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Benadryl Blood Sugar

Can Benadryl Raise Your Blood Sugar 426100

Can Benadryl Raise Your Blood Sugar 426100

Medications That Raise Blood Glucose: Diabetes Forecast almost always increase blood glucose, she says, because this type of administration affects the whole body what doctors If you need to use a steroid inhaler for asthma or hydrocortisone cream for a rash, the risk of increased blood glucose is minimal. How Allergies Can Affect Your Blood Sugar WebMD directly, but some medications may. Benadryl Allergy Does benedryl have any effect on blood sugar not mention this however it mention stomach upset and vomiting in some people I have taken it and am diabetic but your daughter and I are two different people if it should make her sick (just for some reason) then her blood sugar would naturally drop at least nbsp; Do Allergy Medications and Diabetes Medications Interact? (diphenhydramine) are all allergy medications that should not affect your blood sugar when used by themselves. However, these antihistamines are often paired with pseudoephedrine or phenylephrine. Pseudoephedrine and phenylephrine nbsp; Sleeping Aids and Diabetes Healthline Find out the dangers of sleeping aids for people with diabetes, how they might affect their medication, and suggested pills from experts. If your blood sugar drops at night and you can 39;t produce enough cortisol, your body will produce adrenalin instead. This will wake you up and cause your blood sugar nbsp; Sneezes and Wheezes: Seasonal Allergies and Diabetes Diabetes The following types of allergy medicines may affect your blood glucose levels or how you manage them: Antihistamines. These medicines can reduce sneezing, runny nose, and itchy and watery eyes. Common antihistamines include diphenhydramine (Benadryl), loratidine (Alavert, Claritin), cetirizine nbsp; Voice of the Diabetic sugar control. They can increase blo Continue reading >>

Sneezes And Wheezes: Seasonal Allergies And Diabetes

Sneezes And Wheezes: Seasonal Allergies And Diabetes

Spring is really starting to burst out here in Massachusetts. The tulips are blooming and leaves and buds are popping out on the trees. As pretty and welcoming as this is, many of you (about 50 million!) are probably bracing yourself for all of the pollen that is soon to follow, and suffering through the misery that it can bring. Thanks to the mild winter that we had in the Northeast, plants are pollinating earlier than usual. As if that weren’t bad enough, having seasonal allergies can also affect your blood sugar control. Seasonal allergies: do you have them? Seasonal allergies are sometimes called hay fever or, more technically, seasonal allergic rhinitis. You might be wondering if your symptoms are due to a cold, flu, or allergies. While there can be some overlap, the following symptoms are usually indicative of allergies: • Itchy eyes • Watery eyes • Dark circles under the eyes • Sneezing • Runny nose • Stuffy nose • Sore throat You might also feel a little bit tired. You won’t get a fever from allergies, however. These symptoms can linger for weeks unless they’re treated. Treating allergies There are a number of remedies for seasonal allergies, including oral medications, nasal sprays, and eye drops. It’s important that you not only choose the right one for your symptoms, but that you also are aware of how these medicines might affect your blood sugars. The following types of allergy medicines may affect your blood glucose levels or how you manage them: Antihistamines. These medicines can reduce sneezing, runny nose, and itchy and watery eyes. Common antihistamines include diphenhydramine (Benadryl), loratidine (Alavert, Claritin), cetirizine (Zyrtec Allergy), and fexofenadine (Allegra Allergy). Antihistamines might be combined with a deconge Continue reading >>

Can Benadryl Lower Your Blood Sugar

Can Benadryl Lower Your Blood Sugar

So if you take a nap and miss a meal, you wake up with , Bernstein says. Look for newer antihistamines with less of a sedative effect or talk with a pharmacist about the side effects of various medications. To unclog a stuffy nose, you might choose an OTC or prescription nasal spray, but you might not3 Answers - Posted in: , allergy, allergies - Answer: I couldn;t find any information that ( Allergy) Apr 25, 2016 The following types of allergy medicines may affect levels or how you manage them: Antihistamines. These medicines sneezing, runny nose, and itchy and watery eyes. Common antihistamines include (), loratidine (Alavert, Claritin), cetirizineJan 25, 2011 Like any medication, sleep aids also cause side effects and some be particularly addictive, so talk to doctor about the best med for you, and make sure to let him/her know if you For those of us living with diabetes, severe requiring emergency help are always a possibility.The dose, duration, and how the steroids enter system are all important in determining how is affected and how closely diabetes medications need to be monitored, With this dose, you may need more diabetes medication, though that as you gradually steroid dose.May 6, 2011 Choosing the right antihistamine for diabetics is important because many over-the-counter (OTC) drugs may affect levels and cause other undesired side effects. Diabetics who experience symptoms of flu, colds, cough and allergies are often not sure if they are suffering from infection orZyrtec (cetirizine), Claritin (loratadine), Allegra (fexofenadine), and () are all allergy medications that should not affect when used by themselves. However, these antihistamines are often paired with pseudoephedrine or phenylephrine. Pseudoephedrine and phenylephrine is found among people who Continue reading >>

