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Barnyard Millet For Diabetes

9 Diabetic Friendly Grains Beyond Brown Rice

9 Diabetic Friendly Grains Beyond Brown Rice

9 Diabetic Friendly Grains Beyond Brown Rice Diabetes is one of the most prevalent condition throughout the world. Be it Type 1, Type 2 or gestational (which was in my case), as soon as we realize that we have joined the Diabetics camp, we immediately start controlling our sweet tooth in order to keep our sugar consumption under control. Apart from cutting down on sweets and adding less sugar in your coffee, it is also extremely important to understand that we have to limit our calories intake and add more foods which are of low glycemic index in our diet. Low glycemic Index foods are those which take longer time to get digested and therefore release the sugars in our blood at a slow pace. This in turn prevents sudden spikes in the sugar levels. In addition to its high carbohydrate content, white rice also has a high glycemic index. Replacing it with either brown,red or black rice which are high in fiber helps to keep the sugar levels stable. BELOW ARE A LIST OF 9 AWESOME WHOLE GRAINS WHICH YOU CAN EFFECTIVELY USE IN PLACE OF RICE. Health benefits: Gluten free, High protein (15-18%), great source of calcium, fiber, iron, potassium, and many other vitamins and minerals. How to cook: Add 2 cups water to 1 cup amaranth grain, bring to a boil, then simmer for 15-20 minutes Gluten free, high in dietary fiber, Low Glycemic index, reduces the levels of triglycerides, LDL and VLDL, magnesium present in millets is a co-factor in various enzymes involved in the secretion of insulin and metabolism of glucose in the body How to cook: Pressure cook 1 cup of foxtail millet with 2.5 cups water and 1/2 tsp salt for three whistles. Turn off the flame. Highest protein content, gluten free, Rich in fiber, iron, magnesium etc, easy to cook How to cook: Pressure cook 1 cup of quinoa with 2 Continue reading >>

Millets - Types Of Millets, Benefits, Nutrition Information

Millets - Types Of Millets, Benefits, Nutrition Information

Millets - Types of Millets, Benefits, Nutrition Information Millets - Types of Millets, Benefits, Nutrition Information Millets - Millets or Siruthaniyam varieties are all about today post. I use millets for a long time though not all the millets that I am going to talk about today but 3-4 millets are very regular and I always keep stock, about that I will talk later in that post. Millets are not very popular other than Bajra, Jowar and Ragi and in all the millets Bajra (Pearl Millet) is most popular. Now a days millets are again gaining it's movement and people bringing more aware of it and today we going to learn about few millets which we can include in our diet, there are plenty of other millets too which hopefully I can cover some time soon. Millets are a group of highly variable small-seeded grasses, widely grown around the world as cereal crops/ grains. Millet is tiny in size and round in shape and can be white, gray, yellow or red like you can see in pictures. Millets are very high in their nutrition content. Each millets are three to five times nutritionally superior to rice and wheat in terms of proteins, minerals and vitamins. Millets are rich in B vitamins, calcium, iron, potassium, magnesium, zinc, also gluten-free and has low-GI (Glycemic index) thus millets are suitable for people allergies/intolerance of wheat. Also for diabetic, weight loss millets are excellent. For thousands of years, millets has been growing such as Pearl millet, Barnyard millet, Sorghum, Foxtail millet, Little millet, Kodo millet, Proso millet and now ANI (Millet Network of India) promotes milets as Nutri-cereals instead of Coarse Cereals. Here some interesting facts about millets other than that they are gluten-free, highly nutritious, millets need very little water for their prod Continue reading >>

