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Best Bedtime Snack For Gestational Diabetes

10 Savvy Snacks For The Gestational Diabetes Diet

10 Savvy Snacks For The Gestational Diabetes Diet

If you’ve got gestational diabetes, you can still get the nutrients you and Baby need and keep your blood glucose levels under control. Enjoy these 10 healthy, diabetic-friendly snacks during pregnancy. 1. Nachos Who says diabetic snacks mean zero taste? These zesty nachos are tantalizing to the taste buds, provide approximately 29 grams of carbohydrates, and are a good way to work in a little calcium and a serving of vegetables into your prenatal diet. Here’s how to make them: Layer 10 corn tortilla chips—just over 1 ounce in weight—on a baking sheet and top with 1/4 cup of grated cheddar cheese and 1/4 cup of chopped green pepper (or use hot peppers, if preferred). Bake for 10 minutes at 350 degrees Fahrenheit, or until cheese is melted and bubbly. Remove from oven and transfer to plate. Top with 1/4 cup of tomato salsa and a tablespoon dollop of low-fat Greek-style yogurt. Health Tip: Because flavored tortilla chips tend to contain lots of sodium and, even worse for moms with gestational diabetes, added sugar, stick to plain corn tortilla chips. 2. Cheese and Crackers Perfect for a healthy, carb-controlled snack break at home or work—and easy enough to pack up for eating on the go—change up your choice of fruit and cheese to keep this snack classic fresh and exciting. These options are paired with a cup of low-fat milk for added calcium and just enough carbohydrates to reach 30 grams: 10 whole grain baked “thin snack crackers” (approx. 8 g of carbs); 1 ounce of cheddar cheese, sliced; 1/2 medium apple, sliced (10 g) and 1 cup of low-fat milk (12 g) 4 pieces of whole grain melba toast (15 g of carbs); 1 tablespoon reduced-fat cream cheese (1 g); 1/4 cup sliced strawberries (3 g) and 1 cup of low-fat milk (12 g) 5 round whole grain crackers (10 g of car Continue reading >>

Have Gestational Diabetes? Here’s How You Should Eat

Have Gestational Diabetes? Here’s How You Should Eat

While most women need to be careful about their diets, others have to be especially careful not to develop gestational diabetes. I’m on the crusade to fight diabetes in all of us, but I’m especially concerned about women with gestational diabetes because their babies are automatically at risk for developing diabetes related issues down the line. And we don’t want that! So let’s discuss a plan to keep moms as healthy as possible during this magical time known as pregnancy. How Did I Get Gestational Diabetes? Insulin is the hormone responsible for getting sugar out of the blood and inside the cells. Our bodies can typically regulate the amount of insulin it needs to produce to get sugar out of the bloodstream and into the cells. But during gestational diabetes, the hormones in the placenta that help the baby develop properly also block insulin from working in mommy’s body – causing insulin resistance. So instead of getting moved into the cells, all this sugar becomes stuck outside the cells, creating high blood sugar levels, or hyperglycemia. How Does Gestational Diabetes Affect Babies? Diabetic women who become pregnant are at higher risk of developing birth defects. But since gestational diabetes only affects the baby after it’s been formed, but is still growing, the risk becomes macrosomia, or “fat” baby. During gestational diabetes, mom’s pancreas has to work harder to produce more insulin to get rid of all the sugar in the blood that the cells are not absorbing. The placenta doesn’t absorb insulin, but it does let sugar pass through. This extra sugar goes right to the baby. When the baby develops high blood sugar levels, the baby’s pancreas starts to produce additional insulin to eliminate all the extra sugar in the blood, just like mom’s do Continue reading >>