Causes Of High Blood Pressure

Causes Of High Blood Pressure

It's not known exactly what causes most cases of high blood pressure. There are two types of high blood pressure: primary (also called essential) hypertension and secondary hypertension. Primary hypertension tends to develop gradually over a long period of time. When high blood pressure arises suddenly and is a caused by an underlying condition, it’s called secondary hypertension. Some conditions and medications can lead to secondary hypertension, including the following: Kidney problems Adrenal gland tumors Thyroid problems Blood vessels defects Obstructive sleep apnea Alcohol abuse or chronic alcohol use Smoking Drugs and High Blood Pressure Medication that you take to control other health conditions, such as arthritis, epilepsy, or the common cold or allergies, can cause your blood pressure to rise. And such medication can also interfere with the ability of hypertension drugs to keep blood pressure down. Drugs that can affect blood pressue include: Corticosteroids: These anti-inflammatory drugs are often prescribed to treat arthritis, asthma, and other chronic conditions. Examples include prednisone (Sterapred), methylprednisolone (Medrol, Meprolone), dexamethasone (Decadron), and cortisone. Tricyclic antidepressants: These are often used to treat migraine headaches, in addition to depression, and are known to increase blood pressure. Examples include desipramine (Pertofrane, Norpramin), protriptyline (Vivactil), amitriptyline (Elavil, Endep, Vanatrip), and nortriptyline (Pamelor, Aventyl). NSAIDs: Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are common pain relievers used to treat conditions like arthritis as well as minor aches and pains. Ibuprofen (Motrin, Advil) naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn), and aspirin are frequently used NSAIDs. Decongestants: These medicatio Continue reading >>

Allergy Tips For People With Diabetes

Allergy Tips For People With Diabetes

Aaachoooo! It's that time of year again: spring allergy season. For about 1 in 5 people, warm weather brings not only blooming flowers and trees but also the telltale symptoms of hay fever (seasonal allergies) -- sneezing, coughing, runny or stuffy nose, scratchy throat, and itchy eyes. For those with type 2 diabetes, spring allergies don't directly affect blood sugar, but there are things you need to watch out for, says Gerald Bernstein, MD, FACP. HE's the director of the Diabetes Management Program at the Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. For relief from itching, sneezing, and runny nose, you might reach for an over-the-counter (OTC) medication such as an antihistamine, which millions have used safely, Bernstein says. "But when you're throwing something like issues around blood sugar into the mix, you need to be a little more aware of the potential things that can occur." One in five people who use antihistamines become drowsy, according to the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA). "So if you take a nap and miss a meal, you can wake up with low blood sugar," Bernstein says. Look for newer antihistamines with less of a sedative effect or talk with a pharmacist about the side effects of various medications. To unclog a stuffy nose, you might choose an OTC or prescription nasal spray, but you might not know that some contain steroids. "Steroids stimulate the liver to make more glucose [blood sugar], so now your liver is beginning to make more sugar," Bernstein says. "And if you're not aware of this, you might be surprised and ask, ‘Why are my numbers high?'" Ask your doctor or pharmacist about nasal sprays without steroids. You have two choices: an OTC decongestant nasal spray or an OTC antihistamine nasal spray. If you cho Continue reading >>

