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Best Blood Glucose Meter Reviews

The Review Of Bayer Contour Next Ez Glucose Meter

The Review Of Bayer Contour Next Ez Glucose Meter

The Review of Bayer Contour Next EZ Glucose Meter Persons suffering from Diabetes need to monitor their blood glucose levels and make sure that it is within the normal range. This is the only way to prevent the dangerous complications of diabetes and adjust the dosage of insulin shots. For that, theyll need a Glucometer (glucose meter). Ive written a number of articles on several glucometers and you can find them here . Today, Im going to review one of the most popular glucose meter worldwide from the house of German healthcare company, Bayer. You would have already heard about this one though, but Im getting a chance to review the Bayer Contour Next EZ glucose meter only now. Features of Bayer Contour Next EZ glucose meter No-coding required making it easy to use straight out of the box High accuracy courtesy of the MultiPulse technology that tests every blood sample multiple times before displaying the final result Second chance sampling allows you to apply more blood (if needed) thereby saving valuable test strips and money Sip-in sampling absorbs just the right amount of blood sample into the test strip the very first time Identify trouble spots with personalised high/low target range and summary of your blood glucose test results Maximum tracking of blood glucose variations with the help of 7, 14 & 30 day average values Mark each test result as pre or post meal How to use the Contour Next EZ glucose meter? Inserting the grey square part of the test strip into the strip port of the meter will turn the device on. A hanging drop graphic will be displayed on the screen which is the indication for you to obtain the blood sample and apply it to the free end of the test strip. The memory button along with the up and down arrows can be used to tag each value as pre or pos Continue reading >>

Comparing Results Between Different Blood Glucose Meters

Comparing Results Between Different Blood Glucose Meters

Comparing results between different blood glucose meters View / Download pdf version of this article Comparing results between different blood glucose meters Only the CareSens range of blood glucose meters and testing strips are now fully subsidised, except for two small patient groups via Special Authority (see below). Over 90% of people entitled to a subsidised meter have now picked up a CareSens meter. There have been some reports that people are comparing readings from their previous meter with readings from their CareSens meter, and getting different results. For some, the difference is concerning, and they consider that their old meter has the right reading and their new meter must be wrong. Variances are normal between hand held meters and are to be expected. The international standard for blood glucose meters is that they are accurate to within plus or minus 20% of what a laboratory test would show. Some people are aware of the 20% variance, but think that this means that there can only be a 20% difference between the readings of two meters, rather than between a meter and a lab test. The key message for people with diabetes is that directly comparing results between meters is not clinical best practice. It may be useful for a short period of time, while becoming familiar with the new meter, but it is important to reinforce that meter readings from any meter are only indicative. The most meaningful information is to understand the trends, and what the readings mean for them and their diabetes management. There is support available for people who are having particular difficultly in managing the change to the CareSens meters. For more details, phone PHARMAC on: 0800 66 00 50 or email: [email protected] . Changing blood glucose meters is an opportu Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

Blood Glucose Monitoring Devices

What does this test do? This is a test system for use at home to measure the amount of sugar (glucose) in your blood. What is glucose? Glucose is a sugar that your body uses as a source of energy. Unless you have diabetes, your body regulates the amount of glucose in your blood. People with diabetes may need special diets and medications to control blood glucose. What type of test is this? This is a quantitative test, which means that you will find out the amount of glucose present in your blood sample. Why should you take this test? You should take this test if you have diabetes and you need to monitor your blood sugar (glucose) levels. You and your doctor can use the results to: determine your daily adjustments in treatment know if you have dangerously high or low levels of glucose understand how your diet and exercise change your glucose levels The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (1993) showed that good glucose control using home monitors led to fewer disease complications. How often should you test your glucose? Follow your doctor's recommendations about how often you test your glucose. You may need to test yourself several times each day to determine adjustments in your diet or treatment. What should your glucose levels be? According to the American Diabetes Association (Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2011, Diabetes Care, January 2011, vol.34, Supplement 1, S11-S61) the blood glucose levels for an adult without diabetes are below 100 mg/dL before meals and fasting and are less than 140 mg/dL two hours after meals. People with diabetes should consult their doctor or health care provider to set appropriate blood glucose goals. You should treat your low or high blood glucose as recommended by your health care provider. How accurate is this test? The ac Continue reading >>

Bg Meter Accuracy: 10 Meters Put To The Test!

