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Blood Glucose Level Is 113

Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Blood Sugar Levels Chart

Below chart displays possible blood sugar levels (in fasting state). Units are expressed in mg/dL and mmol/L respectively. Additional topics: What is diabetes? How do you know if you have diabetes? How to test for diabetes? Why is it important to measure your blood sugar levels frequently? Diet for people with diabetes You can also download or print this chart by clicking here. Reference: American Diabetes Association, Additional topics: What is diabetes? How do you know if you have diabetes? How to test for diabetes? What is normal blood sugar level? Why is it important to measure your blood sugar levels frequently? Diet for people with diabetes Continue reading >>

The “normal Blood Sugar Range” May Be Misleading You

The “normal Blood Sugar Range” May Be Misleading You

A fasting blood sugar test measures the amount of a type of sugar, called glucose, in your blood after you have not eaten for at least eight hours. Checking for an ideal fasting blood sugar is one of the most commonly performed tests to check for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. So what should your fasting blood sugar be? The normal blood sugar range is 65-99 mg/dL. If your fasting blood sugar is between 100 and 125 mg/dL, you have “impaired fasting glucose,” also referred to as “prediabetes.” If your fasting blood sugar is more than 126 mg/dL on two or more occasions, you have full-blown diabetes. What Is Prediabetes? People defined as having impaired fasting glucose/prediabetes are individuals whose blood sugar levels do not meet criteria for diabetes, yet are higher than those considered normal. These people are at relatively high risk for the future development of diabetes. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), prediabetes is not a disease itself but rather a risk factor “for diabetes as well as cardiovascular disease.”[1] However, the ADA also state that prediabetes can be considered an “intermediate stage” in the diabetes disease process.[1](One might wonder how prediabetes can be a both a risk factor for diabetes and an intermediate stage of the diabetes disease process simultaneously). In addition to increasing the chance of developing diabetes, it’s well-established that people with impaired fasting glucose/prediabetes are more likely to be overweight or obese, especially with what’s known as abdominal or visceral obesity. They also are more likely to have high triglycerides and/or low HDL cholesterol, and hypertension.[1] Even Normal-Range Blood Glucose Levels Can Increase Diabetes Risk There’s a lot more at stake for thos Continue reading >>

Normal Blood Sugar Range After Meals

Normal Blood Sugar Range After Meals

Monitoring is the only way to tell if your blood sugar is consistently staying with in range. Even non-diabetics should check their blood sugar every once in awhile to catch the potential development of the disease early. For non-diabetics, checking post-meal blood sugars is a good way to keep an eye on the potential developing disease. For diabetics, keeping an eye on after meal blood sugars is critical for to make sure the correct amount of insulin is being administered with meals. Video of the Day Blood sugar describes the molecule glucose that circulates in the blood. Glucose is the energy source that we get from the food you eat, specifically carbohydrates, and required by the body’s tissues to perform all of its basic functions. Insulin is a hormone secreted by the pancreas that allows cells to take in glucose from the blood to use as energy. The tissue cells do not take in all of the sugar in the blood though; there is a specific amount that bodies like to keep in the bloodstream, according to the Blood Sugar Diabetic website. How Food Affects Blood Sugar When you eat, digestion breaks down food into smaller molecules to be absorbed into your tissues. Even before you take your first bite, your pancreas produces insulin in preparation for increased blood sugar and therefore energy absorption into cells. Carbohydrates are the main source for glucose, but protein can increase blood sugar, as well. But not all carbohydrates are created equal. Simple carbohydrates such as white bread, fruit, milk, and candy raise blood sugar more quickly than complex carbohydrates such as whole grains, vegetables, and beans. A non diabetic’s blood sugar level should be between 70 and 140 mg/dL one to two hours after a meal, according to the American Diabetes Association. If it is Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Monitoring

Blood Sugar Monitoring

What Do the Numbers Tell You? “I must admit that I stopped checking my blood sugar,” Dave said. “I used to stick myself and write the numbers in a book, but I had no idea what they meant. I’d eat the same thing and get different numbers. Finally, I just gave up.” Sound familiar? Many people dutifully check their blood glucose levels but have no idea what the numbers mean. Part of the problem is that blood glucose levels constantly fluctuate and are influenced by many factors. The other part of the problem is that no two people are alike. A blood glucose reading of 158 mg/dl in two different people might have two different explanations. Most people know that their bodies need glucose to fuel their activities and that certain foods or large quantities of almost any food will raise blood glucose. That’s the easy part. But just as cars require a complicated system of fuel pumps, ignition timing, batteries, pistons, and a zillion other things to convert gasoline into motion, our bodies rely on an intricate system to convert glucose into energy. Back to basics Insulin is a hormone secreted by the pancreas that helps regulate the way the body uses glucose. Its main job is to allow glucose in the blood to enter cells of the body where it can be used for energy. In people who don’t have diabetes, the pancreas changes how much insulin it releases depending on blood glucose levels. Eating a chocolate bar? The pancreas releases more insulin. Sleeping? The pancreas releases less insulin until the wee hours of the morning when the hormones secreted in the early morning naturally increase insulin resistance, so the pancreas needs to release a little more. Insulin also controls how much glucose is produced and released from the liver. Glucose is stored in the liver in a f Continue reading >>

