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What Is The Highest Blood Sugar Reading Recorded?

What Is The Highest Blood Sugar Reading Recorded?

If only we could open the Guinness Book of World Records and get the answer to “What is the highest blood sugar reading recorded?” The true answer probably comes down to two answers. First, we probably will never know. No one really seems to keep track of this kind of stuff, except for unconfirmed reports on various internet bulletin boards. Some boards have people claiming to have 2000 or even higher. (BUT, leave your highest treading below in the comments to compare!) I am not sure you would even be alive if they were that high! Nonetheless, most blood glucose meters stop reading at 600 mg/L, so this tends to be the outer fringe of home tested high glucose levels. Second, the answer depends on the test. There are two tests that are typically done. It should also be noted that each individual will have a different “normal” level. What is a high reading for one person may be normal for another. Only your doctor can really tell you what is the “right” number for you. But first, let’s see what different blood sugar readings mean and how they are tested. One test is the A1C and it is done at your doctor’s office. This test measures a person’s blood glucose levels for the last three months. A good reading is 6 or below, an acceptable reading is 7 or below, while a poor reading (a must get help reading!) is anything above 7. A detailed description of the A1C test can be found here. The second test is self testing. This is often done by the individual multiple times per day using a blood glucose monitor. The monitors measure either the plasma or whole blood levels. The following are the recommend readings for each test: Recommended Plasma Test Results Recommended Whole Blood Test Results A rough comparison chart for A1C versus Plasma readings is below: A1c P Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Count Over 1000: Risks And Treatments

Blood Sugar Count Over 1000: Risks And Treatments

A blood sugar count over 1000 is very high and can be extremely dangerous, leading to death if not treated quickly. Learn the risks involved and why you should seek medical attention if you have high blood glucose levels. Your Blood Sugar Count A blood sugar count over 1000 is way beyond healthy, normal levels, even for a diabetic. Normal blood glucose levels are within a range of 70 to 100. A consistent reading over 125 may be indicative of diabetes. Levels as high as 200 to 500, let alone 1000, can pose a serious risk to the body. A blood sugar count shows the level of glucose in the blood. It is important to try and keep levels as normal as possible, especially for diabetics. They will naturally increase after eating as carbohydrates are broken down and glucose is made available as a source of energy. Other factors such as severe stress, the use of corticosteroids or other medications, a heart attack or stroke can all cause a spike in blood glucose as well. What happens if your blood sugar is over 1000 mg/dL? Why is this dangerous? The body cannot sustain blood glucose levels of 1000 or anywhere close to this amount. Long-term levels of 200 to 300 or even lower cause damage to blood vessels, nerves, kidneys and eyes, greatly increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease and serious kidney problems. When blood sugar levels reach 600, a diabetic coma may occur. This is an extremely dangerous and potentially life-threatening condition that people with diabetes and hyperglycemia are at risk for. Some people who go into a diabetic coma are not aware that they have diabetes. Being aware of blood glucose levels and the symptoms of a diabetic coma is important. Usually before such a major complication occurs there are warning signs such as: Increased thirst More frequent uri Continue reading >>

Diabetic Coma

Diabetic Coma

Print Overview A diabetic coma is a life-threatening diabetes complication that causes unconsciousness. If you have diabetes, dangerously high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) or dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can lead to a diabetic coma. If you lapse into a diabetic coma, you're alive — but you can't awaken or respond purposefully to sights, sounds or other types of stimulation. Left untreated, a diabetic coma can be fatal. The prospect of a diabetic coma is scary, but fortunately you can take steps to help prevent it. Start by following your diabetes treatment plan. Symptoms Before developing a diabetic coma, you'll usually experience signs and symptoms of high blood sugar or low blood sugar. High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) If your blood sugar level is too high, you may experience: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Stomach pain Fruity breath odor A very dry mouth A rapid heartbeat Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) Signs and symptoms of a low blood sugar level may include: Shakiness or nervousness Anxiety Fatigue Weakness Sweating Hunger Nausea Dizziness or light-headedness Difficulty speaking Confusion Some people, especially those who've had diabetes for a long time, develop a condition known as hypoglycemia unawareness and won't have the warning signs that signal a drop in blood sugar. If you experience any symptoms of high or low blood sugar, test your blood sugar and follow your diabetes treatment plan based on the test results. If you don't start to feel better quickly, or you start to feel worse, call for emergency help. When to see a doctor A diabetic coma is a medical emergency. If you feel extreme high or low blood sugar signs or symptoms and think you might pass out, call 911 or your local emergency nu Continue reading >>