Voice Of The Diabetic

Voice Of The Diabetic

by Sarah Johnston Miller, Pharm.D., BCNSP (Note from Dr. Wes Wilson: Looking at this question, I felt it would be wise to refer it to a pharmacist who is actively involved in both patient care and in teaching students about such problems. Dr. Sarah Miller is Professor of Clinical Pharmacy at the University of Montana, and is also a consultant at St. Patrick Hospital in Missoula, Montana. Her answer should be helpful.) Q: Which nonprescription drug products for treatment of common cold symptoms should a person with diabetes avoid? A: There is some concern about the effect some nonprescription (over-the-counter) medications may have on blood sugar control. The diabetic patient should always remember that, in general, "sick days" may be associated with fluctuations in blood sugar. This may be related to the stress of being sick, or to changes in dietary intake during illness. Your nonprescription medications may not be at fault at all--but it pays to know. A severe bout of the common cold (a viral illness) could certainly produce "sick days," elevated blood sugars--without any effects from your nonprescription or other medications. When you're sick, test your blood more often. Textbooks may list quite a few classes of potentially-problematic medications, though many of these are in reality not very significant. Regardless, the diabetic patient should always contact their health care provider (physician, diabetes educator, or pharmacist) prior to taking any new nonprescription medication. This includes "lternative"remedies purchased at the health food store or elsewhere; "natural" does not mean "safe from interactions!" You should be cautious that many nonprescription medications, including those targeting symptoms of the common cold, contain multiple ingredients. Another Continue reading >>

Aspirin-like Drug May Help Diabetics Control Blood Sugar

Aspirin-like Drug May Help Diabetics Control Blood Sugar

Over the years, I’ve written and edited many articles for medical journals. I have to say I’m now finding it a bit odd to be on the flip side as the subject of such an article (along with 285 other people). A couple years ago, I volunteered to take part in a clinical trial testing whether an old, aspirin-like drug called salsalate could help control blood sugar in people with type 2 diabetes. The results of that trial, called TINSAL-T2D, are reported in the current issue of Annals of Internal Medicine. All 286 volunteers were given blue pills to take every day for nearly a year. Half of us got pills containing salsalate; the others got placebo pills. Over the course of the trial, those in the salsalate group had lower blood sugar levels, and some were even able to reduce dosages of other diabetes medications they were taking. “We were very pleased with the findings of the TINSAL-T2D study,” said lead author Dr. Allison B. Goldfine, associate professor of medicine at Harvard-affiliated Joslin Diabetes Center. “They indicate that salsalate, a drug that has been marketed for over 40 years for the treatment of arthritis, could be an inexpensive additional therapeutic option to treat patients with diabetes.” Inflammation and diabetes Salsalate is an old drug that’s closely related to aspirin. Use of these drugs and their natural precursor use can be traced back at least 3,500 years. Today, salsalate is used to treat arthritis pain. One advantage it has over aspirin and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is that it doesn’t irritate the digestive tract. No one knows exactly how salsalate helps control blood sugar. But its effectiveness supports the idea that inflammation plays a role in type 2 diabetes. In addition to improving blood sugar control, sals Continue reading >>

Can Allergies Raise Glucose Level?

Can Allergies Raise Glucose Level?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. For the past wk, with the advent of spring (and pollen, mold, etc, to which I am allergic), my glucose levels have run almost twice as hi as normal, even with eating less and injecting more. I even switched to new bottles of insulin to see if that were the cause (it wasn't). Can allergies cause glucose level to be higher? Can immune activation raise glucose levels? If antihistamines treat the symptoms but not the cause (immune activation), then they won't help glucose levels return to normal, right? Has anyone else noticed this connection? Les Part of the body's natural allergic response is to produce cortisol (which is a steroid). The intent in the body is to reduce inflamation, but it has the unfortunate effect of causing elevated BG.. the effect varies. The last time I dealt with this I was having scary high numbers. Antihistamines don't treat the symptoms, they actually do help to reduce the response. My CDE recently turned me on to using flonase to reduce my nasal symptoms, which seems to be the source of the typical seasonal allergy cascade for me.. I was skeptical about adding a steroid into the mix, but since it's localized it does seem to help without a huge impact on my BG. If I am having more systemic allergy issues, nothing really helps... I have to bump up the insulin a LOT. I believe they can. When your immune system is activated trying to fight off an attack, your body releases cortisol....which raises blood sugar. I have chronic autoimmune hives that were in full force from last may until just recently and my blood sugars were crazy the whole time (and I had tons of antihistim Continue reading >>