What Is A Healthy Blood Sugar Level?

What Is A Healthy Blood Sugar Level?

If you don't have diabetes, a healthy blood sugar is less than 126, says Holly Anderson, Outpatient Diabetes Coordinator at Reston Hospital Center. Watch this video to find out the healthy level for someone with diabetes. A healthy blood sugar level, obtained in a fasting state, is less than 100. A fasting blood sugar of greater than 126 is diabetic. A fasting blood sugar between 100 and 126 is considered "prediabetic". Prediabetes can be associated with increased risk for heart disease and should lead to lifestyle changes. Trinity Health is a Catholic health care organization that acts in accordance with the Catholic tradition and does not condone or support all practices covered in this site. In case of emergency call 911. This site is educational and not a substitute for professional medical advice, always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider. According to the American Diabetes Association, normal blood glucose ranges between 70 to 99 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). In a person without diabetes, the body keeps its blood-glucose level between meals in a range of about 70 to 99 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). This level will rise after eating, depending on the type and amount of food consumed, but it will not exceed 139 mg/dL. It also quickly returns to the between-meal range. After you have fasted overnight or for an eight-hour period, your doctor can measure your blood glucose levels with a basic blood test. Blood sugar levels of under 100 are considered normal after an eight-hour fast. However, fasting blood glucose levels between 100-125 mg/dl could signal prediabetes. Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Print Overview Prediabetes means that your blood sugar level is higher than normal but not yet high enough to be type 2 diabetes. Without lifestyle changes, people with prediabetes are very likely to progress to type 2 diabetes. If you have prediabetes, the long-term damage of diabetes — especially to your heart, blood vessels and kidneys — may already be starting. There's good news, however. Progression from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes isn't inevitable. Eating healthy foods, incorporating physical activity in your daily routine and maintaining a healthy weight can help bring your blood sugar level back to normal. Prediabetes affects adults and children. The same lifestyle changes that can help prevent progression to diabetes in adults might also help bring children's blood sugar levels back to normal. Symptoms Prediabetes generally has no signs or symptoms. One possible sign that you may be at risk of type 2 diabetes is darkened skin on certain parts of the body. Affected areas can include the neck, armpits, elbows, knees and knuckles. Classic signs and symptoms that suggest you've moved from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes include: Increased thirst Frequent urination Fatigue Blurred vision When to see a doctor See your doctor if you're concerned about diabetes or if you notice any type 2 diabetes signs or symptoms. Ask your doctor about blood glucose screening if you have any risk factors for prediabetes. Causes The exact cause of prediabetes is unknown. But family history and genetics appear to play an important role. Inactivity and excess fat — especially abdominal fat — also seem to be important factors. What is clear is that people with prediabetes don't process sugar (glucose) properly anymore. As a result, sugar accumulates in the bloodstream instead o Continue reading >>

Fastin Bs Level 113 - Diabetes Message Board - Healthboards

Fastin Bs Level 113 - Diabetes Message Board - Healthboards

HealthBoards > Immune & Autoimmune > Diabetes > fastin BS level 113 What does this mean my cardiologist doesn't seem concerned Of course he's not concerned...because 113 is a perfectly normal fasting blood glucose! My wife had a 110 and the doctor called her in right away. since she is young and is close to boarderline (a pre-diabetic), he told her to cut off all sugers and carbs. Not even juices. It is very hard to totally change your diet but it is managable. He also is having her take a blood test every 6 months to be sure that the suger levels are low. You may want to talk to your doctor Hi. I'm not an endocrinologist but here's a few ideas. I've had my BG's tested by a lab a few times, and twice I've used my meter at the same time that blood was drawn for the lab. I'm satisfied that my meter is accurate to within ~ 0.2 mmol/l (~ 4 mg/dl). I've also used my meter on clean hands to obtain 5 readings within the space of a few minutes on different fingers, and all readings were within 0.2 mmol/l. Of course it is probably the case that the lab results are not always accurate. This means that no lab result is entirely reliable but multiple lab results along with comparing results to those of my meter decrease uncertainty. Or else I can say that although I may not be certain that my meter displays true measurements I can be pretty sure that serial readings over hours indicate true rises and falls. And that if my meter displays say 10 (180 mg/dl) that my BG might be 9.5 or 10.5 but it's still high, I should work to get it lower. OK. You can probably see what I'm getting to. There are a lot of variables. For example my BG might be 120 mg/dl 5 minutes after getting out of bed at 8 am. I might be having blood drawn for fasting BG at 9.30 am. I've been told I can drink water Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Testing 101 For People With Type 2 Diabetes: Why, When & What To Do