Why You Need A Bedtime Snack

Why You Need A Bedtime Snack

Close your kitchen at 7 pm! Brush your teeth after dinner, so you don’t eat anything the rest of the night! I hear these ‘weight loss tricks’ time and time again. And, not even just from clients or readers. I read them in magazines and I’ve seen them in weight loss books. And I have a couple of questions about them. So, nothing goes into your mouth after this magical, made up time? And what does that even mean – do you put caution tape around your kitchen? Put sticky notes all over the fridge calling yourself a fat cow if you open it? Does the minty flavor REALLY curb your appetite? What kind of toothpaste are you using to stay that minty all night? Really, I want to know what kind of toothpaste you use. All of this, of course, is to avoid eating before bed. And I get it – binging on nachos before hitting the hay probably isn’t a super great idea if you’re trying to lose weight (or ever), but seriously, can we just stop with the bedtime snack police? If you’re hungry – if you have actual hunger pangs – you need to eat. Always. I don’t care who you are, what your goals are – starving yourself is a metabolic disaster and will only cause more harm than good. Steady blood sugar is so important for weight loss, fat burning, energy, a high functioning metabolism, curbing cravings and just overall health. As you can imagine, your blood sugar drops steadily throughout the night because you are fasting. So, not eating from dinner to breakfast – which could be at least 12 hours – is going to cause your blood sugar to bottom out overnight. Starving yourself after dinner is honestly such old news. The newest research shows that including a small bedtime snack won’t sabotage your weight loss efforts, and as a matter of fact, it may even help them. Wro Continue reading >>

Coping With Gestational Diabetes

Coping With Gestational Diabetes

I got diagnosed with GD on Monday, and I have had to do quite a radical diet change but my morning sugars are too high (over 5) how did you get them lower? I don’t want to go on insulin and I am following the rules to the letter. How did you cope and regulate everything? It seems to me that before diagnosis I was eating less now I am eating small meals what feels like constantly (every 2 hours) GD – gestational diabetes (Medical disclaimer: Tips provided need to be considered in conjunction with medical advice. For immediate concerns, please contact HealthDirect (Australia wide) ph 1800 022 222 – to talk to a registered nurse 24hrs a day, and in emergencies call 000.) * Note diabetes needs to be carefully managed by your medical team* I was diagnosed with GD at 26 weeks. I found a few things that helped lower sugars. Firstly always have protein with your carbs. I found things like chicken and eggs always bought my levels down. So eat more protein. Secondly I started walking for 40 minutes every morning and noticed a huge difference. My levels dropped drastically. Keep a food diary as everyone is different and responds differently to certain foods, eg I couldn’t eat low gi raisin toast or bananas but could eat pasta, low gi soy and linseed bread etc. I always had a glass of milk before bed too. You will work out what works for you. My boy was born at 38 weeks healthy and 6lb 13oz. Good luck! Pip I had the same problem. I did end up on insulin, but what helped for a while was having a protein based snack right before bed. No carbs, just protein. Also, every time I woke up I drank some water. Also remember guidelines are just that, guidelines. I stressed out completely, worried I was making my baby sick as I couldn’t get those morning numbers under control (rest Continue reading >>

Bedtime Snacks For Diabetics And Gestational Diabetes: Beat The Dawn Phenomenon

Bedtime Snacks For Diabetics And Gestational Diabetes: Beat The Dawn Phenomenon

Bedtime snacks go against everything we are taught in our nutrition classes. I have always known that eating after 8 p.m. will make me fat, so I avoid it. That all changes when you have diabetes, however. Bedtime snacks can become a critical component of managing blood sugar levels, particularly your fasting blood sugar. Although you would logically expect to have low numbers after eight hours of sleeping, some people with diabetes and gestational diabetes notice higher than expected fasting blood sugar numbers. This is due to what is known as The Dawn Phenomenon. What is the Dawn Phenomenon? The dawn phenomenon is a rise in blood sugar during the early morning hours, usually between 3 a.m. and 8 a.m. There are two theories as to why this occurs in some diabetics. One is that it is caused by our bodies naturally releasing certain growth hormones overnight that are linked to insulin resistance. This insulin resistance may be stronger in some people, which explains why some will experience the dawn phenomenon and not others. The second theory, which is where bedtime snacks come into play, is that the liver produces too much glucose after fasting too long. Our livers are designed to produce extra glucose to help us have the energy to wake up in the morning. In people with diabetes, the difference between the insulin and blood sugar produced is often unequal, resulting in higher fasting blood sugars. To combat this phenomenon, a small snack that contains both carbs and protein can help give your body something to digest longer, keeping your blood sugar levels on an even keel. For gestational diabetes, some recommendations are as high as 45 grams of carbs in a bedtime snack. I have found this number to be much too high for me, but around 30 grams works well. Once I began hav Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Questions!

