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Best Home Glucose Test Kit

Top 10 Best Glucose Meters From Consumer Reports 2015

Top 10 Best Glucose Meters From Consumer Reports 2015

World-wide annual sales of glucose meters and test-strip supplies tally up to well over 10 billion dollars each year, but with over 50 styles and brands to choose from, it can be hard to determine which meter is not only the best for your needs but also best in terms of accuracy, price, and ease of use. Thanks to Stacey Divone from The Girl with the Portable Pancreas, we got the inside scoop on the 2015 Consumer Reports review of today’s glucose meter technology. The first nine of these meters scored as “excellent” in accuracy and “above 80 out of 100” for their overall assessment. Here are the top 10 recommended meters: FreeStyle Lite: $20 for the meter with an annual cost of $2410 at 4 strips per day FreeStyle Freedom Lite: $20 for the meter with an annual cost of $2410 at 4 strips per day Bayer Contour Next: $20 for the meter with an annual cost of $1460 at 4 strips per day Well at Walgreens True Metrix: $22 for the meter with an annual cost of $1225 at 4 strips per day Bayer Breeze 2: $25 for the meter with an annual cost of $1900 at 4 strips per day Up & Up Blood Glucose Meter from Target: $15 for the meter with an annual cost of $525 at 4 strips per day Accu-Chek Aviva Plus: $30 for the meter with an annual cost of $2115 at 4 strips per day ReliOn Micro from Walmart: $15 for the meter with an annual cost of $525 at 4 strips per day Accu-Chek Compact Plus: $75 for the meter with an annual cost of $2030 at 4 strips per day ReliOn Ultima from Walmart: $15 for the meter with an annual cost of $525 at 4 strips per day Do you use one of these top 10 meters? What are your favorite and least favorite features? Further reading on blood sugar monitoring: Continue reading >>

Storing Your Glucose Test Strips Correctly

Storing Your Glucose Test Strips Correctly

Storing glucose test strips incorrectly, especially in high humidity, can lead to falsely high readings. Congratulations on your decision to manage your diabetes using a home glucose monitoring system. The success of glucose monitoring at home depends on accurate readings. Though you may face several issues when checking your glucose levels at home, inaccurate glucose readings are often resulted from test strip errors. If you use test strips to monitor your glucose levels at home you must ensure you close the vial immediately after using them especially in in a humid environment. Failure to do so can potentially expose the test strips to humidity. Exposure to humidity can often result in erroneous glucose test results. How to Properly Store Test Strips? To ensure proper storage of your glucose test strips follow these 4 steps: Store the test strips in their original vial Close the vial tightly after taking out the test strips Write the discard date on the vial. Discard date is 9 months after you first open the vial. Check the expiration date on the vial before using test strips Test strips contain electrical terminals that can quantify the amount of Gluconic acid present in the blood sample. The current amount of glucose produced depends on the level of Gluconic acid. The intensity of the current is then measured by the blood glucose monitor and a numbered reading is generated. Therefore it’s crucial to tightly close the vial immediately after use. Leaving test strips in an open vial or in an unoriginal vial could expose the test strips to an environment that could change the chemical properties of test strips. Such an exposure can result in false glucose readings. Always read the safety instruction provided in the test strip box. Keep your strips in their original vi Continue reading >>

Which Is The Best Blood Glucose Meter In India

Which Is The Best Blood Glucose Meter In India

Patients with type -1 or type 2 Diabetes all face the problem of fluctuating blood sugar levels, As a diabetic you already may be aware of the complications diabetes brings with it, Almost all the diabetics are good at taking pills on time / before meal but many of them seem to neglect the blood glucose monitoring part, But it is highly important because of the following factors Regular blood glucose monitoring can give you a idea about which foods are spiking your blood sugar levels and what are the foods which keeps your blood sugar normal. By frequently monitoring you will be assured free of worrying about fluctuation in blood sugar levels. You can avoid severe complications to your eyes, kidneys and foot. International Diabetes Federation suggests Blood sugar monitoring should be done as per the recommendations of the Doctor, But gives a general guide line about frequency of testing blood sugar levels. type 1 diabetics who take insulin shots or using insulin pump should measure their blood sugar levels 4 times a day. Type 2 Diabetics who are on insulin are recommended to check their blood glucose once a day or at least 4 times a week. Type 2 Diabetics who are on medicine but having trouble achieving good control on their blood sugar levels should check at least once a day. Type 2 Diabetics who are managing their blood glucose levels by exercise and healthy diet should check altleast once in a week. Particularly if you are some one who is trying a new diet and also exercising actively, you may have to check out your blood sugar levels more frequently to avoid your blood sugar levels falling down too low. Along with glucose meters you may also have to purchase control solutions to test if your blood glucose meter and strips are working accurately. I know about onetouc Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meter Reviews