Bg Meter Accuracy: 10 Meters Put To The Test!

Are blood glucose meters accurate? A few months ago, I read a post on blood glucose meter (in)accuracy that was quite alarming. Chris Hannemann, T1D and OpenAPS’er, tested five popular blood glucose meters for accuracy and found major discrepancies. The overall variability between the meters was roughly ±11 %, and two of the meters — both from the same manufacturer — showed major bias. Chris had been using one of those meters to calibrate his CGM and consistently found that his lab-measured A1C would come in a full percentage point higher than his CGM average would predict (e.g., the meter-calibrated CGM data would correspond to an A1C of 6%, but laboratory-measured A1C would actually be 7%). As someone who wears a CGM and always strives to achieve an A1C of ~6.0% or lower, this post freaked me out. If I’m calibrating my CGM with a meter whose results are always off by that much… how can I be sure about reaching my targets?!? But I was also skeptical when I saw Chris’ post, because my A1C has always matched my predictions (based on my CGM average). So, I decided to run my own test on 10 popular meters from various manufacturers. Much to my relief, all 10 meters produced very similar results for each blood sample, with an overall between-meter variability of just under 6%. Below I describe the test and discuss the results. And, in another post, I explain some reasons why your average BG on your meter might not always correspond with your A1C results. (Key point: It doesn’t necessarily mean your meter is bad!) The Test The Meters Accu-Chek Aviva Connect Contour Next EZ OmniPod PDM FreeStyle Meter FreeStyle Lite Livongo InTouch OneTouch Ultra Mini One Touch Ultra 2 Walgreens True Metrix Air Walgreens True 2 Go Wal-Mart ReliOn Confirm These 10 meters varied i Continue reading >>

One Drop Glucose Meter Review And Giveaway: Unlimited Test Strips

One Drop Glucose Meter Review And Giveaway: Unlimited Test Strips

A meter that comes with unlimited test strips is a win for anyone with diabetes. One that comes with a slick app and a leather holder might also be enough to convince you to transition to One Drop, because AT LAST this everyday, every-meal apparatus that you lug around come sunny day, rainy commute, sweaty bike ride doesn’t come in a nylon, made-in-Taiwan, black zippered bag. At last. My One Drop meter arrived inside a gleaming silver box. When I flipped it open, I was greeted with components that might look more appropriate at Best Buy then a pharmacy. Perhaps a functional tool on a cocktail bar? The black leather holder is stitched in red and snugly lined up in the holster are test strips, meter and lancet gleaming in space age silver. “There’s no cool diabetes gear.” Jeff Dachis, CEO and founder of One Drop, said two years ago, right before he launched the One Drop app and the Bluetooth-enabled chrome meter. Dachis had been thinking of this problem since 2013, when he found out he had type-one diabetes. “There’s no waves for diabetes, no collective, collaborative crowd sourced way to bring diabetics together,” said Dachis, who, although diagnosed late in life, knew far too well what it was like. He watched his father struggle with the disease. When Dachis first learned the news, he said, “They gave me a prescription, an insulin pen and patted me on the back. Ten minutes later I was out of the office. I was stunned.” The active 50-year-old Googled his new way of life and decided to do something about it. First of course, he tackled the idea of how to take an unloved object and make it loved. Then he created a platform to enable people to share data instantly. Dachis wanted to create a tool that allows users to track their “journey between glucose r Continue reading >>