Gestational Diabetes Questions!

I just have some questions and I don't want to wait until Tuesday, when I see my dietician again, to ask. If the questions are repetitive in any way I apologize, but I'm a bit scattered brained by all of this. I want to do the right things right out of the gate, and not wait around. 1) Do I time my snacks and next meals based on the time that I finish the snack/meal, or at the beginning? So lets say I start breakfast at 8:30 and finish at 8:45....do I eat my snack at 10:30 or 10:45? 2) Am I allowed to eat something in between snacks and lunch if they won't affect my blood sugar? A small piece of chicken, or some veggies for example? 3) The recommended carb servings on my meal plan...are these what I NEED to eat, or is it just my maximum limit? Can I eat NO carbs if I choose to? 4) If I don't eat my limit of carbs during a meal, can I apply the extra to a different meal or snack? 5) Should my bedtime snack be 2 hours after dinner or right before I lay down to go to sleep? 6) (kind of like #5) Based on my breakfast today, I am expecting to eat dinner around 4:25-4:35. That's fairly early for me. Do I have a snack 2 hours after dinner and then a bedtime snack right before bed? I don't normally go to bed until about 11pm or so. Ooh, I really wish I was at home, so I type this normally, instead of on my phone, lol. 1. I do all my timing from the end of my meal. Also, my window is eat every 2-3 hours, so it's not a rigid time window. 2. Cucumbers and radishes are pretty much free to eat whenever. I end up eating 4 oz of cukes and hour before lunch because I'm starving and it doesn't affect my sugar. 3. You need to eat carbs. Carbs are important and if you skip them, it can actually raise your score. Plus, you might get light-headed, like I do. 4. I've tried it, it doesn't wo Continue reading >>

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

My Experience With Gestational Diabetes

Explanation of gestational diabetes & personal reflection of what to expect if you are diagnosed during your pregnancy. Not to worry, it’s can be managed! When you’re pregnant many people love to say “Now you can eat for two!” or “Your pregnant, this is the time you can eat what you want!” Unfortunately, these words of wisdom are not entirely accurate. Every mom-to-be dreads the glucose tolerance test, which involves ingesting a high concentration of glucose (a form of sugar) mixed with water to see if you have gestational diabetes. It’s a grueling test because you have to sit in a doctor’s office or clinic for a few hours while they take blood samples before and 2-3 times after you drink the solution. Before the test, you have to fast for 8 hours and this alone makes mamas pretty aggravated but then with the drink solution you have to deal with a sugar high! Waiting for the results, you cross your fingers and hope that the last 24-28 weeks you’ve had a balanced, healthy diet. I knew that I had increased my carbohydrate and sweet intake more than before I was pregnant, but I was hoping the test would still be negative. Unfortunately, when I got the call from my doctor who then said I had gestational diabetes, my first reaction was guilt. How could I have done this to my baby? Gestational Diabetes 101 I want to make sure I disclose this up front, I am not a doctor, I’m just sharing my experience with gestational diabetes. My daily pregnancy routine consisted of exercising five times a week and eating healthy on most days. However, I knew I could have eaten healthier in the last trimester, but I didn’t (those darn cravings and ravishing bouts of hunger!). As I learned more about gestational diabetes, I realized that our bodies change so much during p Continue reading >>