Blood Glucose Meter Reviews

Editor's note: The FreeStyle Lite, Bayer Contour Next and Prodigy Voice maintain their top spots for another year. Their staying power proves that reliable technology beats fancy features any day. Meanwhile, the up and coming FreeStyle Precision NEO gives its competitors in the "affordable" category a real run for their money. Users love the FreeStyle Lite glucometer for its tiny size, fast results, and the equally tiny 0.3 microliter blood sample it requires. Experts love it for its excellent repeatability and accuracy in clinical trials. Other user-friendly features that make this the top glucometer in our report include its backlit screen and illuminated test strip port, no-coding test strips, great durability, and a 400-reading memory that calculates a number of averages to help you spot trends in your glucose readings. The inexpensive Bayer Contour Next excelled in a clinical trial and packs features that are very rare in this price range, including programmable reminders and the ability to add notes or meal tags to readings. Users especially love that you can apply blood to the Contour Next test strips from almost any angle, and if you don't provide the full 0.6 microliter sample on the first try, you have up to 30 seconds to add more blood to the strip. Buy for $18.98 The Prodigy Voice continues its dominion over other talking glucose meters for very good reason: It's the only model we've seen that can talk you through every single aspect of its use, from setup to calibration, testing and accessing the memory function. The three high-contrast, touch-friendly buttons are located on the front of the device (no fishing around in the battery compartment), and a playback button allows you to repeat the last message or reading spoken by the meter. Buy for $39.49 Types Continue reading >>

Best Blood Glucose Meter

Best Blood Glucose Meter

We spent over 50 hours researching and testing 16 different types of blood glucose meters and found that accuracy, ease of use, and cost were most important. The active1st Complete Diabetes Testing Kit scored high marks in all categories and is our top pick. We loved that everything we needed to monitor of blood glucose levels were included in this kit. It has test strips, lancets, solution, instructions, and a convenient case to name a few items. This all inclusive kit made blood glucose monitoring less complicated and having all the components in one case made it easy to keep up with when it came time to test. Navigation Introduction to the Blood Glucose Meter The blood glucose meters that are available are much smaller than they used to be and come with much more in the way of features. Accuracy is much better with these newer models as well. There are approximately 29 million Americans that have diabetes. One of the most important things that someone with diabetes can do is monitor their blood glucose. These glucose meters allow them to keep tabs on their levels so there are no complications. These top rated blood glucose meters are popular with consumers because of their quality of performance and reliability. Getting accurate test results means they can safely make any needed adjustments to their exercise and diet plans. Being able to do this lowers their risk of complications that can include kidney disease, blindness, nerve damage and even seizures. active1st Bayer Contour NEXT Complete Diabetes Testing Kit You’ll have everything you need to test your blood glucose levels with the active1st Bayer Contour NEXT Complete Diabetes Testing Kit. Bayer Contour is well known as the #1 rated test strip in the world and tops the charts in fast results and accuracy. Keep Continue reading >>

Checking Blood Sugar: Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy

Checking Blood Sugar: Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy

If handheld blood glucose meters were always as accurate checking blood sugar levels as the much bigger (25 pounds), much more expensive ($10,000) analyzers that hospitals and labs use, then hospitals and labs would use the small, personal blood sugar meters. Find out more about how meters get to market, what to look for when choosing your next meter, and how to calculate the performance results of the meter you have now. How meters get to market To get clearance to market a new meter, a manufacturer needs to submit data to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) that shows the new blood glucose monitoring system (meter plus test strips) is as safe to use and effective as other devices on the market that have FDA clearance. Many meter companies cite criteria published by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO), a network of the national standards institutes of 162 countries, based in Switzerland. The standard for blood glucose meters is ISO 15197, published in 2003. It is an FDA-recognized standard. It includes instructions for manufacturers on how tests of accuracy are to be run and what counts as a passing grade. Companies don't have to go by the ISO standard. According to the FDA, "Conformance with recognized consensus standards is strictly voluntary for a medical device manufacturer. A manufacturer may choose to conform to applicable recognized standards or may choose to address relevant issues in another manner." So if a manufacturer isn't using the ISO standard, it still has to make a case to the FDA that the device and strips are as safe to use and effective as others on the market. How is accuracy tested? Accuracy means how close the meter's results are to the results from a big, expensive, carefully calibrated lab analyzer. ISO requires man Continue reading >>