Best Blood Glucose Meter

Best Blood Glucose Meter

A blood glucose meter is a very helpful device because it provides you information on blood glucose levels. The device is easy to use and understand, it comes at an affordable price, and it’s very convenient. It’s recommended for maintaining the normal blood sugar and thus avoiding any possible health issues caused by diabetes. To help you get an accurate and reliable blood glucose monitoring system, we have selected the most performant models on the market. So, take a closer look at their reviews and choose the one that suits your needs the best. Brand: Fora Dimensions: 3.7 x 0.2 x 1 inches Weight: 9.6 ounces Check Price Brand: FreeStyle Lite Dimensions: 2.0 x 3.3 x 0.63 inches Weight: 8.8 ounces Brand: Accu Chek Dimensions: 6.6 x 3.9 x 5.6 inches Weight: 8 ounces Check Price Brand: Bayer Dimensions: 3.14 x 2.08 x 0.51 Shipping weight: 8.6 ounces Check Price Brand: One Touch Ultra Dimensions: 5.4 x 3 x 8.2 inches Shipping weight: 8.8 ounces Check Price Reviews of the Best Blood Glucose Meters of 2018 With the help of this device you will be able to monitor your blood glucose levels every time you want. Besides the fact that it provides accurate results, this model features Bluetooth, which means you can connect it to your smartphone. This allows you to track the concentration of glucose in the blood on a daily basis, without too much effort on your part. The FORA TN’G works with test strips and it comes with a case to protect the meter and to hold the test strips and the lancets. Furthermore, the meter features 4 alarm settings and no less than 450 test memories with both date and time. In order to recharge it, you simply have to plug it into a USB port. The LCD display allows you to easily read the results in both sunlight and darkness, which is a great plus. PR Continue reading >>

Point-of-care Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy In The Hospital Setting

Point-of-care Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy In The Hospital Setting

Point-of-care (POC) tests provide analytical information that can be used to make decisions at patients' bedside, as opposed to laboratory tests that must be run at a central laboratory. POC testing is a widely used tool to enable immediate determination of glucose levels in hospitalized patients and facilitate rapid treatment decisions in response to fluctuations in glycemia. Accurate POC glucose testing requires attention to various factors before, during, and after performance of tests. These include 1) proper preparation of test sites to avoid preanalytical errors, 2) proper identification of tested patients whose physiological status permits sampled capillary specimens to correlate with central venous blood glucose levels to avoid analytical errors, and 3) proper documentation of the fidelity of meter results with the medical record to avoid postanalytical errors. Diabetes and hyperglycemia are common problems for hospitalized patients. It is necessary to monitor blood glucose levels in these patients so that appropriate types and quantities of medications and food can be delivered to them. Two trends in hospital care are making it more important than ever for patients to be accurately tested for abnormal glucose levels while in the hospital. First, an ever-increasing acutely ill mix of patients can be found in hospitals, and these patients can break down quickly if they develop either hypo- or hyperglycemia. Second, achieving target glycemic levels using accurate blood glucose monitoring is necessary to improve outcomes of hospitalized patients. Three types of initiatives are underway to improve the accuracy of point-of-care (POC) blood glucose monitoring in hospitals, including efforts to 1) improve the accuracy of blood glucose monitoring devices, 2) eliminate s Continue reading >>

