbiome can keep patients blood sugar and body weight under control. Researchers in China were able to pinpoint the specific good bacteria that ferment fiber into acids, andultimately improves insulin regulation. These bugs, according to lead investigator Liping Zhao, chair of applied microbiology at Rutgers University, create an acidic microenvironment in the gut that helps beneficial, blood-sugar-lowering bacteria proliferate and might even keep pathogens at bay. Access to exclusive, in-depth pharma, biotech, business and policy coverage. Join now. The study really gets at the mechanistic reasons of why these fiber-rich, plant-based diets may be helpful, especially in patients with type 2 diabetes, said Dr. Clare Lee, an endocrinologist at Johns Hopkins University who also studies the link between diabetes and the microbiome. She was not involved in the study. Its an exciting step towards understanding potential mechanisms that can help us prevent and treat diabetes, she said. Fiber, of course, has long been shown to improve blood sugar, and diabetics are encouraged to eat plenty of it. But the benefits of fiber may be much more complex than scientists previously understood. Leaf Continue reading >>

13 Diabetes Myths That Don't Lower Blood Sugar

13 Diabetes Myths That Don't Lower Blood Sugar

Skipping meals could potentially push your blood glucose higher. When you don't eat for several hours because of sleep or other reasons, your body fuels itself on glucose released from the liver. For many people with type 2 diabetes (PWDs type 2), the liver doesn't properly sense that the blood has ample glucose already, so it continues to pour out more. Eating something with a little carbohydrate signals the liver to stop sending glucose into the bloodstream and can tamp down high numbers. Skipping meals can also lead to overeating, which can cause an increase in weight. And if you take certain diabetes medications that stimulate the body's own insulin such as common sulfonylureas, or you take insulin with injections or a pump, you risk having your blood glucose drop too low when you skip or delay meals. Going Low-Carb Low-carb diets "are not balanced and deprive the body of needed fiber, vitamins, and minerals," says Constance Brown-Riggs, M.S.Ed, R.D., CDE, CDN, author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes (Career Press, 2010). Recently, Brown-Riggs counseled a PWD type 2 who ate very little carbohydrate. The result: poor energy and severe headaches. Brown-Riggs helped the person balance out his meal plan by suggesting fruits, grains, and other carb-containing foods. "His headaches subsided, his energy level was restored, and he was happy to learn that he could eat healthy sources of carbohydrate and manage his blood glucose levels successfully," Brown-Riggs says. The keys to success are to manage portions of all foods, spread your food out over your day, and work with your health care team to devise an individualized meal, activity, and medication plan. Eating Pasta Al Dente It is best to eat your spaghetti al dente, says David J. A. Jenkins, M. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is a condition marked by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that are discovered during pregnancy. It is defined as carbohydrate intolerance. About two to 10 percent of all pregnant women in the U.S. are diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Am I at risk for gestational diabetes? These factors increase your risk of developing diabetes during pregnancy: Being overweight before becoming pregnant (if you are 20% or more over your ideal body weight) Family history of diabetes (if your parents or siblings have diabetes) Being over age 25 Previously giving birth to a baby that weighed more than 9 pounds Previously giving birth to a stillborn baby Having gestational diabetes with an earlier pregnancy Being diagnosed with pre-diabetes Having polycystic ovary syndrome Being African-American, Hispanic/Latino, Asian-American, American Indian, or Pacific Islander American Keep in mind that half of women who develop gestational diabetes have no known risk factors. What causes gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes is caused by some hormonal changes that occur in all women during pregnancy. The placenta is the organ that connects the baby (by the umbilical cord) to the uterus and transfers nutrients from the mother to the baby. Increased levels of certain hormones made in the placenta can prevent insulin—a hormone that controls blood sugar—from managing glucose properly. This condition is called "insulin resistance." As the placenta grows larger during pregnancy, it produces more hormones and increases this insulin resistance. Usually, the mother’s pancreas is able to produce more insulin (about three times the normal amount) to overcome the insulin resistance. If it cannot, sugar levels will rise, resulting in gestational dia Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Levels And Diabetes