Millet & Diabetes | Livestrong.com

Millet & Diabetes | Livestrong.com

Tracey Roizman, DC is a writer and speaker on natural and preventive health care and a practicing chiropractor. She also holds a B.S. in nutritional biochemistry. A box of millet.Photo Credit: DAJ/amana images/Getty Images Millet is actually a group of related plants that produce small pearl-like grains and not a single plant. Millet is low in essential amino acids and higher than most grains in fat content, 75 percent of which is heart-healthy polyunsaturated fat. Millet has been shown to be potentially beneficial in the management of diabetes. Millet may make a good substitute for rice for some diabetics, according to Peter Belton, author of the book "Pseudocereals and Less Common Cereals: Grain Properties and Utilization Potential." Millet's high fiber content slows digestion and releases sugar into the bloodstream at a more even pace. This helps diabetics avoid dangerous spikes in blood sugar that lead to glucose spilling over into the urine, known as glucosuria. Millet also contains high quantities of methionine, an amino acid that is deficient in most grains, giving millet a valuable place in a vegetarian diet. Researchers at the department of biological chemistry and food science, faculty of agriculture, Iwate University, Japan reported that a high-fat diet containing 20 percent millet protein for three weeks significantly decreased glucose and triglyceride levels and increased levels of adiponectin -- a substance secreted by fat cells that regulates appetite -- in laboratory animals. Millet also increased levels of high-density lipoprotein, HDL, the good form of cholesterol. The researchers concluded that millet may potentially be useful at managing insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease in Type 2 diabetes. The study was published in the February 2009 is Continue reading >>

Efficacy Of Millets In The Development Of Low Glycemic Index Sweets For Diabetics

Efficacy Of Millets In The Development Of Low Glycemic Index Sweets For Diabetics

Home Uncategorized Efficacy of Millets in the Development of Low Glycemic Index Sweets for Diabetics Efficacy of Millets in the Development of Low Glycemic Index Sweets for Diabetics Efficacy of Millets in the Development of Low Glycemic Index Sweets for DiabeticsBisht AT & Srivastava S Department of Foods and Nutrition, GB Pant University of Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar- 263145, US Nagar, Uttarakhand, India Introduction: Three types of burfi (a sweet confection), namely, foxtail millet burfi (FMb), barnyard millet burfi (BMb) and control Bengal gram flour burfi (CBGFb) were developed for the consumption of diabetics. Methods: The flour blends for FMb and BMb contained 43% of foxtail millet and barnyard millet flour, respectively and 57% of bengal gram flour. The CBGFb was prepared by using 100% Bengal gram flour and served as control. The burfis were analysed for sensory quality, acceptability, storage stability, nutritional quality, glycemic index (GI) and glycemic load (GL). Results: All the three burfis were acceptable to diabetic as well as non-diabetic subjects and could be stored easily for 15 days under ambient conditions. The millet burfis possessed fibre and starch contents which contributed to a low GI value of 37.5 for FMb compared to the control. The GL values were 14.7, 17 and 17.9 for FMb, BMb and CBGFb, respectively. Conclusion: The millet, especially foxtail millet which had a low GI value has the potential of being served to diabetics in the form of sweets. Keywords: Foxtail millet, barnyard millet, glycemic index, glycemic load, sweets Continue reading >>

Barnyard Millet | Shailja's Kitchen [ Meals & Memories Are Made Here ]

Barnyard Millet | Shailja's Kitchen [ Meals & Memories Are Made Here ]

Shailja's Kitchen [ Meals & Memories Are Made Here ] I am a proud DFT blogger. To learn about DFT, click on the picture above .. This recipe is part of Recipes With A cause for Diabetes Friendly Thursday. This time the theme for DFT was One Pot Meal . When I heard about the theme, I was excited and a little overwhelmed then came up with my familys all time favorite Pulao . This Pulao is quick to make , can be eaten all by itself or with yogurt , raita , chutney and papadums .. I like to cook with whole grains as well as millet as much as I can as It contain lots of vitamins, minerals and protein and is comparatively healthier then rice & one can easily use in dishes the same way as you would use rice DFT goes easy and cooks a one pot meal for you!! Tomatoes (finely chopped) 1 medium size (optional) Cabbage chopped 1/2 cup I used purple cabbage Cilantro / Coriander leaves For garnishing 1. Wash and soak the rice for 15 20 minutes. Drain. Keep aside. 2. Heat the oil in a pan with a lid . Add cumin seeds & when they crackle, add the onion, grated ginger .Saut for 2 minutes. 3.Now add all the other vegetables along with red chili powder, coriander powder , and turmeric powder if using. Saut for 3-5 mins 4.Add the rice and chopped tomatoes & Saut for 2 more minutes, add 2 cups of water and salt as per taste . 5.Once the rice comes to a boil , put the heat on medium low , cover the pan with a lid and cook for 10 -12 mins or till all the water is absorbed and millet is cooked . 6.Garnish with the mint springs. Serve hot yogurt or raita and papadum of your choice .. Benefits of the Ingredients Used In Making This Pulao Millet may make a good substitute for rice for some diabetics. Millets high fiber content slows digestion and releases sugar into the bloodstream at a more even Continue reading >>