Understanding Gestational Diabetes

Understanding Gestational Diabetes

Introduction Approximately 3 to 5 percent of all pregnant women in the United States are diagnosed as having gestational diabetes. These women and their families have many questions about this disorder. Some of the most frequently asked questions are: What is gestational diabetes and how did I get it? How does it differ from other kinds of diabetes? Will it hurt my baby? Will my baby have diabetes? What can I do to control gestational diabetes? Will I need a special diet? Will gestational diabetes change the way or the time my baby is delivered? Will I have diabetes in the future? This brochure will address these and many other questions about diet, exercise, measurement of blood sugar levels, and general medical and obstetric care of women with gestational diabetes. It must be emphasized that these are general guidelines and only your health care professional(s) can tailor a program specific to your needs. You should feel free to discuss any concerns you have with your doctor or other health care provider, as no one knows more about you and the condition of your pregnancy. What is gestational diabetes and what causes it? Diabetes (actual name is diabetes mellitus) of any kind is a disorder that prevents the body from using food properly. Normally, the body gets its major source of energy from glucose, a simple sugar that comes from foods high in simple carbohydrates (e.g., table sugar or other sweeteners such as honey, molasses, jams, and jellies, soft drinks, and cookies), or from the breakdown of complex carbohydrates such as starches (e.g., bread, potatoes, and pasta). After sugars and starches are digested in the stomach, they enter the blood stream in the form of glucose. The glucose in the blood stream becomes a potential source of energy for the entire body, sim Continue reading >>

How To Snack Right With Gestational Diabetes

How To Snack Right With Gestational Diabetes

Written by Natasha Leader, Accredited Practising Dietitian & Credentialled Diabetes Educator Snacks are a really important part of the gestational diabetes (GDM) diet for several reasons. Simply put, eating regularly will generally help keep your glucose levels tracking smoother. And including a snack between your meals also makes it less likely that you’ll get super hungry. Have you noticed that once you’re hungry it’s much harder to try to control your food intake? The key to a successful GDM diet is ensuring that you’re having a consistent amount of carbs. Snacks are also a good time to fit in your fruit and dairy requirements that you may no longer be able to eat together with your main meal. And often small and frequent intake also helps with other common problems in pregnancy such as nausea and heartburn/reflux. If you’re working or at home with little kids or just aren’t used to including mid-meal snacks, it’s often hard to adjust to this. So planning and preparation is the key! When you’re out and about you’ll probably find it challenging to find something that is both the right amount of carbs and not too high in fat, but also nutritious. So it pays to have a selection of suitable options on hand and variety will help too. I’ve put together this extensive list of suggestions. Your dietitian can help you work out whether you should eat some of these in combination to ensure you’re eating the recommended amounts both in terms of carbohydrate amount but also overall food group and nutrient amounts. Please note, the majority of these products are Australian. Dairy 1 carb snacks (where 1 carbohydrate serve = 15 grams of total carbohydrate) (Always check the product’s nutritional panel for exact info) Cup of low fat/soy milk (if you’d like s Continue reading >>

10 Tips To Control Gestational Diabetes Without Medication

10 Tips To Control Gestational Diabetes Without Medication

Update: When I wrote this post, I was thinking that I was going to be put on insulin. However, by the grace and goodness of God, I ended up making it full term without insulin and had a beautiful waterbirth! ---- I've been debating whether to write this post or not. The status of my Gestational Diabetes has changed. The last 3 weeks, I've been unable to manage it on my own with diet & exercise. The first week, I had 5 high readings. The 2nd week, another 5 high readings. This past week, I had 6 high readings. It's not because I've changed anything I've done. It's because your hormones in pregnancy change, throwing everything off, including your Gestational Diabetes numbers sometimes. Due to the recent 3 weeks numbers, my Endocrinologist will be putting me on either medication or insulin. This means I need to find an OBGYN & possibly switch hospitals. It also means my plans for a waterbirth are out. While I'm disappointed, I know there was nothing more I could've done. And as the Diabetes Educator said, "You are doing more than most people. In fact, you could probably write a book about the subject." So, that leads me here. Writing this post, in hopes of inspiring others to at least TRY to beat their Gestational Diabetes without medication. I managed mine with these tips for 33 weeks and no medication! Before we begin, I must write a disclaimer: I am not a professional. I have no health degree and am not a dietician. These are simply things that I researched and tried on my own and had some success with. Always speak with your Endocrinologist or Diabetes Educators before beginning or changing what you're doing. Tip #1: Don't be so hard on yourself. I'm starting with this tip, because it's the one I've had the hardest time with. I kept thinking that my Gestational Diabete Continue reading >>

