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Best Snacks For Low Blood Sugar

> When Blood Sugar Is Too Low

> When Blood Sugar Is Too Low

No matter what we're doing — even when we're sleeping — our brains depend on glucose to function. Glucose is a sugar that comes from the foods we eat, and it's also formed and stored inside the body. It's the main source of energy for the cells of our body, and it's carried to each cell through the bloodstream. The blood glucose level is the amount of glucose in the blood. When blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar levels) drop too low, it's called hypoglycemia (pronounced: hi-po-gly-SEE-me-uh). Very low blood sugar levels can cause severe symptoms that need to be treated right away. People with diabetes can have low blood sugar levels because of the medicines they have to take to manage their diabetes. They may need a hormone called insulin or diabetes pills (or both) to help their bodies use the sugar in their blood. These medicines help take the sugar out of the blood and get it into the body's cells, which makes the level of sugar in the blood go down. But sometimes it's a tricky balancing act and blood sugar levels can get too low. People with diabetes need to keep their blood sugars from getting too high or too low. Part of keeping blood sugar levels in a healthy range is having good timing, and balancing when and what they eat and when they exercise with when they take medicines. Some things that can make low blood sugar levels more likely to happen are: skipping meals and snacks not eating enough food at a meal or snack exercising longer or harder than usual without eating some extra food getting too much insulin not timing the insulin doses properly with meals, snacks, and exercise Also, certain things may increase how quickly insulin gets absorbed into the bloodstream and can make hypoglycemia more likely to occur. For example, taking a hot shower Continue reading >>

Best Snacks For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Best Snacks For People With Type 2 Diabetes

Diabetes can lead to a wide range of symptoms including high blood pressure, circulation issues, kidney damage, blindness, and skin problems. But the right diet can help manage these symptoms. Healthful snacks for people with diabetes can keep blood sugar in check. They may also help reduce the severity of diabetes symptoms such as high blood pressure. Eating right can feel daunting, particularly at first, but people with diabetes can continue enjoying a wide range of snacks. Foods high in protein High-protein foods include nuts, legumes, animal products such as eggs and cheese, and alternatives to meat such as tofu and mushrooms. Healthful snacks for people with diabetes that are satisfying and rich in protein include: roasted chickpeas apples or celery with almond butter almonds, walnuts, or pistachios trail mix, particularly if it doesn't contain sweetened ingredients hard-boiled eggs plain yogurt, particularly Greek yogurt low-sodium cottage cheese mixed with fresh fruit diced avocado and cherry tomatoes snap peas or other raw veggies with hummus Several of these options can work well as both sweet and savory snacks. Honey-roasted chickpeas provide a good balance of sweet and savory. Nuts can be paired with slices of cheese or dried fruit. Adding nuts or fruit can also make yogurt sweeter or more savory. For the turkey roll-ups, people can use thinly sliced turkey or lettuce to replace the pita. Adding hummus and vegetables makes for a hearty snack. High-fiber snacks Vegetables, legumes, and nuts are excellent sources of fiber. Whole grains, oats, and some fruits are as well. People with diabetes can try some of these high-fiber snacks: smoothies blended with high-fiber, non-starchy vegetables sprouted, whole-grain breads whole-grain or bean pastas oatmeal, mixed wi Continue reading >>

