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Blood Sugar 126 Fasting

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

When Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 1)

In the next two articles we’re going to discuss the concept of “normal” blood sugar. I say concept and put normal in quotation marks because what passes for normal in mainstream medicine turns out to be anything but normal if optimal health and function are what you’re interested in. Here’s the thing. We’ve confused normal with common. Just because something is common, doesn’t mean it’s normal. It’s now becoming common for kids to be overweight and diabetic because they eat nothing but refined flour, high-fructose corn syrup and industrial seed oils. Yet I don’t think anyone (even the ADA) would argue that being fat and metabolically deranged is even remotely close to normal for kids. Or adults, for that matter. In the same way, the guidelines the so-called authorities like the ADA have set for normal blood sugar may be common, but they’re certainly not normal. Unless you think it’s normal for people to develop diabetic complications like neuropathy, retinopathy and cardiovascular disease as they age, and spend the last several years of their lives in hospitals or assisted living facilities. Common, but not normal. In this article I’m going to introduce the three markers we use to measure blood sugar, and tell you what the conventional model thinks is normal for those markers. In the next article, I’m going to show you what the research says is normal for healthy people. And I’m also going to show you that so-called normal blood sugar, as dictated by the ADA, can double your risk of heart disease and lead to all kinds of complications down the road. The 3 ways blood sugar is measured Fasting blood glucose This is still the most common marker used in clinical settings, and is often the only one that gets tested. The fasting blood glucose Continue reading >>

What Is A Fasting Blood Sugar Or Fasting Glucose Level?

What Is A Fasting Blood Sugar Or Fasting Glucose Level?

A fasting blood sugar (FBS) level is the result of a blood sample taken after a patient fasts for at least eight hours. A normal fasting blood sugar level for someone without diabetes is less than 100 mg/dL, or HbA1C below 5.7%. Prediabetes is a fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 mg/dL, or HbA1C of 5.7%-6.4%. Diabetes is a fasting blood sugar level of 126 mg/dL and above, or HbA1C of 6.5% or higher. Source: Continue reading >>

Fasting Blood Sugar Levels

Fasting Blood Sugar Levels

Tweet Fasting, as the name suggests, means refraining from eating of drinking any liquids other than water for eight hours. It is used as a test for diabetes. After fasting, a carbohydrate metabolism test is conducted which measures blood glucose levels. Glucagon during fasting When fasting the hormone glucagon is stimulated and this increases plasma glucose levels in the body. If a patient doesn’t have diabetes, their body will produce insulin to rebalance the increased glucose levels. However people with diabetes either don’t produce enough insulin to rebalance their blood sugar (typically in type 1 diabetes) or their body is not able to use the insulin effectively enough (typical of type 2 diabetes). Consequently when blood glucose levels are tested, people with diabetes will have blood sugar levels significantly higher than people who do not have diabetes. What is the fasting blood sugar test used for? The fasting blood sugar test is also used to test the effectiveness of different medication or dietary changes on people already diagnosed as diabetic. Fasting tests The fasting test should be conducted on two separate occasions to ensure consistent results and in order to avoid a false diagnosis. This is the case as increased blood glucose levels may be as a result of Cushing’s syndrome liver or kidney disease, eclampsia and pancreatitis. However many of these conditions are often picked up in lab diagnostic tests. Fasting test results The results of a fasting test with respect to glucose levels in the body are as follows: Normal: 3.9 to 5.5 mmols/l (70 to 100 mg/dl) Prediabetes or Impaired Glucose Tolerance: 5.6 to 7.0 mmol/l (101 to 126 mg/dl) Diagnosis of diabetes: more than 7.0 mmol/l (126 mg/dl) The American Diabetes Association reduced the level of diagno Continue reading >>

What Are “normal” Blood Sugar Levels?

What Are “normal” Blood Sugar Levels?