Blood Sugar Levels And Diabetes

Blood glucose levels, often called blood sugar levels, are an important part of checking that diabetes is well managed. Over time, high sugar levels associated with diabetes damage the body and can lead to other health problems. If blood glucose levels are too high, this is called hyperglycaemia. If they are too low, it is called hypoglycaemia. Both extremes are best avoided and a person with diabetes will use treatments such as tablets, diet, exercise or insulin to try to keep the readings within target levels. Guideline targets vary depending on age and the type of diabetes, but a doctor may suggest specific targets for individual patients. Blood glucose readings can be done at home with a special meter and test strips. Some allow results to be downloaded to a computer to help show trends in glucose control. Before meals: 4–8mmol/l Two hours after meals: less than 10mmol/l Adults with type 1 diabetes Before meals: 4–7mmol/l Two hours after meals: less than 9mmol/l Before meals: 4–7mmol/l Two hours after meals: less than 8.5mmol/l Sugar and your body Why are high blood sugar levels bad for you? It turns out your body doesn't have much of a sweet tooth. Glucose is precious fuel for all the cells in your body - when it's present at normal levels - but persistently high sugar levels behave like a slow-acting poison. High sugar levels slowly erode the ability of cells in the pancreas to make insulin. The pancreas overcompensates, though, and insulin levels remain overly high. Gradually, the pancreas is permanently damaged. All the excess sugar is modified in the blood. It becomes a form that sticks to and coats bloodstream proteins, which are normally "sugar-free." Thanks to this sugary film, the proteins don't function well, can be deposited in blood vessels, and ca Continue reading >>

Other Factors That Affect Your Blood Sugar

Other Factors That Affect Your Blood Sugar

Managing our blood sugar levels can often be a very difficult task. We tend to think that if eat healthily, control the amount and type of carbohydrate rich food we eat, take our medication on time and at the correct dose and test our blood sugar regularly we will have spot on blood glucose values. Unfortunately this isn’t always the case. Blood glucose levels are affected by a variety of factors all of which cause our blood sugar to either increase, decrease or rollercoaster. Everyone is different, so what may cause my blood glucose to increase will cause another person’s to decrease or even stay the same. All this can be very confusing… never fear I am here to clarify some other factors that affect our blood sugar levels. ALCOHOL Alcohol can cause hypoglycaemia or low blood glucose levels directly after drinking and up to 24 hours therafter1,2,3,4, making it extremely difficult to manage blood glucose levels. Our liver maintains our blood glucose levels by releasing glucose into our blood stream2,3, however, when we drink alcohol, our liver is so busy breaking down the alcohol that it reduces the amount of glucose released, this leads to low sugar levels, particularly when drinking on an empty tummy2,3. Due to this fact, there are two important tips that you must follow when drinking: 1. Drink alcohol responsibly and in moderation1, 3 What is responsible moderation you may ask? Women should have no more than 1 unit of alcohol per day and men no more than two3. One unit is equal to a 340 ml beer, 125 ml of wine or 30 ml of distilled spirits (vodka, whiskey, gin, etc.)3. Rather choose light beer as it has less alcohol and calories than normal beer or add soda to your wine to make a wine spritzer. 2. Don’t drink on an empty stomach1,3 Make sure that you eat a car Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar & Stress

Blood Sugar & Stress

When stressed, the body prepares itself. Insulin levels fall, glucagon and epinephrine levels rise, and more glucose is available in the blood stream. Stress affects everyone… During stressful situations, epinephrine (adrenaline), glucagon, growth hormone and cortisol play a role in blood sugar levels. Stressful situations include infections, serious illness or significant emotion stress. What happens to my blood sugar levels when I’m stressed? When stressed, the body prepares itself by ensuring that enough sugar or energy is readily available. Insulin levels fall, glucagon and epinephrine (adrenaline) levels rise and more glucose is released from the liver. At the same time, growth hormone and cortisol levels rise, which causes body tissues (muscle and fat) to be less sensitive to insulin. As a result, more glucose is available in the blood stream. When you have type 1 diabetes… When you have type 1 diabetes, insulin reactions or low blood sugars are a common cause of stress. The hormonal response to a low blood sugar includes a rapid release of epinephrine (and glucagon for a year or so after diagnosis), followed by a slower release of cortisol and growth hormone. These hormonal responses to the low blood sugar may last for 6-8 hours – during that time the blood sugar may be difficult to control. The phenomena of a low blood sugar followed by a high blood sugar is called a “rebound” or “Somogyi” reaction. When you have type 1 diabetes, stress may make your blood sugar go up and become more difficult to control – and you may need to take higher doses of insulin. During times of stress, individuals with diabetes, may have more difficulty controlling their blood sugars. Self-assessment Quiz Self assessment quizzes are available for topics covered in thi Continue reading >>