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

"Don't eat between meals." That's one piece of advice diabetics might want to take with a grain of salt. If you go more than four or five hours between meals, a mid-afternoon snack might be just what the doctor ordered to help you keep your blood sugar steady. Snacking is also important if you're taking medication that could cause a blood-sugar low between meals. Discuss with your doctor or a registered dietitian what snacking approach is right for you. Keep your snacks to 150 calories or less The danger of snacks is that they can become more like extra meals if you go overboard. First, make sure you're truly hungry—and not just bored or stressed or craving chocolate—before reaching for a snack. Then limit yourself to 150 calories per snack. (Cutting calories is easier than you think.) This will help keep your snacking "honest." After all, it's hard to find a candy bar with only 150 calories. And if you're hankering for a candy bar, but a healthier snack doesn't appeal, you're probably not truly hungry. Beware of low-fat snacks Studies show that people tend to eat about 28 percent more of a snack when it's low-fat because they think they're saving on calories. But low-fat snacks, such as cookies, only have about 11 percent fewer calories than their full-fat counterparts. Stick to the same amount you'd eat if you thought the snack was full-fat. Need more snack ideas? Check out these delicious snacks for adults. Check the ingredients Avoid heavily processed crackers and chips. If the list of ingredients is long and has big words with lots of syllables, put it back on the shelf. Stay away from these worst eating habits for diabetics. Watch those carbs Carbohydrates are major culprits when it comes to raising blood sugar (though there are some good carbs for diabetes). Continue reading >>

The 7 Best Snacks For Hypoglycemics

The 7 Best Snacks For Hypoglycemics

Low blood sugar isn’t just an issue for diabetics. Hypoglycemia is a common side effect of certain medication as well as a symptom associated with eating disorders, pregnancy and any disorder affecting the liver, heart or kidneys. If you don’t physically need an insulin pump or shots, the best way to keep your blood sugar in check is through your diet. When your blood sugar dips, you feel weak and nauseated. You may even become dizzy or irrationally angry. Snacking on something sugary, however, is just as scary, a different culprit wielding the same symptoms. Most of the food available out in the open is too simple. The solution, then, is to always have snacks on hand. Depending on what you eat, your pancreas releases various amounts of insulin. The best foods to combat a blood sugar dip (while preventing a spike) are complex carbohydrates, produce and protein. Additionally, make sure you’re drinking water with your snack—it’s an easy way to stabilize your sugar levels, especially if you’re eating something sweeter like a fruit. 1. Nuts Nuts are easy to carry and an excellent source of protein, fiber and omega-3 fatty acids, so unless you’re allergic, they’re one of the best things you can put in your body. If you’re prediabetic, eating certain nuts, like almonds, cashews or a handful of pistachios, daily can lower your risk of developing type 2. 2. Cheese Cheese may be fatty (remember, not all fat is bad), but it has relatively low sugar levels. A serving of cheese (one string cheese, or a scoop of cottage cheese) contains enough protein and fat to combat weakness and keep you going. 3. Fibrous Fruit Not all fruits are created equally, and some of them, such as grapes and bananas, are more sugar than substance. Fruits like apples, pears and mangoes ar Continue reading >>

Kids And Diabetes: Snack Hacks To Reverse Your Child’s Low Blood Sugar

Kids And Diabetes: Snack Hacks To Reverse Your Child’s Low Blood Sugar

Diabetes can be full of ups and downs – literally. While blood glucose levels can rise, they also can come crashing down. And when they go down too low, your child may experience low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia. If this serious condition is not treated, it can worsen and cause your child to pass out. Your child may become hypoglycemic if she: Skips or delays a meal Doesn’t eat enough carbohydrates Takes too much insulin or diabetes medicine Has been vomiting and/or has had diarrhea Is more active than usual Had inaccurate blood-glucose readings It’s important that you’re able to recognize the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia. These include: Shakiness and/or dizziness Sweating Behavior changes, such as nervousness or irritability Extreme hunger Weakness or tiredness Headache If your child experiences any of these signs or symptoms, check her blood glucose right away. If you’re unable to check it immediately, treat your child as if she has low blood sugar. How to treat hypoglycemia You can reverse your child’s low blood sugar by giving her 15 grams of something high in sugar. This may include: 4 ounces (1/2 cup) of regular fruit juice like orange, apple or grape juice 4 ounces (1/2 cup) of regular soda pop (not diet) 3 or 4 glucose tablets 5 to 6 hard candies that are safe (like Life Savers) After your child consumes a high-sugar item, wait 15 minutes. Then check her blood sugar again. If it’s still low, give her something to eat or drink that’s high in sugar again. Once her blood sugar returns to normal, give her a meal or snack to help keep low blood sugar from returning. If your child regularly becomes hypoglycemic, consult with your doctor. Specific treatment for your child’s individual case will be based on: Your child’s age, overall health and Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Hypoglycemia For Dummies Cheat Sheet

