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Blood Sugar 13

How Resistance Training Affects Your Blood Sugar

How Resistance Training Affects Your Blood Sugar

If you regularly do cardio (like running, swimming, dancing etc.), you have probably noticed that your blood sugar reacts differently depending on the type of cardio. While steady-state cardio will usually make your blood sugar drop, interval training can make it increase (you can read why in this post). The same goes for resistance training. Some types of resistance training will make your blood sugars increase! In this post, I’ll talk about how different types of resistance training affects your blood sugar and the strategies you can try to proactively manage your blood sugar during and after resistance training. I absolutely love resistance training for three simple reasons: Resistance training makes me feel strong and empowered. Resistance training has helped me shape my body to my liking. Resistance training ultimately makes my diabetes easier to manage, as it improves my body’s ability to utilize insulin. Resistance training generally falls into two categories Low-rep (heavy) training with pauses between each set. High-rep training or supersets with little rest between sets. Your heart rate is elevated throughout the workout. Each type of resistance training will affect my blood sugar a little differently during my workouts but they both have the same long-term benefit of a significantly improved insulin sensitivity. How high-rep workouts affect my blood sugar In general, I need to be a little more careful and watch my sugars more closely if I do high rep workouts, supersets, or a lot of compound leg exercises (like squats, deadlifts, or lunges). These kinds of workouts will have a cardio-like (aerobic) impact on my blood sugar since my heart rate will be elevated for most of the session and I can expect my blood sugars to drop. I treat sessions like these alm Continue reading >>

Ketone Drink Could Help Diabetics By Lowering Blood Sugar

Ketone Drink Could Help Diabetics By Lowering Blood Sugar

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Ketone drink could help diabetics by lowering blood sugar For the first time it has been shown that drinking a ketone supplement can lower blood sugar levels, presenting a potential future method to control spikes in blood sugar experienced by diabetics. For the first time it has been shown that drinking a ketone supplement can lower blood sugar levels, presenting a potential future method to control spikes in blood sugar experienced by diabetics. Type 2 diabetes and obesity have reached epidemic proportions in the past few decades. These conditions are associated with high blood sugar, which can damage the vessels that supply blood to vital organs and can also increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. Although previous studies have shown that infusing ketones into the bloodstream can reduce blood sugar levels, this study, published in the Journal of Physiology, has shown that a ketone ester supplement can also lower blood sugar levels. Researchers at the University of British Columbia and University of Oxford have demonstrated that a single drink of ketone ester enables better control of blood sugar by reducing spikes in sugar levels. Twenty healthy individuals participated in the study and on two occasions consumed the ketone monoester supplement or a placebo after a 10-hour fast. Thirty minutes later they consumed a drink containing 75 grams of sugar (i.e., a standard oral glucose tolerance test). Blood samples were collected every 15-30 minutes throughout the entire 2.5 hours protocol for analyses of glucose, lipids, and hormones. Compared to the placebo, the blood sugar spike was reduced on the day that the individuals had consumed the ketone drink. It should be noted that this stud Continue reading >>

Controlling Blood Sugar May Be Easier Than You Think

Controlling Blood Sugar May Be Easier Than You Think

Share Controlling Blood Sugar May Be Easier Than You Think on Pinterest PORTLAND, Ore. People with diabetes who took their medications at least 80 percent of the time, as well as people who exercised four or more times per week were at lower risk for poorly controlled blood sugar, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Pharmacy Benefits. The study also found that people who were clinically obese were at higher risk for poorly controlled blood sugar. Poorly controlled blood sugar can lead to complications including kidney disease, retinal damage, heart disease, hospitalization and death, according to the American Diabetes Association. The ADA estimates that about 29 million Americans have diabetes , and according to the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 21 percent of adults with diabetes have poorly controlled blood sugar. The study, which included nearly 20,000 patients from Kaiser Permanente in Oregon and Southwest Washington, is novel because researchers were able to track medication adherence using Kaiser Permanentes unique electronic health record system, which includes pharmacy refill data. Many prior studies relied on asking patients if they took their medications, which is less reliable than their medical records. Nearly 30 million Americans have diabetes and many of them have poorly controlled blood sugar, which can lead to severe complications, including death.In this video , learn about a new study that reveals three factors associated with better blood sugar. Our physicians can look at a patients electronic medical record and quickly see how often patients are refilling their diabetes, cholesterol and blood pressure medications. If patients are refilling medications when theyre supposed to, theyre also likely taking the Continue reading >>