Choosing A Antihistamine For Diabetics

Choosing A Antihistamine For Diabetics

Choosing the Right Antihistamine as a Diabetic written by: AngelicaMD edited by: Diana Cooper updated: 5/6/2011 Diabetics who suffer from allergies, flu, colds and cough sometimes take over-the-counter (OTC) drugs such as antihistamines. Choosing the right antihistamine as a diabetic is important because many OTC drugs may affect blood sugar levels and cause other undesired side effects. Many diabetic people who experience symptoms of flu, colds, cough and allergies are often not sure if they are suffering from infection or allergies. The symptoms may be similar and so people often buy over-the-counter drugs (OTC) that contain combinations of ingredients which target these symptoms all at once. These symptoms may include headache, fever, runny nose and weakness, for which OTC drugs combining pain relievers, antihistamines, nasal decongestants, cough suppressants and other ingredients are sold. Antihistamines block the action of histamines which are produced by normal cells in reaction to allergens, thus preventing symptoms like runny nose, excessive tearing, itchiness and other allergic reactions. OTC antihistamines are usually combined with other drugs such as nasal decongestants, cough suppressants, expectorants, pain relievers, etc to relieve cough, colds and other flu symptoms. First generation or older preparations of antihistamines often cause drowsiness. Examples of these are diphenhydramine (Benadryl) and chlorpheniramine (Chlortrimeton). These are usually taken when one is expected to rest in bed and contraindicated for persons who are driving vehicles or heavy equipment. Second generation antihistamines are the newer class of drugs which are non-sedating and are taken by people who work or go to school. They include certirizine (Zyrtec) and loratadine (Clarit Continue reading >>

Sleeping Aids And Diabetes

Sleeping Aids And Diabetes

People with diabetes certainly aren't immune to issues with insomnia or other sleeping problems that occur with age, jet lag or seasonal affective disorder. When that happens, sometimes counting sheep just doesn't cut it. But there has been concern discussed recently in the D-OC about using sleep aids with diabetes. A thread on TuDiabetes starts off with the notion that "any kind of sleep aid is taboo for an insulin-dependent diabetic." So we decided to put on our Mythbusters hat and investigate whether this claim is true or false... Although there aren't any recommended sleep aids specifically for people with diabetes, Kelley Champ Crumpler, a diabetes nurse educator and the wife of an endocrinologist, primarily recommends melatonin to treat sleeping problems. Melatonin is a naturally occurring hormone in your system that helps to control your sleep and wake cycles. Unlike insulin, melatonin is a hormone that is synthetically made and can be ingested, so a natural supplement is available over-the-counter (usually found in the vitamin section of your grocery store). "We have them start with a small, 1 mg tablet before bed, and can taper up as needed," Kelley says. "Melatonin won't render you useless like other sleep aid/hypnotics will. It's even safe for children to use." If that doesn't work, Kelley says that using an antihistamine that contains either diphenhydramine (found in Benadryl or nighttime pain relievers like Tylenol PM or Advil PM) or doxyalimine (found in the over-the-counter sleep-aid tablets Unisom). Anecdotal evidence on some of the diabetes forums shows that melatonin and antihistamines are the most popular way of treating insomnia. These meds are also "light" enough that they won't knock you out so much that you won't wake up naturally in an emergency Continue reading >>

Help, My Mom Has An Insulin Allergy!

Help, My Mom Has An Insulin Allergy!

Integrated Diabetes Services (IDS) provides detailed advice and coaching on diabetes management from certified diabetes educators and dieticians. Insulin Nation hosts a regular Q&A column from IDS that answers questions submitted from the Type 1 diabetes community. Not all problems with diabetes are cut and dry. Recently, my fellow certified diabetes educators, Gary Scheiner, Lisa Foster-McNulty, and I put our heads together about this inquiry: I think my mom is allergic to insulin. Every one she tries, she develops a reaction at the injection site. It’s like a painful swollen bee sting. Her doctors have switched her to oral medications besides insulin, but her blood sugar levels are out of control. As a side note, when I had gestational diabetes I too became allergic to insulin. I broke out in hives after using it for a few weeks. They switched me to glyburide and I was able to control my blood sugar levels with that alone. Any advice? -Lisa B. This was our internal email conversation on this: Hi Gary and Lisa, Although I have heard of people developing antibodies to insulin after some time and having to switch brands for a while – I haven’t seen too much about immediate reaction to all insulins. Does something like oral benadryl or topical benadryl help in a situation like this? Also, we can’t be sure that every insulin has been tried, since some are less well-known, even among some doctors. This appears to be someone with Type 2, who is not dependent completely on injected insulin, so perhaps a cocktail of various oral meds would be in the patient’s best interest. Good follow-up from her endocrinologist would be needed, as well as good education to ensure all lifestyle issues are being addressed. Thoughts? -Jennifer Lisa weighed in next: Hi Jennifer, From w Continue reading >>