Ketone Drink Could Help Diabetics By Lowering Blood Sugar

Ketone Drink Could Help Diabetics By Lowering Blood Sugar

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Ketone drink could help diabetics by lowering blood sugar For the first time it has been shown that drinking a ketone supplement can lower blood sugar levels, presenting a potential future method to control spikes in blood sugar experienced by diabetics. For the first time it has been shown that drinking a ketone supplement can lower blood sugar levels, presenting a potential future method to control spikes in blood sugar experienced by diabetics. Type 2 diabetes and obesity have reached epidemic proportions in the past few decades. These conditions are associated with high blood sugar, which can damage the vessels that supply blood to vital organs and can also increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. Although previous studies have shown that infusing ketones into the bloodstream can reduce blood sugar levels, this study, published in the Journal of Physiology, has shown that a ketone ester supplement can also lower blood sugar levels. Researchers at the University of British Columbia and University of Oxford have demonstrated that a single drink of ketone ester enables better control of blood sugar by reducing spikes in sugar levels. Twenty healthy individuals participated in the study and on two occasions consumed the ketone monoester supplement or a placebo after a 10-hour fast. Thirty minutes later they consumed a drink containing 75 grams of sugar (i.e., a standard oral glucose tolerance test). Blood samples were collected every 15-30 minutes throughout the entire 2.5 hours protocol for analyses of glucose, lipids, and hormones. Compared to the placebo, the blood sugar spike was reduced on the day that the individuals had consumed the ketone drink. It should be noted that this stud Continue reading >>

How Blood Sugar Affects Your Body

How Blood Sugar Affects Your Body

When you have diabetes, your blood sugar (glucose) levels may be consistently high. Over time, this can damage your body and lead to many other problems. How much sugar in the blood is too much? And why is high glucose so bad for you? Here’s a look at how your levels affect your health. They're less than 100 mg/dL after not eating (fasting) for at least 8 hours. And they're less than 140 mg/dL 2 hours after eating. During the day, levels tend to be at their lowest just before meals. For most people without diabetes, blood sugar levels before meals hover around 70 to 80 mg/dL. For some people, 60 is normal; for others, 90. What's a low sugar level? It varies widely, too. Many people's glucose won't ever fall below 60, even with prolonged fasting. When you diet or fast, the liver keeps your levels normal by turning fat and muscle into sugar. A few people's levels may fall somewhat lower. Doctors use these tests to find out if you have diabetes: Fasting plasma glucose test. The doctor tests your blood sugar levels after fasting for 8 hours and it’s higher than 126 mg/dL. Oral glucose tolerance test. After fasting for 8 hours, you get a special sugary drink. Two hours later your sugar level is higher than 200. Random check. The doctor tests your blood sugar and it’s higher than 200, plus you’re peeing more, always thirsty, and you’ve gained or lost a significant amount of weight. He’ll then do a fasting sugar level test or an oral glucose tolerance test to confirm the diagnosis. Any sugar levels higher than normal are unhealthy. Levels that are higher than normal, but not reaching the point of full-blown diabetes, are called prediabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association, 86 million people in the U.S. have this condition, which can lead to diabetes Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia And Low Blood Sugar | Symptoms And Causes

Hypoglycemia And Low Blood Sugar | Symptoms And Causes

What are the symptoms of hypoglycemia? While each child may experience symptoms of hypoglycemia differently, the most common include: shakiness dizziness sweating hunger headache irritability pale skin color sudden moodiness or behavior changes, such as crying for no apparent reason clumsy or jerky movements difficulty paying attention or confusion What causes hypoglycemia? The vast majority of episodes of hypoglycemia in children and adolescents occur when a child with diabetes takes too much insulin, eats too little, or exercises strenuously or for a prolonged period of time. For young children who do not have diabetes, hypoglycemia may be caused by: Single episodes: Stomach flu, or another illness that may cause them to not eat enough fasting for a prolonged period of time prolonged strenuous exercise and lack of food Recurrent episodes: accelerated starvation, also known as “ketotic hypoglycemia,” a tendency for children without diabetes, or any other known cause of hypoglycemia, to experience repeated hypoglycemic episodes. medications your child may be taking a congenital (present at birth) error in metabolism or unusual disorder such as hypopituitarism or hyperinsulinism. Continue reading >>