What Makes Millets A Super Food For Diabetics

What Makes Millets A Super Food For Diabetics

What makes millets a super food for diabetics Millets are not just bird seed, but the secret to enjoying your grains while staying gluten free, keeping your blood sugar low and accelerating weight loss Millets are tiny seeds of the grass family that originated in Africa and Asia. Consumed traditionally in South India, these easy to cook goodies are nutritious, cultivated with less water, are pest resistant and therefore environment friendly. They come at a marginally higher expense but are richer in protein, fat, fibre and other nutrients than grains like wheat and rice. Millets are a powerhouse of the following nutrients: Fibre offers satiety therefore is a good choice to manage blood sugars and diabetes Beta-glucan [soluble fibre] lowers cholesterol and triglycerides Resistant starch helps in the growth of good bacteria in the gut Bran is not digested and aids easy bowel movement preventing constipation Millets contain higher amounts of protein in comparison to rice and wheat. Typically grains lack an essential amino acid called lysine. Finger and foxtail millet contains more lysine. High protein content increases serotonin which is a feel good factor and it helps to induce sleep B vitamins, B3, B6, and folic acid makes one feel energetic Magnesium is an anti-stress mineral and together with potassium helps to reduce blood pressure and boosts heart health Calcium and phosphorus are good for bone health, however the absorption of calcium may be not be optimal due to the presence of anti-nutrients like phytates, phenols, enzyme inhibitors and tanins Iron is vital for stamina and its absorption in finger millet [ragi] can be enhanced by malting. Most of the common food items prepared with rice or wheat can be replaced with millets either partly or whole. Millets contain Continue reading >>

Millets Can Work Magic On Diabetes: Study

Millets Can Work Magic On Diabetes: Study

Millets can work magic on diabetes: Study Millets can work magic on diabetes: Study Millet can significantly bring down sugar levels in those suffering from type-2 diabetes. Millets can work magic on diabetes: Study (Thinkstock photos/Getty Images) From a humble crop that once satiated the poor to the base of a gourmet meal for the health conscious, millets have made a comeback. While flavours of the grain may vary to suit modern palates, a doctor's ideal recipe is still traditional. A research paper has documented this formula and tracked its impact on people with diabetes. The study, undertaken by M V Hospital for Diabetes , found that replacing rice based dosas with ones made of foxtail millet (Thinai) can significantly bring down sugar levels in those suffering from type-2 diabetes. The research, published recently in the Indian Journal of Medical Research, is based on a survey undertaken on 105 patients in Chennai diagnosed with type-2 diabetes. "We wanted to estimate the effect of a single change in the diet in one of the meals and check the rise in their sugar levels," said Dr Vijay Viswanathan, who was part of the study team. A WHO-ICMR study based on non-communicable diseases' risk factor surveillance showed that the prevalence of diabetes is 10.4% of the population. In summers, diabetes-related emergencies spike by 25%, with many reporting exhaustion and dehydration. The participants surveyed, aged between 35 and 55, were divided into two groups. While one group was given rice dosa for breakfast on one day, the others ate dosas made of millets. Two days later, the plates were swapped be tween the groups. On both days, researchers first measured their fasting blood glucose levels and one and a half hours after breakfast, their levels again.While the glycaemic Continue reading >>