Physicians focus so much ondisease that we sometimes lose sight of what’s healthy and normal. For instance, the American Diabetes Association defines “tight” control of diabetes to include sugar levels as high as 179 mg/dl (9.94 mmol/l) when measured two hours after a meal. In contrast, young adults without diabetes two hours after a meal are usually in the range of 90 to 110 mg/dl (5.00–6.11 mmol/l). What are Normal Blood Sugar Levels? The following numbers refer to average blood sugar (glucose) levels in venous plasma, as measured in a lab. Portable home glucose meters measure sugar in capillary whole blood. Many, but not all, meters in 2010 are calibrated to compare directly to venous plasma levels. Fasting blood sugar after a night of sleep and before breakfast: 85 mg/dl (4.72 mmol/l) One hour after a meal: 110 mg/dl (6.11 mmol/l) Two hours after a meal: 95 mg/dl (5.28 mmol/l) Five hours after a meal: 85 mg/dl (4.72 mmol/l) (The aforementioned meal derives 50–55% of its energy from carbohydrate.) Ranges of blood sugar for healthy non-diabetic adults: Fasting blood sugar: 70–90 mg/dl (3.89–5.00 mmol/l) One hour after a typical meal: 90–125 mg/dl (5.00–6.94 mmol/l) Two hours after a typical meal: 90–110 mg/dl (5.00–6.11 mmol/l) Five hours after a typical meal: 70–90 mg/dl (3.89–5.00 mmol/l) * Blood sugars tend to be a bit lower in pregnant women. What Level of Blood Sugar Defines Diabetes and Prediabetes? According to the 2007 guidelines issued by the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists: Pre-diabetes: (or impaired fasting glucose): fasting blood sugar 100–125 mg/dl (5.56–6.94 mmol/l) Pre-diabetes: (or impaired glucose tolerance): blood sugar 140–199 mg/dl (7.78–11.06 mmol/l) two hours after ingesting 75 grams of glucose Continue reading >>

Diagnosing Diabetes

Diagnosing Diabetes

In diagnosing diabetes, physicians primarily depend upon the results of specific glucose tests. However, test results are just part of the information that goes into the diagnosis of type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Doctors also take into account your physical exam, presence or absence of symptoms, and medical history. Some people who are significantly ill will have transient problems with elevated blood sugars, which will then return to normal after the illness has resolved. Also, some medications may alter your blood glucose levels (most commonly steroids and certain diuretics, such as water pills). The 2 main tests used to measure the presence of blood sugar problems are the direct measurement of glucose levels in the blood during an overnight fast and measurement of the body's ability to appropriately handle the excess sugar presented after drinking a high glucose drink. Fasting Blood Glucose (Blood Sugar) Level A value above 126 mg/dL on at least 2 occasions typically means a person has diabetes. The Oral Glucose Tolerance Test An oral glucose tolerance test is one that can be performed in a doctor's office or a lab. The person being tested starts the test in a fasting state (having no food or drink except water for at least 10 hours but not greater than 16 hours). An initial blood sugar is drawn and then the person is given a "glucola" bottle with a high amount of sugar in it (75 grams of glucose or 100 grams for pregnant women). The person then has their blood tested again 30 minutes, 1 hour, 2 hours, and 3 hours after drinking the high glucose drink. For the test to give reliable results, you must be in good health (not have any other illnesses, not even a cold). Also, you should be normally active (for example, not lying down or confined to a bed like a patient in a Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

Hyperglycemia (high Blood Sugar)

What Is Hyperglycemia? Hyperglycemia may be described as an excess of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Your endocrine system regulates the amount of sugar that is stored and used for energy. It is important in brain cell function, and energy levels. Since the sugar that you consume in your diet is either used or stored, certain conditions and disorders may cause you to have difficulty processing and storing blood glucose, resulting in hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia. One hormone that is important to the normal storing and processing of sugar is insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is made in the pancreas that is responsible for maintaining "normal" blood sugar levels. If you have a problem with your pancreas, then you may have increased blood sugar levels. Normal blood Glucose (sugar) levels are 60-110 mg/dL. Normal values may vary from laboratory to laboratory. Levels higher than these might indicate hyperglycemia. Causes of Hyperglycemia: Diabetes. About 90% of people with diabetes, have diabetes of adult onset (Diabetes type 2). You are more at risk for developing diabetes if you are older, extremely overweight (obese), if you have a family history of diabetes (parents, siblings), and if you are of African-American, Hispanic American, or Native-American heritage. People who have diabetes have an underproduction of the hormone, insulin, which lowers your blood sugar levels. If you have diabetes, you will have problems with elevated blood sugar levels. If you develop diabetes type 2, and you are an adult, your healthcare provider may prescribe medications in a pill form, which allow your body to process insulin that is needed for maintaining "normal" blood glucose levels. It is likely that your pancreas is producing enough insulin, but your body is resistant to the insulin, a Continue reading >>

What Are The Ideal Levels Of Blood Sugar?

What Are The Ideal Levels Of Blood Sugar?