Exactly What I Ate To Get My Blood Sugar Under Control For Good

Exactly What I Ate To Get My Blood Sugar Under Control For Good

When Thomas Rupp was diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, he was stunned. Despite having a challenging career (he was working in corporate finance and for FEMA), he managed to exercise regularly, and he rarely ate fast food or sweets. Sure, he weighed 245 pounds, but at 6 feet tall that didn't seem so terrible. He didn't consider that his weight pushed his BMI into the obese category—and he didn't realize that many of the "healthy" foods he was eating were actually loaded with tons of sugar and calories. Rupp's doctor started him on four different medications. The side effects were bothersome, but what really kicked him into gear was learning that he'd need to start injecting himself with insulin nightly. Instead, he turned to the Diabetes Reversal Program at Tufts Medical Center, where he met with the founding director, Michael Dansinger, MD. They worked together to closely examine Rupp's diet and uncover pitfalls that Rupp had trouble spotting on his own. (You can control your blood sugar with food and without insulin by making healthy lifestyle changes. Try the easy plan in The Natural Way To Beat Diabetes.) For instance, while adding some cream and sugar to a cup of coffee might not be a big deal for some people, Rupp often downed 10 cups of coffee a day to power himself through long days in the office. (Here are 8 physical signs you drink way too much coffee.) And he was putting cream and sugar in each cup. "That's 10 containers of cream and 10 teaspoons of sugar a day I was adding to my diet," he says. And even though he worked out, "I was drinking green juices at the gym, or protein smoothies with mango, once again without realizing the sugar content." Other seemingly healthy choices—like salads—also concealed stealth sugar bombs. "I would add vinaigrette dressi Continue reading >>

How Resistance Training Affects Your Blood Sugar

How Resistance Training Affects Your Blood Sugar

If you regularly do cardio (like running, swimming, dancing etc.), you have probably noticed that your blood sugar reacts differently depending on the type of cardio. While steady-state cardio will usually make your blood sugar drop, interval training can make it increase (you can read why in this post). The same goes for resistance training. Some types of resistance training will make your blood sugars increase! In this post, I’ll talk about how different types of resistance training affects your blood sugar and the strategies you can try to proactively manage your blood sugar during and after resistance training. I absolutely love resistance training for three simple reasons: Resistance training makes me feel strong and empowered. Resistance training has helped me shape my body to my liking. Resistance training ultimately makes my diabetes easier to manage, as it improves my body’s ability to utilize insulin. Resistance training generally falls into two categories Low-rep (heavy) training with pauses between each set. High-rep training or supersets with little rest between sets. Your heart rate is elevated throughout the workout. Each type of resistance training will affect my blood sugar a little differently during my workouts but they both have the same long-term benefit of a significantly improved insulin sensitivity. How high-rep workouts affect my blood sugar In general, I need to be a little more careful and watch my sugars more closely if I do high rep workouts, supersets, or a lot of compound leg exercises (like squats, deadlifts, or lunges). These kinds of workouts will have a cardio-like (aerobic) impact on my blood sugar since my heart rate will be elevated for most of the session and I can expect my blood sugars to drop. I treat sessions like these alm Continue reading >>

Testing Your Blood Sugar

Testing Your Blood Sugar

David Kinshuck See the new glucose sensor here. These will soon be available on the NHS, November 2017. Sensors are highly recommended for all insulin users trying to keep good control of their diabetes. At present in October 17 for £30 a week, you can test your (interstitial) glucose levels, and this could really help insulin users. It does not measure the blood glucose, but it measures the glucose in the tissue fluid. Tissue fluid interstitial glucose takes 15 minutes to catch up with the blood glucose level, but this will not be a problem most of the time. See. If you live near Good Hope and would like to try a sensor free for 2 weeks only, please contact my (DK) secretary at Good Hope. Here is the evidence 27214060 27641781 But NICE recommends they are funded even at present see "CGM may be considered appropriate under the following situations: If having more than one severe hypo a year that’s brought on by no obviously preventable cause. A complete loss of hypo awareness. Frequent episodes of problematic hypos occurring without symptoms. If an extreme fear of hypoglycemia is causing problems or distress. If unable to achieve an HbA1c of under 75 mmol/mol (9%) despite testing blood sugar levels at least 10 a day. CGM use can be applied if the following factors also apply: [170] The intended user of the CGM is willing both to commit to using the CGM at least 70 per cent of the time and keep it regularly calibrated. The user is on multiple daily injections or insulin pump therapy. The health team providing the CGM has the expertise to advise on effective use of the CGM." Buying a glucose testing meter There are many new glucose testing meters. Your diabetes nurse will need to show you how to use these. For people with no fingers or very tender fingers there is a 'v Continue reading >>

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