Quick Fix: Millet For Diabetes

Quick Fix: Millet For Diabetes

A popular birdseed, millet doesnt have to be categorizedas only bird food. These tiny, round grains, while indigenous to Africa, have steadily spread across other continents with various varieties now readily available in markets over the world. Highly regarded for its richcontent of nutrients such as calcium, magnesium, iron, potassium, zinc and vitamin B, millet is also a great source of heart-healthy polyunsaturated fats. Not to mention the appreciable amounts of dietary fiber, which can be beneficial in improving digestive health as well as protecting the heart against cholesterol deposition in the arteries. Apart from the above listed benefits, millet can also reduce your risk of diabetes and help manage it better. Itshigh-fiber content ensures slow release of glucose into the bloodstream, which helps maintain blood sugar levels. The grain also improves the levels of HDL (good cholesterol) in the body, which is useful for managing insulin resistance and cardiovascular diseases that can be triggered by type 2 diabetes . The most importantingredient in milletthat works in preventing diabetes is the abundant supply of magnesium present in it. Magnesium acts as a co-factor for the enzymes involved in glucose metabolism as well as insulin secretion in the body. Use millet inyour breakfast porridge. Adda handful ofnuts and fruits to enhanceits nutritional value. Ground millet can be a great addition to your bread and muffin recipes. 1. Lee SH, Chung IM, Cha YS, Park Y. Millet consumption decreased serum concentration of triglyceride and C-reactive protein but not oxidative status in hyperlipidemic rats. Nutr Res. 2010 Apr;30(4):290-6. doi: 10.1016/j.nutres.2010.04.007. PubMed PMID: 20534332. 2. Lakshmi Kumari P, Sumathi S. Effect of consumption of finger millet on hyper Continue reading >>

Millet

Millet

The George Mateljan Foundation is a not-for-profit foundation with no commercial interests or advertising. Our mission is to help you eat and cook the healthiest way for optimal health. Although millet is most often associated as the main ingredient in bird seed, it is not just "for the birds." Creamy like mashed potatoes or fluffy like rice, millet is a delicious grain that can accompany many types of food. As with most grains, millet is available in markets throughout the year. Millet is tiny in size and round in shape and can be white, gray, yellow or red. The most widely available form of millet found in stores is the hulled variety, although traditional couscous made from cracked millet can also be found. The term millet refers to a variety of grains, some of which do not belong to the same genus. This chart graphically details the %DV that a serving of Millet provides for each of the nutrients of which it is a good, very good, or excellent source according to our Food Rating System. Additional information about the amount of these nutrients provided by Millet can be found in the Food Rating System Chart . A link that takes you to the In-Depth Nutritional Profile for Millet, featuring information over 80 nutrients, can be found under the Food Rating System Chart. Millet is more than just an interesting alternative to the more common grains. Our food ranking system qualified it as a good source of some very important nutrients, including copper, manganese, phosphorus, and magnesium . Although oats have been widely publicized for their heart-protective properties, millet is a grain that should also be included on your list of heart-healthy choices because of its status as a good source of magnesium. Magnesium has been shown in studies to reduce the severity of asthm Continue reading >>

Glycemic Index And Significance Of Barnyard Millet (echinochloa Frumentacae) In Type Ii Diabetics

Glycemic Index And Significance Of Barnyard Millet (echinochloa Frumentacae) In Type Ii Diabetics

This study focused on developing nutritious 3D-printed snacks from composite flour prepared from barnyard millet, green gram, fried gram, and ajwain seeds. The work evaluated extrusion printability of the high-fibre, high-protein composite flour. Optimised process parameters that gave best resolution and stability are nozzle diameter of 0.84 mm, nozzle height of 0.63 mm, printing speed of 2400 mm/min, extruder motor speed of 300 rpm, and movement speed of X/Y and Z axis of 6000 mm/min and 1000 mm/min, respectively. 3D-printed objects were post-processed by deep frying, hot-air drying followed by deep frying and microwave drying. With proximate analysis of the post-processed 3D-printed foods, we conclude that microwave drying could better retain nutrients, while ensuring minimal changes in colour and textural properties, as compared with other post-processing methods. All post-processed samples were acceptable in terms of sensory attributes; the developed snack has the potential to be commercialised. This work explains the successful development of nutritious 3D-printed snacks from diverse plant sources, importantly, with emphasis on the development of high-fibre foods with good consumer acceptance. In the 21st century, climate changes, water scarcity, increasing world population, rising food prices, and other socioeconomic impacts are expected to generate a great threat to agriculture and food security worldwide, especially for the poorest people who live in arid and subarid regions. These impacts present a challenge to scientists and nutritionists to investigate the possibilities of producing, processing, and utilizing other potential food sources to end hunger and poverty. Cereal grains are the most important source of the world's food and have a significant role in Continue reading >>