A blood sugar or blood glucose chart identifies ideal blood sugar levels throughout the day, including before and after meals. Doctors use blood sugar charts to set target goals and monitor diabetes treatment plans. Blood sugar charts also help those with diabetes assess and self-monitor blood sugar test results. What is a blood sugar chart? Blood sugar charts act as a reference guide for blood sugar test results. As such, blood sugar charts are important tools for diabetes management. Most diabetes treatment plans involve keeping blood sugar levels as close to normal or target goals as possible. This requires frequent at-home and doctor-ordered testing, along with an understanding of how results compare to target levels. To help interpret and assess blood sugar results, the charts outline normal and abnormal blood sugar levels for those with and without diabetes. In the United States, blood sugar charts typically report sugar levels in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). In the United Kingdom and many other countries, blood sugar is reported in millimoles per liter (mmol/L). A1C blood sugar recommendations are frequently included in blood sugar charts. A1C results are often described as both a percentage and an average blood sugar level in mg/dL. An A1C test measures the average sugar levels over a 3-month period, which gives a wider insight into a person's overall management of their blood sugar levels. Blood sugar chart guidelines Appropriate blood sugar levels vary throughout the day and from person to person. Blood sugars are often lowest before breakfast and in the lead up to meals. Blood sugars are often highest in the hours following meals. People with diabetes will often have higher blood sugar targets or acceptable ranges than those without the condition. These Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level During Pregnancy: What’s Considered Normal?

Blood Sugar Level During Pregnancy: What’s Considered Normal?

Changes in hormone levels during pregnancy cause your body to change, and you might find yourself falling prey to illnesses more easily. The blood running through your body carry these hormones – so changes arise in them easily as well. Let’s look at blood sugar levels during pregnancy: What is gestational diabetes, what are the risks and what should you do if you have a high blood sugar level? Blood sugar level during pregnancy: Does “high” mean gestational diabetes? Blood sugar level refers to the glucose in the blood. According to the American Diabetes Association, one is considered diabetic when a fasting plasma glucose level of more than 126 mg/dL (7.0 mmol/l) or a casual plasma glucose level of more than 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/l).1 If you’re at risk of getting gestational diabetes, your OB-GYN might recommend that you take a glucose screening test to check your glucose level in Week 24 of pregnancy. A blood sugar level of about 130 to 140mg/dL is considered high, and a level of more than 200 mg/dL means there is a high possibility that you have gestational diabetes.2 The effects of hormones on your blood during pregnancy cause sugar levels to go higher than pre-pregnancy sugar levels. Although gestational diabetes can be an indication of a slight metabolic disorder, once the pregnancy ends, blood levels in such cases usually return to normal without the need for medical intervention. Why do pregnant women have high blood glucose levels during pregnancy? What makes blood sugar levels in your body drop? Insulin is the key hormone that does so. When levels of insulin decrease during pregnancy, blood sugar levels does not drop because of not enough insulin is secreted to metabolize the glucose in the blood. During pregnancy, your insulin levels decrease becaus Continue reading >>

Normal Range Of Blood Glucose Level For Women

Normal Range Of Blood Glucose Level For Women

Your cells require glucose, a simple sugar, to keep your heart beating, your muscles pumping, and otherwise support everything your body does. You obtain glucose from the carbohydrates you eat; even complex carbohydrates can be broken down to simple sugars. The normal range of blood glucose for women depends on how much she ate and when. High blood sugar can be harmful to your health by stressing your kidneys and nervous system, and is used to diagnose diabetes mellitus. Health care providers use a variety of laboratory tests to check blood sugar levels, some that require fasting for up to 12 hours before the blood is drawn. Blood glucose levels that are too high suggest insufficient insulin production, reduced insulin sensitivity, or a combination of the two. Video of the Day Your cells need glucose to make the energy that keeps your heart beating and your muscles warm. Your cells require insulin, a hormone secreted by your pancreas, to help move glucose from your bloodstream across the cell membrane. Abnormally high blood sugar, also known as hyperglycemia, may indicate that the pancreas is not producing enough insulin, your cells are not sensitive to insulin, or a combination of the two. Fasting Blood Glucose Levels The most common test for blood sugar is the fasting plasma or blood glucose test, or FBG. For an accurate reading, it is necessary to fast starting at midnight the day that your blood is drawn. A normal fasting blood glucose level for women is the same as that for a man, ranging from 60 to 110 mg/dL. A person with a fasting blood glucose level of 115 to 125 mg/dL may have a condition known as impaired fasting glucose or "prediabetes." A fasting blood glucose level of 126 mg/dL or greater on at least two occasions diagnoses diabetes mellitus. Health care p Continue reading >>