Diphenhydramine For Sleep

Diphenhydramine For Sleep

Chocolate biscuits. :) What are they called in your neck of the woods? I think Peat may have suggested that alarm clock method for some people. I'm sure not going to try it though - alarm clocks are so alarming. I find if I'm still lying awake after about 5 mins (estimating, cause I keep my eyes shut), its time to have a snack (formerly chocky bikky, more recently a couple of dates). If I leave it for 15 minutes or more, hoping to go back to sleep without, it takes longer to work. I also try to get something in without having to sit up or open eyes - the less I disturb the better. Try some thiamine and niacinamide combo before bed. Niacinamide is basically a benzodiazepine so it will sedate you and of course inhibit the night starvation-induced lipolysis. Thiamine will make you utilize sugar better, similar to thyroid hormone, So, even with low glycogen stores you may be able to sleep through the night. Some people have reported great benefit on sleep from Energin, which has these two vitamins and also B6 which blocks both cortisol and adrenalin as shown by the studies I posted some time ago. Continue reading >>

Allergy Medications: Know Your Options

Allergy Medications: Know Your Options

Several types of medications are used to treat allergy symptoms. Here's more information. Allergy medications are available as pills, liquids, inhalers, nasal sprays, eyedrops, skin creams and shots (injections). Some are available over-the-counter; others are available by prescription only. Here's a summary of the types of allergy medications and why they're used. Antihistamines block histamine, a symptom-causing chemical released by your immune system during an allergic reaction. Oral antihistamines, available over-the-counter and by prescription, ease a runny nose, itchy or watery eyes, hives, swelling, and other signs or symptoms of allergies. Because some of these drugs can cause drowsiness and fatigue, take them with caution when you need to drive or do other activities that require alertness. Antihistamines that tend to cause drowsiness include: These antihistamines are much less likely to cause drowsiness: Antihistamine nasal sprays help relieve sneezing, itchy or runny nose, sinus congestion, and postnasal drip. Side effects of antihistamine nasal sprays might include a bitter taste, drowsiness or fatigue. Prescription antihistamine nasal sprays include: Antihistamine eyedrops, available over-the-counter or by prescription, can ease itchy, red, swollen eyes. These drops might have a combination of antihistamines and other medicines. Side effects might include headache and dry eyes. If antihistamine drops sting or burn, try keeping them in the refrigerator or using refrigerated artificial-tear drops before you use the medicated drops. Examples include: Decongestants are used for quick, temporary relief of nasal and sinus congestion. They can cause insomnia, headache, increased blood pressure and irritability. They're not recommended for pregnant women or for pe Continue reading >>

Flickr: Benadryl Blood Sugar

Flickr: Benadryl Blood Sugar

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Rid 17 To How Of Of Them Headaches Get Causes Types

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rid 17 to how of of them headaches get causes types Find product information ratings and reviews for benadryl allergy relief 25 mg tablets diphenhydramine hcl 100ct online on . Consumer ratings reports for benadryl. Includes 581 patient rankings on scale of 15 comments side effects dosage sex age time taken. Page 1 of 10. Find patient medical information for benadryl oral on webmd including its uses side effects and safety interactions pictures warnings and user ratings. Baby may be sitting up babbling or even crawling. Parenting is becoming a bit more challenging. Share with other moms and dads here. Webmd experts and contributors provide answers to your health questions. sollicitudo rei socialism core message examples , rot47 php , meera kahe Benadryl oral uses side effects interactions pictures Information on itching its causes symptoms and home remedies come in handy as a supplement to conventional treatment or as an alternative in mild cases and also for. Webmd provides information about interactions between benadryl oral and agentsthataffectiodideradioactiveiodide. Many people treated with hemodialysis complain of itchy skin usually on the back chest head or limbs. The itching is often worse during or just. Continue reading >>

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