5 Millets Health Benefits & Their Role In Weight Loss

5 Millets Health Benefits & Their Role In Weight Loss

Millet Types | Benefits | Recipes | Side Effects Millets are a group of small seed grasses grown in semi-dry areas of Asia and Africa. Millets have been widely cultivated as cereal crops or as fodder for animals. Because milletshave a short growing season, can withstand dry and high-temperature conditions yet yield well, they are popularly grown in the developing nations. In the developed nations, millets have been relegated to be used as bird feed.However, millets in India are enjoying rising popularity due to a variety of health benefits of millets. They are gluten-free grains and hence it can be consumed by everyone. We will elucidate on the types of millets. Dont know what foods can help you in weight loss as well as keeping up with your health? Know from our expert Nutritionists. Click here to book an appointment. The first consultation is totally FREE! Millets in India enjoy prime importance that is because India is one of the biggest producers clocking 8 million tonnes every year followed by Africa and China [ 2 ]. So let us know a bit more about the types of millets grown in India and millet nutrition that will convince you to stock them. [ 3 ] Sorghum or jowar is one of the most popular millets for weight loss The very mention of millets and you would have picturized jowar or jowar rotis in your mind. Well, it is one of the most popular, much-researched millet for weight loss . Due to jowar roti benefits, many grandmas prefer it over regular wheat rotis. Compared to rice and wheat, jowar has a high proportion of calcium. It also packs in a neat iron, protein, and fibre punch. Researchers have found that a typical sorghum wax is rich in policosanols which helps in reducing the levels of cholesterol. Being a gluten-free grain, it is also much preferred by those Continue reading >>

5 Indian Millets For Sugar Control & Managing Diabetes

5 Indian Millets For Sugar Control & Managing Diabetes

Food, an energy reservoir often becomes a hurdle for people living with diabetes who have to consciously eat the right food to keep their blood sugar in check. Refined carbohydrate or sugar rich foods such as Bread, Donuts and tetra pack juices act as culprits whereas fibre and protein rich foods such as whole grains, pulses, oats, barley , millets, nuts , milk, raw veggies and fruits act as saviours. There are studies been done globally to find balanced diet, that can be recommended for diabetics, which is not only tasty but also gives energy boost. One such study reveals, Millets which are natural source of fibre, protein, calcium, magnesium, help control the blood sugar spike. Just replacing refined grains with these tiny but mighty Millets, open a whole new array of diet options for people living with diabetes. Pearl Millet (Bajra), Finger Millet (Ragi), Sorghum (Jowar), Little Millet (Varai, Sanwa) are millets that are easily available locally. Each of them supplements the diet with minerals, fibres, proteins and phytochemicals - the combination of which helps beat diabetes. Besides these nutrients, a non-nutrient yet beneficial component of millet is the fibre in it. Fibre is an indigestible part of food and helps in slow release of sugar into the blood after the breakdown of food, along with improving of insulin sensitivity ie, your body cells respond to the insulin and in turn use up the sugar released into the blood, thereby controlling blood sugar levels. Similar to fibre, proteins also help in controlled and slow release of sugar into the blood. Millets being a rich source of protein and fibre handle the sugar load in body more efficiently. Phytochemicals, found in the bran layers of millet are the non nutrient component commonly found in plant based food. It Continue reading >>

Controlling Diabetes With Millets From South India

Controlling Diabetes With Millets From South India

> Controlling Diabetes with Millets from South India Controlling Diabetes with Millets from South India It might be a major aspect of cultural identity, but the consumption of white rice and other refined grains has led to an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes in South India. However, diabetes specialists in Bangalore along with dieticians and diabetes educators are digging deep into the rich heritage of millet cuisine of Karnataka to address the issue of a proper food for diabetics. Remember your grandparents and why they had no chronic illnesses or non-communicable diseases like diabetes, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia (high cholesterol)? Apart from the fact that they did not face urbanization, and there was no rampant use of fertilizers and pesticides, the diet they had was diverse. To begin with, most of these people did not consume the varieties of rice we now consume and that rice was not polished. The food they consumed was diverse even though they used to consume local produce and never heard of blueberries, hazelnuts, or the Noni juice of Tahiti. Their diet was full of seasonal vegetables and fruits, lentils, rice, wheat, and of course generous amounts of millets. They used palm jaggery and used sugar sparingly as a treat only during festivals. As the demand for higher agricultural outputs increased, the use of fertilizers and pesticides increased. Moreover, the perceptions of people regarding food changed. Rice was considered as a better food when compared to millets. With the arrival of newer varieties of rice and the increase in its consumption, more and more people fell prey to diabetes. Now, neither our love for rice nor its consumption has reduced. Why does rice consumption increase the risk of diabetes? Many studies and researches have time and aga Continue reading >>