Pet Glucose Meters Vs. Human Glucose Meters

Pet Glucose Meters Vs. Human Glucose Meters

by Robin Two months ago, my 13-year-old male cat Zulu was diagnosed as having feline diabetes. Zulu is a beautiful long haired manx. Now, after many visits to my veterinarian to do glucose monitoring, it was suggested that I might want to use a home monitor. I have done literally hours of research to find what meter would be best suited for my cat and have come away with two points: 1.) Only use a pet meter for the most accurate results. 2.) If you are to use human meters, choose one that can utilize the smallest blood sample such as, Freesyle Lite. Can someone help me sort this out please? Thank you for your response, Robin Dear Robin Thank you for writing in with your question. I recommend home monitoring for all of my feline diabetes patients, and have always used human glucometers in my practice and so have my clients. Human glucose meters have the benefit of easy access to additional test strips and batteries from your local pharmacy. There are many different models on the market these days and it is easy to find one that only requires a very small blood sample for testing. The other thing to consider heavily when purchasing a glucometer is the cost of the strips. Just recently, I realized how much more I was paying for strips than I needed to and ended up purchasing a new glucometer just so I could start buying the cheaper strips. The savings in the price of strips has already paid for the new glucometer. The most important thing, however, is to measure your chosen glucometer's accuracy. You should bring the meter you choose to your veterinarian's office and ask them to compare the results from your meter with their own meter, or to test a blood sample on your meter and have it compared with an outside laboratory's results. Keep in mind that all glucometers are go Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar (glucose) Monitors

Blood Sugar (glucose) Monitors

How often is it covered? Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) covers blood sugar monitors as durable medical equipment (DME) that your doctor prescribes for use in your home. Who's eligible? All people with Part B are covered. Your costs in Original Medicare If your supplier accepts assignment, you pay 20% of the Medicare-approved amount, and the Part B deductible applies. Medicare pays for different kinds of DME in different ways. Depending on the type of equipment: You may need to rent the equipment. You may need to buy the equipment. You may be able to choose whether to rent or buy the equipment. Medicare will only cover your DME if your doctors and DME suppliers are enrolled in Medicare. Doctors and suppliers have to meet strict standards to enroll and stay enrolled in Medicare. If your doctors or suppliers aren’t enrolled, Medicare won’t pay the claims submitted by them. It’s also important to ask your suppliers if they participate in Medicare before you get DME. If suppliers are participating suppliers, they must accept assignment. If suppliers are enrolled in Medicare but aren’t “participating,” they may choose not to accept assignment. If suppliers don't accept assignment, there’s no limit on the amount they can charge you. To find out how much your specific test, item, or service will cost, talk to your doctor or other health care provider. The specific amount you’ll owe may depend on several things, like: Other insurance you may have How much your doctor charges Whether your doctor accepts assignment The type of facility The location where you get your test, item, or service Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring And Insulin Administration

Blood Glucose Monitoring And Insulin Administration

Summary The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has become increasingly concerned about the risks for transmitting hepatitis B virus (HBV) and other infectious diseases during assisted blood glucose (blood sugar) monitoring and insulin administration. CDC is alerting all persons who assist others with blood glucose monitoring and/or insulin administration of the following infection control requirements: Fingerstick devices should never be used for more than one person Whenever possible, blood glucose meters should not be shared. If they must be shared, the device should be cleaned and disinfected after every use, per manufacturer’s instructions. If the manufacturer does not specify how the device should be cleaned and disinfected then it should not be shared. Insulin pens and other medication cartridges and syringes are for single-patient-use only and should never be used for more than one person Monitoring of blood glucose levels is frequently performed to guide therapy for persons with diabetes. Blood glucose monitoring and insulin administration can be accomplished in two ways: self-monitoring of blood glucose and insulin administration, where the individual performs all steps of the testing and insulin administration themselves, and assisted monitoring of blood glucose and insulin administration, where another person assists with or performs testing and insulin administration for an individual. Examples of settings where assisted monitoring of blood glucose and insulin administration may occur include: Hospitals or clinics Long term care settings such as nursing homes and assisted living facilities Senior centers Health fairs Correctional facilities Schools or camps Unsafe Practices during Blood Glucose Monitoring and Insulin Administration An underap Continue reading >>