Suppress Deadly After-meal Blood Sugar Surges

Suppress Deadly After-meal Blood Sugar Surges

High blood sugar is fast becoming the leading preventable killer of maturing individuals in the United States. In addition to the 26 million Americans with diabetes, the Centers for Disease Control estimate that more than a third of the general population is now pre-diabetic.1 This may be just the tip of the iceberg. As Life Extension® members know, recent data confirm that risk for most degenerative diseases and death rise dramatically when fasting blood glucose exceeds 85 mg/dL.2 Yet the medical establishment persists in defining readings up to 99 mg/dL as "safe." By this measure, virtually all of us are vulnerable to diabetic complications. Even more alarming is widespread physician ignorance of the stealth danger posed by blood sugar surges after meals that can reach diabetic levels and last for hours—or even days. These after-meal glucose "spikes" inflict silent damage to cells via multiple mechanisms and have been linked to cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease, kidney failure,and retinal damage.3-16 The good news is there are documented ways to suppress deadly after-meal glucose surges. The most recent is a green coffee bean extract shown to neutralize a key enzyme that facilitates after-meal glucose surges. When tested on humans in a placebo-controlled study, this natural extract produced an extraordinary 24% drop in after-meal blood sugar in just 30 minutes!17 Silent Epidemic of High Blood Sugar The percentage of adults suffering from dangerous, chronically high blood sugar has been vastly underestimated. Currently, you aren’t considered diabetic unless your fasting blood glucose is higher than 125 mg/dL. The range from 100-125 mg/dL is considered "pre-diabetic," while anything lower is defined as normal. Unfortunately, your risk for age-re Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia, also known as low blood sugar, is when blood sugar decreases to below normal levels.[1] This may result in a variety of symptoms including clumsiness, trouble talking, confusion, loss of consciousness, seizures, or death.[1] A feeling of hunger, sweating, shakiness, and weakness may also be present.[1] Symptoms typically come on quickly.[1] The most common cause of hypoglycemia is medications used to treat diabetes mellitus such as insulin and sulfonylureas.[2][3] Risk is greater in diabetics who have eaten less than usual, exercised more than usual, or have drunk alcohol.[1] Other causes of hypoglycemia include kidney failure, certain tumors, such as insulinoma, liver disease, hypothyroidism, starvation, inborn error of metabolism, severe infections, reactive hypoglycemia, and a number of drugs including alcohol.[1][3] Low blood sugar may occur in otherwise healthy babies who have not eaten for a few hours.[4] The glucose level that defines hypoglycemia is variable.[1] In people with diabetes levels below 3.9 mmol/L (70 mg/dL) is diagnostic.[1] In adults without diabetes, symptoms related to low blood sugar, low blood sugar at the time of symptoms, and improvement when blood sugar is restored to normal confirm the diagnosis.[5] Otherwise a level below 2.8 mmol/L (50 mg/dL) after not eating or following exercise may be used.[1] In newborns a level below 2.2 mmol/L (40 mg/dL) or less than 3.3 mmol/L (60 mg/dL) if symptoms are present indicates hypoglycemia.[4] Other tests that may be useful in determining the cause include insulin and C peptide levels in the blood.[3] Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) is the opposite condition. Among people with diabetes, prevention is by matching the foods eaten with the amount of exercise and the medications used.[1] When Continue reading >>

42 Factors That Affect Blood Glucose?! A Surprising Update

42 Factors That Affect Blood Glucose?! A Surprising Update

42 Factors That Affect Blood Glucose?! A Surprising Update Adding 20 new factors, a whole new category on behavior and decisions, and research on unexpected things that impact blood sugar and diabetes. A printable, colorful PDF version of this article can be found here . Ever heard someone explain diabetes with a frustrating level of simplicity? Youll have on-target blood sugars as long as you eat right, exercise, and take your medicine." If only it were that easy, and if only vague advice was all we needed to hear. One of our missions in diaTribe and in this column has been to debunk this myth. Of all the topics Ive covered in Adams Corner, one article has resonated with readers more than any other: How many factors actually affect blood glucose? Since its publication in 2014 , over 400,000 people have viewed that initial list of 22 factors quadruple the next most-viewed column ( Low Carb vs. High Carb ). Why has it been so popular? I think the 22 factors really speak to the complexity of living with diabetes: even if I eat right, exercise, and take my medication, there are so many blood-sugar-related variables in play at any given time. Plus, all these factors interact in infinitely complicated ways: What happens to my blood glucose after five hours of sleep, a low-carb breakfast, lots of exercise, high stress, and a big cup of coffee? I bring this up because its the 150th issue of diaTribe, and Ive often thought about what I would add to that list of 22 factors if I were to revisit the article especially given all Ive learned since then from so many people with diabetes, healthcare providers, and scientists. This article expands on the original sharing 20 additional factors and a whole new category of factors to consider. See the complete list of 42 factors below, f Continue reading >>