High Blood Sugars (ketoacidosis)

High Blood Sugars (ketoacidosis)

Ketoacidosis And Hyperglycemic Hyperosmolar Syndrome Severe high blood sugars, ketosis (the presence of ketones prior to acidification of the blood), and ketoacidosis (DKA) are serious and potentially life-threatening medical problems which can occur in diabetes. High blood sugars become life-threatening in Type 1 or long-term Type 2 diabetes only when that person does not receive enough insulin from injections or an insulin pump. This can be caused by skipping insulin or not receiving enough insulin when large amounts are required due to an infection or other major stress. Ketoacidosis surprisingly occurs almost as often in Type 2 diabetes as it does in Type 1. However, people with Type 2 diabetes also encounter another dangerous condition called hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome, which is roughly translated as thick blood due to very high blood sugars. Here, coma and death can occur simply because the blood sugar is so high. The blood will have ketones at higher levels but does not become acidotic. HHS usually occurs with blood sugar readings above 700 mg/dl (40 mmol) as the brain and other functions begin to shut down. When insulin levels are low, the body cannot use glucose present at high levels in the blood. The body then starts burning excessive amounts of fat which causes the blood to become acidic as excess ketone byproducts are produced. Even though the blood pH which measures acidity only drops from its normal level of 7.4 down to 7.1 or 7.0, this small drop is enough to inactivate enzymes that depend on a precise acid-base balance to operate. High blood sugars and ketoacidosis can be triggered by: not taking insulin severe infection severe illness bad insulin In Type 1 diabetes, ketoacidosis often occurs under the duress of an infection, and is also freque Continue reading >>

How To Lower Blood Sugar Naturally Through Diet

How To Lower Blood Sugar Naturally Through Diet

If you can understand how to lower blood sugar naturally through diet, you can change your entire life – and really it all comes down to carbs, well a large part of it anyway. There are 4 main components that influence blood sugar and A1C. Diet – healthy vs. unhealthy diet Macronutrients – Carbs / proteins/ fats Stress Lifestyle/ activity levels We're only going to cover the first 2 because we're talking about diet. But just so you know, stress and lifestyle factors also play a part here. DIET Your diet has the single biggest influence on your blood sugar and A1C levels – it is absolutely critical in gaining good control and achieving good health! So I hope you'll learn some new things about your diet in this Carb Course that will help you get on track. NUTRITION MYTHS Nutrition myths are everywhere so we have to be careful. In fact, there are many nutrition myths that are deeply embedded in our society that we think are true, but they're not. For example, one of the biggest myths of all time is that it’s all about how many calories we eat. We’ve all heard it time and time again over the years that we need to reduce our calories and eat low fat to lose weight. But this is a myth because not all calories are created equal. 1200 calories of fresh natural unprocessed food is very different to 1200 calories of processed packaged food. The most important thing is the food quality and the types of foods you eat. If you've ever tried a calorie restricted diet and still struggled to lose weight, then it could have come down to the types of food you are/were eating. Whole natural unprocessed foods are the types of foods that are supposed to make up a healthy diet, while processed packaged foods should make up a minimum. Over time, we've definitely lost our way and be Continue reading >>