Why Meters Can't Tell Us Our Blood Sugar Levels

Why Meters Can't Tell Us Our Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes advocate and author Riva Greenberg has been on a "meter accuracy kick" lately — researching the heck out of this controversial topic. Very timely considering I've been seeing loads of expensive TV ads for Accu-Chek's new Nano meter, claiming that it's "23% more accurate" (!) Riva recently published a piece at the Huffington Post on why meter accuracy is both less, and more, critical than you might think. Truth is, she tells us, meter accuracy is only one part of a much larger story. A Guest Post by Riva Greenberg After being lucky enough to receive an iBGStar meter from Sanofi the day before its launch, I ran a few comparison tests between it and the Bayer Contour USB, which I'd been using the past two years, and discovered that the iBGStar consistently gave me a reading 20-25 points higher. So I took out all my meters. There were several, (Sanofi studies show most people use 4 meters on average) and I even ordered two new free meters from FreeStyle. I checked my blood sugar several times on my collection of 7 meters (some think I was a little obsessed) and saw it was rare when two meters gave me the same number! Given that I feel like my meter is my lifeline, I wanted to find out how meters work and why different meters give different results. I talked with a number of Chief Medical Officers, MDs and Medical Safety Officers at several meter manufacturers and I'm going to tell you what I learned in layman's terms. To better understand the science behind meter and strip technology, you can google "meter accuracy" for white papers and posts that would delight even the geekiest engineer. To better know how accurate your own meter is (in percentage terms), you can "check the package insert that comes with the strips and look online at prescribing information," sa Continue reading >>

Best Blood Glucose Monitors

Best Blood Glucose Monitors

1. ACCU-CHEK Nano Blood Glucose Monitoring System Why we like it: The ACCU-CHEK Nano blood glucose monitoring system makes it easy to check your blood sugar accurately no matter where you go. There is no denying that ACCU-CHEK is a well-known brand name among blood sugar meters. It is with good reason considering just how accurate the results are with this meter. In fact, you can be quite certain that they will be as close to the proper lab readings as you can get. So, if it is important for you to be able to have near-precise recordings of your blood sugar levels, then this is the monitoring system for you. You can definitely rely on the results that you will be getting. This meter doesn’t require a large blood sample, regardless of how accurate it is. This makes each test a lot less painful for you. Speaking of which, this kit has a lancing device with around eleven adjustable levels. This means that it is capable of penetrating skin of various thicknesses. Therefore, you should have some degree of success if you are trying to get blood from other sites with the exception of your fingers. This is great news for people who have to check their levels multiple times a day. 2. Active1st TrueMetrix Testing Kit Why we like it: The Active1st TrueMetrix testing kit contains everything that you need to draw, test, and document your blood glucose levels. If this is the first time that you have to buy a blood glucose monitor, then you are probably not looking for anything too complicated or high tech. You will also need a meter that comes with all of the bells and whistles so that you will not need to add anything to it. Well, this kit will meet all of your needs and then some. You get the meter, lancets, lancing device, control solution, and test strips. You are fully set to Continue reading >>

Testing Your Blood Glucose

Testing Your Blood Glucose

Testing your blood glucose, also known as Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose (SMBG), is a method of checking how much glucose (sugar) is in the blood using a glucose meter -- anywhere, anytime. Here, you'll learn some basics about: Blood sugar targets for adults How your doctor tests your blood The importance of self-testing When to test and what to look for How to share results with your doctor Blood glucose targets for non-pregnant adults* Before meal After meal 80-120 mg/dL Less than 180 mg/dL How your doctor tests your blood -- the A1C test† Your doctor uses what is called an A1C (Glycosylated Hemoglobin) test to see what your average blood glucose level has been over the last two to three months. Used for both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, it gives you and your doctor an indication on how well you are responding to your treatment regimen, and if any adjustments are necessary. The goal is to keep your level below seven percent (7%).* The A1C test is sometimes referred to as the hemoglobin A1c, HbA1c or glycohemoglobin test. The connection between A1C and average blood sugar levels.† Your A1C test result will not show the daily effects of food choices and your activity. A blood glucose meter is the best way to observe and track the immediate effects of food choices and activity on your blood glucose levels. This allows you to take immediate action to bring your glucose levels within range if needed. Your doctor will also rely upon your blood glucose meter results to assess and adjust your treatment regimen. When to test and what to look for – a practical guide Use this simple chart to remind you when to test and what to observe to help you manage your blood glucose level on a daily basis. When to test What to look for First thing in the morning, before you eat How Continue reading >>

