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Blood Sugar 123 Fasting

Fasting Blood Sugar Of 123?

Fasting Blood Sugar Of 123?

I randomly check my blood sugar. This morning it was 123 which surprised me. Normally it's around 90-100. Diabetes doesnt run in my family, but my dad who is in his 50's was diagnosed with it last year (diet induced - he gained a lot of weight very rapidly and is now obese). I had a bad dinner last night... show more I randomly check my blood sugar. This morning it was 123 which surprised me. Normally it's around 90-100. Diabetes doesnt run in my family, but my dad who is in his 50's was diagnosed with it last year (diet induced - he gained a lot of weight very rapidly and is now obese). I had a bad dinner last night around 6 - roast beef sandwich, chocolate milkshake, and 2 Reese's cups. Horrible, I know. I don't eat that bad daily. Then at midnight I had half of a Gatorade drink. Could some of this, though several hours earlier, be the cause of the spike in BS? Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: The food and the Gatorade weren't the cause. In a non-diabetic, the pancreas typically returns blood sugar to pre-meal levels within 1-2 hours. When the insulin responses of the pancreas become impaired, the process takes longer. The first-phase insulin response, the one that releases stored insulin right after eating to keep blood sugar in check, doesn't work as well, and so blood sugar spikes higher after meals. The second-phase insulin response, which is slower real-time insulin production, then has to mop up whatever the first phase couldn't get. If your second-phase response works well, usually a 6-8 hour fasting period is long enough to get back below 100 mg/dL, but this eventually becomes impaired, too. Not only was your dinner very high in carbohydrates, but then you added a bunch of sugar. Essentially, you "stacked" Gatorade on top of that meal Continue reading >>

Normal Range For Blood Sugar Two Hours After Eating

Normal Range For Blood Sugar Two Hours After Eating

Your blood glucose levels can determine whether you have or are at risk for developing diabetes, a condition in which your body no longer effectively processes and absorbs glucose from the bloodstream. Blood glucose levels fluctuate during the day, particularly after meals. Postprandial -- which means after eating -- glucose levels that rise beyond a certain level may mean you have diabetes or prediabetes. However, two-hour postprandial blood sugar testing is not recommended to screen for or diagnose diabetes. Video of the Day Two to 3 hours after eating a meal, blood glucose levels typically fall to normal fasting levels. For people without diabetes, this is typically 125 mg/dL or less, according to criteria established by the American Diabetes Association. If your 2-hour postprandial blood glucose level is higher than 125 mg/dL, your doctor will likely order one of the ADA-recommended blood tests for diagnosing diabetes. The options include a hemoglobin A1c test and an oral glucose tolerance test. Before developing type 2 diabetes, many people go through a phase called "prediabetes." With this condition, postprandial blood sugar levels are typically abnormally high -- but not elevated enough to meet the criteria for a diagnosis of diabetes. Modest weight loss, increased physical activity and dietary changes can often prevent prediabetes from progressing to type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

A condition in which blood glucose levels are elevated, but not yet within the diabetic range. Prediabetes is also known as impaired fasting glucose (IFG) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). The new term was inaugurated by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) in March 2002 to promote public understanding of this increasingly widespread problem. According to HHS, nearly 57 million Americans have prediabetes. Studies have shown that most people with blood glucose levels in the prediabetes range go on to develop Type 2 diabetes within 10 years; the condition also raises the risk of having a heart attack or stroke by 50%. Prediabetes can be controlled, and in many cases even reversed, through lifestyle changes. Prediabetes can be detected by either of the two standard tests currently used to diagnose diabetes. In the fasting plasma glucose test (FPG), a person fasts overnight and then has blood drawn for testing first thing in the morning, before he eats. Until recently, a normal fasting blood glucose level under 110 mg/dl was considered to be normal and fasting blood glucose in the range of 110 to 125 mg/dl indicated impaired fasting glucose (IFG), or prediabetes. In late 2003, an international expert panel recommended that the cutoff be lowered to 100 mg/dl, so now people with a fasting blood glucose level of 100 to 125 mg/dl are considered to have prediabetes. A fasting blood glucose level over 125 mg/dl indicates diabetes. (A second test must be done on a subsequent day to confirm a diagnosis of diabetes.) In the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), a person’s blood glucose is tested once after an overnight fast and again two hours after he has consumed a special, glucose-rich drink. A normal blood glucose Continue reading >>

Is There A 'safe' Blood Sugar Level?