Ask The Diabetes Team

Ask The Diabetes Team

Question: From Chicago, Illinois, USA: My 6 year old son is a relatively skinny child and had an initial blood sugar level of 1200 with no ketones. No one at the hospital could explain why. Can you tell me why some elevated blood sugar levels cause ketones while others don't? I also talked to a nurse in the hospital who said she has seen levels as high as 4000 with no ketones? Answer: Ketones are produced when the body breaks down fat for energy because the cells in the body are not getting enough calories (either due to inadequate intake of calories, or inability to use ingested calories due to insulin deficiency). In early diabetes, the body may be making enough insulin so the cells aren't "starving," so no ketones are produced, but not enough insulin to keep the blood sugar normal. In my experience, it would be most unusual for a 6 year old with new onset diabetes and a blood sugar of 1200 not to be producing ketones in the urine. Most likely, I would suspect the urine strips for ketones were spoiled. In adults with non-insulin dependent diabetes, you can occasionally see very high blood sugars without ketones if they also have some kidney impairment interfering with the ability to clear glucose from the body through the urine, especially if they are also dehydrated. [This situation is called non-ketotic, hyperglycemic, hyperosmolar syndrome. Editor] I have never seen a blood sugar up to 4000. Original posting 22 Mar 97 Continue reading >>

Do Glucosamine And Chondroitin Worsen Blood Sugar Control In Diabetes?

Do Glucosamine And Chondroitin Worsen Blood Sugar Control In Diabetes?

Despite theoretical risks based on animal models given high intravenous doses, glucosamine/chondroitin (1500 mg/1200 mg daily) does not adversely affect short-term glycemic control for patients whose diabetes is well-controlled, or for those without diabetes or glucose intolerance (SOR: A, consistent, good-quality patient-oriented evidence). Some preliminary evidence suggests that glucosamine may worsen glucose intolerance for patients with untreated or undiagnosed glucose intolerance or diabetes (SOR: C, extrapolation from disease-oriented evidence). Long-term effects are unknown; however, no compelling theoretical or incidental data suggest that long-term results should be different (SOR: C, expert opinion). Further studies are required to clarify the effects of glucosamine on patients with poorly controlled diabetes or glucose intolerance. These products seem to be a safe alternative to NSAIDs Lisa Brandes, MD University of Wyoming, Cheyenne Glucosamine/chondroitin is a popular over-the-counter supplement used by many patients; it appears to be without any serious adverse affects or drug interactions. It does not seem to have much effect on blood sugar for patients with diabetes. It may relieve symptoms for some patients with pain due to osteoarthritis. As such, glucosamine/chondroitin seems to be a safe alternative to nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) for patients with osteoarthritis. I would monitor blood sugars more frequently for patients with diabetes given the low numbers in the studies cited above. I would avoid glucosamine/chondroitin during pregnancy and lactation for the younger symptomatic female patient. The cost of this product varies widely, and this can be a factor for patients since they are paying out of pocket. Diabetes mellitus and osteo Continue reading >>

Secrets To Make This One Diet You Can Stick To. Eat To Beat Diabetes In Just Eight Weeks: It's The Life-changing Diet That Can Help You Avoid Or Even Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Secrets To Make This One Diet You Can Stick To. Eat To Beat Diabetes In Just Eight Weeks: It's The Life-changing Diet That Can Help You Avoid Or Even Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Earlier in this series, I explained the thinking behind my new Blood Sugar Diet, which can reverse both pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes. This is a bold and radical plan that involves eating 800 calories a day for up to eight weeks. It works by tackling the fat that clogs your liver and pancreas and lies at the heart of many blood sugar problems. Once levels of this 'visceral' fat start to drop (and this happens within days), the fat in and around these organs will begin to melt away like snow under a hot sun. Scroll down for video And within weeks, both pre-diabetics and Type 2 diabetics should see their blood sugar levels falling back towards normal, setting you on course for a leaner, healthier future. Yesterday, I explained how the diet works - and how healthy Mediterranean recipes can help you lose weight fast. But as with all diets, some people may find it easier to stick to the regime than others. That's why I recommend a number of steps to take beforehand that will help you measure your progress - and keep you committed. Measure your pulse, weight and waist Find a quiet moment and measure your pulse. You will find it throbbing away on your wrist, just outside the outermost tendon. Your pulse is a measure of your overall fitness. Check it a few times, then write down the average score. I'd expect to see it improve over the coming weeks. Next I want you to weigh yourself. With your weight and height you can calculate your Body Mass Index (BMI). The easiest way to do this is to use a website, such as the NHS's healthy weight calculator (www.nhs.uk/Tools/Pages/Healthyweightcalculator.aspx), which will do it automatically for you and advise you on the results. Or you can simply type 'calculate BMI' into Google. While you are in the bathroom, I want you to measure you Continue reading >>