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes As A Food Lover

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes As A Food Lover

What I Ate When I Couldn't Eat Anything: Facing Gestational Diabetes as a Food Lover Whether food is your comfort, your hobby, or your profession, gestational diabetes is tough. Here's what you can eat. [Photograph: Shutterstock ] In the first few months of my pregnancy, friends often asked me how I was dealing with life without wine, beer, and cocktails; without buttery pieces of toro at my beloved neighborhood sushi bar; without the various other foods most people avoid when they're carrying a baby. Early on, none of those things mattered much to me; I was too sick to crave much more than mac and cheese. Coffee and wine started to taste oddly bitter and flat to me, but it didn't seem that awful to wait 40 weeks to get back to enjoying them. My local bar always managed to serve me some creative alcohol-free concoction. (Pineapple juice and savory Cel-ray? Highly recommended.) I took advantage of California's citrus season, buying pounds of floral Oro Blanco grapefruits and tangerines for making fresh juice. Fruit never tasted better: I sent my husband on wild goose chases for out-of-season mangoes, and celebrated the early arrival of local strawberries by eating a pint every day. And I had ice cream: pints of salted caramel at home, cones of Bi-Rite's insanely rich buffalo-milk soft serve during walks around the park. In challenging moments in those first few months, Max reminded me that "at least it's an excuse to eat all the ice cream you could desire." (I never did convince him to ship me some homemade pints of this crazy chocolate number from New York.) But in mid-March I found myself undergoing a hazing ritual pretty much all pregnant women experience: you show up at the hospital with an empty stomach, get your blood drawn, and then chug a bottle of extra-strong Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Snacking Mistakes To Avoid

10 Diabetes Snacking Mistakes To Avoid

Snacking can help or hinder your glycemic control…. You are the force behind which occurs. Whether we are addressing snacking between meals or evening and bedtime snacks, some familiar mistakes are described below with some helpful tips to conquer those slip-ups. 1. Too Many Carbs Ask anyone what their favorite snacks are…. They are nearly all high carbohydrate foods. Crackers, pretzels, chips, cookies…. All go-to snacks for kids and adults alike. Carbohydrate content of snacks is typically recommended at 15-30 grams. Just one cup of the thin pretzel sticks contains 36 grams of carbohydrate. An 8-ounce container of lowfat strawberry yogurt contains 43 grams of carbohydrate. Only 15 Triscuit-type crackers contains 45 grams of carbohydrate. It is easy to eat more than you need. Tip: Read labels carefully for serving size and total carbohydrate. 2. Not Enough Carbs On the flip side, many people with diabetes go overboard and avoid carbohydrate at snack time. In reality, you need some carbohydrate continuously through the day for energy. Some common low-carbohydrate snacks: 1 ounce of cheese (contains zero carbohydrate), carrot and celery sticks with ranch dressing (about 8 grams of carbohydrate), or ¼ cup of roasted almonds (7 grams of carbohydrate). Remember that typical recommendations are for 15-30 grams of carbohydrate in a snack. Tip: Don’t be afraid to include some carbs in your snack, just be informed about how much you are eating. 3. Caught Without a Plan You are driving the kids to and from extracurricular activities, or you have a crazy day at work, or you are on a business trip…. Hectic schedules can certainly interfere with your eating plan. The best laid plans may get side tracked. But, having a plan in place in the beginning is the key to success. Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Survival Tips + Meal And Snack Ideas