Glucose Meters: A Review Of Technical Challenges To Obtaining Accurate Results

Glucose Meters: A Review Of Technical Challenges To Obtaining Accurate Results

Go to: Introduction Glucose meters are widely used in hospitals, outpatient clinics, emergency rooms, ambulatory medical care (ambulances, helicopters, cruise ships), and home self-monitoring. Glucose meters provide fast analysis of blood glucose levels and allow management of both hypoglycemic and hyperglycemic disorders with the goal of adjusting glucose to a near-normal range, depending on the patient group. The development of self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is probably the most important advance in controlling diabetes since the discovery of insulin in the 1920s and provides the ability for diabetes patients to test their own blood glucose and adjust insulin dosage to control their glucose needs. With the universal availability of glucose meters today, it is difficult to imagine that managing blood glucose was once considered impossible. The history of glucose meters started in 1963 when Ernie Adams invented the Dextrostix®, a paper strip that develops a blue color whose intensity was proportional to glucose concentration and could be read by visually comparing the strip color to a color-concentration chart. This method gave an approximation of the blood glucose level. In 1970, Anton H. Clemens developed the first blood glucose meter and glucose self-monitoring system, the Ames Reflectance Meter (ARM), to detect reflected light from a Dextrostix.1 This ARM weighed 3 lb, cost $650, and was intended for physician office use. Richard K. Bernstein was the first patient to test his blood glucose with an ARM.2 Medical journals at the time refused to publish this method, so Bernstein had to complete medical school at the age of 45 in order to gain attention for this method from the medical world. The idea of SMBG developed by Bernstein had to travel to Europe and Continue reading >>

Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data On 18 Meters

Are Blood Glucose Meters Accurate? New Data On 18 Meters

Results from the Diabetes Technology Society’s Blood Glucose Meter Surveillance Program identifies only six out of 18 meters that passed. Did yours make the cut? The Diabetes Technology Society (DTS) recently revealed long-awaited results from its Blood Glucose Monitor System (BGMS) Surveillance Program. The rigorous study tested the accuracy of 18 popular blood glucose meters (BGM) used in the US. These FDA-cleared meters were purchased through retail outlets and tested rigorously at three study sites in over 1,000 people (including 840 people with diabetes). The results were troubling: only six out of the 18 devices met the DTS passing standard for meter accuracy – within 15% or 15 mg/dl of the laboratory value in over 95% of trials. The devices that passed were: Contour Next from Ascensia (formerly Bayer) – 100% Accu-Chek Aviva Plus from Roche – 98% Walmart ReliOn Confirm (Micro) from Arkray – 97% CVS Advanced from Agamatrix – 97% FreeStyle Lite from Abbott – 96% Accu-Chek SmartView from Roche – 95% The devices that failed were: Walmart ReliOn Prime from Arkray – 92% OneTouch Verio from LifeScan – 92% OneTouch Ultra 2 from LifeScan – 90% Walmart ReliOn Ultima from Abbott – 89% Embrace from Omnis Health – 88% True Result from HDI/Nipro (Trividia) – 88% True Track from HDI/Nipro (Trividia) – 81% Solus V2 from BioSense Medical – 76% Advocate Redi-Code+ from Diabetic Supply of Suncoast – 76% Gmate Smart from Philosys – 71% Get the full data and all the accuracy information here. While all of these meters received FDA clearance at some point, this study shows that not all are equivalent in terms of accuracy. The FDA looks at company-reported trials when it reviews new meters; this study took an independent look, purchasing the meters di Continue reading >>

The Best Ketone Meters To Monitor Ketosis – Christmas 2017

The Best Ketone Meters To Monitor Ketosis – Christmas 2017

The goal of a high-fat, low-carb diet is to get into a state called Ketosis where the body burns fat as fuel rather than using glucose as its source of energy. Types of Ketone Meters There are several types of ketone meters available that monitor ketosis in vastly different ways, some more accurate than others and some more convenient others. We’ll discuss 3 types of Ketone Meters available starting with the best on the market today in 2017. Ketonix Breath Ketone Analyzer The Ketonix breath analyser doesn’t use any blood glucose test or test strip, it works by analysing acetone on your breath that your body produces when you’re in a state of ketosis. The Ketonix is slightly less accurate as blood ketone and glucose meters are per test. But they are more convenient With the Ketonix, you can test yourself an unlimited amount of times, hourly if you like. Which is ideal if you want to see how various foods effect ketosis after you’ve eaten them or even the effects exercise has. The Ketonix is affordable when you take into account the price of test strips for blood monitors. (Many companies give away cheap versions of blood monitors but make their money on testing strips). The Ketonix has no test strips and requires no further outlay. Ketonix also comes with software that will keep a log and also calibrates the device to the optimal settings for your goals. If you’re trying to monitor ketones under conditions such as athletic performance, weight loss, diabetes, alzheimer’s or epilepsy. The Ketonix adjusts its settings to test whether you’re in the ideal range for that condition. The Ketonix Breath Ketone Analyzer is a one-off payment you can read more & check them out here. Blood Ketone Meter One of the best & most precise ways of monitoring ketosis is with a Continue reading >>

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