Is There A 'safe' Blood Sugar Level?

What is the "safe" blood sugar level? I have heard several opinions from other diabetics, and I am very confused. I was told that it was 154 about a year ago, and my doctor didn't recommend daily monitoring. At one time on a morning fasting, my level was 74. — Theresa, Alabama Yes, there is a safe blood sugar level. It is the optimum range that safely provides the body with adequate amounts of energy. For the average person, it is 70 to 105 mg/dl in a fasting state. (Diabetes is diagnosed when the fasting blood glucose level is at or above 126 mg/dl.) Glucose values vary depending on the time of day, your activity level, and your diet. Your sugar level of 154 mg/dl, which is high, may not have been determined while you were fasting. If it had been, a physician would have repeated the test. Your doctor did, and your level was determined to be normal at 74 mg/dl. In this case, daily monitoring is probably not necessary. If your levels are elevated in the future, you will be diagnosed with diabetes. Treatment can include lifestyle modification, diet, and exercise. If these strategies are not adequate to control your blood glucose level, your physician may prescribe oral medicines or insulin. Having a laboratory examination during your yearly physical and maintaining a healthy lifestyle are adequate for now. Why is it important to keep your glucose level within a normal range? An excess of glucose in the bloodstream causes various chemical changes that lead to damage to our blood vessels, nerves, and cells. Each cell in the body has a function that requires energy, and this energy comes primarily from glucose. The energy allows you to perform various tasks, including talking and walking. It allows your heart to beat and your brain to produce chemicals and signals that hel Continue reading >>

Impaired Fasting Blood Glucose Is Associated With Increased Endothelin-1 Vasoconstrictor Tone

Impaired Fasting Blood Glucose Is Associated With Increased Endothelin-1 Vasoconstrictor Tone

IMPAIRED FASTING BLOOD GLUCOSE IS ASSOCIATED WITH INCREASED ENDOTHELIN-1 VASOCONSTRICTOR TONE 1Integrative Vascular Biology Laboratory, Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 2Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver and the Health Sciences Center, Aurora, Colorado 80045 3Denver Health Medical Center, Denver CO 80204 1Integrative Vascular Biology Laboratory, Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 2Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver and the Health Sciences Center, Aurora, Colorado 80045 1Integrative Vascular Biology Laboratory, Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 2Department of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver and the Health Sciences Center, Aurora, Colorado 80045 3Denver Health Medical Center, Denver CO 80204 Correspondence: Christopher DeSouza, Ph.D., Integrative Vascular Biology Laboratory, Department of Integrative Physiology, University of Colorado, 354 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309, TEL: (303) 492-2988; FAX: (303) 492-6778, [email protected] The publisher's final edited version of this article is available at Atherosclerosis See other articles in PMC that cite the published article. The experimental aim of this study was to determine whether ET-1-mediated vasoconstrictor tone is elevated in adult humans with impaired fasting blood glucose concentrations, independent of other cardiovascular risk factors. Forearm blood flow (FBF: plethysmography) responses to intra-arterial infusion of selective ETA receptor blockade (BQ-123: 100 nmol/min for 60 min) and non-selective ETA/B blockade (BQ-123 + BQ-788: 50 nmol/min for 60 min) were determined in 28 middle-aged, sedentary adults (17 M/11 F): 1 Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose — Know Your Number!

Blood Glucose — Know Your Number!