Gestational Diabetes Survival Tips + Meal And Snack Ideas

This post contains affiliate links. This means that I make a small commission off of purchases made through my links at no extra charge to you. All opinions are my own. When I was pregnant with Bensen, my biggest struggle came when I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes. Some women cry when their regular clothes don't fit anymore, I cried when my carb intake became drastically limited and I realized just how many high carb foods I enjoy. I knew going into that pregnancy that I was at risk for GD because I was pre-diabetic, a little overweight and have a family history of Type II diabetes, but getting that confirmation that I indeed had it was rough for me. I'm here to tell you that I survived and that six weeks postpartum, I was healthier than I'd been when I first got pregnant! My diagnosis came the week of Valentine's Day, so my loving husband changed his plans for our celebration. Instead of going to our favorite pasta restaurant, stuffing ourselves silly, and then coming home to lounge on the couch in front of a movie, he planned and prepared a low carb dinner at home and then we went for a walk. It meant a lot to me because I knew how much time and effort he'd put into researching and preparing our meal, and also how much of a sacrifice it was for him to eat the same thing that I was eating and nothing more. He told me later that he was hungry within a couple of hours because the meal just wasn't filling enough for him. During those last two months of my pregnancy, I learned to love vegetables and eat foods that I never would have considered in the past. After a few weeks of testing my blood sugar levels before and after each meal, I learned what I needed to eat and do to keep them level throughout the day. Some days were better than others, but I was diligent a Continue reading >>

High Fasting Levels

High Fasting Levels

High fasting levels are a huge problem for many ladies. Fasting blood sugar levels, levels taken first thing in the morning when you wake up, are the hardest thing to control with gestational diabetes. But why is that? When we're sleeping we are not eating and drinking and we are not active and so the body is left to it's own devices with regards to controlling blood sugar levels. Impacts on fasting blood sugar levels Many things can impact fasting levels: what you've eaten earlier in the evening when you last ate hydration levels how well you've slept the dawn phenomenon the Somogyi effect What you ate earlier in the evening Bearing in mind how much of each food group converts to glucose in the bloodstream and the time taken, your fasting levels may be impacted by this. Too much carbohydrate in your evening meal or as a snack before bed can contribute to high fasting levels, as your body can only produce or use so much insulin, so if you raise your blood sugars too high by eating too much carbohydrate, your body can spend the night battling to try to lower your blood sugar levels. A high fat meal such as takeaway food can also cause higher blood sugar levels and so eating a well paired evening meal is important. When you last ate The key to stabilising blood sugar levels is to eat small amounts, often. We obviously cannot do this throughout the night, but if you eat your evening meal early and do not eat again until breakfast the following day, it can be an extremely long time to go without eating. Likewise, if you eat a large meal just before going to bed, this too can have a detrimental effect on your fasting levels. Hydration levels Dehydration will cause higher blood sugar levels. Water helps to flush excess sugar from the body and so it is important to stay well h Continue reading >>

Diabetic Bedtime Snack Ideas

Diabetic Bedtime Snack Ideas

Low blood sugar during the night can be a concern for people with diabetes, especially those on insulin. A 2003 study published in "Diabetes Care" investigated the impact of snack composition on nightly blood sugars in adults with Type 1 diabetes. The researchers concluded that bedtime snacks consisting of a carbohydrate and protein worked best in preventing low blood sugars when the bedtime blood sugar was less than 126 mg/dL. Video of the Day Most bedtime snacks contain about 15 to 30 g of carbohydrate, or two servings of a carbohydrate-containing food, and a serving of protein. It is not quite understood why protein helps to prevent nightly hypoglycemia, according to the authors of the "Diabetes Care" study, but it is believed to be related to the way protein is metabolized. Cereal and milk provides both carbohydrate and protein. A good bedtime snack consists of 3/4-cup serving of whole-grain cereal and 1-cup of low-fat milk. During cold months, you can try 1/2 cup of hot cereal with 2 tbsp. of raisins and 1 cup of skim milk as a cereal bedtime snack. Crackers and Peanut Butter Crackers provide the carbohydrate and peanut butter provides the protein. Spread 12 whole-grain crackers with 3 tsp. of peanut butter or you can also try six whole-grain crackers with 3 tsp. of peanut butter and 1-cup of skim milk. Each of these snacks contain 30 g of carbohydrate. Sandwiches also make a good bedtime snack for diabetics. Choose lean sources of meat to decrease your intake of saturated fat. Too much saturated fat in the diet increases blood cholesterol levels, another risk factor for heart disease. Bedtime sandwich ideas include two slices of whole wheat bread with 1 oz. of turkey, 1 oz. of lean ham, 1oz. of low-fat cheese or 1 oz. of canned tuna packed in water mixed with 1 ts Continue reading >>

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