Hypoglycemia is a condition you definitely have to pay attention to, but once you get in the habit of choosing healthy foods and avoiding processed foods that can wreak havoc with your blood sugar levels, you can enjoy a healthy lifestyle without too much thought. Making the transition can lead to cravings for the “old, bad” foods, but you can come up with strategies to deal with those and find that the cravings weaken over time. Foods to Choose if You’re Hypoglycemic You can help manage your hypoglycemia, often referred to as low blood sugar, by choosing foods that improve your condition. You can enjoy a variety of foods, and the foods in the following list are tasty and healthy: Organic meats (grass-fed, if possible), vegetables, and fruits whenever you can High-quality protein (fish, poultry, lean meat, free-range eggs) Fresh fruits, preferably with a meal or half an hour before. Eat blueberries and raspberries often; stone fruits, such as peaches and nectarines, are also good. You may not be able to tolerate fruit initially. If that’s the case, wait several months before trying again. Fresh vegetables, especially dark, leafy greens, lightly cooked or, as much as possible, raw Raw, unsalted, unseasoned nuts and seeds Alternative sweeteners, such as stevia Foods to Avoid if You’re Hypoglycemic Controlling low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, is easier if you just say no to foods that can throw your blood glucose levels out of whack. The following list of foods and food groups are those to avoid: Processed foods Fried foods MSG (monosodium glutamate) All soft drinks Artificial sweeteners such as aspartame (NutraSweet), sucralose (Splenda), and saccharine (Sweet’n Low) Hot dogs, sausages, and deli meats Having arguments or debates or discussing unpleasant topic Continue reading >>

If You Have Diabetes, What Is Your Go To Emergency Snack For Low Blood Sugar? We're Looking For Some New Ideas!

If You Have Diabetes, What Is Your Go To Emergency Snack For Low Blood Sugar? We're Looking For Some New Ideas!

Submit My husbands birthday is coming up and we are going for dinner then he and our friends may venture elsewhere. My question is if you go out how do you explain the diabetes kit? Do bouncers even care? (Needles, lancets etc) Submit Submit Submit I have been been getting really low blood sugar (around the 50s) ever since I came back to college a week and a half ago. I'm usually in class when it starts to happen or really far away from my dorm. Also I eat a healthy well balanced breakfast and lunch. The only thing is that I have to walk a lot since it is a really big campus. It is really scaring me. Does anyone have any opinions on what can help me? My son Brad was asked to speak last night at a JDRF walkathon fund raising evening about his experience with AFREZZA the new Inhaled Insulin. People were VERY excited. Over 100 attendees. He is 26&T1 Continue reading >>

Top 23 Snacks For People With Diabetes

Top 23 Snacks For People With Diabetes

NEW! Download our free grocery shopping companions: Free Foods – a guide to foods that won’t impact your blood sugar 15 Carbs Snack List – a mega-list of great snack ideas What’s the best snack for someone with diabetes? A snack with few carbs! (There are some exceptions. If you are planning on working out or have low blood sugar, than some carbohydrates may be beneficial.) Here are our top 23 favorite low-carb snacks in no particular order: Peanut butter Cheddar cheese String cheese Cottage cheese Broccoli with melted cheese Salad with free veggies and low-carb dressing Tomato and mozzarella salad Celery with peanut butter Fresh strawberries or blueberries with low-fat plain yogurt Veggies with hummus Cucumbers with olive-oil and rice vinegar Carrot sticks Snap peas with Caesar dressing Green beans cooked and cooled with lemon juice Nuts Sauteed Spinach Pickles Rotisserie chicken Deli meat Pepperoni and cheese Beef jerky Hard boiled eggs What are your favorites? You can get more snack ideas in our recipes forum, diabetes cookbook, and the Simply Cooking blog. Further reading on diabetes diet: Read more about low blood glucose/sugar (hypoglycemia), low-carb diet, snacks. Continue reading >>