[treatment And Blood Sugar Analysis Of 1,200 Diabetic Patients At A Diabetes Clinic]

[treatment And Blood Sugar Analysis Of 1,200 Diabetic Patients At A Diabetes Clinic]

Abstract : We have studied the characteristics of insulin therapy and home blood glucose monitoring of 1.200 diabetic patients (590 males, 610 females), mainly type I adults (age: 43 +/- 19 years, mean +/- 1 SD), attending a licensed diabetes center in Belgium which benefits from a National Health Service convention system for providing education and home blood glucose monitoring kits and disposables to diabetic subjects. 50% of these patients were treated with 2 daily insulin injections, while 22% were treated with 3 and 24% with 4 daily injections. 4% of the subjects were treated with a continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Patients treated with four daily injections were younger than those treated with other insulin schemes (p < 0.001). Home blood glucose monitoring strip consumption was 2.2 patient(-1) day(-1). The mean HbA(1C) level was 8.63 +/- 1.55% [8.54 +/- 1.46 in males and 8.72 +/- 1.62% in females (NS)]. Ill more than one third of the subjects treated with injections, HbA(1C) was lower than 8%. HbA(1C) was also below 8% hi 50% of patients using 1100-1200 strips year(-1). Continue reading >>

Does Blood Sugar Impact On Metastatic Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (nsclc) Outcome?

Does Blood Sugar Impact On Metastatic Non-small Cell Lung Cancer (nsclc) Outcome?

e20579 Background: Diabetes is a frequent diagnostic (9.3%) in general Western population, and because of its complications, becomes a comorbidity in NSCLC patients that could impact on prognostic. Impact of diabetes on NSCLC prognosis is unknown but the majority of patients fear eating desserts because feeding mostly the NSCLC tumor cells. Methods: Using our SARDO database and hospital files, we retrospectively reviewed 548 patients with metastatic NSCLC diagnosed and treated in our University hospital between 2006 and 2015. Uncontrolled diabetes was established when Hb1Ac > 7% or with more than 2 hospital glycemia over 11 mmol/L. Results: Amongst 418 metastatic NSCLC patients, 294pts (70%) had synchronous metastasis at diagnostic and 117pts (30%) have metachronous metastasis. As expected metachronous metastasis patients had a better survival (mOS 25mo) than synchronous metastasis (mOS 6mo). Then, we divided our patients in 4 subgroups: 1) Patients with diagnosed and uncontrolled diabetes (n = 78); 2) Patients with high glycemia but not previously diabetes diagnostic (n = 19); 3) Patients with controlled diagnosed diabetes (n = 59); 4) Control patients with normal glycemias or HBA1c (n = 262). Some tumor stage and demographic disparities were seen between the 4 groups but we controlled for them. In upfront metastatic NSCLC patients, mOS was 4.0 months for group 1, 4.0 months for group 2, 4.0 months for group 3 and 7.0 months for our control group, not statistically different, which is lower than literature but expected for this unselected population treated before 2015. In metachronous patients, group 1 mOS was 21mo, group 2 was 58mo, group 3 was 30mo and mOS was 23mo for control patients, with no statistically difference between groups. Women had a better mOS 8 mo com Continue reading >>

What Are The Side Effects Of High Blood Sugar Levels?

What Are The Side Effects Of High Blood Sugar Levels?

High blood sugar, also known as hyperglycemia, occurs when the body has too little insulin, or cannot use it properly. Common causes of high blood sugar include overeating, under-exercising and emotional stress. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), hyperglycemia is a major cause of complications for people diabetes. If you experience frequent or extreme symptoms of high blood sugar, seek guidance from your doctor. Video of the Day Frequent urination is a common symptom of high blood sugar. Urinating more frequently or producing greater urine volume than usual, regardless of how much fluid you've consumed, is often a first recognized symptom of diabetes. When blood sugar increases, compounds known as ketones may develop in the body. Urine test strips provide a means of testing ketone levels at home. According to the ADA, exercise can lower blood sugar. However, if you know that your blood sugar is high and your ketone level is high, exercise may further elevate blood sugar. Reducing your food intake may also help manage your blood sugar. If you have not been tested for, or diagnosed with, diabetes and experience on-going frequent urination, discuss your symptoms with your doctor. Unexplained increases in thirst and hunger may indicate high blood sugar. According to the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics (UIHC), dry mouth and increased thirst are common first symptoms of ketoacidosis, a condition also known as diabetic coma. Ketoacidosis occurs when the body lacks insulin and cannot utilize glucose as fuel. The body breaks down fats to use as energy, which causes ketone production. Too many ketones cause build-up, the precursor to ketoacidosis. People with diabetes often recognize the symptoms of high blood sugar, such as thirst, before ketoacidosis Continue reading >>