Blood Sugar Testing 101 For People With Type 2 Diabetes: Why, When & What To Do

The Why I am a registered dietitian and certified diabetes educator, have run Diabetes Centers in hospitals, have a private practice in medical nutrition therapy specializing in metabolic syndrome, weight loss, and type 2 diabetes, and have written a NY Times Bestselling book on the same topics. January 10, 2012 was the world-wide release of my newest book, The Diabetes Miracle. I have had type 2 diabetes for 15 years. Guess what? If you asked me what my blood sugar is right now, I have no idea. Neither do you! Did you know that unless your blood sugar is over 200mg/dL, you most likely will have none of the traditional diabetes symptoms such as excessive thirst, urination, fatigue, hunger, or wounds that will not heal? If you’ve run blood sugar over 200mg/dL for a period of time, you probably won’t even have symptoms when your sugar exceeds that 200mg/dL point. If you have been prescribed medication for diabetes that is aimed at reducing your blood sugar and you begin to feel shaky, dizzy, nauseated, can’t speak clearly, can’t think, feel wiped out….you may assume that you are hypoglycemic. Are you? Without testing, you really have no idea…your once high readings may have returned to normal range…and your body may assume you are hypoglycemic when you are far from it! If you grab some juice or glucose tabs, you will push that normal sugar right back into the very high range. Or maybe those symptoms really are hypoglycemia and if you don’t treat it, you will lose consciousness, fall down the stairs, drop your child, run off the road. Your Hemoglobin A1C might be 6.3 and you think to yourself: “Wow, my blood sugar is now normal…why should I spend the money and take the time to test?” Do you realize that hemoglobin A1C is your average blood sugar 24 ho Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level Of 113

Blood Sugar Level Of 113

HealingWell.com Forum > Diseases & Conditions > Diabetes > Blood sugar level of 113 Hello all. I had a colonoscopy about 1 month ago (I have ulcerative colitis) While I was on the bed waiting they took a blood sample and when I went to the Dr. after he said that my blood sugar was a little high (113) he said he wanted me to take a "fasting blood sample" to be sure. Here is the thing though. On the way home I realized "wait a minute. When I had the last test done I had already not eaten anything in preparation for the colonoscopy?" Will this test be any different? How high is 113? All the Dr. told me was that 105 was "high normal". Hi edco. The 113 could have been influenced bya couple of things: stress and what was in your system. There might have been stuff in the preps for the colonoscopy to affect the blood sugar. So, go on with the next blood test and see what it says. Yes, it's creeping to the high side for fasting but because of factors you don't know about,I think youshould take a 'wait and see' stance. If there is diabetes in your family, if you're some pounds overweight - then this might be a wake-up call. Don't stress over it but follow the instructions for what the doctor/nurse says to do before the test. Let us know how it comes out, ok? Good luck. Thanks Lanie. I'll see how it goes. It just kind of completely shocked me. I do have some history in my moms side of the family. The only thing that bothers me is that if it is high I don't know much to do about it. I already don't eat sugar, follow a strict diet, work-out 6 days a week. I walk around at about 15% body fat. The Dr. did mention that the IV can sometimes throw things off but I got the blood taken before the IV. It could be if the diet you follow because of UC is high in carbs,your blood sugarmay be Continue reading >>

Being A

Being A "pre-diabetic"