When it comes to blood sugar, the closer you can keep it to the normal range of 80 to 89 mg/dL the better. For years I have been warning that blood sugars even in the 90 to 100 range show that you are becoming insulin resistant and on your way to diabetes. A recent study done on 47,000 Kaiser Permanente patients validated this observation. The study, published in the American Journal of Medicine found that blood sugar, blood glucose (BG) levels in the 95-99 range more than doubled a person’s risk of becoming diabetic. In fact, for every point over 85 mg/dL the risk of becoming diabetic increased 6%, even when they controlled for other factors.1 Accordingly, the study noted that there was more incidence of cardiovascular disease and hypertension in those with higher BG. Why is this research so important? It flies in the face of currently accepted medical guidelines that for years have used 100 as the magic number for diagnosing “pre-diabetes.” At LMI, I’ve been seeing red flags for years when patients come in with BG levels even in the 90’s, because these levels are often accompanied by being somewhat overweight or over fat, having a thick waist, or the spare tire of dangerous belly fat. These are signs that the body can no longer efficiently process the sugars that come from complex carbohydrates in whole grains, starchy vegetables, fruits, and simple sugars. In other words, they are signs of insulin resistance. Insulin is the “key” that unlocks the door to each cell in the body, letting glucose into the cell to be processed for energy. If the insulin key is faulty, the glucose remains in circulation, raising triglycerides, lowering HDL, and usually ending up at the waistline. Anytime you see your doctor for a routine physical, fasting blood glucose is tes Continue reading >>

When “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

When “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

In the last article I explained the three primary markers we use to track blood sugar: fasting blood glucose (FBG), oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and hemoglobin A1c (A1c). We also looked at what the medical establishment considers as normal for these markers. The table below summarizes those values. In this article, we’re going to look at just how “normal” those normal levels are — according to the scientific literature. We’ll also consider which of these three markers is most important in preventing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Marker Normal Pre-diabetes Diabetes Fasting blood glucose (mg/dL) <99 100-125 >126 OGGT / post-meal (mg/dL after 2 hours) <140 140-199 >200 Hemoglobin A1c (%) <6 6-6.4 >6.4 But before we do that, I’d like to make an important point: context is everything. In my work with patients, I never use any single marker alone to determine whether someone has a blood sugar issue. I run a full blood panel that includes fasting glucose, A1c, fructosamine, uric acid and triglycerides (along with other lipids), and I also have them do post-meal testing at home over a period of 3 days with a range of foods. If they have a few post-meal spikes and all other markers or normal, I’m not concerned. If their fasting BG, A1c and fructosamine are all elevated, and they’re having spikes, then I’m concerned and I will investigate further. On a similar note, I’ve written that A1c is not a reliable marker for individuals because of context: there are many non-blood sugar-related conditions that can make A1c appear high or low. So if someone is normal on all of the other blood sugar markers, but has high A1c, I’m usually not concerned. With all of that said, let’s take a look at some of the research. Fasting blood sugar According to cont Continue reading >>

Fasting Sugar: 121... How To Make It In The Normal Range.. Please Help... I Am Just 30yrs Old...

Fasting Sugar: 121... How To Make It In The Normal Range.. Please Help... I Am Just 30yrs Old...

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Fasting Sugar: 121... how to make it in the normal range.. Please help... I am just 30yrs old... My fasting sugar was 121 and post meal 108... Its pre-diabetes. My doctor asked me to control the sugar... I am trying to conceive but first want to control the fasting sugar level. Please help. I am 30 years old and i have family history of diabetes from my mom's side... Hi Reeno, don't panic. There's a lot of helpful people on this forum who can offer really good advice for you to get your BG levels down. Then you'll be able to start your gestational project with joy. Are you testing your BG levels at home. If not, get yourself a Blood Glucose monitor/meter and test regularly throughout the day to see how foods that you eat are affecting your levels. To see a quick reduction in levels readings avoid carbs (as the body converts them to sugar) from the outset and then add them later to see how you react to them. There;s lots of good dietary info on this forum, find one you're happy with. By taking control now you will certainly benefit and could even stave off a Diabetic diagnosis in the future. Hi and welcome. Those blood sugar readings indicate more than pre-diabetes? If you are overweight then you are likely to be T2 and need a low-carb diet. If not overweight and as you are quite young it's always possible that T1.5 (LADA) is lurking as you have a family history. Do get the GP to do proper checks and monitor your blood sugar. BTW, your blood sugar reading 2 hours after a meal is more relevant than your fasting level as overnight liver dumps can affect results. One thing that took my wife the longest time to make me understand is that the carbs to be sh Continue reading >>

Are You At Risk For Diabetes?