Comparison Evaluation Of Blood Glucose Meter Systems

Comparison Evaluation Of Blood Glucose Meter Systems

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of one investigational Bayer Blood Glucose meter (with investigational Bayer test strips) and four Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems from other companies. All meter BG results were compared with plasma results obtained with a reference laboratory glucose method (YSI Glucose Analyzer). Performance of the five systems was evaluated across the glucose range of the BGMSs using capillary blood. All testing and lancing were performed by study staff and some blood samples were glycolyzed to lower the glucose levels. Study Type : Interventional (Clinical Trial) Actual Enrollment : 146 participants Intervention Model: Single Group Assignment Masking: None (Open Label) Primary Purpose: Diagnostic Official Title: Evaluation of Blood Glucose Meter Systems - NACT Study Study Start Date : March 2012 Primary Completion Date : March 2012 Study Completion Date : March 2012 Arm Intervention/treatment Experimental: Study Staff Test BGMSs All testing and lancings were performed by the study staff; subjects did not perform any lancing or self-testing in this study. Study Staff lanced the fingers of subjects and tested the blood samples using five Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems(BGMS): FreeStyle Freedom Lite® BGMS; ACCU-CHEK® Aviva BGMS; TRUEtrack® BGMS; OneTouch® Ultra®2 BGMS; CONTOUR® NEXT EZ BGMS. Device: CONTOUR® NEXT EZ BGMS Study staff performed Blood Glucose (BG) testing with capillary fingerstick blood collected from subjects with diabetes and without diabetes (up to 10% of subjects without diabetes were included). Performance of CONTOUR® NEXT EZ BGMS was evaluated across the glucose range of the BGMs. All meter BG results were compared with capillary plasma results obtained with a reference laboratory glucose method ( Continue reading >>

The Most Accurate Blood Glucose Meter

The Most Accurate Blood Glucose Meter

Credit: Accu-chek.com The Accu-Chek Aviva was first in an evaluation of a dozen meters conducted by a team of testing experts at Germany’s University of Ulm led by Guido Freckmann, M.D. It led the field in accuracy and precision. Few studies of meter accuracy have appeared in the more than 20 years that I have been writing about diabetes. Dr. Freckmann and his team of researchers have been the most relevant, reliable, and prolific in testing our meters. But some of the meters that they evaluated aren’t available in the United States. The leading diabetes journal that evaluates our meters just released the full text of this meter accuracy study. The editors tell me that the study will be free online only until March 31. Most Relevant Info So don’t wait too long if you want to review the whole thing. Meanwhile, I summarize below what I think is the most relevant information. The journal is Diabetes Technology & Therapeutics, and the study is “Evaluation of 12 Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems for Self-Testing: System Accuracy and Measurement Reproducibility.” The journal published it two years ago, but until now only the abstract has been freely available to us. Dr. Freckmann and his colleagues rated the meters against both the current and proposed standards. The current standard can be met more easily. It requires that at least 95 percent of the results fall within plus or minus 15 mg/dl at blood glucose levels below 75 mg/dl and within plus or minus 20 mg/dl at levels greater than or equal to 75 mg/dl. The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) set this level back in 2003, and it is the standard not only in Europe but also in the United States because the U.S. Food and Drug Administration uses it. The Tighter Standard ISO’s 2013 standard is tigh Continue reading >>

Meter Accuracy

Meter Accuracy

Two things landed on my desk recently. One was a newspaper article saying that the Food and Drug Administration has asked the international body that sets standards for home blood glucose meters to tighten its accuracy requirements. (A public meeting on the topic is scheduled for March 16 and 17.) The other was a letter from a Diabetes Self-Management subscriber who described how she had attempted to compare two home meters with a plasma glucose measurement done in a laboratory — and how she was unnerved when she got three different readings. Stricter standards for meter accuracy would be a welcome development: Currently, most available blood glucose meters are accurate only to within 10% to 15% of the actual blood glucose level. But it will likely be a while before standards are changed and more accurate meters become the norm. In the meantime, there are steps you can take to get the best possible results from your meter. One of the most important is to use only strips made for your meter and to use them correctly. This includes making sure the strips have not passed their expiration date, coding your meter for each new batch of strips (if you use a meter that requires coding), and being careful to store your strips in their original container, away from sources of heat, cold, or humidity. Improperly used or stored strips are one of the biggest sources of error in home blood glucose monitoring. To check whether a batch of strips is OK, use a drop of the control solution (unexpired!) that’s compatible with your meter on one of the strips in the batch. If you still want to check the accuracy of your meter by comparing it to a laboratory measurement, there is a way to do that. But getting meaningful results requires doing it right — both on your end and on the labor Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy Comparison (chart)