Millet Connection - The Hindu

Millet Connection - The Hindu

Millets in ones diet can help prevent diabetes, says Dr. Vijay Viswanathan. Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder in which a person has high blood glucose (sugar), either because of inadequate insulin production, or because the bodys cells do not respond properly to insulin, or both. Prolonged exposure to diabetes damages important organs like the eye, the kidney, the heart and nerves, as the result of damage to small blood vessels. Heredity, obesity, stress, rich diet, and lack of physical activity are some of the causes for diabetes. Can diabetes be prevented? The answer is yes, but with lifestyle and dietary modification. Dietary modification, physical activity and keeping an ideal body weight may help to take care of diabetes and prevent associated problems. Physical activity/exercise helps the muscles convert glucose to energy. But there is a risk of developing hypoglycemia. Shifting to a healthy diet and a brisk walk of more than five hours a week helps keep blood glucose level normal. As far as diet is concerned, millets have an important role in helping control diabetes. Millets are a group of highly variable small-seeded grasses, widely grown as cereal crops or grains. Millets are important crops in the semi-arid tropics of Asia and Africa. Kodo millet (Hindi: Kodra; Tamil: Varagu), foxtail millet (Hindi: Kangni; Tamil: Thinai), pearl millet (Hindi: Bajra, Tamil: Kambu), barnyard millet (Hindi: Jhangora; Tamil: Kuthiravaali), little millet (Hindi: Kutki; Tamil: Samai), proso millet (Hindi: Barri; Tamil: Panivaragu), finger millet (Hindi: Mandua; Tamil: Raagi) and sorghum (Hindi: Jowar; Tamil: Cholam) are some types available in India. Millets like sorghum are predominantly starchy and the protein content is comparable to that of wheat and maize. Millets ar Continue reading >>

Proso Millet - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Proso Millet - An Overview | Sciencedirect Topics

Proso millet is an annual herbaceous plant in the genera Panicum, and it has a chromosome number of 2n = 36 with basic chromosome number of x = 9. Hari D. Upadhyaya, ... Shailesh Kumar Singh, in Genetic and Genomic Resources for Grain Cereals Improvement , 2016 Proso, barnyard, little, and kodo millets belong to the group called small millets, sometimes also referred to as minor millets. Proso millet (Panicum miliaceumL.) is commonly known as broomcorn millet, common millet, hog millet, Russian millet, and so on, in different parts of the world. Barnyard millet is generally well-known as Japanese barnyard millet (Echinochloa crus-galli(L.) P. Beauv.), Indian barnyard millet (Echinochloa colona(L.) Link), cockspur grass, Korean native millet, prickly millet, sawa millet, watergrass, and so on. Kodo millet (Paspalum scrobiculatumL.) is also known by different names in different languages in India (kodo in Hindi, khoddi in Urdu, arugu in Telugu, varagu in Tamil), African bastard millet grass, arika, haraka, ditch millet in New Zealand, and mandal in Pakistan. Similarly, little millet (Panicum sumatrenseRoth. ex. Roem. & Schult.) is also commonly known as samai, gindi, mutaki, kutki, and so on, in different Indian languages. These crops are cultivated in the marginal areas, and are adapted to a wide range of growing environments. Proso millet is currently grown in Asia, Australia, North America, Europe, and Africa (Rajput etal.,2014), and used for feeding birds and as livestock feed in the developed countries and for food in some parts of Asia. Barnyard millet is mainly grown in India, China, Japan, and Korea for human consumption as well as fodder (Upadhyaya etal.,2014). Kodo and little millets are largely cultivated throughout India by tribal people in small areas. All t Continue reading >>

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