Are You At Risk For Diabetes?

Who Gets Diabetes and How to Manage It Diabetes is a metabolic disease that can lead to serious health complications if left untreated. Several factors, such as body weight, family history and race and ethnicity may increase your risk of diabetes. Diabetes can be effectively managed by exercising and eating a healthy diet. What is diabetes? Diabetes (medically known as diabetes mellitus) is a common, chronic disorder marked by elevated levels of blood glucose, or sugar. It occurs when your cells don’t respond appropriately to insulin (a hormone secreted by the pancreas), and when your pancreas can’t produce more insulin in response. Diabetes usually can’t be cured. Left untreated—or poorly managed—it can lead to serious long-term complications, including kidney failure, amputation, and blindness. Moreover, having diabetes increases your risk for cardiovascular disease, including heart attack and stroke. Your body and sugar To understand diabetes, it’s helpful to understand the basics of how your body metabolizes (breaks down) sugar. Most of the cells in your body need sugar as a source of energy. When you eat carbohydrates, such as a bowl of pasta or some vegetables, your digestive system breaks the carbohydrates down into simple sugars such as glucose, which travel into and through your bloodstream to nourish and energize cells. A key player in the breakdown of sugar is the pancreas, a fish-shaped gland behind your stomach and liver. The pancreas fills two roles. It produces enzymes that flow into the small intestine to help break down the nutrients in your food—proteins, carbohydrates, and fats—to provide sources of energy and building material for the body’s cells. It makes hormones that regulate the disposal of nutrients, including sugars. Cells in Continue reading >>

Why Is My Fasting Blood Glucose Level High?

Why Is My Fasting Blood Glucose Level High?

The body uses complex mechanisms to maintain blood sugar within a healthy, narrow range. Your fasting blood glucose, or FBG, is the amount of sugar in your blood after not eating or drinking fluids other than water for at least 8 hours. Elevated FBG can mean the body's ability to regulate glucose is faltering, which most commonly indicates either prediabetes or diabetes. Less frequently, a high FBG may be due to another medical condition or a medication side effect. For those already living with diabetes or prediabetes, high FBG levels often indicate the condition is progressing or a medication adjustment is needed. Whatever your current status, it's important to determine the cause of an elevated FBG so you can receive appropriate treatment. Video of the Day Prediabetes occurs prior to the onset of type 2 diabetes (T2DM), as the body loses its ability to metabolize glucose normally. The condition causes no symptoms, so the first detectable sign is usually an elevated FBG. With prediabetes, FBG is higher than normal but not high enough to signal T2DM. People with prediabetes have a metabolic abnormality called insulin resistance, in which the body doesn't respond normally to the hormone insulin. This pancreatic hormone enables body tissues to absorb blood glucose and use it to generate energy. With insulin resistance, the pancreas initially produces more insulin to compensate. Prediabetes develops when the extra insulin isn't sufficient to keep blood glucose levels normal. Insulin resistance also causes the liver to overproduce glucose, further contributing to high blood sugar. Without intervention, prediabetes usually progresses to T2DM. But with modest weight loss, regular exercise and possibly a medicine called metformin (Fortamet, Glucophage, Glumetza), the developm Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Monitoring