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

Yes, you can snack if you have diabetes When your stomach starts to rumble, you need a snack that can curb your hunger without blowing your blood sugar. Just like meals, snacks should be a combination of fat, protein, and carbohydrates. Aim for one that consists of 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates and 100 to 200 calories (depending on your meal plan and medication). Here are five that typically get a seal of approval from diabetes educators and nutritionists. Whole-grain crackers, grapes, and cottage cheese Nutrient-rich whole grains like cracked wheat, whole wheat, rye, and quinoa can lower blood sugar and cholesterol. The cottage cheese adds protein to stabilize blood sugar, curb hunger pangs, and provide calcium for strong bones. Buy your favorite whole-grain crackers, and make sure that the first ingredient is whole-wheat flour or another whole grain, such as rye. (Even if the ingredient list says "wheat flour," it is not a whole-grain food unless it specifies "whole-wheat flour.") Arrange on a small plate 2 crackers, 1/4 cup nonfat cottage cheese, and 1/4 cup grapes. Serving size: 2 crackers, 1/4 cup cottage cheese, and 1/4 cup grapes. Nutritional information—Calories: 138, Total Carbohydrate: 21.2 g (7%), Dietary Fiber: 1.5 g (6%), Sugars 11.9 g Homemade popcorn Popcorn is high in fiber, and when made from scratch is an all-natural food without additives and artificial flavorings. Pour 1 tablespoon of mild-flavored oil such as canola into a heavy-bottomed medium-large pot. Cover the bottom of the pot with 1/2 cup of popcorn kernels spread in a thin layer. (If the kernels are too crowded, not all of them will pop.) Cover the pot and heat on medium, shaking the pot every minute or so until all of the kernels have popped. Take care not to cook too long, which could Continue reading >>

100 Pwd’s Answer What Is Their Go To Solution For A Low Blood Sugar

100 Pwd’s Answer What Is Their Go To Solution For A Low Blood Sugar

If you are a PWD (Person with Diabetes), or know someone who is, you know the frustration and fear that comes along with a low blood sugar. Treating a low blood sugar can be challenging, especially with the brain fog and confusion that many PWDs experience during the moment. Everyone is given a ‘recommended’ treatment by their doctors and endocrinology team, but throughout the process of living with diabetes, you probably have developed your own little tips and tricks that have helped you work through your low blood sugars. The Diabetes Council has interviewed 100 People with Diabetes and parents of Type 1 kiddos to share with us their “Go to treatment for low blood sugars”. We received an overwhelming response and had some amazing treatment methods shared with us, that we feel will benefit you greatly. Read on to find out what those that live and deal with diabetes on a daily basis have found to help treat low blood sugars efficiently. 1. “Juice, and Crackers”, “If I don’t have either of those I use glucose tablets”. Jaimie Rose Chaffin 2. “Peanut butter crackers or half a peanut butter sandwich”. Jacqueline Nichole, a mother of a Type 1 3. “Either a juice box or a glucose liquid “shot”. Rhon Marquess, a mother of a Type 1 4. “For me it’s a Sunny D”. Beth Ford 5. “Coke or Orange”. Susanne Malhiet-Fontenot 6. “Small biscuit and a juice”. Audrey Kerr 7.“Starburst when she’s on the go. Juice at home/school. More recently I started using a half a banana at night for borderline numbers to give a little boost, and it’s worked really well.” Wendy Rose, a mother of a Type 1 8. “Usually fruit snacks.. it still amazes me how she can chew them without chocking and being asleep the whole time”. Amy Ermel, a mother of a Type 1 9 Continue reading >>