High Triglycerides

High Triglycerides

When your triglyceride levels are too high, you may not have symptoms. It's a "silent" problem with big implications, such as a four-fold increase in the likelihood of having a heart attack or stroke. A simple blood test is all it takes to check your triglyceride levels. If they're too high, you can get them back under control, often by changing your daily habits. If you already know that your triglyceride levels are too high, the actions you take now might even save your life. Having high triglycerides could be a sign that you’re becoming insulin-resistant, which means your body isn’t using insulin (a hormone that controls blood sugar) properly. When insulin doesn’t do its job, glucose can't get into your cells. That raises your blood sugar levels, which can lead to pre-diabetes and, eventually, type 2 diabetes. Having diabetes makes you much more likely to have a heart attack and other heart problems, in addition to the risk from your high triglycerides. Untreated diabetes is a major health threat. To manage it well, you may need to track everything you eat, test your blood sugar, exercise, lose extra weight, take medication as directed, and keep up with your medical appointments. Many people don't know that they have diabetes. Your doctor should check on whether you do, and if so, help you get both your diabetes and your triglycerides under control. High triglyceride levels can be a clue that you have fatty liver disease. Poor eating habits lead not only to high levels of fat in the bloodstream (triglycerides) but increased storage of fat throughout the body, including in the liver. Elevations in liver function tests (like ALT and AST) can indicate that fatty liver is present. Fatty liver usually does not cause symptoms, but unless reversed, fatty liver can lea Continue reading >>

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories

3-day Diabetes Meal Plan: 1,200 Calories

Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be restrictive or complicated. Healthy eating is the cornerstone of managing diabetes, yet it can be a challenge figuring out what to eat to balance your blood sugar. Here we've created a delicious 3-day meal plan that makes it easier to follow a diabetes diet. In this plan you'll find a mix of nutritious foods including fiber-rich complex carbohydrates, like whole grains and fresh fruits and vegetables, lean protein sources, healthy fats and dairy. This plan limits the amount of foods with refined carbohydrates (think white bread, white rice and sugar), added sugars and saturated fats, which can negatively impact your health if you eat too much. The carbohydrates are balanced throughout the day with each meal containing 2-3 carb servings (30-45 grams of carbohydrates) and each snack containing around 1 carb serving (15 grams of carbohydrates). The calorie and carbohydrate totals are listed next to each meal and snack so you can swap foods with similar nutrition in and out as you like. Eating with diabetes doesn't need to be restrictive or complicated. Incorporating a variety of foods, as we do in this meal plan, is a healthy and sustainable approach to managing diabetes. Not sure if this is the right plan for you? Calculate your calorie level and find the diet meal plan that will work best for you. Day 1 Meal Prep Tip: Cook or set aside an extra 1/2 cup of black beans tonight at dinner to have for lunch on Day 2. Be sure to rinse canned beans to get rid of excess salt. Breakfast (298 calories, 32 grams carbohydrates) • 1 cup nonfat plain Greek yogurt • 1/2 cup blueberries • 1 1/2 Tbsp. chopped walnuts • 2 tsp. honey Top yogurt with blueberries, walnuts and honey. Note: We use a small amount of added sweetener, in this case h Continue reading >>