Blood Sugar Monitoring

What Do the Numbers Tell You? “I must admit that I stopped checking my blood sugar,” Dave said. “I used to stick myself and write the numbers in a book, but I had no idea what they meant. I’d eat the same thing and get different numbers. Finally, I just gave up.” Sound familiar? Many people dutifully check their blood glucose levels but have no idea what the numbers mean. Part of the problem is that blood glucose levels constantly fluctuate and are influenced by many factors. The other part of the problem is that no two people are alike. A blood glucose reading of 158 mg/dl in two different people might have two different explanations. Most people know that their bodies need glucose to fuel their activities and that certain foods or large quantities of almost any food will raise blood glucose. That’s the easy part. But just as cars require a complicated system of fuel pumps, ignition timing, batteries, pistons, and a zillion other things to convert gasoline into motion, our bodies rely on an intricate system to convert glucose into energy. Back to basics Insulin is a hormone secreted by the pancreas that helps regulate the way the body uses glucose. Its main job is to allow glucose in the blood to enter cells of the body where it can be used for energy. In people who don’t have diabetes, the pancreas changes how much insulin it releases depending on blood glucose levels. Eating a chocolate bar? The pancreas releases more insulin. Sleeping? The pancreas releases less insulin until the wee hours of the morning when the hormones secreted in the early morning naturally increase insulin resistance, so the pancreas needs to release a little more. Insulin also controls how much glucose is produced and released from the liver. Glucose is stored in the liver in a f Continue reading >>

123 Fasting Blood Sugar Level

123 Fasting Blood Sugar Level

Talk to other moms, share advice, and have fun! Send me email updates about messages I've received on the site and the latest news from The CafeMom Team. By signing up, you certify that you are female and accept the Terms of Service and have read the Privacy Policy . I took my daughter to the doctors today because she was complaining of headaches, sore neck, belly pain. She really hasnt been eating all that well for 3 days..today I went to give her breakfast she didnt want it....I tried giving her something for lunch but she didnt want it. She had drank 2 cups of water before we left for the appt. They tested her blood sugar and it was 123. They want to do a fasting for 8 hr blood sugar test on her. I know nothing about diabetes...her father has diabetes, diagnosed as an adult. that thought of diabetes never crossed my mind. You must be a member to reply to this post. don't know anything about it, but it is best to test and see. I only had gestational diabetes and 123 was in the normal range for me. I don't know if it would be the same for juvenile though. Did her dad have type 1 or 2? I know type 1 is harder to control, whereas type 2 can be more controlled through diet. I think that you will know more when you have the fasting blood sugar. Remember that a fasting is EVERYTHING but water, including gum. (I've had some parents give their kids gum to tide them over until they can eat and it throws off the test) the public school curriculum. Rather, it's a noxious by-product produced while stewing schooling in a pot w/ unions, administrators, multi-billion dollar budgets, state education departments, and school boards, then letting politicians control the heat." Linda Dobson children to think, you begin by treating them seriously when they are little, giving them respons Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 123 Mg/dl (6.83mmol/l) Fasting - Is That Good Or Bad?

Blood Sugar 123 Mg/dl (6.83mmol/l) Fasting - Is That Good Or Bad?

Blood sugar testing measures how much glucose is in the bloodstream. No matter what is eaten, from a small snack to a large meal, blood glucose values rise in response to any carbohydrates that are digested. In a healthy person, the pancreas reacts to the higher blood glucose by releasing insulin, a hormone that converts blood sugar into usable energy. In addition to carbohydrates, other body processes also raise blood sugar levels.When a person fasts, which is defined medically as not eating or drinking anything aside from water for at least eight hours, the release of glucagon is triggered in the body. Glucagon instructs the liver to metabolize reserve supplies of glycogen, which are then circulated into the bloodstream as sugars. Accordingly, the amount of plasma glucose goes up. This is how the body creates energy even while fasting. In sum, when diabetes is not present the body responds to all blood sugars by manufacturing insulin in proportion with the glucose level. When it comes to fasting blood sugars, insulin lowers and stabilizes the levels so that they remain in a normal, healthy range. Yet when any form of diabetes is present, either pre-diabetes, Type 1 diabetes or Type 2 diabetes, the whole physiological process doesn’t work correctly, and blood sugars are often considerably higher than normal. The fasting blood sugar test (FBS) is commonly used to detect the existence of diabetes. In order to prepare for a fasting blood sugar test, one must refrain from eating or drinking from eight to twelve hours before the test, depending upon the doctor’s instructions. It is conducted in the same manner as any laboratory blood test. The health professional will wrap an elastic band around the upper arm in order to restrict blood flow, which enlarges the veins and Continue reading >>

Is Sugar Fasting Level Of 123 Is Indication Of Diabetes. How To Control It. And What To Do If The Person Is Already Underweight.