I've never been a fan of the term "pre-diabetes." Of course, I'm no medical professional. I'm not able to dispute the scientific validity of this term and how it's utilized. Online research tells me that the CDC has reported that one in four people (roughly 57 million people) have pre-diabetes and therefore have a higher risk of developing Type 2 within 10 years. But as a jaded and skeptical Type 1 for now more than a quarter century, I have reservations with this "diagnosis" and how the existing medical establishment throws this around in what I'd describe as a reckless manner. For example, take my wife who was recently told at an employer-offered health screening that she has "pre-diabetes" because of a single fasting blood glucose reading of 113 mg/dL. Yes, that's right. 113. One one three. (Waiting, allowing that number to process...) This is where I let Suzi jump in and tell the story, as it happened to her... The health screeners were testing the "Big Bad 3" (Cholesterol, Triglycerides, & Blood Sugar, along with basic height, weight, and BMI (Body Mass Index). Employees were told no drinking alcohol within 48 hours of the testing (wine festival on Sunday meant FAIL here), no drug use within 24 hours (Tylenol because of previous FAIL meant another FAIL), no eating or drinking except for water within past 12 hours (FAILED by an hour), and no tobacco use within an hour of test (Non-smoker, so PASSED - woohoo!). I had hoped to be able to back out of the screening, due to the failures; but I also failed at that; so at 7:56 a.m., I trotted over to begin the torture (really wasn’t torture – but nobody likes be told what's wrong with them…) Started out with filling out what would be my results form; then my height, weight, and blood pressure were taken. Next, I move Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Too High? Blood Sugar Too Low?

Blood Sugar Too High? Blood Sugar Too Low?

If you have diabetes, your blood sugar doesn't call your cell phone and say, "My readings are too high right now." Instead, blood sugar rises slowly and gradually, causing complications that may damage your organs -- heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, feet, and even skin are at risk. Sometimes you wonder, "Is my blood sugar too high? Too low?" because "normal" levels are so important. "Diabetes is not a 'one-size-fits-all' condition, and neither are blood sugar readings. Different targets are established for different populations," says Amber Taylor, M.D., director of the Diabetes Center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore, Maryland. Targets may vary depending on a person's age, whether they have type 1 or type 2 diabetes and for how long, what medications they're taking, whether they have complications, and, if the patient is a female, whether she is pregnant. "Patients on insulin may need to test more frequently than someone on oral agents," says Taylor. "Those with type 1 diabetes always require insulin, but many with type 2 diabetes also need it." Target Blood Sugar Levels If you have diabetes, these are target "control" blood glucose levels, using a rating of milligrams to deciliter, or mg/dl: Blood sugar levels before meals (preprandial): 70 to 130 mg/dL Blood sugar levels one to two hours after the start of a meal (postprandial): less than 180 mg/dL Blood sugar levels indicating hypoglycemia or low blood glucose: 70 or below mg/dL Types of Blood Sugar Tests Blood glucose testing can screen, diagnose, and monitor. Glucose is measured either after fasting for eight to ten hours, at a random time, following a meal (postprandial), or as part of an oral glucose challenge or tolerance test. You can compare your levels to these results for specific tests, based on clinical Continue reading >>

Discussion: Blood Sugar Levels And Type 2 Diabetes

Discussion: Blood Sugar Levels And Type 2 Diabetes

When it comes to blood sugar levels, the numbers always seem to confuse people. So we're here today to cover a whole range of reader questions that have come in. If you have questions of your own, join the discussion – please feel free to leave your comments at the bottom. Healthy blood sugar goal ranges Healthy blood sugar control values will depend on several factors, the most important being when you check it. Blood glucose levels will rise after eating meals regardless of whether a person has diabetes–however, someone with good control will be able to bring it down to a stable level after 2 hours. The diagnostic values below are for non pregnant adults with type 2 diabetes. Ranges are different for children, those with type I diabetes and pregnant women. FASTING AFTER MEALS 2 HOURS HbA1c Normal 70-99 mg/dL (4-6 mmol/L)* <140 mg/dL (<7.8 mmol/L)** <5.7% Pre-Diabetes 100-125 mg/dL (6.1-6.9 mmol/L) 140-179 mg/dL 5.7-6.4% Diabetes >126 mg/dL (>7 mmol/L) >180 mg/dL 6.5% and higher *Note that different agencies establish different standards. Some range 70-100 mg/dL, some 70-110 mg/dL, some 70-130 mg/dL **Some agencies recommend <180 mg/dL post-meal especially in the elderly and those who have had diabetes for a very long time What should your goals be? That is between you and your healthcare team because it does depend on various factors. But overall your goal is to gain good control of your diabetes, which means maintaining normal levels or getting as close to normal levels as possible (refer to the normal numbers above). We’ve answered some specific questions regarding blood sugar over here, so be sure to check those out as well. Some specific comments and questions we’ve received regarding blood sugar levels include: 1. My post meal is hovering around 140-160, Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar 113 Mg/dl Fasting - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Blood Sugar 113 Mg/dl Fasting - Good Or Bad? - Bloodsugareasy.com