What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level

What Is Normal Blood Sugar Level

The blood sugar concentration or blood glucose level is the amount of glucose (sugar) present in the blood of a human or an animal. The body naturally tightly regulates blood glucose levels (with the help of insulin that is secreted by pancreas) as a part of metabolic homeostasis. If blood sugar levels are either increased or decreased by a greater margin than expected this might indicate a medical condition. Diabetic patients must monitor their blood sugar levels as body’s inability to properly utilize and / or produce insulin can pose a serious threat to their health. Navigation: Definition: What is blood sugar? What is diabetes? Diagnosis: Diabetes symptoms Levels and indication Normal blood sugar levels Low blood sugar levels High blood sugar levels Managing: How to lower blood sugar level? Children blood sugar levels Blood sugar levels chart Checking for BS: How to check blood sugar? Treatment: How to lower blood sugar level? Can diabetes be cured? Accessories Diabetic Socks Diabetic Shoes What is blood sugar? What does it mean when someone refers to blood sugar level in your body? Blood sugar level (or blood sugar concentration) is the amount of glucose (a source of energy) present in your blood at any given time. A normal blood glucose level for a healthy person is somewhere between 72 mg/dL (3.8 to 4 mmol/L) and 108 mg/dL (5.8 to 6 mmol/L). It, of course, depends on every individual alone. Blood sugar levels might fluctuate due to other reasons (such as exercise, stress and infection). Typically blood sugar level in humans is around 72 mg/dL (or 4 mmol/L). After a meal the blood sugar level may increase temporarily up to 140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L). This is normal. A blood sugar level between 72 mg/dL (4 mmol/L) and 108 mg/dL (6 mmol/L) is considered normal for a h Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level 13 After Not Eating For 2 Days

Blood Sugar Level 13 After Not Eating For 2 Days

blood sugar level 13 after not eating for 2 days New Member just been diagnosed - all advice welcome blood sugar level 13 after not eating for 2 days i have recently introduced myself, and am now looking for some clarity. for those who dont know what happened a few weeks ago, i shall quickly explain, had extreme stomach pain for 2 weeks and had to go to A&E/ER they didnt bother to do any investigation other than a water sample and a blood sample and then send me home with pain killers. went to dr, who then said, need to do a test for d2 as trace of sugar and blood in water and blood sugar 13. but this test (fasting and then sweet drink and waiting for 2 hrs for another blood test) isnt being done for another 3 weeks - so I dont understand why they are scaring me to the point i feel like i am going to go into a coma. until going to A&E/ER there had never been any suggestion of d2, now all of a sudden i'm in d2 land. anyway today had a scan and found out i have an infected stomach from an infected gall bladder with a 2.4cm gallstone - hence the agony for 2 weeks and not being able to eat. what i need to know is this - if i haven't been able to eat much, other than to stay alive - yoghurt, toast, soup and only one of these a day because soon as i ate the gallbladder attack would start again. Is (lack of eating ) a reason for having a blood trace of 13 ? I am so confused, I felt fine until gallbladder became a new thing, now I have an infection so am sweating, dizzy and taking anti biotics and strong pain relief and antiacids (which I have now heard can give false b/sugar reading as they destroy insulin). so I am literally poop scared ( though totally constipated from all this medication) and freaking out, looking for any sign of a coma because the dr's have scared me stup Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia And Low Blood Sugar | Symptoms And Causes

Hypoglycemia And Low Blood Sugar | Symptoms And Causes

What are the symptoms of hypoglycemia? While each child may experience symptoms of hypoglycemia differently, the most common include: shakiness dizziness sweating hunger headache irritability pale skin color sudden moodiness or behavior changes, such as crying for no apparent reason clumsy or jerky movements difficulty paying attention or confusion What causes hypoglycemia? The vast majority of episodes of hypoglycemia in children and adolescents occur when a child with diabetes takes too much insulin, eats too little, or exercises strenuously or for a prolonged period of time. For young children who do not have diabetes, hypoglycemia may be caused by: Single episodes: Stomach flu, or another illness that may cause them to not eat enough fasting for a prolonged period of time prolonged strenuous exercise and lack of food Recurrent episodes: accelerated starvation, also known as “ketotic hypoglycemia,” a tendency for children without diabetes, or any other known cause of hypoglycemia, to experience repeated hypoglycemic episodes. medications your child may be taking a congenital (present at birth) error in metabolism or unusual disorder such as hypopituitarism or hyperinsulinism. Continue reading >>

What’s A Normal Blood Glucose Level?