The Best Snacks For Reactive Hypoglycemia

The Best Snacks For Reactive Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia, or low blood glucose, can cause potentially life-threatening reactions in people with diabetes. But people who do not have diabetes can also have hypoglycemia, which cause shakiness, sweating, lightheadedness, difficulty concentrating and weakness. Non-diabetic hypoglycemia, often called functional or reactive hypoglycemia, can often be modified by careful attention to diet. Choosing the right type of snacks reduces the rapid rises and falls in blood sugar that cause hypoglycemia. Pick snacks that contain protein, fats and carbohydrates with a low-glycemic load. Video of the Day Because hypoglycemia occurs one to three hours after a meal, eating a snack designed to prevent hypoglycemia during this time frame can ward off symptoms. Avoid snacks that contain refined sugars, which raise your blood sugar levels rapidly but also cause a rapid fall in people with reactive hypoglycemia, who often have abnormal insulin responses. Insulin helps cells absorb glucose. Protein, fat and fiber all help stabilize blood sugars. Carbohydrates have a low-glycemic load, meaning they have a minimal effect on raising blood sugar levels and also help stabilize blood sugars. Avoid caffeine and alcohol; both can increase the symptoms of hypoglycemia. Nuts are a good snack for people with hypoglycemia. They contain a number of elements that slow the absorption of glucose. Nuts are high in protein, fats and fiber, all of which increase the time needed to break down and absorb glucose. Nuts are also easily portable, so you can carry them with you for a quick snack on the run. Although fruit, which contains carbohydrates, may not seem like a good choice for hypoglycemia, many fruits have a low-glycemic load. Fruits with a low-glycemic load include apples, pear and oranges. Fruits are Continue reading >>

What To Eat When You Have Low Blood Sugar

What To Eat When You Have Low Blood Sugar

When your blood sugar dips, it can leave you feeling hungry, shaky, and lightheaded. This can happen to anyone who hasn’t eaten in several hours. When blood sugar drops below normal levels, it’s called hypoglycemia. In people with diabetes, hypoglycemia can be a life-threatening complication of diabetes medication, other health problems like infection, or inadequate caloric intake. You can lower your chances of low blood sugar—and treat it when it occurs—with some simple steps. Know the Symptoms Sugar, or glucose, is a key source of energy for the body. When blood sugar drops, you may get these symptoms: Hunger Shakiness Sweating Dizziness Lightheadedness Confusion Anxiety Feeling tired or sleepy Headache What You Can Do Most of the sugar or glucose in your blood comes from carbohydrates. Carbohydrates are the sugars and starches in grains, beans, vegetables, fruit, milk and milk products, honey, and sugar. If you don’t have diabetes and you’re feeling the unpleasant effects of a drop in blood sugar, eat or drink something with carbohydrates. Good choices are a piece of fruit, a few whole wheat crackers, a glass of milk, or a carton of yogurt. In people with diabetes, hypoglycemia can come on suddenly and needs to be treated right away so it doesn’t get worse. Eat or drink a quickly digested carbohydrate food, such as: ½ cup fruit juice ½ cup of a regular soft drink (not a diet soda) 1 cup of milk 5 or 6 hard candies 4 or 5 saltine crackers 2 tablespoons of raisins 3 to 4 teaspoons of sugar or honey 3 or 4 glucose tablets or a serving of glucose gel Each of these choices provides about 15 grams of carbohydrate. Wait for 15 or 20 minutes, then check your blood sugar with a blood glucose meter. If your blood sugar is still low, have another portion of carb Continue reading >>

The Bedtime Snack Unraveled

The Bedtime Snack Unraveled

Despite what you may have heard, it is not only “okay,” but actually VERY IMPORTANT to eat a bedtime snack! The common response to this is, “But I thought we weren’t supposed to eat after (insert time here)?” Let’s unravel this myth, by looking at the following three arguments: 1) Bedtime snacks provide unnecessary calories. If it were all about calories, then this argument may be legit, but…it’s not. So much more goes into metabolism than just calories; food quality and the type of macronutrients (P, F and C) consumed, timing of when you’re eating, hormone regulation, sleep, and the list goes on! The reason it’s important to eat a bedtime snack is because, in order to support your metabolism and therefore maintain your weight/promote weight loss, you need stable blood sugar levels. The reasoning for the combination of carbohydrate and fat before bed is because the carbs bring your blood sugar levels back up slightly (they’ve been falling since dinner or the time you last ate) and the fat slows the assimilation of the carbs into your blood stream, promoting nice stable blood sugar levels all night long. When blood sugar levels are stable, your fat BURNING hormone, glucagon, can do it’s awesome job (not to mention, the other sweet benefits of balanced blood sugar levels, including consistent energy levels, focus, stable moods, and no cravings just to name a few). If you take your blood sugar levels for a daily—maybe hourly—rollercoaster ride, you are creating an enviroment that your fat STORING hormone, insulin, THRIVES in! By following the Three-Three Rule that I outline in my article, Back to the Basics, you’re setting yourself up for success by promoting stable blood sugar levels all day long. Who wouldn’t want to create this same type Continue reading >>