Overview Of Diabetes

Overview Of Diabetes

Diagnosis The biochemical hallmark of diabetes is elevated blood glucose. Therefore, diagnosis of diabetes is made by estimation of glucose concentrations in the blood. When the fasting plasma glucose is ≥ 126 mg/dl or random blood glucose ≥ 200 mg/dl on more than one occasion.1 Fasting Plasma Glucose: Elevated fasting plasma glucose is always regarded to have a high degree of specificity for the diagnosis of diabetes. It is more consistent and reproducible than postprandial plasma glucose because there are more variable in the latter, such as timing and carbohydrate load. FPG may be easier to control with medications than PPG. An overnight fasting for 8 – 12 hours is considered desirable. The ADA and WHO have recommended FPG value of ≥ 126 mg/dl as the diagnostic value for diabetes and the value of 110 – 125 mg/dl have been termed as impaired fasting glucose which is a prediabetic stage.1 Postprandial Blood Glucose: The word postprandial means after a meal and hence it refers to plasma glucose concentration after food intake. The optimal time to measure postprandial glucose concentrations is 2 hr after the start of a meal. An elevated PPG concentration is one of the earliest abnormalities of type 2 diabetes, and represents an independent risk for cardiovascular disease. Postprandial changes precipitate atherosclerosis before FPG concentrations are affected. The recommended PPG goal of treatment is a value of <160mg/dl. Oral Glucose Tolerance Test It is recommended for diagnosis/exclusion for diabetes. The Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) is done in the morning after 8-10hrs of overnight fast (water may be taken). A fasting blood sample should be taken before giving glucose load. The person then drinks 75gm of glucose in 250-300 ml of water (the glucose load Continue reading >>

Prediabetes (impaired Glucose Tolerance)

Prediabetes (impaired Glucose Tolerance)

Pre-diabetes (previously called Impaired Glucose Tolerance IGT) was first named in 2003 and is designed to foster attention and action in people who receive this diagnosis. It is defined as having a blood glucose level that is higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. The cutoff for pre-diabetes is a fasting blood sugar of 100 mg/dl. Fasting levels between 100 and 126 mg/dl are diagnosed as pre-diabetes and a fasting level of 126 mg/dl and up is diabetes. The other determiner of pre-diabetes is a blood sugar level two hours after eating carbs of 140 to 199 mg/dl. A blood sugar under 140 mg/dl is considered normal and one 200mg/dl and over is considered diabetes. Early diagnosis is important. In the early years of pre-diabetes or diabetes, the beta cells are progressively damaged by high blood sugars.Usually by the time diabetes is diagnosed, half of the beta cells are nonfunctional. This can not be reversed so that the beta cells can go back to insulin production. When an early diagnosis of pre-diabetes is made, almost 100 percent of beta cells are functional. If lifestyle changes are made and some diabetes medications are used right away, many beta cells will stay healthy and make blood sugar control easier Criteria for Diagnosing Prediabetes and Diabetes Fasting BG BG 2 Hours After High Carbs Normal 70-99 mg/dl < 140 mg/dl Prediabetes 100-125 mg/dl 140-199 mg/dl Diabetes ≥ 126 mg/dl ≥ 200 mg/dl An estimated 20 million people have pre-diabetes in the U.S. and this number is growing rapidly. 50 percent of the people who have pre-diabetes are likely to develop Type 2 diabetes, however diet, exercise and glucose monitoring can greatly reduce the onset of diabetes altogether. People who have a higher risk of developing pre-diabetes or Type 2 Continue reading >>

Understanding A Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis

Understanding A Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis

Diagnosing Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes is a manageable condition. Once you’re diagnosed, you can learn what to do to stay healthy. Diabetes is grouped into different types. The most commonly diagnosed are gestational diabetes, type 1 diabetes, and type 2 diabetes. Gestational Diabetes Maybe you have a friend who was told she had diabetes during pregnancy. That type is called gestational diabetes. It can develop during the second or third trimester of pregnancy. Gestational diabetes usually goes away after the baby is born. Type 1 Diabetes You may have had a childhood friend with diabetes who had to take insulin every day. That type is called type 1 diabetes. The peak age of onset is in the midteens. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), type 1 makes up 5 percent of all cases of diabetes. Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes makes up 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes, according to the CDC. It is also called adult-onset diabetes. Although it can occur at any age, it’s more common in people older than 40. If you think you might have diabetes, talk to your doctor. Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes can cause severe complications, such as: amputation of the legs and feet blindness heart disease kidney disease stroke According to the CDC, diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the United States. People with diabetes are 1.5 times as likely to die as people of the same age who don’t have diabetes. Many of the severe side effects of diabetes can be avoided with treatment. That’s why it’s so important to be diagnosed as soon as possible. Some people are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes because they have symptoms. Early diabetes symptoms include: increased or frequent urination increased thirst fatigue cuts or sores that won Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels

Gestational Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels

Here we discuss gestational diabetes blood sugar levels as well as normal blood sugar levels. We also provide natural strategies for preventing blood sugar level fluctuations. About Gestational Diabetes First, a few things you need to know about gestational diabetes so that you can understand what gestational diabetes blood sugar levels mean. Gestational diabetes is diabetes that is found for the first time when a woman is pregnant. Diabetes means that your blood sugar levels are too high. You body uses glucose for energy, but too much glucose in your blood is harmful for both you and your baby while you are pregnant. Less than 3 months pregnant 3-6 months pregnant 6-9 months pregnant I'm ready to pop! I'm not pregnant There is also evidence that women that have gestational diabetes are at higher risk for developing pre-diabetes and type 2 diabetes later in life. This may be because pregnancy puts stress on your body and can bring out vulnerabilities. The changing hormones and weight gain you experience in pregnancy can make it hard for your body to keep up with its need for insulin. When this happens, your body doesn’t get the energy it needs from the foods you eat. Read Gestational Diabetes Diagnosis to find out more about the dangerous complications you want to avoid. How to find out if you have Gestational Diabetes Blood Sugar Levels If it turns out you have gestational diabetes blood sugar levels, you will need to regularly test your blood. What you may not realize is that you can go to your local pharmacy and purchase a blood glucose monitoring system without being diagnosed with gestational diabetes. There is no prescription required, although your insurance company will not reimburse you for the testing strips unless you have an official diagnosis. Need to Tal Continue reading >>

Pre-diabetes: No Sweet News This

Pre-diabetes: No Sweet News This

You need not wait to be a diabetic to treating diabetes. With campaigns on the run up to World Diabetes Day on November 14 advocating prevention of diabetes, focus is clearly on the pre-diabetes stage. The pre-diabetes stage is the ‘cat on the wall' stage as V.Ravindranath, consultant diabetologist, Tiruchi Diabetes Speciality Centre puts it, with blood glucose levels falling between the normal and diabetic range. Those in the pre-diabetic stage are potential diabetics as diabetes does not emerge overnight. Physicians and various specialists reiterate the significance of intervention at this crucial phase not only to prevent or delay onset of diabetes but to avoid other complications in the long run. Various studies have proved that cardiovascular complications including heart disease has already set in at the time of detection of diabetes in many patients opine cardiologists. Hence intervening at this stage means that complications are stalled. “Pre-diabetic stage precedes diabetes by five to ten years. While macro vascular complications like cardiac disease, stroke and peripheral vascular disease set in ten years before diagnosis of diabetes, micro vascular conditions like diabetic retinopathy (eye disease), diabetic nephropathy(kidney) and neuropathy (nerves) set in before five years,” says Dr.Ravindranath. When someone is diagnosed with diabetes, it is advisable to check for these complications immediately, he adds. Though family history and genetic predisposition plays an important role in developing type II diabetes, there are those who develop diabetic due to non-genetic factors like obesity, high stress levels, faulty diet and sedentary lifestyle. What worries doctors is the early onset of diabetes. Though age remains a risk factor, incidence of diabetes i Continue reading >>

The “normal Blood Sugar Range” May Be Misleading You

The “normal Blood Sugar Range” May Be Misleading You

A fasting blood sugar test measures the amount of a type of sugar, called glucose, in your blood after you have not eaten for at least eight hours. Checking for an ideal fasting blood sugar is one of the most commonly performed tests to check for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. So what should your fasting blood sugar be? The normal blood sugar range is 65-99 mg/dL. If your fasting blood sugar is between 100 and 125 mg/dL, you have “impaired fasting glucose,” also referred to as “prediabetes.” If your fasting blood sugar is more than 126 mg/dL on two or more occasions, you have full-blown diabetes. What Is Prediabetes? People defined as having impaired fasting glucose/prediabetes are individuals whose blood sugar levels do not meet criteria for diabetes, yet are higher than those considered normal. These people are at relatively high risk for the future development of diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), prediabetes is not a disease itself but rather a risk factor “for diabetes as well as cardiovascular disease.”[1] However, the ADA also state that prediabetes can be considered an “intermediate stage” in the diabetes disease process.[1](One might wonder how prediabetes can be a both a risk factor for diabetes and an intermediate stage of the diabetes disease process simultaneously). In addition to increasing the chance of developing diabetes, it’s well-established that people with impaired fasting glucose/prediabetes are more likely to be overweight or obese, especially with what’s known as abdominal or visceral obesity. They also are more likely to have high triglycerides and/or low HDL cholesterol, and hypertension.[1] Even Normal-Range Blood Glucose Levels Can Increase Diabetes Risk There’s a lot more at stake for thos Continue reading >>

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