Your blood glucose level is 113 mg/dl fasting? (or 6.27mmol/l) Blood sugar 113 mg/dl (6.27mmol/l) fasting - is that good or bad? We help you interpret your blood sugar values. You have tested your blood sugar fasting and the result was 113 mg/dl. Let's have a look at the blood sugar gauge: Slightly too high blood sugar (beginning hyperglycemia) To improve your blood sugar fasting you need to lower your blood glucose level by 13mg/dl. Your fasting blood sugar level should always be below 100mg/dl but not fall below 80mg/dl. Blood sugar testing measures how much glucose is in the bloodstream. No matter what is eaten, from a small snack to a large meal, blood glucose values rise in response to any carbohydrates that are digested. In a healthy person, the pancreas reacts to the higher blood glucose by releasing insulin, a hormone that converts blood sugar into usable energy. In addition to carbohydrates, other body processes also raise blood sugar levels.When a person fasts, which is defined medically as not eating or drinking anything aside from water for at least eight hours, the release of glucagon is triggered in the body. Glucagon instructs the liver to metabolize reserve supplies of glycogen, which are then circulated into the bloodstream as sugars. Accordingly, the amount of plasma glucose goes up. This is how the body creates energy even while fasting. In sum, when diabetes is not present the body responds to all blood sugars by manufacturing insulin in proportion with the glucose level. When it comes to fasting blood sugars, insulin lowers and stabilizes the levels so that they remain in a normal, healthy range. Yet when any form of diabetes is present, either pre-diabetes, Type 1 diabetes or Type 2 diabetes, the whole physiological process doesnt work correctly, Continue reading >>

I Recently Received A Fasting Glucose Level Of 113. I Am

I Recently Received A Fasting Glucose Level Of 113. I Am

A new question is answered every 9 seconds Ask an ExpertExperts are full of valuable knowledge and are ready to help with any question. Credentials confirmed by a Fortune 500 verification firm. Get a Professional AnswerVia email, text message, or notification as you wait on our site. Ask follow up questions if you need to. 100% Satisfaction GuaranteeRate the answer you receive. Ask-a-doc Web sites: If you've got a quick question, you can try to get an answer from sites that say they have various specialists on hand to give quick answers... Justanswer.com. JustAnswer.com...has seen a spike since October in legal questions from readers about layoffs, unemployment and severance. Traffic on JustAnswer rose 14 percent...and had nearly 400,000 page views in 30 days...inquiries related to stress, high blood pressure, drinking and heart pain jumped 33 percent. Tory Johnson, GMA Workplace Contributor, discusses work-from-home jobs, such as JustAnswer in which verified Experts answer peoples questions. I will tell you that...the things you have to go through to be an Expert are quite rigorous. I feel so much better today, and upon further investigation believe that there is a chance that the responses I got saved me from a serious, even life threatening situation. I am very grateful to the experts who answered me. I can go as far as to say it could have resulted in saving my sons life and our entire family now knows what bipolar is and how to assist and understand my most wonderful son, brother and friend to all who loves him dearly.Thank you very much I thank-you so much! It really helped to have this information andconfirmation. We will watch her carefully and get her in for theexamination and US right away if things do not improve. God bless you aswell! Outstanding response t Continue reading >>

Non-fasting Blood Sugar Levels

Non-fasting Blood Sugar Levels

Non-fasting blood sugar levels are considered random readings where a person's levels should be no higher than 200 mg/dl, or it indicates type 2 diabetes. A fasting glucose level, on the other hand, should be no higher than 126. Further tests provide insight into how long it takes a person's blood sugar to spike and drop after eating. Warning Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include having close relatives with the condition, being over 45 years of age, being overweight, not exercising on a regular basis, and having gestational diabetes during pregnancy. Because symptoms can be mild for months or even years, type 2 often is initially indicated during a routine non-fasting blood test. Considerations Diabetes cannot be confirmed by non-fasting blood sugar levels, so physicians require fasting tests as well. Diabetes is suspected if the non-fasting level is higher than 200 mg/dl, especially if the patient also has symptoms of increased thirst and urination, along with fatigue. Even soon after eating, such high blood sugar numbers are considered unhealthy. The physician will advise the person to return for a fasting blood sugar test, which is performed after at least eight hours with no food. Identification A fasting blood sugar level indicates type 2 diabetes if the reading is higher than 126 on two separate days. Numbers between 100 and 126 are considered impaired, or pre-diabetes, where a person can more easily return to normal levels through diet changes and exercise. Types A glucose tolerance test is another type of non-fasting blood sugar diagnostic procedure. The patient typically drinks water with a specific amount of glucose added, and then a health care professional determines how long it takes the blood sugar level to peak and return to normal. Levels should drop Continue reading >>

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