5 Snacks To Stabilize Your Blood Sugars

5 Snacks To Stabilize Your Blood Sugars

Are you sticking to three healthy meals per day but still having a hard time stabilizing your glucose numbers? Many of my clients find it surprising that I recommend they actually eat more frequently than just three times per day. It seems counterintuitive to them – they think that if they’re trying to improve their eating habits they should be eating less not more. In reality, though, inconsistent eating habits or not eating for several hours between meals can make it increasingly difficult to stabilize blood glucose. Going hours between meals may lead to numbers that are too low, sending you towards the nearest vending machine or causing you to over-eat at your next meal. So, snacking between meals can be an essential part of daily diabetes management to help avoid major peaks and valleys in blood sugar ranges and also to prevent over-eating at mealtimes. But it’s the nutritional quality and portion sizes of your snacks that can either make or break your daily diabetes management plan. The goal when snacking is to raise your blood glucose numbers to a healthy level in between meals at a gradual pace. This can usually be accomplished by pairing a high-fiber carbohydrate with a bit of protein. While the complex carbohydrates work to increase your blood glucose numbers to a healthy range, the protein helps to slow this process to a steady speed, allowing for more stabilized numbers and consistent energy levels. Need some examples? Take a look at these perfect pairings that are easy to prepare and perfect for an on-the-go snack: 1. Veggies and Hummus; Hummus is a dip traditionally made of chickpeas, olive oil and sesame seed paste (tahini) and is rich in heart-healthy fats, protein and complex carbohydrates. Pair a couple of tablespoons of this Mediterranean favorit Continue reading >>

4 Ways To Keep Your Blood Sugar Steady

4 Ways To Keep Your Blood Sugar Steady

You’re having a hot or cold sweat, losing your concentration, and you feel shaky. Maybe you’re a little nauseated or even faint. Most of us know the feeling. Most of us have been there at one time or another, especially women. The blood sugar crash, or what my colleague at The UltraWellness Center, Dr. Mark Hyman, calls “The Food Emergency,” is super common. It’s an awful feeling that can interfere with work, productivity, and even our safety if it happens while we’re driving! As a young mom, keeping up with a breastfeeding baby and toddlers, then again later as a medical resident working insanely long hours, I often skipped meals, or at least skimped on them, only to find myself at the bottom of the blood sugar barrel. And what happens when you land there? You’re body goes into survival mode – literally – and you will eat ANYTHING in front of you. Since most Americans live in a sea of quick carbohydrate and sugar “fixes,” we grab what is quick and right in front of us. Most often that is bread, chips, a cookie or brownie, a soda, juice, a candy bar, or other quick acting sugary food. And hey, in a pinch, it really does feel life saving. But in the long run, this is not a fix at all. In fact, the cycles of low and high blood sugar, and the reliance on sweets and carbs to rescue us from our blood sugar crashes are a key cause of our national diabetes and obesity epidemics. And did you know that Alzheimers disease is now considered a form of diabetes? YIKES! Over time I learned how to keep my blood sugar steady, completely prevent blood sugar crashes, and always have access to good quality foods. Here are my 4 key tips so you can do the same! 1. Eat a quality breakfast. What you eat for breakfast sets the barometer for your day’s blood sugar. Eat a Continue reading >>

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