Is Sugar Fasting Level Of 123 Is Indication Of Diabetes. How To Control It. And What To Do If The Person Is Already Underweight.

fasting 100-125 indicates prediabetes or glucose intolerance ..u r at increased risk of developing diabetes in future Following are the tips to prevent onset/or control diabetes 1-Losing Extra Weight:-is the most significant thing which can make a big difference to your health . It helps lower your blood pressure and cholesterol too. waist of more than 80 cm in women & 90 cm in man are at risk 2- Constant and regular food timings :- it will improve your metabolic activity and helps reducing your weight. 3- Split your meals and eating in moderate amount:-Splitting your meals into 3-4 times per day (including snacks)and eating in fair amount, improves your metabolic rate as the food u take is not concentrated at one time. 4- No long Gaps and skipping of meals:-Never miss out breakfast. 5- No overeating:-Never eat in a bulk on one time Remember to eat your food slowly, chew well. 6- Proper Exercise and work outs:-Exercise is a fast way to trim down calories, extra weight and controlling glucose level. Brisk walking for 30 min. atleast five times a week is the best . You can also try Cycling, swimming, dancing. Timings for exercise should be fixed and regular.Do not eat right away after a workout . 7-constant and regular timings for medication 8-Avoid fried foods ,meat,fats and sweets. 9- Take high-fibre and complex carbohydrates:-like oats .Add whole grain foods in your diet. Avoid white bread, pasta, pizza , candies, and snacks .Instead include high-fiber carbohydrates like wheat bran, flaxseed and methi seeds to your wheat flour. This will increase fibre in your diet. 10-Drink enough fluids:-Keep your body well hydrated. 11.Fresh vegetables and fruits:- these contain a lot of minerals as well as nutrients .Include sprouts in the diet as they are easily digestible Continue reading >>

Why Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

Why Your “normal” Blood Sugar Isn’t Normal (part 2)

Hi, I just found this site and would like to participate. I will give my numbers, etc. First, my last A1c was 6.1, the doc said it was Pre-diabetes in January of 2014, OK, I get it that part, but what confuses me is that at home, on my glucometer, all my fastings were “Normal” however, back then, I had not checked after meals, so maybe they were the culprits. Now, I am checking all the time and driving myself crazy. In the morning sometimes fasting is 95 and other times 85, it varies day to day. Usually, after a low carb meal, it drops to the 80’s the first hour and lower the second. On some days, when I am naughty and eat wrong, my b/s sugar is still low, and on other days, I can eat the same thing, and it goes sky high, again, not consistent. Normally, however, since February, my fbs is 90, 1 hour after, 120, 2nd hour, back to 90, but, that changes as well. In February, of 2014, on the 5th, it was horrible. I think I had eaten Lasagne, well, before, my sugars did not change much, but that night, WHAM-O I started at 80 before the meal, I forgot to take it at the one and two hour mark, but did at the 3 hour mark, it was 175, then at four hours, down to 160, then at 5 hours, back to 175. I went to bed, because by that time, it was 2 AM, but when I woke up at 8:00 and took it, it was back to 89!!!! This horrible ordeal has only happened once, but, I have gone up to 178 since, but come down to normal in 2 hours. I don’t know if I was extra stressed that day or what, I am under tons of it, my marriage is not good, my dear dad died 2 years ago and my very best friend died 7 months ago, I live in a strange country, I am from America, but moved to New Zealand last year, and I am soooo unhappy. Anyway, what does confuse me is why the daily differences, even though I may Continue reading >>

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