In Search Of: The Highest Diabetes A1c In History

In Search Of: The Highest Diabetes A1c In History

My most recent A1C was nothing to be proud of, but I consoled myself with the thought that it was hardly the worst in history. That got me wondering: What was the all-time worst A1C? Who holds this dubious record, and how high is it possible to go? I decided to pound the pavement and try to find out. So where to start when looking for a diabetes record? Well, with the Guinness Book of World Records, of course. But oddly, the Guinness people don’t seem to have any listings related to A1Cs. They do, however, report that Michael Patrick Buonocore survived a blood sugar of 2,656 mg/dL upon admittance to the ER in East Stroudsburg, PA, on March 23, 2008. Michael was a T1 kiddo at the time, and that record-high sugar level was part of his diagnosis experience. So does Michael also hold the record for top A1C? No. Because while he’s living (thankfully) proof that stratospheric blood sugar levels are possible, a sky-scraping A1C requires both altitude and time. Remember that A1Cs provide a three-month average of our blood sugars. Individual high BG readings, even crazy-high ones, don’t alter the test as much as you’d think if they last only a short time. Because type 1 in kids Michael's age hit so quickly, I figured his A1C would have been rather middle of the road. It takes a slow burn to make an A1C boil. But just to be sure, I reached out to his parents, who tell me his A1C was 11.9 at diagnosis. Higher than I expected, but not too high given the four-digit BG reading. (If his 2,656 had been his average blood sugar for three months, his A1C would have been roughly 95! Yes, that’s 95.0, not 9.5). The highest A1C turns out to be a tricky piece of data to ferret out. If you try Google, you find a gazillion people talking about their own personal highest A1Cs, and comp Continue reading >>

1 Week Diabetes 1200 Calorie Meal Plan

1 Week Diabetes 1200 Calorie Meal Plan

These diabetic-diet meal plans avoid refined grains and limit added sugars. Each meal and snack is planned to help you keep your blood sugar in check. Snacks are generally 1 to 2 1/2 carbohydrate servings and meals are 2 1/2 to 5 carbohydrate servings, depending on the calorie level. 7 Day Diabetes 1200 calorie menu – Day 1 BREAKFAST 1 Cup Skim Milk 1 Orange, medium 1 Cup Cheerios Cereal MORNING SNACK 1 Cup Cantaloupe Melon LUNCH 1 Whole-Wheat Pita Bread, small 1 Cup Skim Milk 1 Fudgsicle, no sugar added AFTERNOON SNACK 2 Tablespoons Prepared Hummus 3 Ounces Celery Sticks DINNER 1/2 Cup Cooked Brown Rice North African Spiced Carrots 1/2 Banana, small 7 Day Diabetes 1200 calorie menu – Day 2 BREAKFAST 1 Cup Skim Milk 1/2 Banana, small 1 Cup Bran Flakes Cereal MORNING SNACK 1 Fruit & Nut Granola Bar LUNCH 1 Whole-Wheat Bread Vanilla-Orange Freezer Pops AFTERNOON SNACK 6 Ounces Nonfat Vanilla or Lemon Yogurt, Sweetened with Low-Calorie Sweetener DINNER 1 Cup Steamed Brussels Sprouts Grilled Shrimp Remoulade 1/2 Cup Cooked Couscous 1 Peach, medium 7 Day Diabetes 1200 calorie menu – Day 3 BREAKFAST 1 Whole-Wheat English Muffin 1 Cup Skim Milk 1/2 Cup Blueberries 1 Teaspoon Fat Free Cream Cheese MORNING SNACK 1 Apple, small LUNCH 1 Cup Tossed Salad Mix 1 Tablespoon Fat Free Blue Cheese Salad Dressing Hungarian Beef Goulash 1/2 Cup Fresh Pineapple 1 Slice Reduced-Calorie Oatmeal Bran Bread AFTERNOON SNACK 6 Ounces Nonfat Vanilla or Lemon Yogurt, Sweetened with Low-Calorie Sweetener DINNER Asian Green Bean Stir-Fry 1 Cup Skim Milk Five-Spice Tilapia 1/2 Cup Cooked Quinoa 1 Nectarine, medium 7 Day Diabetes 1200 calorie menu – Day 4 BREAKFAST 1 Cup Skim Milk 1/2 Cup Hot Oatmeal 1 Ounce Dried Fruit 1 Tablespoon Walnuts MORNING SNACK 1 Kiwi LUNCH 1 Cup Tossed Salad Mix Manh Continue reading >>

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