What’s A Normal Blood Glucose Level?

I have Type 2 diabetes, and five months ago I started on insulin in minimal doses, which were gradually increased. Although I eat the same things and do the same amount of exercise, my blood glucose varies from 14 to 4mmol/l and I can't explain why. What's the normal blood glucose I should be aiming for and why does mine fluctuate so widely? A 'normal' blood glucose level is below 10mmol/l, though sometimes the doctor might want to try and keep it under 8mmol/l. Fourteen isn't a disaster, but it would be better if it never went higher than 10mmol/l. Lots of things influence sugar levels, but primarily they are affected by the food you eat and the activities you undertake – all kinds of activities from walking to housework to exercise. Although you say you broadly keep to the same diet and exercise, in reality both of these will fluctuate quite a lot. One suggestion is to try to keep a more accurate food and exercise diary with specific times noted along with your blood sugar level. Do this in as much detail as possible, eg every 30 minutes or so throughout the day, and do it for at least two weeks. This will give you an objective record that you can examine for clues about what influences your blood sugar level. Yours sincerely The NetDoctor Medical Team Other Qs & As Last updated 03.04.2011 Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms: Plant-based Diet Is Better For Controlling Blood Sugar And Weight Loss | Express.co.uk

Diabetes Symptoms: Plant-based Diet Is Better For Controlling Blood Sugar And Weight Loss | Express.co.uk

Diabetes diet: It's traditionally low in sugar, carbs and fat Many people with type 2 diabetes are overweight or obese. This tends to be because being overweight or obese raises the risk of type 2 diabetes in the first place, and high blood sugar - the hallmark of diabetes - can lead to weight gain. However, slimming down to a healthy weight could help make the condition better. Dr Hana Kahleova, director of clinical research at the non-profit Physicians Committee, said: Losing muscle fat increases insulin sensitivity. Weight loss: Slimming down can help diabetics control symptoms By taking extra fat out of the muscle cells, we're letting insulin back in to convert sugar into energy. By taking extra fat out of the muscle cells, we're letting insulin back in to convert sugar into energy. Dr Kahleova was the lead study author in new research, published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition, which discovered a plant-based diet was better for diabetics than the traditional one they are normally recommended. This was because it lead to greater slimming results compared to a calorie-equivalent diabetes diet. Indeed, it resulted in double the weight loss. Diabetes is a common life-long health condition. There are 3.5 million people diagnosed with diabetes in the UK and an estimated 500,000 who are living undiagnosed with the condition A classic symptom of diabetes can lead to rapid weight loss Plant-based diet: New research says it's more effective In the study, a group of 74 adults with type 2 diabetes adopted a 500-calorie reduced diet for a period of six months - half ate vegetarian and the other half stuck to a regular diabetes diet. Those in the former group lost an average of 13.67 pounds, while the latter group shed 7.05 pounds. This was despite both cons Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugar Symptoms: How High Blood Sugar Affects The Body - Health

High Blood Sugar Symptoms: How High Blood Sugar Affects The Body - Health

Glucose, or sugar, is the fuel that powers cells throughout the body. Blood levels of this energy source ebb and flow naturally, depending what you eat (and how much), as well as when you eat it. But when something goes wrongand cells aren't absorbing the glucosethe resulting high blood sugar damages nerves, blood vessels, and organs, setting the stage for dangerous complications. Normal blood-sugar readings typically fall between 60 mg/dl and 140 mg/dl. A blood test called a hemoglobin A1c measures average blood sugar levels over the previous three months. A normal reading is below 5.7% for people without diabetes . An excess of glucose in the bloodstream, or hyperglycemia, is a sign of diabetes. People with type 1 diabetes dont make insulin, the hormone needed to ferry sugar from the bloodstream into cells. Type 2 diabetes means your body doesnt use insulin properly and you can end up with too much or too little insulin. Either way, without proper treatment, toxic amounts of sugar can build up in the bloodstream, wreaking havoc head to toe. Thats why its so important to get your blood sugar levels in check. If you keep glucose levels near normal, you reduce the risk of diabetes complications, says Robert Ratner, MD, chief scientific and medical officer of the American Diabetes Association. Heres a rundown of the major complications and symptoms of high blood sugar. Often, high blood sugar causes no (obvious) symptoms at all, at least at first. About 29 million people in the U.S. have diabetes, but one in four has no idea. Another 86 million have higher-than-normal blood sugar levels, but not high enough to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes . That's why its a good idea to get your blood sugar tested if you are at risk for diabetes. That includes people who are overwei Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 13, How Bad Is This? | Yahoo Answers