Blood Glucose Meter Accuracy Comparison (chart)

How accurate is your blood glucose meter? A major study found that almost half of meters do not meet the minimum required standards: For blood sugars over 75 mg (4.2 mmol): Accurate within 20%. For example, if your blood sugar is 200 mg (11 mmol), the meter must read between 160 (8.8 mmol) and 240 (13.3 mmol) at least 95% of the time. For blood sugars under 75 mg (4.2 mmol): Accurate within 15 mg. For example, if your blood sugar is 60 mg (3.3 mmol), the meter must read between 45 (2.5 mmol) and 75 (4.2 mmol) at least 95% of the time. There is a new proposal that would require all results to be within 15%. But how do you know if your meter is meeting this standard? Today, there is no systematic verification of meter accuracy after it gets approved for sale. And as you will see below, many meters are sub-standard. This puts people relying on these tools in unnecessary danger. If you’re going to take a shot of insulin, a number that’s 15% off is a really big deal. Taking too much insulin can result in severe low blood sugars, hospitalization and even death. Comparison of Meter Accuracy The chart below is from System Accuracy Evaluation of 43 Blood Glucose Monitoring Systems for Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose according to DIN EN ISO 15197 by Dr. Guido Freckmann and others published in Journal of Diabetes Science and Technology, Volume 6, Issue 5, September 2012. Between 2009 and 2011, over a hundred people were recruited to test each of the meters listed below. The test strips were taken from at least seven different vials of one manufacturing lot. Over at least ten days, the patients tested their blood sugar with the meter and then a second sample was taken for analysis in a lab. Before using this data, it is important to know the limitations: The study only looked Continue reading >>

Review Of The New Contour Next One Blood Glucose Meter And App

Review Of The New Contour Next One Blood Glucose Meter And App

In October, Ascensia (formerly Bayer) launched its newest blood glucose meter and integrated app-The CONTOUR®NEXT ONE meter and the CONTOUR®DIABETES app. You can find out more about the specifics of this new meter and app here. DISCLAIMER; Thriveabetes was asked if we would share information about this new product with our followers and subscribers. I was really interested in this meter, I asked if I could have a meter sent to me. Both the meter and the app are free for everybody and the meter had already been launched in Ireland (details of how to get it at the end of this post). Once I received the Contour Next One meter and I downloaded the app from the Apple App store. I volunteered to do the blog post review and have not received any payment of any kind to do this. I have tried to give an unbiased review but I feel that maybe I’m a little spoilt when it comes to the diabetes devices. I would like to re-enforce that my opinion is just one opinion. What works for me is not going to work for every person with diabetes. In writing this post I realised that checking my blood glucose on a meter alone isn’t enough for me. That I really do appreciate an app that allows me to input the information associated with that blood glucose reading. I need to include if this reading is before or after a meal, if I am using this reading to calculate insulin dosage, how much carb I’m about to eat, physical activity, etc. I have been using the MySugr App to log my blood glucose readings for almost two years and I love it. This meter is one of the few existing blood glucose meters that is integrated with a smartphone app. BG results captured throughout the day are automatically synced and logged. It removes the need for uploading to a desktop computer or laptop. Last week, I lis Continue reading >>

Best Blood Glucose Monitors:

Best Blood Glucose Monitors:

Choosing the Right Glucose Monitors - Millions of people depend on blood glucose monitors to help them manage their diabetes and keep glucose levels in check. This is crucial for short-term health, but also in preventing complications due to diabetes in the future. A single drop of blood holds a treasure trove of information for the diabetic, and routine testing is essential to maintaining optimal health. With a tool that is this important, you need to make the best possible choice. Whether, for you, that means the easiest to read, the easiest to use, the most convenient, the least invasive, a blood glucose monitoring system that meets your needs is literally a lifesaver. How do you choose the right one for you? Choosing the Right Glucose Meter for Your Needs Before you buy based on one factor, such as price, it is important to take a look at the different features commonly available so you can decide which blood glucose monitor will be the best fit for your life. Here are some considerations to keep in mind: *Size. Meters are quite small, typically between 3 and 4 inches in length and width, and quite light. Many models are between 1 and 5 ounces. How to choose? Think about where you will be carrying your blood glucose meter: in your backpack, purse, glove compartment, pocket? Do you need it to have a large display screen? Would a backlit display or a speaking monitor be better for you? Meters are typically very discrete, so you'll want to think about your needs as far as reading your results comfortably. *Size. This time, consider the size of the blood sample that the meter needs to test. As blood glucose monitors have advanced, you typically need very little blood. Most use between 0.3 microliters (which would fit on a pin head) to 1.0 microliter. If it needs signif Continue reading >>

On Call Plus Glucose Meter

On Call Plus Glucose Meter

This On Call Plus Blood Glucose Monitoring System is ideal for people with pre-diabetes or diabetes so they can keep track of their blood sugar at home, in their workplace, or even while on a holiday vacation out of town. Taking advantage of portable blood glucose monitors allows you to know whether or not your blood sugar is high or within normal range - anytime, anywhere. The On Call Plus glucose meter comes with advanced data management downloadable to your computer. This On Call Plus Blood Glucose Monitoring System is one of the most affordable blood glucose monitoring meter in the market today. It is capable of storing up to 300 test memory with date and time, as well as show averages over the last 7, 14, and 30-day periods. On Call Plus Blood Glucose Monitoring System is a reliable blood sugar monitoring system that delivers accurate results in 10 seconds. Accurate, portable glucose meter and free shipping to California. Wonderful on call plus glucose meter. Comes with everything you need to test your blood sugars. Same quality my endocrinologist office uses. Good glucose meter work great and good services. These work great. Easy to use. Clear instructions. No complaints. A good glucose meter. Good prices. Fast shipping... everything is good here! This glucose meter On Call Plus work perfect! Great this On call plus glucose meter, fast shipping to New York and free delivery. Cheap and works great this on call plus blood glucose meter, free shipping to Chicago and excellent service. I love the On Call Plus, I carry it with me and load it up to my laptop to do management on my diabetes. My blood glucose levels are always inline with this glucose meter. Continue reading >>

Consumer Reports: Best Deals On Glucose Meters

Consumer Reports: Best Deals On Glucose Meters

If you’re one of the almost 10 percent of Americans with diabetes, keeping track of blood sugar levels can help keep you out of the hospital. A home glucose meter is essential. Consumer Reports tested 29 blood glucose meters for accuracy by comparing their results to those from a glucose analyzer used in medical labs. Another important consideration is the cost of the test strips. Those little strips are a big, ongoing expense. And the cost can vary wildly. For example, Consumer Reports’ top-rated glucose meter, the FreeStyle is easy to use, very accurate and costs just $20. But the strips are very expensive, $2,400 per year if you test four times a day. Compare that with the Up & Up glucose meter from Target. The same number of strips costs far less, $525. That’s an annual savings of about $2,000. And Consumer Reports found the Up & Up meter easy to use and very accurate. It costs $15. Another good choice is the $15 ReliOn Micro from Walmart. It takes a few seconds longer to get a reading, but it’s also very accurate, and the annual cost of the strips is also $525. Consumer Reports health experts say that anyone taking insulin should monitor their glucose levels frequently at home, as should pregnant diabetics. How often you test is a decision you should discuss with your doctor. Complete Ratings and recommendations on all kinds of products, including appliances, cars and trucks, and electronic gear, are available on Consumer Reports’ website. Continue reading >>

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