Blood Sugar 13, How Bad Is This? | Yahoo Answers

It depends on what measurement system you are using and when the test was done.If you are in the uk and using mmol/L then it is slightly high as a diabetic we are told to keep the level below 10 If you have just eaten with in the last hour or so then that may be why it is high but with no details no one can say how bad it is. If it is a one of high reading and the rest of your readings are between 4- 8 then it is not to bad. If you have tested it because you are concerned you may be diabetic then go to your doctor as soon as possible because it is not good to have that kind of level for long periods. I'll base it on UK, because if it's the USA you'd be unconcious right now. First of all, why and when did you test. That can make a... show more I'll base it on UK, because if it's the USA you'd be unconcious right now. First of all, why and when did you test. That can make a difference. Are you thirsty, blurry eyesight, any other symptoms? Was it 1/2 an hour after eating a whole load of candy? Did you thoroughly wash your hands before? If you had some coke on your finger, or some sweet residue that can affect it a lot. Make sure you do the test correctly before paying attention to any of the results. A normal reading in the UK is 4 - 8. Any lower than 4 and most people feel hypo, any higher than 8 for a while is bad. Anything over 20 requires immediate medical attention. The real problem would be is it like this all the time, or just once in a blue moon. You need to go and see your doctor, and tell him what happened. Get a long term blood test, and a fasting glucose tolerance test done. Don't worry until you know what's actually happening. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar & Stress

Blood Sugar & Stress

When stressed, the body prepares itself. Insulin levels fall, glucagon and epinephrine levels rise, and more glucose is available in the blood stream. Stress affects everyone… During stressful situations, epinephrine (adrenaline), glucagon, growth hormone and cortisol play a role in blood sugar levels. Stressful situations include infections, serious illness or significant emotion stress. What happens to my blood sugar levels when I’m stressed? When stressed, the body prepares itself by ensuring that enough sugar or energy is readily available. Insulin levels fall, glucagon and epinephrine (adrenaline) levels rise and more glucose is released from the liver. At the same time, growth hormone and cortisol levels rise, which causes body tissues (muscle and fat) to be less sensitive to insulin. As a result, more glucose is available in the blood stream. When you have type 1 diabetes… When you have type 1 diabetes, insulin reactions or low blood sugars are a common cause of stress. The hormonal response to a low blood sugar includes a rapid release of epinephrine (and glucagon for a year or so after diagnosis), followed by a slower release of cortisol and growth hormone. These hormonal responses to the low blood sugar may last for 6-8 hours – during that time the blood sugar may be difficult to control. The phenomena of a low blood sugar followed by a high blood sugar is called a “rebound” or “Somogyi” reaction. When you have type 1 diabetes, stress may make your blood sugar go up and become more difficult to control – and you may need to take higher doses of insulin. During times of stress, individuals with diabetes, may have more difficulty controlling their blood sugars. Self-assessment Quiz Self assessment quizzes are available for topics covered in thi Continue reading >>

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia In Childhood

Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia In Childhood

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What is non-diabetic hypoglycemia? Non-diabetic hypoglycemia is a condition that causes your child's blood glucose (sugar) level to drop too low. This type of low blood sugar level can happen in children who do not have diabetes. When your child's blood sugar level drops too low, his brain cells and muscles do not have enough energy to work well. Glucose is also important for helping your child's brain grow normally. What causes non-diabetic hypoglycemia in children? The cause of non-diabetic hypoglycemia may be unknown. It may be caused by certain medical conditions. These include hyperinsulinism (your child's body makes too much insulin), hypothyroidism, or prediabetes. It may also be caused by fasting, which can lead to ketotic hypoglycemia. This is a condition that causes the body to change fats into glucose for energy. What are the signs and symptoms of non-diabetic hypoglycemia in children? Hunger or nausea Sweating more than usual Anxiety, confusion, or changes in behavior Fast heartbeat Weakness Blurred vision Dizziness or lightheadedness Headache How is non-diabetic hypoglycemia in children diagnosed? Healthcare providers will ask about your child's symptoms and your family's health. They may ask you about the amount of time between your child's last meal and the start of his symptoms. They may also ask if any other children in your family have hypoglycemia, or have had it in the past. Blood tests are done to measure your child's blood sugar levels. These tests may also be done to find the cause of your child's hypoglycemia. Fasting tests may be done. Healthcare providers watch your child closely during a period of time in which he does not eat. This test is done to see if, and when hypoglycemia occurs. An oral glucose tolerance test may Continue reading >>

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